9 Burst results for "University Of Geneva"

"university geneva" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

24:44 min | 1 year ago

"university geneva" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"All of their names they haven't been named let's name them there's a contest going on to name them if you want to get involved with that yes Munich Moon phase and a you're going to start us off with the chemistry prize the twenty thousand nine Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to I love this guy's name John a good enough actually pronounce it good enough yeah Oh my gosh okay so this reminds me yeah I had a friend in high school whose last name was by the way now there's something I wonder why I used to be good enough and then they take we we've talked about him on his show a couple of times before just because more recent work that he's doing on batteries ion batteries there are a lot of really great quotes it came out of the committee talking about their contributions to lithium ion so a little bit of background on the lithium ion revolution really began in the sixties and seventies and that's where a lot of this work actually started if you think about it when cars I came on the scene around the turn of the century or just turn of the century they were actually utilizing battery technology in their first designs isn't that crazy but they realized they were just way too heavy and obviously we didn't have a way to recharge them batteries have been around for quite some time not lithium ions that's what we're going to talk about but it was always an idea within the out of industry that batteries be involved then they realized that petroleum was much faster easier cheaper yeah the battery operated electric cars due at the beginning of the industry were great if you're driving around in the city but there was no way to recharge them between cities that was the problem when Ford came doc basically put their chips down on the gasoline engine that killed the electrical hills yeah it killed everything petroleum became king all of the research became in that area and unlike the sixties was really I think when it started to come to a lot of people's realization that emissions were not good like things like these were becoming smoggy air pollution was becoming a real problem I think there were even some mutterings of climate change this early and so that's when researchers started to say okay I think we need to take another stab at this battery thing and it took several several years to get batteries to a place where they would become a viable option and not just for cars but also four you know the ubiquitous electronics that we use right now so if you wanna look maybe just break down really quickly the contribution of each individual to this work so we'll start with Whittingham in the seventies he was doing research on superconducting materials and you know doing like classic Solid State Chemistry Research and he actually developed a new cathode material titanium dioxide so we know that batteries an ano to cathode right through these two terminals and that there's a circuit within the release and recapture of these tron that actually makes them work talking about rechargeable batteries now so he was trying to develop a new cathode material because batteries were just not very power fall and he came up with titanium dice fide that was better at the ions moving around right so there were a lot more free I uh-huh because using lithium really aided and that and that made these kind of new classes of materials then good enough improved on his work he actually realized that a metal oxide material could hold even more energy than the sulfide that Wittingham utilized so instead of using titanium di sulfide he decided to use a cobalt oxide cathode and that actually doubled the voltage and also increase the energy capacity of the battery which made it more viable in commercial applications and then after that Yoshino aw was focusing on the ano to the battery and he realized that lithium had always been a problem because they would explode and that was just not safe in show products and the interesting thing is he was actually looking at electro conductive polymers in research that was related but also not related and it allowed him to up with this realization that instead of using lithium metal on the road he could use something called petroleum coke which I had never heard up which is a carbon matrix and when they used Yoshino New Anna with good enough new cathode all of a sudden we had a safe lightweight and very efficiently ion battery and soon after that Sony released their first lithium ion and we've only seen improvements since then but as a lot of the Nobel Eh pointed out the batteries that we're using the lithium ions that we're using right now to power Tesla's are based on the technology that these three chemists developed upped even starting in the seventies so we've seen small iterations but they're developments were you know altering for the field so the people who are saying the time has come we're really excited to see this recognition almost everybody in the world is utilize lithium ion battery in their daily lives chiefs are everywhere and they've really changed the way that we interact with our technology so super cool and congratulations once again to doctors John Good enough I am Stanley Wittingham and Akira Yoshida definitely deserves it I hope that in twenty thirty nine the Nobel Prizes for whatever the next batter areas right whatever next battery technology transforms our world again some big chains like quantum matter all right thanks okay Bob you're next with the Nobel Prize in physics the Royal Swedish Academy of Science announce some Nobel winners for twenty one thousand nine this week we've been talking about we all have our favourite goto category for the Nobel Prizes for us for me anyway it's a Nobel Prize for best podcast mine of course is physics hello so the prize for physics was won by two onerous Michael Maher and diddy air KAYLA's shared it with cosmologists James People's a noble judges said that they all three transformed is about the cosmos so I'll start with the one half of the prize going to the two astronomers of mayor is an extra physicist and professor emeritus of astronomy at University of g Neva and I did Eric is a professor of physics at the Kevin Dish Laborat- laboratory at Cambridge University and the University of Geneva wow I mean you mentioned working Ed Cambridge University and the university Geneva I work place but the work that they did they didn't do their work there unfortunately the work at Francis Hot Province Observatory so me throw me throw out some fifty one peg aside be mean any star close the planet around the Star so they published a paper in nineteen ninety five and this was not the first exoplanet discovery that was done that was actually planted that was orbiting a pulsar and it was very bizarre but it was actually the first planet around us sunlight star the very first exoplanet around star like that another dead star but an active star so so a huge milestone obviously now the idea to actually find these plants came out in the fifties earlier than than thought it was their idea just did not have the technology to to make it work it did it did prove ultimately to be workable the idea is that an orbiting planet we'll tug on his star gravitationally while it's in orbit around it or basically they tug on each other but it's giving the the the the star a tug and that will doppler shift the light so blue when it's pulled towards the earth and then read when it's pulled away away from us and detecting that was extremely subtle but that was what they were able to finally do in in the nineties and they scientists realize I think in the mid to late eighties that yeah the technology's getting there were really close let's start the start trying to do this and eventually they did do that for the first time in ninety five and what they found was a jupiter mass exoplanet that completed its orbit only in every four as which was so fast that they doubted it they actually studied they studied there are the results for for a really long time they went back and forth and they just you had a problem with it because it just didn't make a lot of sense based on on on what they knew at the time which of course was so great about science one of the greatest things about scientists that you make these amazing discoveries in often it's not even believe because it doesn't go with a you know the Zeitgeist of the of the time so inverse of course was history now we've discovered over winning the earliest investigations of examining exoplanet atmospheres just an amazing amazing discovery a well-deserved the second half of the Nobel Prize for physics goes to James People's he's a professor emeritus at Princeton and he's also the Albert Einstein professor of science at Princeton amazing title Oh boy so every every year the academy put together a basically a scientific background paper to describe their reasonings for this one they said that people's wrote a nine hundred sixty five paper talking about how dark matter is necessary for galaxy formation and then they said was the moment cosmology embarks on its way to become a science of precision and a tool to discover new physics so that was a milestone clear milestone really understand you know the universe cosmology at biggest scales Michael Turner of the University of Chicago said Jimmy's been involved in almost all of the major developments into since the discussion the Cosmic Microwave background radiation in nineteen sixty five and has been the leader of the field for all that time people's and and it's called so here's here's some of the things that they that he his colleagues did amazing peoples in his colleagues had predicted cosmic background radiation they predicted it and the minute variations found in that is we're matter was and they they they predicted that as well and they also proposed the acceleration of the accelerated expansion of the universe that was due to dark energy. Also a key predictor of that major discovery which also wanted to own a Nobel prize years ago but I got to end on a little bit of a Downer on this one because people are complaining about this and a lot of it has to do with our Vera Rubin who is an astrophysicist who was the first person woman who discovered he gave us the I evidence of of dark matter come on how amazingly important was that and she did it by solving the galaxy rotation problem spiral galaxies often and we'll we'll we'll rotate in a way that makes no sense based on the luminous mass that we can detect there had to be some hidden mass in there a lot of it to to explain it rotation and that is as dark matter and she didn't predict dark matter initially that was from Swiss extra physicist Fritz Zwicky in one thousand nine hundred yeah she was the first one I want to have to have verified you know real solid evidence for this you so for years they've people were saying oh she's going to get nominee This year never happened she died in two thousand sixteen and it's.

