22 Burst results for "University Of Chicago"

What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:49 min | 11 months ago

What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

"Next week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of atomic bombs being dropped on japan. It's one of the most controversial decisions in us. History research resulted in the weapons of mass. Destruction took place at several locations but chicago became one of the main science centers. I spoke with writer. Terry mcclellan mcandrew about the work done in the state and the reasons chicago was a manhattan project site while there were several reasons wine wise. It was the home of arthur holly compton who was a physicist who was already working on some of this chicago is also seen as centrally located in the country. So that other manhattan project. Scientists around the country could excess it fairly readily also the university of chicago approved of being a manhattan project site and supported it. This work going on people unaware of it in a very busy location in a major city. It seems dangerous it does doesn't it It was a secret project and secrecy was something that was drilled into everyone's minds who worked on the manhattan project there have been some oral histories taking of people who worked on the project. And one was of william. J nicholson who helped. Create the pile as it was called. That was what became the nuclear reactor that developed the first self sustaining nuclear reaction at the university of chicago and he talks about this need for secrecy and how it was drilled into all of staff there there were known agents of the german government in and around the university of chicago and we were told that and that We were not to reveal anything of what you do. Don't take up with strangers If you're having a sandwich someplace or beer or whatever Watch out that people who may engage you in conversation. would be damaging to the war effort and that the they may actually be the enemy so one huge question that comes up about this manhattan project site at the university of chicago in the in. The middle of this metropolitan side is where danger. Was there a danger to the university chicago illinois even the mid west region and the physicists. I spoke to said in essence no the nuclear reactor that the scientists were developing at the chicago at chicago was very low powered in comparison to what we see today at most. It could have powered a two hundred watt lightbulb therefore it was not putting out the kind of radiation that one of our nuclear directors today could could do in there for the harm was not significant. Now there was some danger to the people who were in the room where that nuclear reactor was working one of the dangers. Although the scientists in charge had done innumerable calculations to make sure the danger was very small. There was still a worried that the nuclear reactor could get out of control and they took protection against that and they had what they called the suicide squad two to three men who stood atop the nuclear reactor with the cadman solution. So that in case it did run away and start to melt down. They would pour this over the pile and hopefully it would stop but as one. Scientists told me the suicide squad would not live to tell about it. The first nuclear reaction took place there and it was momentous you know especially when you think about it in terms of what would come later but at the time from what i read in your story to those folks sorta matter of fact it was a big deal but their reaction was a bit anti-climactic. They basically broke out a bottle of chianti and also signed the basket that the bottle of chianti was in and that was pretty much it. The physicists i talked to said that the lead scientists on the reactor enrico fermi was so sure he had done endless calculations he carried his slide rule around with him for those who don't know what a slide rule is. That was your pre computer calculator in the days and he cared around with him. He did endless calculations to make sure he knew what was going to happen with this nuclear reactor and so it went exactly as planned and in essence while it was an enormous event. It changed our lives. It changed science and international relations forever. The scientists there. Just pretty much congratulated. Each other broke out a bottle

Chicago Terry Mcclellan University Of Chicago Arthur Holly Compton J Nicholson German Government Mcandrew Manhattan Japan Mass William Cadman Illinois Enrico Fermi
10 residents dead amid virus outbreak at Kansas nursing home

America's Morning News

01:01 min | 1 year ago

10 residents dead amid virus outbreak at Kansas nursing home

"Numbers are once again climbing back up across the US with more than half of the state's reporting anew rise and infections a total of 58,387 new cases diagnosed in the US Monday, according to Johns Hopkins University, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot warning Chicago into the cities experiencing levels the last scene. In late May Make no mistake. We are in the second search, the highest daily rate we've seen in Chicago since the tail end of the pandemics first wave. Back in May. This is the second surge that Dr Fauci and doctor already have been warning about since March. We're now, innit? In fact, the outbreak a affecting multiple states, as I mentioned one in Kansas at killing 10 residents in a nursing home in Norton County that it already Proportionally been the nation's largest increase in cases over two weeks.

Chicago United States Johns Hopkins University Lori Lightfoot Norton County Dr Fauci Kansas
"university chicago" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"university chicago" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"I can't sit silently I cannot sit silently or just nod my head up and down when I see what's taking place in this country now and whenever I try to provide perspective even information on the CDC's website perspective even from scientists and professors and medical experts from Yale and Stanford another highly regarded places Chicago university Chicago's have I know I'm going to come under withering attack because the left in this country whether it's in the media or otherwise they do not want to have a discussion in which Jim do next says is true as a result of this virus in the last few months your country has changed especially at the state level a lot of these governors in my view are now running wild running scared panicked to cover their own **** because I didn't order enough ventilators enough pets they were not prepared not just for a pandemic for any health crisis they spend enormous sums of your tax dollars on their political pet projects to improve their political status with their pace now we'd all be paying a price as a result of pandemic but some people are paying a bigger price as a result you don't cut the shut down an entire country this virus in any significant way so far is not in about three fourths of the country can it reach the other three fourths maybe maybe maybe it will but why are we acting like it will for sure and why are we acting like there's nothing else we can do about it other than to destroy our economy and therefore destroy our ability to produce these products were these governors say they need the you destroy the economy destroyed GM no ventilators you destroy three AM no mass you destroy the pharmaceutical companies no treatments nothing exceeds you destroy the economy you have to slash the police force the empties the military I am deeply frustrated in trouble now by what I'm hearing I already was but now can you even hear Cuomo say this do you choose a life or do you choose a dollar bill no that's not right do you choose to live do you approve the dollar bill my day to day life when I will be out of jail you're ready yet you're the one with the dollar bills looking for.

