22 Burst results for "University Of Chicago"

"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:51 min | Last month

"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

"To be out of the classroom for 5 days, unvaccinated students and staff will no longer need to quarantine for 5 days if coming into close contact with someone who has COVID, the teachers union is expected to vote very soon on the safety agreement. Charges are pending against a man who police say sexually abused a 6 year old boy inside the bathroom of a McDonald's at Clark and Ontario in Chicago's river north neighborhood, CPD says the boy was in good condition at Laurie children's hospital. CPD says just before 6 Sunday Night, officers responded to the restaurant on the 600 block of north Clark on the report of a sexual assault. The boy was reportedly inside a bathroom stall when the suspect allegedly entered in sexually abused him. At least say they offend her escaped after assaulting a security officer, but was taken into police custody a short time later. Steve roxton WGN news. Friends and family of the three men killed in a south shore hit and crash one week ago came together along the lakefront Sunday. Donald Huey and Jalen osley were killed. It happened in the 7000 block of south Jeffrey when a silver sedan traveling southbound hit them and organizers of Sunday Sunday's vigil had a message for the people going about their daily business in the neighborhood. To the next generation, please love each other. We got enough hate from the outside world still continuing to happen today. Chicago police have the vehicle that was involved, but nobody's in custody. Sister Jean, longtime chaplain of the Loyola basketball team celebrating her 103rd birthday Sunday. In a big way, governor J B pritzker announced her big gift this year was having the Plaza outside of the loyalist stop on the CTA red line named in her honor. From now on, every visitor in every current and former Loyola university Chicago student that hops on or off the CTA here. We'll see

COVID CPD Laurie children's hospital north Clark Steve roxton teachers union Donald Huey Jalen osley McDonald Chicago Clark Ontario Sister Jean J B pritzker basketball CTA Loyola university Chicago
What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:49 min | 2 years ago

What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

"Next week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of atomic bombs being dropped on japan. It's one of the most controversial decisions in us. History research resulted in the weapons of mass. Destruction took place at several locations but chicago became one of the main science centers. I spoke with writer. Terry mcclellan mcandrew about the work done in the state and the reasons chicago was a manhattan project site while there were several reasons wine wise. It was the home of arthur holly compton who was a physicist who was already working on some of this chicago is also seen as centrally located in the country. So that other manhattan project. Scientists around the country could excess it fairly readily also the university of chicago approved of being a manhattan project site and supported it. This work going on people unaware of it in a very busy location in a major city. It seems dangerous it does doesn't it It was a secret project and secrecy was something that was drilled into everyone's minds who worked on the manhattan project there have been some oral histories taking of people who worked on the project. And one was of william. J nicholson who helped. Create the pile as it was called. That was what became the nuclear reactor that developed the first self sustaining nuclear reaction at the university of chicago and he talks about this need for secrecy and how it was drilled into all of staff there there were known agents of the german government in and around the university of chicago and we were told that and that We were not to reveal anything of what you do. Don't take up with strangers If you're having a sandwich someplace or beer or whatever Watch out that people who may engage you in conversation. would be damaging to the war effort and that the they may actually be the enemy so one huge question that comes up about this manhattan project site at the university of chicago in the in. The middle of this metropolitan side is where danger. Was there a danger to the university chicago illinois even the mid west region and the physicists. I spoke to said in essence no the nuclear reactor that the scientists were developing at the chicago at chicago was very low powered in comparison to what we see today at most. It could have powered a two hundred watt lightbulb therefore it was not putting out the kind of radiation that one of our nuclear directors today could could do in there for the harm was not significant. Now there was some danger to the people who were in the room where that nuclear reactor was working one of the dangers. Although the scientists in charge had done innumerable calculations to make sure the danger was very small. There was still a worried that the nuclear reactor could get out of control and they took protection against that and they had what they called the suicide squad two to three men who stood atop the nuclear reactor with the cadman solution. So that in case it did run away and start to melt down. They would pour this over the pile and hopefully it would stop but as one. Scientists told me the suicide squad would not live to tell about it. The first nuclear reaction took place there and it was momentous you know especially when you think about it in terms of what would come later but at the time from what i read in your story to those folks sorta matter of fact it was a big deal but their reaction was a bit anti-climactic. They basically broke out a bottle of chianti and also signed the basket that the bottle of chianti was in and that was pretty much it. The physicists i talked to said that the lead scientists on the reactor enrico fermi was so sure he had done endless calculations he carried his slide rule around with him for those who don't know what a slide rule is. That was your pre computer calculator in the days and he cared around with him. He did endless calculations to make sure he knew what was going to happen with this nuclear reactor and so it went exactly as planned and in essence while it was an enormous event. It changed our lives. It changed science and international relations forever. The scientists there. Just pretty much congratulated. Each other broke out a bottle