Nobel Prize Vera Rubin Fritz Zwicky physicist
"university geneva" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"university geneva" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Sorry. Is getting. Just by tax payers. Read offered a compromise. Give Gardner half the money, but mayor crews refused to give Gardner any for now. And controller Darlene green only wanted to give her the full amount with no compromise. So the matter was table news time, six thirty four. A Webster university professor has long been an amateur Genealogists, but her discoveries took a huge leap forward with a recent ancestry dot com tests because family ties were severed by slavery in the United States. Most African Americans had little hope of finding relatives in Africa. That was before. Ancestry dot com Simone Cummings is dean of the Walker school of business, and technology at Webster university. She says she found a relative on her father's side, who was from Africa and lives in Philadelphia. He didn't have any relatives in the United States because according to his lawyer in his the town, he grew up and no one in that town was taken inflated. So he was really surprised when his ancestry results came up, and he found that he had relatives in the US. They have already met and Cummings learned that his father was a diplomat who got a degree from Webster, university Geneva, campus, her next step is to travel to Africa this month and try to go to the village in Nigeria where many of our ancestors came from Carol Daniels, Saint Louis is NewsRadio KOMO wax. Goal and a blues just got. Well what in the name of hand pass was that at enterprise center last night? Tom Ackerman tries to explain coming up at six forty five K Molex news time now six thirty six. This is Margaret and I'm live from the cardinals lot across Busch stadium this afternoon to preview the US women's soccer game against New Zealand tonight it all starts at two after rush on KOMO ex hey, it's Tom Ackerman. I recently visited.