CDC Yale Chicago Jim GM Cuomo Stanford
Chicago: Mother of slain nursing student arrested after police encounter at U of C Hospital

Nick Digilio

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Chicago: Mother of slain nursing student arrested after police encounter at U of C Hospital

"An eighteen year old nursing student shot and killed Tuesday outside a convenience store on Chicago's south side was not the intended target she was one of five people shop their seventy nine ten Woodlawn WGN's Tonya Francisco has spoken with her family the mother claims she was arrested at the hospital after viewing her daughter's body J. a B. man was a nursing student following in the footsteps of her mother and her well the family of J. U. Beeman says their grief over her death was further compounded when her mother was arrested and now the ACLU of Illinois is speaking out on her family's behalf you hate them was so bad that my daughter have to get shot the mother of J. U. B. men questioning why someone fired at least twenty shots into a convenience store hitting her eighteen year old daughter in the chest killing her police believe the gunmen were targeting a boy inside the store at seventy ninth in Avalon last night when they wildly fired inside that boy was not injured but police say two women who were with him more wounded the three other victims including J. Edgar boyfriend for innocent bystanders Chicago has is not equipped to handle a trauma center J. as mother says her grief was compounded when she was arrested and charged after Chicago police say she pushed and kicked an officer after breaking down while viewing her daughter's body the Chicago police and university Chicago police handle us so you maintain humane I passed out when I saw my baby and they drove me out the hospital let the dog they created us so badly unjustly so inhumane and had the nerve to tell us that screaming and falling to the floor was not proper closer spent the night in jail the university of Chicago in a statement says he'd parted staff is prepared to deal with grieving families and that the decision to arrest the mother was made by the Chicago police officers investigators are still searching for three men seen in surveillance video leaving that scene in a white sedan that has damage to the passenger side fender tended windows black rims and no front license plate

Chicago Tonya Francisco J. U. Beeman Illinois Avalon J. Officer J. U. B. J. Edgar University Chicago Police University Of Chicago Chicago Police
"university chicago" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"university chicago" Discussed on KTRH

"In two thousand and nine he's lost half of his money a second time okay so later on in this segment I'm a talk about how we fix the problem but what he almost did to himself was a run out of money due to what we call sequence of returns risk in this is well documented in the probabilities are so high that you will run out of money if you get swept up in the US that you should really listen to what I'm gonna go through now so let's just say that your jam you had a million dollars what if you have five hundred grand in two thousand in you were sixty five years old okay and let's say that the next ten years look like this ten years in the stock market so Jim has a million he pulls the recommended four percent withdrawal rate now forty grand the problem is as the internet bubble comes apart he loses nine percent the first year ninety one thousand dollars twelve percent the second year hundred two thousand dollars is gone twenty two percent the third year one hundred and fifty six thousand dollars is lost he's just four years into retirement the sixty eight he has half of his money gone in its distribution rate goes from four percent to nine percent he has to spend it nine percentage generate his forty thousand dollars in income plus a little increase for inflation Marcia you can't spend at nine percent of your portfolio yeah okay so even though the markets good from two thousand and three to two thousand and seven then we come to down to two thousand and eight he takes a thirty seven percent loss two hundred and twenty four thousand dollars is gone he has about six hundred thousand dollars laughed his distribution rate has to go to about sixteen percent to generate the income that he needs by twenty ten the what I had about three hundred grand today he'd have you know maybe two hundred grand left so statistically and they've studied this at length the Stanford center on the study on longevity university Toronto university Chicago if you take losses like that right before retirement the last few years of retirement or the first few years where you're taking in come out of your now stag odds are very very good you run out of money by about age eighty three the way that the life expectancy tables are going you better plan to live till ninety or beyond because if you're wrong it is not a good luck to run out of money by age eighty three and live jail age ninety okay your only defense is to have a.

US Jim Stanford center Toronto university Chicago
AP FACT CHECK: Bracing for Trump's 'relentless optimism'

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

AP FACT CHECK: Bracing for Trump's 'relentless optimism'

"The state of the union address may include more than a few boasts this could be a lot of credit claiming going on in the speech university Chicago politics professor William Howell says president trump is not likely to hold back on his claims of success as he challenges the Democrats to impeach him he's been demonizing the Democrats and calling them out left and right throughout this impeachment process and now he's gonna be steaming before all of them how all adds it's a speech comes at what he calls a fraught time the day before the Senate votes on trump's impeachment the day after the Iowa caucuses the president is likely to talk about the economy the rollback of environmental regulations healthcare immigration including the wall and national security Tim acquire Washington