Chicago Terry Mcclellan University Of Chicago Arthur Holly Compton J Nicholson German Government Mcandrew Manhattan Japan Mass William Cadman Illinois Enrico Fermi
"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Up i this week. The pandemic has changed a lot of summer. Plans for college. Students like internships trampled jobs. Keep mcgee with. Wbz tells us how some students are still trying to make the most of their summer rice university. Student has leigh matthews. Had big plans the summer. She was going to spend eight weeks in argentina studying public health and working in a clinic then she was heading to israel for a traditional birthright trip for young jewish adults. All of that was canceled. Due to the novel coronavirus. She moved back in with her parents. In chicago's lincoln park neighborhood so instead i took Calculus to definitely a bummer cova. Nineteen is cancelled. Many internships study abroad opportunities and typical funds. Summer plans as colleges worry how the pandemic will affect to fall enrollment. Many schools illinois have seen a bump in summer enrollment. Compared to last year as students tried to turn lemons into some kind of lemonade the university of illinois at urbana-champaign and the university of illinois at chicago both saw summer enrollment numbers jumped twenty five and twenty seven percent respectively from last summer. Alina callous is an incoming freshman at loyola university chicago. She decided to get a headstart in take online classes this summer. To get some of her general courses out of the way especially double major. I would have to do a little bit more work and just thinking of the future. I want to study abroad and things like that. I just wanna make time. Loyola and local private universities say they've seen an increase in summer enrollments to for those lucky enough to keep their internships. It's now from the comfort of their homes. Indiana resident joe grazziano says when the pandemic initially hit lots of friends saw summer internships. They'd secured in the fall cancelled and he was worried. His paid internship with the risk management company a on would-be to he plays baseball for butler university and dedicated previous summer to baseball heading into senior year. His resume was pretty thin. So i kinda really needed this. Am i gonna live because it got cancelled by resume would have been mike baseball club. Not very filling and depends heavily on its interns. Traditionally they hire nearly two thirds every year permanently so they mailed laptops for interns and integrated them into teams who are also working virtually due to the pandemic. They've also been assigned group projects with other interns to help improve the company internally. Grazziano says he misses the in person interaction. It's difficult to make a good impression remotely. there's a wide you can get from even just small talk at the officers and sometimes via 'cause it's kinda hard to like to get across my personality as i want to i don't know it's like hard to portray myself to you and over video still. He feels lucky to earn a paycheck this summer. So does nineteen year old man. he gonzales. Who is studying computer. Science and engineering at harold washington college in downtown chicago. He was involved with the group. Genesis works in high school with help students in underinvested communities connect with employers for job and internship to these he was able to quit an overnight job at ups and start working at a data analytics company downtown which he's continued remotely throughout the pandemic guaranteed income. That's also helping him build toward his career. I honestly feel like unlucky because you know not everybody gets this opportunity especially at my age having like these big corporate companies on my resume at my age. So it's like you know it's a blessing but even with his job. he's being extra productive this summer. He's tacked on two summer classes so he can finish his associates degree early and transfer to a four year school to earn a bachelor's kate mcgee. Wbz news in may the department of education made sweeping changes to title nine regulations. Peter madeleine with w j reports on how colleges and universities are coming to terms with new policies. Many advocates in school officials say will chill reporting. The new regulations changed the definition of what qualifies ask sexual harassment under title nine to meet the new standard harassment must be quote severe pervasive and objectively offensive. She wa patel is the director of justice for students survivors at the national women's law center. So these rules kind of in total religious turned on its head. A civil rights law says they raised the threshold of what schools can choose to ignore. And it's a departure from guidance. That's been in place for around twenty years. If a student isn't being outright denied equal access to a program or activity that might not be enough so that means substance would be forced to endure repeated an escalating levels of abuse before they can get help. The new rules also require institutions of higher learning to dismiss reports of harassment. The happened off campus. Now they'd have to put together a separate sexual misconduct policy to apply to those situations. This has ramifications for online harassment. Too especially as many schools move to more virtual instruction during the pandemic faith. Ferber is a student engagement organizer with no. You're nine she says if someone's harassing you in a class zoom meeting that would be covered but if someone is sexually harassing you over facebook and then you have to see them in zoom classroom. That wouldn't necessarily be covered a northern illinois university title. Nine coordinator garner says they do have procedures to help students. We have the opportunity to see okay even though it doesn't reach this level of conduct how we can address it s university but as faith ferber says the problem is that places like could ignore those cases that they choose to and she says the education department isn't there to protect students either. We can't count on our schools and we can't count on the government so all we can count on. Is students in student power to really make a difference. In holder schools account law at nyu students held protests last year on the basis that the university was mishandling investigations and the process was slow and apathetic the university hire another coordinator and garner says. They're much better equipped to handle their case load now. The new regulations are over two thousand pages. Two thousand thirty three to be exact and the policies themselves fit into the last thirty pages or so the reason. The document is so long as so that the department of education headed by betsy. Devos is trying to justify why the changes are needed and respond to public comments. She wally patel says there were more than a hundred thousand comments. Mostly opposing the new rules. They were school principal. There were mental health. Experts over nine hundred trauma. Specialists joined a letter and raise concern about the rule so there was significant opposition and yet they continue to move forward sarah garner and i you were one of the many schools that it comments. I'm harshly concerns. Made it into the final regulations patel says the provisions were largely unchanged from what was proposed but there were also a few changes that weren't even in the proposed rule so they didn't have a chance to comment. One example is that colleges and universities are now barred from dealing with complaints by people who aren't actively participating in an education program that means a school won't be allowed to investigate a complaint of sexual harassment if the survivor already graduated or they transferred. Or let's say they dropped out of school because they were sexually assaulted. And they don't plan to re enroll and colleges could dismiss cases when the respondent who's being accused isn't enrolled or employed by the school but tells us that could include professor who retires or who resigns after abuse comes to light another change. that wasn't included originally reiterates that the department's guidelines supersede any state law and some of the new title and changes are in conflict with illinois state law one forces those going through an investigation to undergo cross-examination in a live hearing and as sarah gardner says we have a state law. That says you cannot cross examined one another. This is the sexual violence. A higher education act however now the federal.

harassment chicago sarah garner kate mcgee department of education illinois joe grazziano university of illinois Ferber leigh matthews rice university loyola university chicago baseball Wbz northern illinois university Loyola israel lincoln park argentina
"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:59 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I this week. The pandemic has changed a lot of summer. Plans for college. Students like internships trampled jobs. Keep mcgee with. Wbz tells us how some students are still trying to make the most of their summer rice university student. Kathleen matthews had big plans. The summer she was going to spend eight weeks in argentina studying public health and working in clinic then. She was heading to israel for a traditional birthright trip for young jewish adults. All of that was canceled. Due to the novel corona virus. She moved back in with her parents in. Chicago's lincoln park neighborhood. So instead i took Calculus to definitely a bummer copen. Nineteen is cancelled. Many internships study abroad opportunities and typical funds. Summer plans as colleges worry how the pandemic will affect fall enrollment. Many schools in illinois have seen a bump in summer enrollment compared to last year as students to turn lemons into some kind of lemonade. The university of illinois at urbana-champaign and the university of illinois at chicago votes saw summer enrollment numbers jumped twenty five and twenty seven percent respectively. From last summer alina callous is an incoming freshman at loyola university chicago. She decided to get a headstart in take online classes this summer to get some of her general courses out of the way especially double majoring. I would have to do a little bit more work and just thinking of the future. I want to study abroad. And things like that. And i just wanna make time loyola and other local private universities say they've seen an increase in summer enrollments to for those lucky enough to keep their internships. It's now from the comfort of their homes. Indiana resident joe grazziano says when the pandemic initially hit lots of friends saw summer internships. They'd secured in the fall cancelled and he was worried. His paid internship with the risk management company. A on would be too. He plays baseball for butler university and dedicated previous summers to baseball heading into senior year. His resume was pretty thin. So i kind of really needed this. I'm gonna live got cancelled my resume. Mike baseball club. Not very filling and depends heavily on its interns. Traditionally they hire nearly two thirds every year permanently so they mailed laptops home for interns and integrated them into teams who are also working virtually due to the pandemic. They've also been assigned group projects with other interns to help improve the company internally. Grazziano says he misses the in person interaction. It's difficult to make a good impression remotely. There's a lie you can get from even just small talk at the just and sometimes video calls kinda hard to like to get across my personality is i want to. I don't know it's like hard to like. Trae myself to you and over video still feels lucky to earn a paycheck this summer. So does nineteen year. Old manny gonzalez. Who is studying computer. Science and engineering at harold washington college in downtown chicago. He was involved with the group. Genesis works in high school which helps students in under invested communities connect with employers for job an internship opportunities. He able to quit an overnight job at ups and start working at a data analytics company downtown. Which he's continued remotely throughout the pandemic guaranteed income. That's also helping him build toward his career. I honestly feel like. I'm lucky because you know not. Everyone gets this opportunity especially and my age having these big corporate companies on my resume at my age. So it's like you know it's a blessing but even with his job. he's being extra productive this summer. He's tacked on two summer classes so he can finish his associates degree early and transfer to a four year school to earn a bachelor's kate. Mickey wbz news in may the department of education made sweeping changes to title nine regulations. Peter madeline w j reports on how colleges and universities are coming to terms with new policies. Many advocates in school officials say will chill reporting. The new regulations changed the definition of what qualifies as sexual harassment under title nine to meet the new standard harassment must be quote severe pervasive and objectively offensive. She wally patel is the director of justice for student survivors at the national women's law center. These rules kind of total religious. Turn ted on nine on. Its head as a civil rights law says they raised the threshold of what schools can choose to ignore and it's a departure from guidance. That's been in place for twenty years. If a student isn't being outright denied equal access to a program or activity that might not be enough to that means. Some students would be forced to endure repeated an escalating levels of abuse before they can get help. The new rules also require institutions of higher learning to dismiss reports of harassment. The happened off campus. Now they'd have to put together a separate sexual misconduct policy to apply to those situations. This has ramifications for online harassment. Too especially as many schools move to more virtual instruction during the pandemic faith. Ferber is a student engagement organizer with no. You're nine she says if someone's harassing you in a class zoom meeting that would be covered but if someone is sexually harassing you over facebook and then you have to see them in zoom classroom. That wouldn't necessarily be covered a northern illinois university title nine coordinator. Sarah gardner says they do have procedures to help students. We have the opportunity to see okay even though it doesn't reach this level of conduct how we can address as university but as faith ferber says the problem. Is that places like you could ignore those cases that they choose to and says the education department isn't there to protect students either. We can't count our schools and we can't count on the government so all we can count on is students and student our to really make a difference in holder schools accountable well at nyu students. Held protests last year on the basis of the universe was mishandling investigations and that the process was slow and apathetic. The university hired another coordinator garner. Says they're much better equipped to handle their case load now. The new regulations are over two thousand pages. Two thousand thirty three to be exact and the policies themselves fit in the last thirty or so the reason the document is so long is so that the department of education headed by betsy. Devos is trying to justify why the changes are needed and respond to public comments. She wally potala says there were more than a hundred thousand comments. Mostly opposing the rules. They were school principal. There were mental health. Experts over nine. hundred trauma. specialists joined a letter and raised concern about the role so there was significant opposition and yet they continue to move forward. Sarah gardner and you were one of the many schools. That sent in comments and harshly. Not many of our concerns made it into the final regulations patel says the provisions were largely unchanged from what was proposed but there were also a few changes that weren't even in the proposed rule so they didn't have a chance to comment. One example is that colleges and universities are now barred from dealing with complaints by people who aren't actively participating in an education program that means a school won't be allowed to investigate a complaint of sexual harassment if the survivor already graduated or transferred. Or let's say they dropped out of school because they were sexually assaulted. And they don't plan to re enroll and colleges could dismissed cases when the respondent who's being accused isn't enrolled or employed by the school patel says that could include professor who retires or who resigns after abuse comes to light another change that wasn't included originally reiterates that the department's guidelines supersede any state law and some of the new title changes are in conflict with illinois state law one forces those going through an investigation under cross examination in a live hearing and as sarah gardner at says we have state law. That says you cannot cross. Examine one another. This is the element providing sexual Asian act however now the.