Webster university Simone Cummings United States Africa Tom Ackerman Gardner KOMO Darlene green K Molex professor Busch stadium cardinals Philadelphia Walker school of business Nigeria Margaret enterprise center Saint Louis Carol Daniels
"university geneva" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

12:18 min | 1 year ago

"university geneva" Discussed on KGO 810

"Show taking you through the third shift. This is the John Batchelor show. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. I welcome Bob Zimmerman keeps the website behind the black. He is importantly, the author of universe and Amir which is the biography of Hubble neces- spectacular robot. Giving us deep field pictures of the beginning of our well what we call our Cosmo's. But there might be more. But the defeated is fabulous also close ups of all the objects. We study in our solar system and happy birthday Hubble, Bob. How old is Hubble? Good evening to you. Good evening, John. Well, twenty nine years ago. Stays telescope was launched on the space shuttle's plenty nine years ago when it was launched it had a nominal mission of fifteen years. That's how long they hoped to work the first three years kinda loss because the telescope mirror wasn't in focused, and they had to get a shuttle mission up that affects it. But so if teen years it was supposed to last from nineteen ninety here, we are in twenty nine teen, and it's still going and so next by next year. It will have doubled its nominal life expectancy. And let's hope it can make next year because it is living right now. On the edge. It's really has. No sped gyroscopes. If one fails it will go down into one gyroscope move, which means we will no longer be getting shop images like we do today. And I posted on behind they celebrated this twentieth. Anniversary with an image of what is called the southern crab nebula because in some ways, it looks like a crab. It's basically a typical bipolar explosion probably left over from a supernova. They say it's actually two stars orbiting Nisha the and they create hourglass shape. Basically. It's Paula jets flying out in opposite directions. And it's just a really beautiful picture. And it's. Typical of what Hubble can do. And unfortunately, it will not be doing. I've say sometime in the next two to three years polluted. And we have nothing to replace John five planets dob Vince bothered with long orbits first of all what is the significance of the long orbit. Why why the emphasis well, everything that's been found pretty much up to now almost everything over the four to five thousand exoplanets. Most of them would those confirmed. They find them over the Ryan techniques that of favor finding X planets with very short orbits. 'cause you don't have to look as long the pattern of the orbit. If it's a radio Doppler of thing you see the wobble of the star itself. And if it's a short bit of, you know, several months at longest very quickly the research will pick up that wobble. And you'll see the pattern that wobbles. You'll know this. Planet there. Same thing with the transit effect. If it if it crosses the stall. Of course, the star every every ten days very quickly within a few months, you'll see the pattern. So most of the planet's we found have been short. It's and that means very close to the star much closer than mercury and therefore the very different than anything. We've got enough all system. Well, finding the long goal which is hard because you gotta wait longer. And so what's happened is forty years? Observations beginning in the nineties when they found the first exa planets a ground based telescope in Chile run by Switzerland university Geneva university they've been doing every two weeks of a bunch of stars every two weeks consistently without any fail. And so all that period of time they've collected twenty years of data, and they've now been able to pinpoint the patterns of five to maybe nine x applying its having all bits of fifteen to forty years. Now, the press release this was really badly written. I don't think the guy person woman, whoever was it was writing it knew English very well. But based on what I can gather they using the radio Doppler effect, which means you see the stop. And even though they've only been looking for twenty years. They can extrapolate that wobble out beyond twenty years. If they started to see a pattern, and that's why they say they found some long of twenty years. Because you being planets in orbits something. We're more familiar with that exist. We just had our our technique observing the planets have been biased in favor of the shorter orbits. This is starting to correct that what is test. Bob. Is the space telescope launch basically replacing Kepler designed to look for applying its transit messes and in a much way actually than Kepler's factually, looking at the whole sky and focusing on me by stars, which is really cool. Well last week they announced that they think they have found their first earth sized planet. And this is a preliminary announcement, basically tell everyone that the space telescope is functioning and gathering data, and they quick look. And they think what they found is a a planet about fifty three light years away. The sun is it son is eighty percent the mass of the earth, and the planet is about twenty three times the earth's mass with the radius about almost three times that of earth, quite or sides. But it's big and it probably. Has stand atmosphere. They don't know if it's rocky it might be more like a self neutron new Neptune planet, but the can planet in this system eight days, and that's the one that's more interesting seems