Professor William Howell Donald Trump Senate Iowa President Trump Washington TIM
"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Dot org it's a lovely website and get a lot of information there Lucia moral is now a filmmaker who what once was one of the great and talented arts writers and critics in the stone and we're talking about sheaves Jacqueline Saudi Arain for Lujan to before you even matter to have a screening of the documentary that she had made and now you two were collaborating and documentary and heather how are you involved it's a great question I first met Jacqueline haze I think back in two thousand fifteen I was working at Loyola University Chicago is a multimedia producer and I was working on a photography project so we were photographing some of our award ease and trying to find events in which they were working with and social justice and so Jack he happened to be at this loyal school of law's events that I was photographing and it was at the Lawson house for a monthly dinner she did I'm called Jackie's place yeah and she introduced herself to me and just floored me in and I started volunteering for a good five years I taught a digital storytelling class at the a Chicago health initiative and from there a couple years later a few years later fast forward last year I got a call and from Jackie who said I've met Lucia Morrow and I wanted to make a documentary about the Chicago health initiative and I think we should all have lunch and I'd like you to be involved and I had to rack my breed I said how do I know Lucia Morrow turns out that I had which she and I had talked on the phone because I would often have to coordinate the photography for loyal magazine and we were doing a feature on which Shia who was her for her first film in my brother shoes and we just talked on the phone a few times for what must have been like an hour each time and we're just kindred spirits.

Jacqueline Saudi Arain Lujan Jacqueline haze Loyola University Chicago producer Jack Lawson house Jackie Lucia Morrow Shia Dot Chicago
"university chicago" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"university chicago" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"How to keep something in mind the Democrats have already put their proverbial best foot forward right that's what they've done they've already put forward the proverbial best foot presidents floors haven't anything so the Democrats will get there twenty four hours over two days the president's lawyers will get there twenty four hours of for today and I suspect they're going to even disarray but the Democrats have done because this filing today the proceedings before the United States Senate trial memorandum of president Donald J. trump is a killer is a killer and I guarantee you that most of the legal analysts on cable TV certainly an MSNBC in constipated news network in virtually every one of the hosts in virtually every one of the commentators have not read it we get as I call it on freedom of the press thanks to professor Daniel borscht in the late great professor university Chicago in the later director library Congress pseudo events after several events I ended the first hour by saying there wasn't any violence in Richmond Virginia the pro second amendment pro liberty protests were enormous number of people showed up so for days we had pseudo news as the president rightly calls it fake news the governor of Virginia formally a black face fine formally of post birth abortion has now figured out how to win approval by the Washington compost on the left will get to the washing compost yes Lou hard left any brings in all these law enforcement experts wares county is from the state other states have dot com ready for war then they got peace you think there's an anti fur protests he brings up Charlottesville he wants you to think all these honorable tax paying Americans we're trying to protect their liberty and the constitution and the bill of rights that indeed applies the Democrats including the governor of Virginia better white supremacists that they're neo **** and that's what the media was trying to portray thousands and thousands of audible hardworking taxpaying neighbors of yours as something they're not just like the Covington Kentucky boys who dare to wear many hats how they tried to destroy them they're lawyers they're trying to destroy you with the president they are a dangerous bunch of people they really are here we have a montage of the news media in nineteen ninety nine during the Clinton impeachment trial Eleanor Clift Dan rather al hunt Peter Jennings Charlie Gibson John Hockenberry our body Geraldo who's been consistent and ginger Thompson the only more witnesses such a distraction tactic news busters got one go then the whole issue is been a sham that shouldn't have gotten this far the house acted improperly in passing it on to the Senate why is your party dragging this thing out why is this happening why go through all this this business about what doesn't do we really need more witnesses it's going to happen once to this thing we should stop this this bogus inflated Taylor case and get on with the business of governance with these people just get down to business and leave this impeachment thing alone it's going to be an enormous distraction to the White House in all kinds of issues that the Congress ought to be considering it was a long line of of the people's business it seems have been put aside and the firm is going to be put aside for weeks if not months now we begin tonight with the voice of the people the visitor who got up and shouted god almighty take the vote and get it over with god almighty the man said take the vote and get it over with here all of this whole thing is that the guy was set up in the Senate gallery last week and said god yes we have this process is Stalinist his action certainly do not warrant impeachment is there.

"university chicago" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"university chicago" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Already put their proverbial best foot forward right that's what they've done they've already put forward the proverbial best foot presidents floors haven't anything the Democrats will get there twenty four hours over two days the president's lawyers will get there twenty four hours and for today and I suspect they're going to even this right but the Democrats have done because this filing today proceedings before the United States Senate trial memorandum of president Donald J. trump is a killer is a killer and I guarantee you that most of the legal analysts on cable TV certainly an MSNBC in constipated news network in virtually every one of the hosts in virtually every one of the commentators have not read it we get as I call it on freedom of the press thanks to professor Daniel borscht in the late great professor university Chicago then later director library Congress pseudo events after several events I ended the first hour by saying there wasn't any violence in Richmond Virginia the pro second amendment pro liberty protests were enormous number of people showed up we had pseudo news as the president rightly calls it fake news the governor of Virginia formally a blackface fine formally of post birth abortion has now figured out how to win approval by the Washington compost on the left will get the washing campus yes move hard left any brings in all these law enforcement agencies wares county.