harassment Chicago Sarah gardner Mickey wbz wally patel illinois joe grazziano university of illinois department of education loyola university chicago Kathleen matthews baseball coordinator israel mcgee Ferber northern illinois university manny gonzalez argentina
"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Up first this week the pandemic plans for college students like internships travel. Jobs keep mcgee. Wbz tells us how some students are still trying to make the most of their summer rice university student. Kathleen matthews had big plans. The summer she was going to spend eight weeks in argentina studying public health and working in a clinic then she was heading to israel for a traditional birthright trip for young jewish adults. All of that was canceled. Due to the novel corona virus. She moved back in with her parents. In chicago's lincoln park neighborhood so instead i took Calculus to definitely a bummer. Cova nineteen has cancelled. Many internships study abroad opportunities and typical funds. Summer plans as colleges worry. How the pandemic will affect fall enrollment. Many schools in illinois have seen a bump in summer enrollment compared to last year as students tried to turn lemons into some kind of lemonade the university of illinois at urbana-champaign and the university of illinois at chicago both saw summer enrollment numbers jumped twenty five and twenty seven percent respectively from last summer. Alina callous is an incoming freshman at loyola university chicago. She decided to get a headstart in take online classes this summer to get some of her general courses out of the way especially double majoring. I would have to do a little bit more work and just thinking of the future. I want to study abroad. And things like that. And i just wanna make time loyola and other local private universities say they've seen an increase in summer enrollments to for those lucky enough to keep their internships. It's now from the comfort of their homes. Indiana resident joe grazziano says when the pandemic initially hit lots of friends saw summer internships. They'd secured in the fall cancelled and he was worried. His paid internship with the risk management company. A on would be too. He plays baseball for butler university and dedicated previous summers to baseball heading into senior year. Resume was pretty thin. So i kind of really needed this. I'm not gonna lie because it got cancelled. Ben mike baseball club not very filling and depends heavily on its interns. Traditionally they hire nearly two thirds every year permanently so they mailed laptops home for interns an integrated them into teams who are also working virtually due to the pandemic. They've also been assigned group projects with other interns to help improve the company internally. Graziano says he misses the in person interaction. It's difficult to make a good impression remotely you can get from even just small talk at the office just and sometimes video calls kinda hard to like to get across. My personality is i want to. I don't know it's hard to like trae myself to you over video still. He feels lucky to earn a paycheck this summer. So does nineteen year. Old manny gonzalez. Who is studying computer. Science and engineering at harold washington college in downtown chicago. He was involved with the group. Genesis works in high school which helps students in underinvested communities connect with employers for job and internship opportunities. He was able to quit an overnight job at ups and start working at a data analytics company downtown. Which he's continued remotely throughout the pandemic guaranteed income. That's also helping him build toward his career. I honestly feel like. I'm lucky because you know not everybody gets this opportunity especially like mia age having like these big corporate companies on my resume at my age. So it's like you know it's a blessing but even with his job he's being extra productive. He's tacked on two summer classes so he can finish his associates degree early and transferred to a four year school to earn a bachelor's kate mcgee. Wbz news in may the department of education made sweeping changes to title nine regulations. Peter medlin with w and i j reports on how colleges and universities are coming to terms with new policies many advocates in school officials. Say will chill reporting the new regulations change the definition of what qualifies as sexual harassment under title nine to meet the new standard harassment must be quote severe pervasive and objectively offensive. She patel is the director justice for students survivors at the national women's law center so these rules in total religious. Turn ted on nine on its head. A civil rights law says they raised the threshold of what schools can choose to ignore. And it's a departure from guidance. That's been place for twenty years. If a student isn't being outright denied equal access to a programmer activity. That might not be enough. So that means some james would be forced to endure repeated. An escalating loves of abuse before they can get help. The new rules also require institutions of higher learning to dismiss reports of harassment. That happen off campus. Now they'd have put together a separate sexual misconduct policy to apply to those situations. This has ramifications for online harassment especially as many schools move to more virtual instruction during the pandemic faith. Ferber is a student engagement organizer with nine. She says if someone's harassing you in a classroom meeting that would be covered but if someone is sexually harassing you over facebook and then you have to see them. Zoom classroom that wouldn't necessarily be covered at northern illinois university title. Nine coordinator. Sarah gardner says they do have procedures to help students. We had the opportunity to see okay. Even though it doesn't reach this level of conduct how we to address it as university but as faith ferber says the problem. Is that places like you could ignore those cases that they choose to and she says the education department is in there to protect students. Either we can't count on our schools and we can't count on the government so all we can count on is students and student power to really make a difference and holders schools accountable at iu. Students held protests last year on the basis of the university was mishandling investigations and the process was slow and apathetic. The university hired another coordinator and garner. Says they're much better equipped to handle their case load now. The new regulations are over two thousand pages. Two thousand thirty three to be exact and the policies themselves fit into the last thirty pages or so the reason. The document is so long as so that the department of education headed by betsy. Devos is trying to justify why the changes are needed and respond to public comments. She wally potala says there were more than a hundred thousand comments. Mostly opposing the new rules principle. There were mental health. Experts over nine hundred trauma. Facialists joined a letter and raised concern about the rule so the risk significant opposition and yet they. They continue to move forward. Syra garner and i..