to have a similar sized earth. And that's more interesting. They don't have much information. They don't have the mass yet or its composition. So they don't know much about it. And it is all school so close all being very close to stall, which which will affect it significantly. But nonetheless, distemper Strates tests works John, and we're going to start this a lot of good discoveries from it the coming year. Funds story on behind the black did an interstellar meteor hit the earth in twenty fourteen. What the heck is an inter- an ex. Oh media. What is this Bob? Well, okay. You know, you had that inner still object that flew pass through the cell of suspicious of for a while. Yes. Well, you know, what we know it still could be an alien spaceship, the point it was considered to instill object came from outside the solar system. Well, there's no reason why those objects if there are enough of them come through the solar system, and sometimes if the earth and so decided to analyze media revenge detected with various government censors various telescopes and they focused on the fastest meteors meteorites thinking high speed would give them they'd be able to measure the speed it hits the earth from its track is as detective and using that they can extrapolate speed entering the earth. And maybe it speed in the soles is them. Have from that they say they think they spotted an asteroid that the earth in twenty four team moving at a hundred thirty four thousand miles per hour at subjective. He that suggested it came from outside the system and basically saying can use the atmosphere of the earth is detective of these meteorites. Now, there's a lot of uncertainties here. So we shouldn't be to one over the by the idea. But the I that their approach is intriguing. It's quite logical. And so if you if as we get better at observing these things have better technology, we should be able to translate backwards and actually trace meteorites came from outside the solar system Cassini Davis glimpse, while we're still getting data from Cassini low is no longer exists of titan and titan is an earth twin in another direction, it's a hydrocarbon planet, and it's rich as a includes lakes, we had a Lander on titan for moments, and we. Believe that there is a rocky surface and shores. But there's new information about titan that suggests that it has how do you put this Bob they have biospheres atmospheres hemispheres what to say about the differences on titan? Well, first of all, it's not so much his new data. Johnny make very clear. This is scientists using the data that was collected by Cassini when. Exist. Coming up with the final results and what they did here. They looked at the flag. Fly by the Cassini titan looked at the data when they came up with a bunch of things one the Lord and lakes. They have an idea now that they could be as much as three hundred people. Deeper than they thought they also feels almost with methane, which was a surprise at pain mixed in with it. They also have got sound that the hemisphere. They're looking at the northern hemisphere, the northern lakes, the northern hemisphere, and they found that the western half of the northern hemisphere is geologically different than the eastern half eastern. Add big seas Lowell evasion. Canyons and western half. Lots spoil lakes. They also found that those lakes up perched atop big hills and plateaus suggesting things like maces suggesting that Rosen factors which in this case, you probably have been the methane rain comes down and the soft and bedrock that exists. It's not like on earth cost erosion patterns, and they actually use the term caustic lakes. These lakes actually lakes found on terrain that resembles costs to rain on costuming on earth is what produces caves so in this case, you have underground drainage essentially that you're not selfish screams, the water the Likud goes into the ground and drains through the ground. And they thinking the same thing might be happening here with. Methane. What's really cool about this is that suggests on the ground pay systems? Unlike the moon and he's on nut prime sites for habitation. They would be extremely hospitable. But methane once again makes titan a prime. We saw for future space colonists. Because the material of valuable for a number of reasons of fuel above all let's go to the surface of Mars Bob puts photographs up that he picks up from the Orbiter's what we're looking at is frosty. The what is this is where's the frost? Bob on the surface. This is on the surface. You've got goalies. That flow down the rims of craters is all across Mars and a lot of those crave. Those collies the avalanches there are caused by processes if they suspect are related to water sometimes they think because there's ice onto the surface exposed. Sublimate as a collapse in that produces the gully in the avalanche in this particular case, that's not the case, you've got the Brie and on top of the debris. There is what they call seasonal frost. This is what the malls reconnaissance all picked up in an image. And that's what I post behind the black. You can see this white coding on the avalanche scree slope debris, and so it's white on top. And it appears seasonal suggest that frost develops on the surface periodically. And what about this is not a lot of water if it's just frost, but it was a matching your prospect looking for resources on malls. And you're out in the wild. Hey, here's a quick we saw that you can drink while you're doing your research finding water on the on your travel. Bob Zimmerman keeps the website behind the black. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show..