Democrats president Donald J. trump MSNBC Daniel borscht Congress Richmond Virginia United States Senate professor professor university Chicago director Washington
"university chicago" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"university chicago" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Best foot forward right that's what they've done they've already put forward the proverbial best foot presidents floors haven't done anything so the Democrats will get there twenty four hours over two days the president's lawyers will get there twenty four hours of for today and I suspect they're going to even disarray but the Democrats have done because this filing today the proceedings before the United States Senate trial memorandum of president Donald J. trump is a killer is a killer and I guarantee you that most of the legal analysts on cable TV certainly an MSNBC in constipated news network in virtually every one of the hosts in virtually every one of the commentators have not read it we get as I call it on freedom of the press thanks to professor Daniel borscht in the late great professor university Chicago in the later director library Congress pseudo events after several events I ended the first hour by saying there wasn't any violence in Richmond Virginia the pro second amendment pro liberty protests where Norma's number people showed up so for days we had pseudo news as the president rightly calls it fake news the governor of Virginia formally a blackface fame formally of post birth abortion has now figured out how to win approval by the Washington compost in the left will get to the washing compost yes my hard left any brings it all these law enforcement agents various county.

president Donald J. trump MSNBC Daniel borscht Congress Richmond Virginia Norma United States Senate professor professor university Chicago director Washington
"university chicago" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"university chicago" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'll keep something in mind the Democrats have already put their proverbial best foot forward right that's what they've done they've already put forward the proverbial best foot presidents floors haven't anything so the Democrats will get there twenty four hours over two days the president's lawyers will get there twenty four hours and for today and I suspect they're going to even disarray but the Democrats have done because this filing today the proceedings before the United States Senate trial memorandum of president Donald J. trump is a killer is a killer and I guarantee you that most of the legal analysts on cable TV certainly an MSNBC in in virtually every one of the hosts in virtually every one of the commentators have not read it we get is I call in on freedom of the press thanks to professor Daniel borscht in the late great professor university Chicago then later director library Congress shoot events after several events I ended the first hour by saying there wasn't any violence in Richmond Virginia the pro second amendment pro liberty protests where Norma's number people showed up so for days we had pseudo news as the president rightly calls it fake news the governor of Virginia formally a black face thing formally of post birth abortion has now figured out how to win approval by the Washington compost in the left will get to the washing campus yes move hard left any brings in all these law enforcement agents various counties from the state other states have dot com ready for war then they got peace you think there's an anti fur protests he brings up Charlottesville he wants you to think all these honorable tax paying Americans we're trying to protect their liberty and the constitution and the bill of rights that indeed applies to Democrats including the governor of Virginia that the white supremacists that they're neo **** and that's what the media was trying to portray thousands and thousands of audible hardworking taxpaying neighbors of yours as something they're not just like the Covington Kentucky boys who dared to wear many hats how they tried to destroy them they're lawyers they're trying to destroy you when the president they are a dangerous bunch of people they really are here we have a montage of the news media in nineteen ninety nine during the Clinton impeachment trial Eleanor Clift Dan rather al hunt Peter Jennings.

Eleanor Clift Dan Clinton Covington Kentucky Washington director professor university Chicago professor United States Senate Peter Jennings president Charlottesville Norma Richmond Virginia Congress Daniel borscht MSNBC Donald J. trump
"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Bacon and fried in the back actually bacon does make you feel like life is a lot of room they gives it yeah this morning we are starting off cold is going to stay that way throughout the day your WGN twenty one degrees west Windsor northwest wind five gusting up to twenty four actually of the wind chill right now of all weather other temperatures well these the woman won the Westchester old timers who is caught with twenty seven degrees twenty four university Chicago lab schools public only ten however in Harvard wind chill there five below it's eleven any odd box like a twelve it's fourteen in St so that read our composite no snow or rain anything like that around here mainly clear for awhile this morning and it looks like some clouds this afternoon but it's not like it's going to be a mostly cloudy day make a huge difference becomes the temperatures just the colder the spilling into our region but hardly coldest air will stay for northeast once we get in the afternoon I was looking for a little more cloud cover there and for a while this evening and clearing up much of the overnight hours but strengthening southerly winds means warmer temperatures in here as early as tomorrow fourteen day will make it back in the lower twenties ASAP new bridge going to feel like public low to mid teens as the clouds moved back in the region then tonight mainly clear temperatures bottoming out mid teens public early youth with rising temperatures late in the overnight hours a continuing to rise here tomorrow highs in the mid upper thirties and lower forties for Friday mid forties for Saturday flirting with fifty on Sunday and Monday and guess what Christmas Eve we'll be looking for a White Christmas I think the chances are very slim with special with a high of forty five degrees expected them to have to get out there makes a man made snow for Santa's sleigh we don't have any snow out there that some good news especially on always good news on the roadways because then you have to worry about all that slip and slide around the lake shore drive right now looks great no major delays as you're heading southbound or north bound just past North Avenue here heading into downtown you are in.