harassment chicago kate mcgee department of education Ferber university of illinois coordinator baseball loyola university chicago Kathleen matthews Wbz lincoln park northern illinois university israel manny gonzalez illinois butler university argentina Syra garner harold washington college
"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Up I this week. The pandemic is a lot of summer plans for college students like internships travel jobs key with WBZ tells us how some students are still trying to make the most of their summer rice university student. Kathleen Matthews had big plans this summer. She was going to spend eight weeks in Argentina studying public health and working in a clinic. Then she was heading to Israel for a traditional birthright trip for young Jewish dots. All of that was canceled due to the novel Corona virus she moved back in with. Her parents in Chicago's Lincoln Park neighborhood. So instead I took Calculus to definitely a bummer cove nineteen is canceled many internships study abroad, opportunities and typical funds. Summer plans as colleges worry how the pandemic will affect fall enrollment. Many schools in Illinois have seen a bump in summer enrollment compared to last year as students tried to turn lemons into some kind of lemonade the University of Illinois at her Champagne and the University of Illinois at Chicago both saw summer enrollment numbers twenty five and twenty, seven percent respectively from last summer. Alina callous is an incoming freshman at Loyola University Chicago. She decided to get a head start in take online classes this summer to get some of her general courses out of the way especially double majoring I would have to do a little bit more work and just thinking of the future I want to study abroad and things like that I just WanNa make time. Loyola. And other local private universities say they've seen an increase in summer enrollments to For those lucky enough to keep their internships, it's now from the comfort of their homes Indiana resident Joe Grazziano says when the pandemic initially hit lots of friends saw summer internships they'd secured in the fall canceled and he was worried his paid internship with the risk management company a on would be too. He plays baseball for Butler University and dedicated previous summers to baseball heading into senior year his resume was pretty thin. So I kind of really needed this I'm not gonNA. Live. Because it got cancelled resume would have been Mike Baseball Club not very filling a on depends heavily on its interns traditionally, they hire nearly two-thirds every year permanently. So they mailed laptops home for interns and integrated them into teams who are also working virtually due to the pandemic. They've also been assigned group projects with other interns to help improve the company internally. Graziano says, he misses the in person interaction. It's difficult to make a good impression remotely. There's a lie you can get from even just small talk at the office just and sometimes video caused Kinda hard to like to get across my personality as I want to I. Don't it's like hard to like portray myself to you over video still he feels lucky to earn a paycheck this summer. So does nineteen year old Manny Gonzalez who is studying computer science and engineering at Harold Washington College in downtown Chicago he was involved with the group Genesis works in high school, which helps students in underinvested communities connect with employers for job and. Internship opportunities he was able to quit an overnight job at ups and start working at a data analytics company downtown, which he's continued remotely throughout the pandemic guaranteed income that's also helping him build toward his career. I honestly feel like I'm lucky because you know not everyone gets this opportunity especially like my age having like these big corporate companies on my resume at my age. So it's like you know it's a blessing but even with his job, he's being extra productive this summer he's tacked on two summer classes. So he can finish his associates degree early and transferred to a four year school to earn a Bachelor's Kate. McGee. WBZ News. In May, the Department of Education made sweeping changes to title nine Regulations Peter Madeleine with w. j reports on how colleges and universities are coming to terms with new policies. Many advocates in school officials say will chill reporting the new regulations changed the of what qualifies as sexual harassment under title nine to meet the new standard harassment must be quote severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive. Patel is the director of Justice for student survivors at the national, women's law center. So these rules kind of total religious turn Ted on nine on its head as a civil rights law says, they raised the threshold of what schools can choose to ignore, and it's a departure from guidance that's been in place for around twenty years. If a student isn't being outright denied equal access to a program or activity that might not. Be Enough. So that means some students would be forced to endure repeated. An escalating loves of abused before they can get help. The new rules also require institutions of higher learning to dismiss reports of harassment that happened off campus. Now, they'd have to put together a separate sexual misconduct policy to apply to those situations. This has ramifications for online harassment too especially as many schools moved to more virtual instruction during the pandemic faith. FERBER. Is A student engagement organizer with no, your nine. She says, if someone's harassing you in a class zoom meeting that would be covered but if someone is sexually harassing you over facebook and then you have to see them in the zoom classroom that wouldn't necessarily be covered a northern Illinois University Title Nine Coordinator Sarah Gardner says, they do have procedures to help students. We have the opportunity to see okay even though it doesn't reach. This level of conduct how we can address it as university but as faith ferber says, the problem is that places like an eye you could ignore those cases they choose to, and she says, the Education Department isn't there to protect students either we can't count on our schools and we can't count on the government. So all we can count on is students and student power. It really make a difference in holders schools accountable at. Students held protests last year on the basis of the university was mishandling investigations and that the process was slow and apathetic university hired another coordinator and Garner says they're much better equipped to handle their case load. Now, the new regulations are over two thousand pages two, thousand, thirty three to be exact and the policies themselves fit into the last thirty pages or so the reason the document is so long so that the Department of Education headed by Betsy Devos is trying to justify why the. Changes are needed and respond to public comments. She Wally Patel says there were more than a hundred thousand comments mostly opposing the new rules school principal. There were mental health experts over nine hundred trauma facialists joined a letter and raised concern about the rule. So there was significant opposition and yet they continue to move forward Sarah Gardner and I you were one of the many schools that Senate comments and harshly not money concerns made it into the Final Regulation Patel says the provisions were largely. Unchanged from what was proposed, but there were also a few changes that weren't even in the proposed rule. So they didn't have a chance to comment. One example is that colleges and universities are now barred from dealing with complaints by people who aren't actively participating in an education program that means a school won't be allowed to investigate a complaint of sexual harassment if the survivor already graduated or they transferred or let's say they dropped out of school because they were sexually assaulted and they don't. Plan to re enroll and colleges could dismiss cases when the respondent who's being accused isn't enrolled or employed by the school. But tells says that could include professor who retires who resigns after abuse comes to light. Another change the wasn't included originally reiterates that the department's guidelines supersede any state law and some of the new title nine changes are in conflict with Illinois. State Law one forces those going through an investigation to undergo cross-examination in a live hearing and as Sarah Gardner at nyu says. State Law that says, you cannot cross examine what another this is the element providing sexual violence Asian Act. However now, the federal regulations.

harassment Sarah Gardner University of Illinois Chicago Illinois Department of Education Kathleen Matthews baseball Loyola University Chicago coordinator WBZ Israel Lincoln Park Argentina Butler University Indiana Manny Gonzalez Mike Baseball Club
10 residents dead amid virus outbreak at Kansas nursing home

America's Morning News

01:01 min | 2 years ago

10 residents dead amid virus outbreak at Kansas nursing home

"Numbers are once again climbing back up across the US with more than half of the state's reporting anew rise and infections a total of 58,387 new cases diagnosed in the US Monday, according to Johns Hopkins University, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot warning Chicago into the cities experiencing levels the last scene. In late May Make no mistake. We are in the second search, the highest daily rate we've seen in Chicago since the tail end of the pandemics first wave. Back in May. This is the second surge that Dr Fauci and doctor already have been warning about since March. We're now, innit? In fact, the outbreak a affecting multiple states, as I mentioned one in Kansas at killing 10 residents in a nursing home in Norton County that it already Proportionally been the nation's largest increase in cases over two weeks.