Bob Zimmerman John Batchelor Amir Cosmo Chile Kepler Nisha Ryan Likud Cassini Davis Lowell Switzerland university Geneva Johnny Rosen Vince twenty years
"university geneva" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

12:05 min | 1 year ago

"university geneva" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Welcome. Bob Zimmerman keeps the website behind the black. He is importantly, the author of university mayor, which is the biography of Hulo neces- spectacular robot. Giving us deep field. Pictures of the beginning of our well what we call our Cosmo's. But there might be more. But the field is fabulous also close ups of all the objects. We study in our solar system and happy birthday Hubble, Bob. How old is Hubble? Good evening to good evening. John wealth twenty nine years ago. The space telescope was launched on the space shuttle twenty nine years ago when it was launched it had a nominal mission of fifteen years until along they hope to would work the first three years kind of lost because the telescope mirror wasn't in focus, and they had to get a shuttle mission up that affects it. But so fifteen years it was supposed to last from nineteen ninety here we are in twenty nine teen, and it's still going and so next by next year. It will have doubled its nominal life expectancy. And let's hope it can make next year because it is living right now on the edge. It's really has. No, spare gyroscopes if one fails. It will go down into one gyroscope mauve, which means we will no longer be getting shop images like we do today and I posted on behind black they celebrated this twentieth. Anniversary with an image of what astronomers call the southern crab nebula because in some ways, it looks like a crab. It's basically a typical bipolar explosion probably leftover from a supernova they say it's actually to stars Albany each of the and they create this hour glass shape. Basically, it's Paula jets flying out in opposite directions. And it's just a really beautiful picture and can do and unfortunately it will. Not be doing side say sometime in the next two to three years will lose it. And we have nothing to replace John five planets Bob Vince bothered with long orbits first of all what is the significance of along at why why the emphasis, well, everything that's been found pretty much up to now almost everything over the four to five thousand exit planets, most of them would like share those confirmed. They find them over the variety of techniques. That Favre finding x planets with very short orbits. 'cause you don't have to look as long to see the pattern of the orbit. If it's radio Doppler of thing you see the wobble of the star itself. And if it's a short bit of, you know, several months at longest very quickly the research will pick up that wobble. And you'll see the pattern of that wobbles. You'll know this planet there. Same thing with the transit affect if. Croix crosses the stall. Of course, the star every every ten days very quickly within a few months, you'll see the pattern. So most of the planet's we've found have been a short off. It's and that means very close to the star much closer than mercury and therefore the very different than anything. We've got all the system. Well, finding the long goal is hard because you've got to wait longer. And so what's happened is twenty years of vacations beginning in the nineties when they found the first exit planets a ground based telescope in Chile run by Switzerland university Geneva university they've been doing observations every two weeks of a bunch of stars every two weeks consistently without any fail. And so over all that period of time. They've now collected twenty years of data, and they've now been able to pinpoint the patterns of five to maybe nine x applying having all bits of fifteen to forty years now, though the press release this. Was really badly written. I don't think the guy person woman, whoever was that was writing it new English. Very well. But based on what I can gather they using the radio Doppler effect, which means you see the wobble of the stop. And even though they've only been looking for twenty years. They can extrapolate that wobble out beyond twenty years. If they started to see a pattern, and that's why they say they found some long of twenty years significant because you've being planets in orbits something. We're more familiar with and the simple fact is gone exist. We just had our our technique observing planets have been biased in favor of the shorter orbits. This is starting to correct that what is test, Bob? Is the space telescope launch basically replacing Kepler designed to look for exa planets transit messes, and in a much more significant way actually than Kepler actually, looking at the whole sky and focusing on me by stars the cool. Well last week they announced that they think they have found their first earth sized planet. And this is a preliminary announcement, they tell everyone that the space telescope is functioning and that gathering data, and they do a quick look. And they think what they found a a a planet about fifty three light years away. The sun is it son is eighty percent the mass of the earth and the planet is about twenty three times the earth mass with the radius about almost three times that of earth. So it's not quite size. But it's big and it probably. Has Stansell atmosphere. They don't know if it's rocky it might be more like a self neutron Neptune planet, but they can plant in system all eight days, and that's the one that's more interesting seems to have a similar size to earth. And that's more