Bacon WGN Santa Westchester
"university chicago" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

07:03 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"The medical bills of zero you can not use a person's medical bill history AS eight predictor of if they're going to live or die but the data was working we showed less was being spent on black patients because they receive less care is a black patients occurred roughly eighteen hundred less in medical costs annually than white patients with the same level of six researchers say this is due to a myriad of factors of the lack of insurance lack of access and even unconscious biases from doctors there for the machine rings white patients equally at risk of future health woes as black patients were actually sicker they say correcting these biases of the algorithm what more than double the number of black patients flagged for additional care following the findings the study was replicated on a different data set of three point seven million patients and I found a black patients collectively suffered from eight it's forty eight thousand a vision of chronic diseases compared with white people although the study was conducted on just one health care algorithm the researchers say similar biases probably exist across a number of industries now the lead researcher was down percent hill who will lie Jonathan he's a professor of computational behavioral sciences university Chicago said it's truly inconceivable to me that anyone else's algorithm doesn't suffer from this I'm hopeful that this causes an entire industry to say all my we've got to fix this so all right what is I mean for your eyes what it means is as we go more high tech and eight I it's all about algorithms okay so if you're a man or woman that fit the textbook yeah high cholesterol diabetes high blood pressure they're gonna probably have you flags appropriately as high risk for heart disease okay if you're a woman that let's say has no family history of breast cancer never went to a doctor for a breast lump had a couple babies you're not going to be considered rest at rest for breast cancer and so you might be put on a lower risk category we get less reminders to go get your mammogram I'm telling you right now women who have had breast cancer I can't see how many people I've met said they never had in the family and they never had a previous long and then they found something then they went to the doctor so medicine is tricky it's unpredictable health issues are unpredictable and I don't want somebody saying well you're good because it's not in the family see I don't have a lot of diseases in the family because most of my family died before they get get diagnosed with the disease so when somebody says but look at all your father never cancer so you know how do you know you're at high risk for these types of cancers ago he didn't have cancer because he died of a heart attack before you could ever have the diagnosis of cancer all these algorithms looking family history and your family got killed in the Holocaust or a car accident or a you know over does we're not gonna have family history we're not gonna have any algorithm you have people out there who are adopted and they have no idea what the family as uncle let's just assume they have some sort of cancer and heart disease or whatever and let's just assume it's in your family because if I don't assume that I'm not gonna test you and I understand that there's a big liberal push for us to have more socialized medicine or government run healthcare and government run healthcare is going to need to save money government run healthcare is not going to be able to I individualize for people a government run healthcare system is not gonna like a doctor like me that because what will will will believe it's only that there's something wrong with you which is apt and I've found things I'll either god spoke to me or some that person had a guardian angel but I'm like something's wrong with you ends up having a major aneurysm somebody else having thyroid cancer I'm like I know you're here for something else but something's wrong I need you to do me a favor go and check out your favorite I don't like the way you look I know the hospital said you and heat stroke heat illness or whatever I think it was a heart attack all right there's a cuts there's got all reactions there's instincts there's just something not right that humans could pick up on that computers can't and aren't supposed to computers are not design to pick up on things like that computers are designed to do the best job they can whether it's a ninety six percent accuracy or ninety two percent error because your whatever the better than the other computer and they're designed to save money to the poor for the person using the computer you know we talk about high blood pressure medication I can't tell you how many times I saw African American men and women treated with the wrong blood pressure medication because everybody was so afraid that they were going to be politically correct say look I need to give you a different medication because our bodies built differently than a Caucasian all right African American women seem to lose their potassium more with diuretics I have seen it hundreds of times that's not racist in fact it's racist to not if the knowledge that and say you know what we're just going to treat you like anybody else okay I mean you're hurting people if you're not embracing the racing you're not understanding that we have differences I mean you know people keep trying to fight that women and men are not different and girls and boys are not different physiologically biologically we are were very different medically were different you don't I will support you if you choose to change your gender I will support you in your decision and you know help you if I can but if you have an ovary and you want to be identified as Steve in my medical chart I have got to put that you still have your ovaries because those can turn cancerous same thing with Mary who's a transgender woman if you have **** I need to know about that if you have a prostate I need to know.