Chicago United States Johns Hopkins University Lori Lightfoot Norton County Dr Fauci Kansas
"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:12 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Of the German government in and around the University of Chicago. and. We were told that. And that. We were not to reveal anything of what you do don't take up with strangers. If. You're having a sandwich someplace or beer or whatever watch out that people who may engage you in conversation. would be. Damaging to the war effort. And that the they may actually be the enemy. So. One huge question that comes up about this Manhattan project site at the University of Chicago in the in the middle of this metropolitan site is we're sir danger. was there a danger to the University Chicago Illinois even the Mid West Region and the physicists I spoke to said in essence? No the nuclear reactor that the scientists were developing at the Chicago at Chicago was a very low powered in comparison to what we see today at most it could have powered. Two. Hundred. Watt lightbulb therefore, it was not putting out the kind of radiation that one of our nuclear reactors today could could do in there for the harm was not significant. Now, there was some danger to the people who were in the room where that nuclear reactor was working. One of the dangers although the scientists in charge had done innumerable calculations to make sure the danger was very small. There was still a worried that the nuclear reactor could get out of control. And they took protection against that and they had what they called the suicide squad two to three men who stood atop the nuclear reactor with the cadmium solution so that in case it did run away and start to melt down. They would pour this over the pile and hopefully it would stop. But as one scientists told me, the suicide squad would not live to tell about the first nuclear reaction took place there and it was momentous. You know especially when you think about it in terms of what would come later. But at the time from what I read in your story to those folks was sort of matter-of-fact. It was a big deal, but their reaction was a bit anti-climactic. Obey. Basically broke out a bottle of Chianti, and all signed the basket that the bottle of Chianti was in. That was pretty much it. The physicists I, talked to said that the lead scientists on the reactor Enrico Fermi was so sure he had done endless calculations. He carried his slide rule around with him for those who don't know what a slide rule is. That was your pre computer calculator in the days and he carried that around with him he did endless calculations to make sure he knew what was going to happen. With this nuclear reactor, and so it went exactly as planned and in essence while it was an enormous event changed our lives, it changed science and international relations forever, the scientists there just pretty much congratulated each other and broke out a bottle were the scientists concerned about the the use of this technology going forward I mean from the time they were working on this had they had some idea in their mind that they could be unleashing something that they will never be able to put back in the bottle so to speak. The folks I talked to said that. The scientists, of course are smart people. These were literally some of the greatest brains of the twentieth century scientists at the top of their field. The new the potential of the science that they were working on and. They. Did they know immediately that they were working on a bomb. It's kind of unclear. They certainly became aware of it as their work went on during the Manhattan project. and after. It became clear that there would be a bomb developed from their work. Some of them became very concerned about that some of the Chicago scientists especially, and they developed the bulletin of the Atomic Scientists of Chicago to work on trying to control the use and thoughts and opinions about this new power they had unleashed after the Matlab in Chicago achieved its goals. Of creating plutonium and creating the first self sustaining nuclear reactor, both of which were essential for developing atomic bombs for the war purpose some of the scientists continued the work on the possibilities of this new nuclear power, specifically some of the peaceful purposes of it, and they continued that work at Argonne National Laboratory in Lamont, which still exists and still works today. We. Talked about the concerns that something could go wrong possibly may be dangerous to people around it at the same time there is also concerns that the Germans especially would find out that this work was being done there in Chicago could become a target. During the war that that is something that was drilled into people as well. Yes. In fact. Some of the Chicago scientists working on the Manhattan project were. Refugees from Fascist Europe. And I spoke to a physicist who wrote a book related to the Manhattan Project, and he talks about how they had feared that the Nazis would bomb Chicago specifically because of the work in because of the refugees there. Here's physicist Stanley worked. Quite rightly that the Nazis basically wanted to. Kill, them. Fact I found interesting little note in the are gone archive many years ago said ineffective course to Germans must know where here. So when they have in her comic bomb, the first one they'll drop we'll be on Chicago that was the risk they foresaw to Chicago Chicago area that the terrific dropping a on. So we know that people high up in the military I'm guessing would've known about all of this work and in the president's administration maybe would have known about what was happening here did everybody at the University of Chicago, even the administration there what was taking place? The Manhattan project was extremely secret ultra secret I've read in one place that even Truman didn't know about it, which I have a hard time believing that Congress didn't know about it again, I haven't verified. In the big question even today is did the University of Chicago President Robert Hutchins know what was going on in his own backyard almost literally beneath his football stadium. And sounds like there's a lot of disagreement about that. Now, I have since read the Robert Maynard. By Milton mayor and he says, he absolutely knew about it but was very was under instructions that when he told his deans and trustees number one, he could not even mention the word uranium. And that when they asked him if there was any danger to the university or city, he said unlikely but he couldn't he couldn't rule it out now. Here's what a physicist at the University of Chicago, a current physicist whom I interviewed said about whether or not he thinks the president knew. It was only three blocks from his house in blocks from his house. Can. Debate it. But I'm sure he knew about he just couldn't officially know about it because you can't I said you can't. Ask Him I make a nuclear chain reaction on your campus in the middle of the city. Blow. That physicist is Dr Henry Frisch and historians very interesting because he is literally a Los. Alamos Baby. His parents worked on the Los Alamos project.

Chicago physicist University of Chicago Manhattan University Chicago Illinois bulletin of the Atomic Scienti president University of Chicago. German government Enrico Fermi Europe Los Alamos Alamos Baby Robert Maynard Robert Hutchins Dr Henry Frisch Argonne National Laboratory Milton
"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Up I this week pandemic has changed a lot of summer plans for college students like internships travel jobs key with WBZ, tells us how some students are still trying to make the most of their summer rice university student Kathleen Matthews had big plans this summer she was going to spend eight weeks in Argentina studying public health and working in a clinic. Then she was heading to Israel for a traditional birthright trip for young Jewish adults all of that was canceled due to the novel coronavirus she moved back in with her parents in Chicago's Lincoln Park neighborhood. So instead I took calculus to definitely a bummer. Cove nineteen is canceled many internships study abroad, opportunities and typical funds. Summer plans as colleges worry how the pandemic will affect fall enrollment. Many schools in Illinois have a bump in summer enrollment compared to last year as students tried to turn lemons into some kind of lemonade, the University of Illinois at her banished champagne and the University of Illinois at Chicago both saw summer enrollment numbers jumped twenty five and twenty, seven percent respectively from last summer. Alina callous is an incoming freshman at Loyola University Chicago. She decided to get a head start in take online classes this summer to get some of her general courses out of the way especially double majoring I would have to do a little bit more work and just thinking of the future I want to study abroad and things like that and I just want to make time. Loyola and other local private universities say they've seen an increase in summer enrollments to For those lucky enough to keep their internships, it's now from the comfort of their homes Indiana resident. Joe Grazziano says when the pandemic initially hit lots of friends saw summer internships, they'd secured in the fall canceled and he was worried his paid internship with the risk management company. A on would be too. He plays baseball for Butler University and dedicated previous summers to baseball heading into senior year his resume was pretty thin. So I kind of really needed this. I'm not gonNA live. Canceled resume would have been like baseball club not very filling a on depends heavily on its interns traditionally, they hire nearly two-thirds every year permanently. So they mailed laptops home for interns and integrated them into teams who are also working virtually due to the pandemic. They've also been assigned group projects with other interns to help improve the company internally. Graziano says he misses the in person interaction it's difficult to make a good impression remotely a live. You can get from even small talk at the office just and sometimes video it's Kinda hard to like to get across my personality is I want to I. Don't it's like hard to like portray myself to you over video still he feels lucky to earn a paycheck this summer. So does nineteen-year-old Manny Gonzalez who is studying computer science and engineering at Harold Washington College in downtown. Chicago he was involved with the group. Genesis works in high school, which helps students in underinvested communities connect with employers for job and internship opportunities. He was able to quit an overnight job at ups and start working at a data analytics company downtown, which he's continued remotely throughout the pandemic guaranteed in. That's also helping him build toward his career. I also feel like I'm lucky because you know not everyone gets this opportunity especially MIA age having like these big corporate companies on my resume at my age. So it's like you know it's a blessing but even with his job, he's being extra productive this summer he's tacked on two summer classes. So he can finish his associates degree early and transfer to a four year school to earn a Bachelor's Kate Katie Wbz News. In May the Department of Education made sweeping changes to title nine regulations. Peter Midland with W J. reports on how colleges and universities are coming to terms with new policies. Many advocates in school officials say will chill reporting the new regulations changed the definition of what qualifies as sexual harassment under title nine to meet the new standard harassment must be quote severe, pervasive and objectively offensive. Swallow Patel is director of Justice for student survivors at the National Women's law center. So these rules kind of total religious turn Ted on. Nine on its head as a civil rights law says, they raised the threshold of what schools can choose to ignore, and it's a departure from guidance that's been in place for around twenty years. If a student isn't being outright denied equal access to a program or activity that might not be enough. So that means some students would be forced to endure repeated. An escalating loves of abuse before they can get help the new rules also require institutions of higher learning to dismiss reports of harassment that happened off campus. Now they'd. Have to put together a separate sexual misconduct policy to apply to those situations. This has ramifications for online harassment to especially as many schools move to more virtual instruction during the pandemic faith Ferber is a student engagement organizer with no your nine. She says, if someone's harassing you in a class zoom meeting that would be covered, but if someone is sexually harassing you over facebook and then you have to see them in zoom classroom that wouldn't necessarily be covered a northern Illinois. University. Title Nine Coordinator. Sarah Garner says they. Do have procedures to help students. We have the opportunity to see. Okay even though it doesn't reach this level of conduct how we can address it as university but as faith ferber says, the problem is that places like an eye you could ignore those cases if they choose to and she says, the Education Department isn't there to protect students either we can't count on our schools and we can't count on the government. So we can count on students in student power to really make a difference and holders schools accountable at. Students held protests last year on the basis of the university was mishandling investigations and the process was slow and apathetic university hired another coordinator and Garner says they're much better equipped to handle their case load. Now, the new regulations are over two thousand pages two, thousand, thirty three to be exact and the policies themselves fit into the last thirty pages or so the reason the document is so long is so that the Department of Education headed by Betsy, Devos is trying to justify why the. Changes are needed and respond to public comments. She Wally Potala's there were more than a hundred thousand comments mostly opposing the new rules school principal. There were mental health experts over nine hundred trauma specialists joined a letter and raised concern about the rule. So there was significant opposition and yet they they continue to move forward Sarah Gardner and I you were one of the many schools that Senate comments and harshly Maddie brought concerns made it into the final regulation. Patel says the provisions were largely. Unchanged from what was proposed, but there were also a few changes that weren't even in the proposed rule. So they didn't have a chance to comment. One example is that colleges and universities are now barred from dealing with complaints by people who aren't actively participating in an education program that means a school won't be allowed to investigate a complaint of sexual harassment if the survivor already graduated or they transferred or let's say they dropped out of school because they were sexually assaulted and they don't. Plan to re enroll and colleges could dismiss cases when the respondent who's being accused isn't enrolled or employed by the School Patel says that could include professor who retires or who resigns after abuse comes to light. Another change the wasn't included originally reiterates that the department's guidelines supersede any state law and some of the new title line changes are in conflict with Illinois State Law, one forces those going through an investigation to undergo cross-examination in a live hearing, and as Sarah, Gardner at nyu says. State Law that says, you cannot cross examine what another this is the element providing sexual violence act however now the federal regulations.