interesting. Now, they don't have much information. They don't have the mass yet or its composition. So they don't know much about it. And it just all school so close all being close stall, which which will affect it significantly. But nonetheless this demonstrates tests works John, and we're going to start to see a lot of good discoveries from it. Funds story on behind the black did an interstellar meteor hit the earth in twenty fourteen. What the heck is an inter- an ex oh media. What is this bomb? Well, okay. You know, you had that still object that flew pass through the suspicious of for a while. Yes. Well, you know, what we know it still could be an alien spaceship the point. It was considering instill object came from outside the solar system. Well, there's no reason why those objects if there are enough of them come through the solar system, and sometimes if the earth, and so all bunch of decided to analyze media vents that have been detected with various government censors various telescopes and they focused on the fastest meteors meteorites thinking high-speed would give them they'd be able to measure the speed it hits the earth from its track is as detected and using that they can extrapolate its speed entering the earth. And the maybe it speed in the soles. System have from that they say they think they spotted an asteroid that the earth in two thousand fourteen moving at a hundred thirty four thousand miles per hour at subjective that suggested it came from outside the cell system, and basically saying can use the atmosphere the earth is detective of these meteorites. Now, there's a lot of uncertainty. So we shouldn't be to one over the by the idea. But the I that their approach and pastas is intriguing it's quite logical. And so if you if as we get better at observing these things have better technology, we should be able to travel backwards and actually trace meteorites came from the solar system Cassini Davos glimpse, while we're still getting data from Cassini, though is no longer exists of titan and titan is an earth twin in another direction, it's a hydrocarbon planet. And it's rich as includes lakes, we had a Lander on titan for moments and. And we believe that there is a rocky surface and shores. But there's new information about titan that suggests that it has how do you put this Bob they have biospheres atmospheres hemispheres what to say about the differences on titan? Well, first of all it's not so much his new data Johnny tone, make very clear. This is scientists using the data that was collected by Cassini winning. And now they're coming up with the final results and what they did here. They looked at the flat. Fly by the Cassini titan looked at the data, and they came up with a bunch of things one the northern lakes. They have an idea now that debt they could be as much as three hundred. So these lakes. Than they thought they also filled with methane, which was a surprise at pain mixed in with it. They also got found that the hemisphere. They're looking at the northern hemisphere, the northern lakes, the northern hemisphere, and they found that the western half of the northern hemisphere is logically different than the eastern half eastern Africa because he's Lowell avation canyons and islands once in half lots spoil lakes. They also found those lakes up perched atop big hills and plateaus like maces suggesting that arose in factors which in this case would probably have been the methane. Rain comes down and the soft and bedrock that exists not been on cost erosion patterns, and they actually use the term caustic lakes. These lakes actually lakes found on terrain that resembles costs to rain on or costarring earth is what produces caves so in this case, you have underground drainage essentially that you're not surface. Streams the water the Likud goes into the ground and drains to the ground, and they thinking the same thing might be happening here with methane. What's really cool about this is that suggests on the ground case systems? Unlike the moon and Mazda he's on not prime sites for habitation. They would be extremely hospitable. But. Methane. Once again makes titan a prime. We sauce for future space colonists. Because the material there of valuable for a number of reasons fuel above all let's go to the surface of Mars Bob puts photographs up that he picks up from the Orbiter's what we're looking at is frosty. The what is this is where's the frost? Bob on the surface. This is on the surface. You got gullies that AFL slow down the rims of craters all across Mars and a lot of those crave. Those collies the avalanches there are caused by processes if they suspect are related to water sometimes they think because there's ice onto the surface exposed stop to sublimate. There's a collapse in that produces the Gullion the avalanche in this particular case, that's not the case, you've got the Brie and on top of the debris. There is what they call seasonal frost. And this is what the malls reconnaissance. Picked up in an image. And that's what I post them behind the black. You can see this white coating on the avalanche scree slope debris, and so it's white on top. And it appears seasonal digest that frost develops on the surface periodically and what I see about. This is not a lot of water if it's just frost, but it wasn't matching your prospect of looking for resources on laws and you're out in the wild. Hey, here's a quick we saw that you can drink while you're doing your research finding water on the on your travel. Bob Zimmerman keeps the website behind the black. I'm John bachelor. This is the John Batchelor.