"university chicago" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Into Greenspan inform university Chicago admissions dean Ted o'neill tell I want to ask you one more you kind of glossed over a little bit but number one how much individual time does a stint as an application to get and sexually are do you look at stuff starting off financially need blind and things like that or you start building the mosaic right away will depend on the school I mean at Chicago we were look in lucky enough we have enough resources and erected in the right direction so that we were in fact completely need blind so we didn't the mosaic was the number thing that we we designed initially to include low income and high income and so forth if we just let those chips fall where they may so that that's how we began the process every everyone was equal we we we understood that their inequalities behind what we were seeing that we're expanding certain people but it wasn't a matter of who had who had enough money or who didn't how much time I would say in my time in the admissions office which is now going back eight years ago we were probably devoting about twelve minutes reading it and each file was read at least twice and then by other people and many were discussed the committee so that adds up to a fair number of minutes and we had fourteen thousand applications now all at the university of Chicago and through a lot of schools like it we have thirty six thousand applications but just read in the college newspaper and how many minutes can be devoted to thirty six thousand I can't even compute now that means that in many cases outside readers are being brought in three we stay out of growing much larger than they used to be in order to not just accommodate the flood of applications but to encourage more the desire is always there for more because colleges are judged by by the red meat race by how many applications that yet so it's not that anyone is sitting back and relaxing you know within a course numbers can be much higher I mean if you if the it's a lot sixty thousand I don't know I lose track of it it's just a different world in in the space of eight years but how many minutes he's devote to sixty thousand applications well if Kim I can pick up on what had was saying all the more reason than with all these applications to be able to separate yourself from the pack with a story to tell and remarkable extracurricular endeavor a compelling authentic voice in an essay all of those things are really critical years ago there was a great book written then I'm short tennis familiar with about the admissions process called the the gatekeepers in which Wesley and opened up its doors to shocks I think Sternberg was his name yeah who is the education correspondent for The New York Times and he tells this one story of an admissions officer sitting on his porch sipping diet coke this they awake at eleven o'clock at night getting through his quota applications that day and I think of that admissions officer in my mind when we position our students and I think of him the T. sitting on his porch and how can we wake him up how can we present to him a student with an authentic compelling different story to tell and that's just to me so critical especially when you have thousands upon thousands upon thousands of applications I mean here in Florida for example the university of Florida receive forty one thousand applications this year talk fourteen thousand students are and consider that twenty years ago if received fourteen thousand applications so that's a three fold increase in the number of kids who are applying so it is very difficult it is very difficult to fairly evaluate every student who submits an application let me ask you ended with a front end here because I remember I'm interviewed students for tufts and I'll get somebody for instance who will say I want to apply early and you know I see earlier is a great shot to take were where if you decide to go because it does help you get in they want folks to commit and I'm telling you right now you will not really be able to get into tufts and I think you you know you're better off not wasting your your animal on the school that you can't get into how do you go about that front and adjusting folks and it really comes down to that you know you make your own experience where ever you go to college well where you go to college does not predict where you go in life that that perhaps the most important thing to understand and sadly the parents in this admission scandal did not understand that and not appreciate that I mean in a lot of cases we do suggest strongly that that our students apply early decision because if you look at the statistics you know for example at Columbia they took five point one percent of all out this year but they took fifteen percent early decision so if your a reasonable shot at her school and it really is your dream school sure tried to apply early decision we strongly recommend at the start at the same time I was gonna say at the same time you know it's it's important to get a clear understanding of where you sit in the bigger picture and we have a tool called not be on which provides a pretty sound analysis of where you are in that picture in terms of your GPA in terms of your estate he in terms of your AC three you know are you in the conversation or is it a scratch and if it's a stretch on you probably shouldn't apply early to do attend let me ask you on that can you tell right away when a parent has written the essay and how important are those essays true to you folks are you can tell right away and because you never know the the thing about the essays which were important to us you know we thought of ourselves in a certain way I represent a certain kind of college electoral project was most interesting to what's most important to us and then we found that students remote impressive were ones who could write with not with not perfectly but with real ideas there was something about their sentences there is something about the way they wrote that indicated a mind at work now that could be a parent I think he is one of the ways we try to combat the possibility can ever eliminate the possibility but combat the possibility that parents were doing this or that through through or unduly influential in the writing of the offices we have our own efforts we're kind of famous for them are you still does the if they had their own because some sometimes kind of wacky but they were usually very thoughtful and over to the thoughtful response now with the advent of the common application thing is helpful of his the organize their a college applications with the common application really F. so does very uninteresting kind of generic questions and if you get a lot of workers and generic answers who write them in a way it doesn't matter because if they're not interesting it doesn't matter whether the kid wrote the murder or parent wrote the murder counts for a what you need is something that is so thoughtful which is what I always tell students to no one the people with the most don't they think they have to be a gimmicky or say something shocking or new you know we have to kind of represent the kind of thinking you doing college in Europe and when that when that happens it comes through and basically we thought it wasn't when we heard it from students and of course when it corresponded to the other things that were being said about their grades and whatever I mean the essay was important because the test scores I think are utterly unimportant interesting I think they're completely collectible they told us very little about the way a person thing tell me nothing about a way of food with it within my first year humanities course healer learn more if you could then you couldn't always because sometimes there was to remove a between you and the student because of intervening thing but you really wanted to hear it in their essays he wanted to hear teachers say certain things that were important to us and you know you forty one the the transcript that represent a good hard work overtime and during choice's let's talk with Jim Kelly better final segment coming up next your in charge of hiring and indeed has solutions like company pages where you can get people excited about working for you and we give you this toy monkey which will bang it symbols when the right resume appears there is no monkey.

Ted o'neill Greenspan eight years fifteen percent twelve minutes twenty years one percent
"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Being over exasperated taxes the ones are being under SS instead of dropping and then the other ones yeah I don't know but I don't know what how the university Chicago arrived at this formula the interesting for you to get them on and asking them why did why why in the end of the day the formula that you came up with drove me up to my one of four thousand drove me up twenty and someone else down twenty percent I mean you're gonna have to get these gurus in here who ran the study but in the mean time there is a whole lot that you can do about the bill that you just got so just give me a minute okay what can I do about this about so so I don't want to pay you and I gonna pay you and what in the it is August first so so we're gonna we're gonna direct everyone listening to cook county treasurer dot com okay it is now the eighteenth of July and we've already gotten five hundred and thirty three thousand people on the site so cook county treasure dot com is up in a hundred and twenty six languages you just go to the bottom punch your language if you're not getting this in English you can get it and holy yeah can you can get it whatever you want so you're going to just put in your address without saying nor self Easter western you are then going to see a picture of your house to verify that yes this is my home scroll down you're gonna see a four part grit that grit says twenty fifteen sixteen seventeen and eighteen which is this year eighteen is the sure we always pay a year later because the depression and then you're gonna see some boxes and it's gonna say homestead exemption senior exemption senior freeze those three boxes and then it's gonna say disabled disabled veterans does your exemptions so there are a lot of people in this town is forty five million in front of me about twenty six thousand seniors who did not get their exemption so on this bill which is the little yellow bell that you just got in the mail on on this bill that you just got in the mail yeah yeah I don't like that I.