harassment Chicago Illinois Swallow Patel baseball University of Illinois Sarah Garner Department of Education Ferber coordinator Loyola University Chicago Kathleen Matthews Lincoln Park Israel Loyola School Patel Sarah Gardner Butler University Manny Gonzalez
"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:21 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"And it is a list of questions that. Four questions, four aspiring revolutionaries, and it is blistering I must say. Please go on here with number one. Basically the question was, do you have your facts straight? Out of important and it's laying out that in fact. The vast majority of these. People calling themselves. Anti Capitalists Socialists in these sorts of things do not have their facts straight. Please go on with The point here with University Chicago in two thousand, eight, excuse me two, thousand eight. There was a bit of controversy over the establishment of the Milton Friedman institute at the University of Chicago which operates today as the Becker Friedman Institute used to be a really great school is also named for Friedman's fellow Chicago economist Gary. Becker in a blistering Nobel. Prize. Winners right. I don't know. I. Believe. So okay I'll take your word for it. In a blistering reply to a protest letter signed by a group of faculty members at the University of Chicago economist John Cochran Okay. So get this faculty members at the University of Chicago like Oh. No, you can't have the capitalist on here doing things. which because they're mostly leftists s they protested with. John Cochran wrote if you start with the premise that the last forty years or so or so years including the fall of communism and the opening China and India are negative for much of the world's population. You just don't have any business being a social scientist. You don't have any business being social scientists. If you believe these lefty policies and socialism hasn't been good for anybody to be fair many the faculty members probably not social scientists like not they're qualified realm. But yet they the freedom of speech baby. You don't stand a chance of contributing something serious to the problem that we actually do face nor might I add do you stand much of a chance of concocting revolutionary program that will actually help the people you're trying to lead? Well. Yeah I mean you know you've always been able to get the poor on the the train of, Hey, let's take money from the rich people. I mean you know that's what government's all basically based on. It's an easy sell. Yeah and in in I, don't know what the. Statistics are but generally speaking the less wealthy the poor people will always outnumber the super wealthy. Right, it's just the way it's going to be easy numbers came to win and I get why people don't like the idea of a few people having a whole bunch of money and the rest of US having to work hard for a living but. Fair, it's just the way it is you know, and those people a lot of money in many cases made it and their kids will squander it if or the grandkids will yeah. Yeah and that's just the way it is I mean take a look at Paris Hilton she's not contributing a lot. I'm just saying still wealthy. Probably is number two. What makes me so sure I won't replace the existing regime with something far worse. This is the question for revolutionary. What makes us think that you won't replace the existing regime with something far worse I, hate this would in general because it's it's the you know the devil you know versus don't Yup right why should we not throw over the oppressive United States federal government because who knows what it might be replaced with? Well. I don't look to overthrow the. The. United. States federal government because I don't think that those I mean it's already spent itself into insolvency. We stop believing that it's still exists I mean any organization that is? Twenty six, twenty, six, thirty, thirty, just round numbers here thirty trillion dollars in debt. Is. Probably, just not an existing city more. They. Still do they still do the government people the goons, tyrants, despots, parasites they still act like they have the power. Yes. They they still oppress those that they seem to be lectures. I. Might hesitate to push the affirmation button because while the world we actually inhabit is far from perfect. It's not all that clear that deleting the state overnight wouldn't mean civilizations wholesale and maybe even perpetual collapse. So with the collapse, the collapse of the Roman the well. We're saying the western Roman government in Rome Basically. That's where the dark ages came from people are. Now at some point, a couple, hundred years later they're living in the coliseum they don't know how these acqueduct Scott built they. They just don't get it like they've been spun into a dark age, and that's because people who build great things. These sort of the great man theory of history is is that you need these great men and if they don't have the. Foundations upon which to build, they can't build greater things. So just tearing something down for the sake of tearing it down so we can take the gold out of the temples. Probably, not that great of an idea. And I don't want to see that I'm not looking any anything that results in. Lower. Longevity that. Less happiness less profitability less. These sorts of things I'm not for that. I'm actually for logic and peace not freedom i. just think that freedom by and large is a pass through logic peace and that's why when I when people ask me about push the button. It's not like pushing a button to get rid of the state. It's like typing an essay as to why you don't i. mean there's steps along the way, and if we don't go through those steps, then you just get something bad and I think I would generally be a button pusher yes I. Young men tend to be. I'm not that much younger than you. Perhaps, it's just attitude it could be. Because like I understand that whether or not we take the slow road to serfdom right or whether we hit the revolutionary button and go through a period of rebuilding right there's there's GonNa be some sort of negative impact on the whole right and it's it's whether or not you want to continue down this road or go through. That, but you don't believe that I'm not sure no I mean what could we just get a little more freedom here in a little more freedom there until we're free If you think you're going to get a little more here in a little more there. I would suggest it goes the other way like incrementally they take away more freedom and you period you know down the line of history and we have to educate Pe- as many people as possible that freedom works and that's the best thing we can do Can you read through go through and read them? At the very least I would want to think long and hard about it. The explicit mention of Franz Fanon and shake Vara in the course description suggest that students will be approaching revolutionary ideas from the left. Yeah. Students. The saying the word students suggest that they will be approaching revolutionary ideas from the left. They should look at the results of populous revolutions in the twentieth century Latin America. Africa Asia the blood of many millions starved and slaughtered in millions to forge a better society cries out against socialism and communism be macro economic populism in Latin. America has been disastrous as people I pointed out when told that democratic socialist aren't trying to turn their countries into Venezuela. Venezuelans weren't trying to turn their country into Venezuela when they embraced Hugo Chavez now, they just wanted some something that seemed more fair. I wonder why we should expect W WWL US aspiring revolutionaries to succeed where so many others have failed. I think these questions for aspiring revolutionaries. Great. But I mean the problem is, is that these professors? I mean, they don't they aren't in a profit driven system there in an academic system and their questions don't the questions don't even get asked any more conservative academics have a heck of a time not getting blackballed. And because the profit motive in self for those people is inherently immoral. Right and the old saying, which is the you know said by Republicans not by Democrats. The old saying is we think they're wrong. They think we're evil. and. I mean. That's it..