John Batchelor Bob Bob Zimmerman Cosmo AFL Kepler Chile Albany Favre Croix Likud Bob Vince Lowell avation canyons Switzerland university Geneva Johnny Africa twenty years
"university geneva" Discussed on KXL 101 FM News

KXL 101 FM News

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"university geneva" Discussed on KXL 101 FM News

"Meet with wild diamond back mas where they are an agricultural past and produce offspring that will die before reaching maturity scientists according to universities geneva caplis is again working with oxy tack in this endeavor scientists have now installed a genetic kill switch in the mas that is triggered while they are still larba the moscow jane genetic elements for viruses bacteria and coral among other organisms according to the nonprofit gene watch many concerned organisations and individuals are now putting pressure on the new york department of environmental conservation to halt the release of these bogs the genetic modifications made to the diamond back martha more complex as are the potential consequences although the us views environmental assessment concluded that there would be no significant impact if the mobs were released the they were saying well you know we don't think anything will go wrong but there's a group called gene watch which is a nonprofit bay fish said that impacts on the local farmers wildlife for the wide reaching food chain would be the lethal if that's fear mongering then my gosh to say that what's going on here look let's just take it example here let's say the crops are covered with the dead larba mckay these moss okay there there's a lot of these bosso the crops have all this debt larva lying around more nor more did larger than usual more of these big caterpillars make you know mas lying around so what the us vas environmental assessment is ignoring is the potential impacts of excessive dead larva or the remains of excessive dead larter larba on the final product and the damage to new york's reputation if these products are associated with contamination from genetically engineered insects what if these larba are contaminated and thus contaminate the crops in new york think about that getting products from new york they have these larba grabs burrowing into apples were burrowing in some tomatoes or whatever aides say genetically modified larva without that'll do the dead larba could be consumed by animals and little is known about what happens or the health effects of the killing mechanism what is is a protein called t t a it's called tetracyclene controlled transacted leaders so trend tetracyclene antibiotic so there's some evidence that cga can damage the lungs and brain function of mice so what does it do to humans well not much is known but oxy tech reported and they once again that the.

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"university geneva" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"university geneva" Discussed on KELO

"With wild diamond back moths were they are an agricultrual past and produce offspring that will die before reaching maturity scientists at cornell university's geneva caplis is again working with oxy tack in this endeavor scientists have now installed a genetic kill switch in the moths that is triggered while they are still larba the moscow jane genetic outlets for viruses bacteria and coral among other organisms according to the nonprofit gene watch many concerned organisations and individuals are now putting pressure on the new york department of environmental conservation to haul the release of these moths the genetic modifications made to the diamond back moffitt were complex as are the potential consequences although the us views bard mental assessment concluded that there would be no significant impact if the moths were released the they were saying well you know we will go wrong but there's a group called gene watch which is a nonprofit bay who said that impacts on the local farmers wildlife for the wide reaching food chain would be the lethal if that's fearmongering men my gosh just saying that what's going on mean look let's just take it example here let's say the crops are covered with dead larba mckay lease moths okay there there's a lot of these bought so the crops have all this deadlock arbor lying around more nor more larger than usual more of these caterpillars make yilmaz lying around so what the us fears environmental assessment is ignoring is the potential impacts of excessive dead larba or the remains of excessive dead larbre larba on the final product and the damage to new york's reputation of these products are associated with contamination from genetically engineered insects what if these larba are contaminated it and thus contaminate the crops in new york think about that think about getting products from new york to have these larba perhaps burrowing an apples were burrowing in some blue tomatoes or whatever and it's a genetically modified larba majid without will do the debt larva could be consumed by animals and little is known about what happens with the help the.