university Chicago cook county treasurer twenty percent
What does exposure to gun violence mean for our mental health?

The Takeaway

01:46 min | 2 years ago

What does exposure to gun violence mean for our mental health?

"About what exposure to gun violence means for the mental health of young people. We have Marie Richards with us. She's a psychology professor at Loyola University. Chicago who studies the effects of community violence on lessons and Sandra Galilea is the dean of the Boston University school of public health MAURICE. Let's talk about solutions are their best practices to help children who were exposed to gun violence in their communities, particularly talking about black and Brown. Low income children who are facing a variety of stressors not just gun violence. Yeah. So we know that families are very important to kids, obviously. So when the work I've done many others have done is we find that. When families are supportive of kids that they they demonstrate warmth that parents are able to listen and show concern and care about the feelings of kids the kids do better. When kids feel connected with their parents, when they they spend more time with their families, and they feel close to the mothers and fathers the outcomes are better than mental health is is better, even when they're exposed to high levels of community violence, so families are really important, obviously. But the other thing is that we find that neighborhoods when neighborhoods are more cohesive. In other words, neighbors look out for each other. They look out for the kids in the neighborhood. They're safe places for kids to play that helps kids to do better in life. And then there's schools where teachers are understand trauma when teachers and administrators are trauma informed. Kids are more supported within those contexts, and you know, obviously, kids spend lots of time in school.

Marie Richards Chicago Loyola University Boston University School Of Pu Sandra Galilea Brown
"university chicago" Discussed on Odd Lots

Odd Lots

02:27 min | 4 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Odd Lots

"All right i'm intrigued su who are we talking to enlist their theory okay i'm really excited to bring on andrew lowe he's an economist he's a longtime mit professor and he's written well he's written several books but most recently he has written a book on exactly this topic andrew thank you so much for joining us it's a pleasure thanks for having me so just going back to the efficient market hypothesis i gave a little snapshot of it but maybe you could describe it a little bit more and also perhaps explain how it came to be a fundamental tenet of modern financial theory when everyone seems to beat up on it nowadays sure will it's a really interesting idea and it's the brainchild of two economists gene pharma at university chicago coined the term and came up with the basic idea that in an efficient market prices fully reflect all available information and so that's the case then you really can't beat the markets by using information because it's already in the price and paul samuelson was the other economist who contributed this theory and his paper was title proof that properly anticipated prices fluctuate randomly which is a very fancy way of saying that once you incorporate all available information into prices you don't know where it's going to go so you can't predict future prices based upon where it is today it seems to me the efficient market hypothesis has come under a lot of criticism in recent years we've seen nobel prize winners who have one for their work in sort of talking about this more the behavioral approach which is very as tracy explaining the beginning is sort of this opposite view but it still seemed for all the criticism that efficient markets has come under it's still pretty hard to beat the market megan still seems like more or less it's a pretty difficult task while that was exactly the conundrum that i was trying to figure out when trying to sort through this tikolo theory versus all of the various different critiques the official markets hypothesis actually works pretty well it is really heart beat the market and prices.

professor university chicago paul samuelson nobel prize tracy andrew lowe mit official
"university chicago" Discussed on Constitutional

Constitutional

02:37 min | 4 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Constitutional

"Draft deferments during the vietnam war had been harder to obtain than in previous wars that they were still sometimes given to scientists for example or to those pursuing higher education which meant the fighting foul disproportionately to those of lesser means hand for all the civilian arguments for getting rid of involuntary service the defense department was starting to experience some problems with it as well technology could push the military to the point that we needed skilled people could work our weapons systems and we were not getting those kinds of people from conscription and so the roof shoes of efficiency as well as equity all of this momentum was building to end the draft but a big question remains the most pivotal question of all really could the united states effectively power award time army without a draft without forced service for a major war it had never been done before the commission nixon set up when he became president the gates commission was charged with trying to answer that question then the commission hud ford course section move americans many of them quite opposed to the notion of a volunteer force as a going in position but on the panel was an economist by the name of milton friedman and freidman was from the university chicago was a crate if we take a of market solutions and over the course of those meetings he convinced his colleagues on the commission that it was feasible the commission's report came out a nineteen seventy and it officially recommended that the united states and the draft to replace it they suggested creating an all volunteer force made up entirely of citizens who chose to enlist despite some resistance congress agreed it authorized the extra funding to recruit and pay citizens to voluntarily joined the army and just.

vietnam war weapons systems united states president gates commission milton friedman freidman university chicago army the commission ford milton
"university chicago" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