University Chicago US John Cochran scientist Milton Friedman institute Chicago Becker Friedman Institute Venezuela Friedman Becker Paris Hilton Gary Africa Franz Fanon China Hugo Chavez Rome Scott Latin America America
"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Moved to a downstate prison. WG and slow, Distort has details. The Illinois Department of Corrections says Cunningham has been moved to the Logan Correctional Center in Lincoln, Illinois, to serve her sentence. She was being held at the McHenry County Jail. Joanne Cunningham was sentenced to 35 years in prison last month. She pleaded guilty to murdering her son back in 2019. The boy's father, Andrew Friends, Signor is being held without bail awaiting trial on murder charges. White House Corona Virus Task Force coordinator Dr Deborah Burke's his warning of an uptick in new cases of the Corona virus in nine U. S. Cities, including Chicago WG and Steve Bertrand. Reports, Burke says scientists are seeing a slow uptick in test positivity in places like Chicago, Boston, Detroit in Washington, DC Atlanta, Baltimore, Kansas City are on the list. A CZ well. As mayor Lightfoot said earlier this week cases in Chicago have been trending up after weeks of decline in May and June. Steve Bertrand L. U. G N News staff and faculty at City College is of Chicago are threatening the strike unless they're allowed to work remotely this fall due to public health concerns. Chancellor Juan Salgado at CCC says leaderships already come up with a hybrid plan that does call for most classes to be held remotely. We have a limited number of classes that will be offered face to face or as blended classes when hands on experiences are essential to meeting course requirements or when the student learning And retention can benefit, he says. Specific faculty members will be required to come into the school buildings. Toe work, says the buildings themselves will remain open, so students have access to libraries and computers. Loyola University Chicago Announcing today a new covert 19 related restriction its president is suspending plans to host students in on campus residence halls until, according to a statement. Conditions are favorable. It goes on to cite what the school calls the trajectory of the Corona virus. As reasoning behind the decision. Students who were planning to live on campus are expected to receive an email from residents life with more information and answer any questions. The U. S. Government and Federal Reserve has ordered the board of directors at capital one bank to come up with a plan to improve risk management and internal controls. Capital One also has to pay an $80 million fine and provide a timeline for enhancing cyber security. This. After one of the largest data breaches in history. Back in July of 2019 hacker gained access to the private data of more than 100 million capital one customers. The bank says if he were not contacted, you weren't impacted. Security experts say. Check your credit report for fraudulent activity to confirm the high unemployment rate in Illinois, caused by the pandemic has triggered extended benefits. The state will now allow for 20 additional weeks of unemployment checks for a total of 46 weeks of benefits. Rebecca Cisco is with the Illinois Department of Employment Services, she says. It'll roll over automatically any time that the extended benefits are triggered off. Then the people that had been benefiting from the extended benefits they had. If they had exhausted the 26 a lot of weeks it would be cut off when extended benefits is the money to pay for its being provided by the federal government. The state's employment offices under heavy criticism from residents of Illinois some who say they've called hundreds of times with no answered or returned call. The I D S is urging people to try applying online. And the Chicago Police Department is already nearly burned through the overtime money it had budgeted for the entire year. WG Ens James. Here's sometimes reporting, CPD has spent $84 million in just six months. More than 47 million of that overtime budget in June alone doubled in the same time last year. This is for the period, including a violent Memorial Day weekend that saw 10 killed and 39 shots in the protests and looting following George Floyd's death, which led the mayor to institute a curfew. Officers were working at 12 hour days for weeks, James Sears, WG and news and now W. G and Sports White Sox split the Long four game series against the Brewers two games apiece. The Bruins beat him 83 in the finale. It guaranteed rate field. The Sox host Cleveland for a quick two game, Siri's starting Friday. The pregame at 6 35 The first pitch at 7 10 With Andy Mates are enduring Jackson on 7 20 W g. N The Blackhawks will try to eliminate the Oilers Friday. It's Game four of the best of five. Siri's in there. Stanley Cup qualifier Hawks lead it two games to one. The pre game with Chris Bona 5 15 The puck drops and find 45 with John Weidman, Detroit Murray on 7 20 WG and and a W G on radio dot com. No bats for the Cups Tonight they're win. Streak ends at six. They drop only the last of four against Kansas City Royals Take the finale 13 to 2 and avoid the sweep up started weekend. Siri's in ST Louis Friday, the first pitch at 7 15 Convict Vaughn on Chicago's very own 7 20 This summer. The.

Chicago Joanne Cunningham Illinois Siri Loyola University Chicago mayor Lightfoot Illinois Department of Correct Chicago Police Department Capital One Corona Virus Task Force Dr Deborah Burke McHenry County Jail Lincoln Chancellor Juan Salgado Steve Bertrand L. U. G Logan Correctional Center Rebecca Cisco CCC
"university chicago" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Nine one twenty two twenty two we end our conversation with the university Chicago Polish that fester merit is Charles Lipson talking about corona virus in the politics of it because the left has so politicized it sampled I'm talking about that Egghead Brian Stelter just what I mean of there so many insufferable people on that stooge of a network CNN and Stelter is right near the top right points in stiff competition with radio and Donna Mona Thalia a Brian Stelter on on how the right conservative pundits talk show host they are the ones politicizing coronavirus news outlets have a really important job to do right now conveying accurate information and part of the job is the tamp down on undue fears unfortunately this virus has infected the political arena in in ways that are truly jaw dropping that put trump media stars are defending trump's handling of the operate by accusing news outlets I can't even put their kids into the office of rooting for the virus yeah you just heard Charles Lipson reference one well known writer who was rooting for the virus where are they getting it shipped they're only making up out of whole cloth Brian Salter when president trump was asked at a press conference with with Anthony Fauci from National Institute for health standing right next to him about whether Phalke had been muzzled by the administration something I was just conjured up out of whole cloth by the press and found she had to intercede to say that didn't happen it's not happening and that was miss reporting by the media was that was that Rush Limbaugh Sean Hannity saying O. as in Nancy fox you saying it was the source I mean it's just we wouldn't be talking about the politics of corona virus at all were it not for Democrats making spectacles of themselves trying to find an angle into blaming trump for the virus adoro in the house going on at anti trump diatribe that was so offensive that even members of her caucus like a Donna shillelagh said her diatribe against trump when they were getting briefing from health officials was unhelpful nobody was interested in the politics of just trying to get the facts from the nation's top public health officials I love the projection which is you know the stock in trade of the left I will project onto you the thing I am actually doing and this also not from Sean Hannity or Rush Limbaugh or any other you know trump media protector as there so tags I've been handling these emerging contagion for about twenty years now and I have to tell you I've never seen one handled better that's Dr Marc Siegel who is a professor of medicine at NYU the task force are really top players he added noting Tony Fuji FRGS I mention five G. is one of the best one of the top infectious disease experts in the country said Siegel they've been doing exactly what they're supposed to be doing restricting travel isolating patients were sick and trying to cut down on contact it's a very hard thing to do when people are pouring in from all over the world also CDC Dr CDC director Dr Robert Redfield Redfield a virologist and they said that the the comments last week about the inevitable spread of the virus he he thought were a bit to do mission Gomes and uncalled for now compare this to the coverage as I mentioned earlier I think on yesterday shell you know compare this to the coverage from a decade ago from some of the same people with a bomb imitations handling of H. one N. one which was a pandemic and it was not until six months after that declaration that the president Obama declared it a health emergency in this country by that time there were a thousand dead Americans from H. one N. one and twenty thousand had been hospitalized and many more thousands who have been infected so is that was that the Obama virus the way that New York times is Gail Collins has called this trump virus with Paul Krugman echoing that absurd sentiment no of course not the lectures from Brian Stelter on media coverage in media have this important job to do they could have an important job to do but instead of tamping down hysteria and promulgating facts there of course the purveyors of hysteria any particular politicized version of it in the age of trump aren't they Brian.