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"university geneva" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"university geneva" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Light verily may claim that anyone who opposes the idea oh genetically modified insect releases are simply fear mongering all you have nothing to worry about those who say you do our fear mongering so i'm a fear monger but see the same response i have for genetically modified insects is the same response i have to the big biotech giants who want to create genetically modified foods monsanto which by the way the show we did about the genetically modified populace giving the goahead from uruguay so we'll be getting more on that is bear has decided to take on monsanto seeds and start giving us sir uh you know bob it's equivalent to what paraquat harry that would require did the bear wanna back in the day i dunno i i just i just think that you know everything now is genetically modified and they say it's for our best interest but my gosh we have diabetes we have or be obesity we have we have all kinds of diseases i mean we're we're really doing badly here in the united states because of what we're eating so now imagine what were exposed to genetically modified mosquitoes why while we want to eradicate a group of mosquitoes what what is that due to the ecosystem well we know because most of the data is disappointing we can't seem to get the data there's not much transparency to all this recently we have reported that opponents of genetically modified foods have been correct with their concerns as multiple studies have surfaced over the past couple of years that indicated that gmo genetically modified foods connecticut modified organisms can be very harmful to the environment as well as pose a threat to human health it's no different than genetically modified insects mosquitoes especially because well they've already released into the public these mosquitoes without proper risk assessment on july six united states department of agriculture approved the release of a moth designed to self destruct in even new york its mission is to meet with wild diamond back mas where they are in agricultural test and produce offspring that will die before reaching maturity scientists cornell university's geneva campus is again working with oxy tack in this endeavor scientists have now installed a genetic kill switch in.

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"university geneva" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"university geneva" Discussed on KTRH

"Release of a mauve designed to selfdestruct in genevanew york its mission is to meet with wild diamond back moths were very agricultral pest and produce offspring that will die before reaching maturity scientists according universities geneva campers is again working with oxy check in this endeavor scientists have now installed a genetic kills which in the moths that is triggered while they are still larba the moscow jane genetic outlets for viruses bacteria and coral among other organisms according to the nonprofit gene watch midday concerned organisations and individuals are now putting pressure on the new york department of environment opens conservation to haul the release of these moths the genetic modifications made to the diamond back moffitt were complex as are the potential consequences although the us views environmental assessment concluded that there would be no significant impact if the moths were released the they were saying well you know we don't drink anything will go wrong but there's a group called gene watch which is a nonprofit they they show that impacts on the local farmers wildlife with a wide reaching food chain would be lethal if that's fearmongering men my gosh to say that what's going on here i mean look let's just take it example here let's say the crops are covered with dead larba mckay these moss okay there there's a lot of these boss so the crops have all this debt larbre lying around more nor more larger than usual more of these big caterpillars make yilmaz lying around so what the us fears environmental assessment is norring is the potential impacts of excessive dead larva or the remains of excessive deadlock larba on the final product and the damage to new york's reputation of these products are associated with contamination from genetically engineered insects what if these larba are contaminated and thus contaminate the crops in new york think about that about getting products from new york to have these larba perhaps burrowing into apples were burrowing in some tomatoes or whatever aides say genetically modified larva majid without will do the dead larba.

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"university geneva" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:18 min | 4 years ago

"university geneva" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Sixty five percent and donating time or money to a terrible terrible cause those are the top five nice behaviors not like walking in elderly person across the street or are that's all i can think of yeah anyway buying charity christmas kerr i mean there's a we're yeah but people felt like they were doing a good thing when they bought charity christmas cards when nice person sparingly makes from the ninth i also get very upset when i see people not giving up their seats to held really people or getting into term i get very angry so that will make me lose many nice yeah well traffic carr we will in a cars that makes you lose your nice yeah time i don't like that people are so rude i know i can and withholding anything i was thinking of say it it now okay so a lot of people have been talking about what what else of people been talking about to tell our friend howie in particular often talks about how how far it's will lead to the death of civilization yes that you know pau's expressed methane yeah we are there really cleats causing global warming well it turns out it's not pick how most that are the problem it's goal are well really yeah we'll should i save the larger the quarter very who are good lars day i don't know i mean in the florida thing malaysia leier venue from the university tate ginn nabbed a otherwise notice that university geneva a certain speed sees of wire uses methane to press to propel itself fo basics got a bunch of two who'd in larger via part of a high that in order to move they have to player and yeah.

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