"The when i came to university chicago um i took on the leadership of a group called the center for research and products which is a forty person group that runs all the research products for our divisions do we do things like um all the all of the highthroughput genomic at analyses we run the clinical research data warehouse which um is all of our uh clinical data from our epoch medical records if they're making better available for research of we uh build applications to support all different types of clinical research and clinical trial um and then we have our own systems team that does all of our own hit the compliance storage and highperformance computing so i've been although i still be patient than work in the hospital i actually spend most the right i am now directing dissenter and trying to help um you know make research available to the other folks on catholics here and outsider epa while at state eu we only in the box meeting where role he seemed she learning improved that action healthcare um but before we get into that we were curious why did the old way afflicted all i look like the old at the data was eating really actionable obermann w m predict a modeling and add machine learning and better off for a long time even in the late '60s people were starting to you know look pick about machine learning and and medical data and building expert predictions systems in one of the earliest systems wife to try to predict whether patients out of undecided star not using our data from our data from patient than than from medical records this has been around for almost fifty years now but it's only banned the lap uh you know 10 to 20 years that we've had a real um explosion in the kinds of data we can use to make these prediction of little bubble the situation now is that we have these barged medical records systems uh that were debra collecting using all the patient by chronic health data and we can take oath data if think the mouth we can take this data and and use those for for more advanced types of machine learning the plenty badgers we have a university chicago is that our clinical research data warehouse it was really good at taking that uh information act indeed medical records.

data warehouse eu debra fifty years 20 years
"university chicago" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Pod Save America

"And your wallet save time and money with harry's they're able to provide you an amazing quality shave and an affordable price by owning the factory and taking less profit they pass those savings directly on eu and shipped straight to your door over three million guys have made the switch to harry's there's one hundred percent satisfaction guarantee or you're going to get your money back get started with your free trial offer today all you covers just a few bucks and shipping to get your free trial set including a handle blade shave gel and travel blade cover i think a lot of guys gonna agree interested in that smooth glide cover harry's dot com slash get that's harrys dot com slash curcuit please welcome our guest today tomorrow manasa the cofounder of mask and yen's ludwig the director of university chicago crime lab thank you so much for being here we wanted to have a conversation about it you know in the wake of las vegas and in all these shootings there is you know a bunch of people that really feel passionate and moved and want to do something and then there is sort of the predictable conversation that follows in one of the favorite talking points recently has been we can't do anything about gun violence or assault weapons or any of these issues democrats are talking about because look at chicago they have some of these most strict gun laws in the nation and yet there's enormous gun violence problem and so we wanted to try to get to the bottom of what's fact what's fiction what people are hearing in communities and what action folks would like to see at a federal or state level so a soap in i could start with you again to me your organization is collecting data on what's happening in chicago every day can you help us understand.

harry director las vegas assault chicago university chicago one hundred percent
"university chicago" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:47 min | 4 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"And uh we had a barrelling on in october the last week of october in anticipation of this big push bye folks within the democratic party to push for a return to the antitrust positions that we had during much of the 20th century which was that large corporations when they get too large when they create monopolies are fundamentally antidemocratic that not only can they distort prices and services for consumers but they infringe upon the development of rivals they infringe upon the freedoms that we have in a society that they are toxic to a democracy in a multitude of ways in the late seventies early '80s the chicago school chicago university university chicago school of thought led by robert bork push that monopolies are only bat and we should exercise antitrust law only only as a function of consumer welfare so in other words if a huge commpany can provide cheaper prices then to smaller companies or three smaller companies or four smaller companies for five smaller companies then we should not restrict it with antitrust laws with no regard of the power that company will have in terms of public policy with no regard as to the power that that company has in stifling innovation with no regard as to that power that company has the stifle competition the value of competition and frankly with only a shortsighted notion of what constitutes consumer welfare and under reagan and subsequent to that certainly within on is as recently as the obama administration telling its federal trade commission to now worry about.

democratic party chicago school chicago univers antitrust law reagan obama administration robert bork
"university chicago" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Wherever on many government policies that contributed to the systematic unconstitutional uh practice with residential segregation not all of whom that the federal level so you're correct that the uh once african americans were crowded into uh ghettos which uh with fewer housing options outside of heat so designated african american neighborhoods of then they were a places that the cities and zoning boards placed toxic wellesz with uh toxic waste facilities and industrial facilities in the in many cases uh uh the you had sittings where all fortunately all of the um industrial and toxic waste those sites were in african american neighborhoods and and few if any in white neighborhoods well this wasn't a federal policy this is a local zoning policy but it was equally unconstitutional want equal violations of fourteenth amendment as opposed to federal government policies segregation which violate the fifth amendment 13th to the constitution so this is local policies uh there were other federal policies of one of them that i talk about in my book is uh uh the internal revenue service which granted tax exemptions the nonprofit that profit institutions that practised residential segregation an example i i write about this uh the university of chicago where robert hutchings wellknown education uh reformer uh uh uh uh at because of a liberal education curriculum robert hutchinson the president university chicago in the niche went century he had an office in his office of the presidency whose role was to sue homeowners who sold homes to african americans and the acidity of the university of chicago um uh to uh.

african americans robert hutchings robert hutchinson president university chicago university of chicago