university Chicago Polish
Chicago: Mother of slain nursing student arrested after police encounter at U of C Hospital

Nick Digilio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

Chicago: Mother of slain nursing student arrested after police encounter at U of C Hospital

"An eighteen year old nursing student shot and killed Tuesday outside a convenience store on Chicago's south side was not the intended target she was one of five people shop their seventy nine ten Woodlawn WGN's Tonya Francisco has spoken with her family the mother claims she was arrested at the hospital after viewing her daughter's body J. a B. man was a nursing student following in the footsteps of her mother and her well the family of J. U. Beeman says their grief over her death was further compounded when her mother was arrested and now the ACLU of Illinois is speaking out on her family's behalf you hate them was so bad that my daughter have to get shot the mother of J. U. B. men questioning why someone fired at least twenty shots into a convenience store hitting her eighteen year old daughter in the chest killing her police believe the gunmen were targeting a boy inside the store at seventy ninth in Avalon last night when they wildly fired inside that boy was not injured but police say two women who were with him more wounded the three other victims including J. Edgar boyfriend for innocent bystanders Chicago has is not equipped to handle a trauma center J. as mother says her grief was compounded when she was arrested and charged after Chicago police say she pushed and kicked an officer after breaking down while viewing her daughter's body the Chicago police and university Chicago police handle us so you maintain humane I passed out when I saw my baby and they drove me out the hospital let the dog they created us so badly unjustly so inhumane and had the nerve to tell us that screaming and falling to the floor was not proper closer spent the night in jail the university of Chicago in a statement says he'd parted staff is prepared to deal with grieving families and that the decision to arrest the mother was made by the Chicago police officers investigators are still searching for three men seen in surveillance video leaving that scene in a white sedan that has damage to the passenger side fender tended windows black rims and no front license plate

Chicago Tonya Francisco J. U. Beeman Illinois Avalon J. Officer J. U. B. J. Edgar University Chicago Police University Of Chicago Chicago Police
"university chicago" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on KTRH

"In two thousand and nine he's lost half of his money a second time okay so later on in this segment I'm a talk about how we fix the problem but what he almost did to himself was a run out of money due to what we call sequence of returns risk in this is well documented in the probabilities are so high that you will run out of money if you get swept up in the US that you should really listen to what I'm gonna go through now so let's just say that your jam you had a million dollars what if you have five hundred grand in two thousand in you were sixty five years old okay and let's say that the next ten years look like this ten years in the stock market so Jim has a million he pulls the recommended four percent withdrawal rate now forty grand the problem is as the internet bubble comes apart he loses nine percent the first year ninety one thousand dollars twelve percent the second year hundred two thousand dollars is gone twenty two percent the third year one hundred and fifty six thousand dollars is lost he's just four years into retirement the sixty eight he has half of his money gone in its distribution rate goes from four percent to nine percent he has to spend it nine percentage generate his forty thousand dollars in income plus a little increase for inflation Marcia you can't spend at nine percent of your portfolio yeah okay so even though the markets good from two thousand and three to two thousand and seven then we come to down to two thousand and eight he takes a thirty seven percent loss two hundred and twenty four thousand dollars is gone he has about six hundred thousand dollars laughed his distribution rate has to go to about sixteen percent to generate the income that he needs by twenty ten the what I had about three hundred grand today he'd have you know maybe two hundred grand left so statistically and they've studied this at length the Stanford center on the study on longevity university Toronto university Chicago if you take losses like that right before retirement the last few years of retirement or the first few years where you're taking in come out of your now stag odds are very very good you run out of money by about age eighty three the way that the life expectancy tables are going you better plan to live till ninety or beyond because if you're wrong it is not a good luck to run out of money by age eighty three and live jail age ninety okay your only defense is to have a.

US Jim Stanford center Toronto university Chicago
AP FACT CHECK: Bracing for Trump's 'relentless optimism'

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

AP FACT CHECK: Bracing for Trump's 'relentless optimism'

"The state of the union address may include more than a few boasts this could be a lot of credit claiming going on in the speech university Chicago politics professor William Howell says president trump is not likely to hold back on his claims of success as he challenges the Democrats to impeach him he's been demonizing the Democrats and calling them out left and right throughout this impeachment process and now he's gonna be steaming before all of them how all adds it's a speech comes at what he calls a fraught time the day before the Senate votes on trump's impeachment the day after the Iowa caucuses the president is likely to talk about the economy the rollback of environmental regulations healthcare immigration including the wall and national security Tim acquire Washington

Professor William Howell Donald Trump Senate Iowa President Trump Washington TIM
"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Dot org it's a lovely website and get a lot of information there Lucia moral is now a filmmaker who what once was one of the great and talented arts writers and critics in the stone and we're talking about sheaves Jacqueline Saudi Arain for Lujan to before you even matter to have a screening of the documentary that she had made and now you two were collaborating and documentary and heather how are you involved it's a great question I first met Jacqueline haze I think back in two thousand fifteen I was working at Loyola University Chicago is a multimedia producer and I was working on a photography project so we were photographing some of our award ease and trying to find events in which they were working with and social justice and so Jack he happened to be at this loyal school of law's events that I was photographing and it was at the Lawson house for a monthly dinner she did I'm called Jackie's place yeah and she introduced herself to me and just floored me in and I started volunteering for a good five years I taught a digital storytelling class at the a Chicago health initiative and from there a couple years later a few years later fast forward last year I got a call and from Jackie who said I've met Lucia Morrow and I wanted to make a documentary about the Chicago health initiative and I think we should all have lunch and I'd like you to be involved and I had to rack my breed I said how do I know Lucia Morrow turns out that I had which she and I had talked on the phone because I would often have to coordinate the photography for loyal magazine and we were doing a feature on which Shia who was her for her first film in my brother shoes and we just talked on the phone a few times for what must have been like an hour each time and we're just kindred spirits.

Jacqueline Saudi Arain Lujan Jacqueline haze Loyola University Chicago producer Jack Lawson house Jackie Lucia Morrow Shia Dot Chicago
"university chicago" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Already put their proverbial best foot forward right that's what they've done they've already put forward the proverbial best foot presidents floors haven't anything the Democrats will get there twenty four hours over two days the president's lawyers will get there twenty four hours and for today and I suspect they're going to even this right but the Democrats have done because this filing today proceedings before the United States Senate trial memorandum of president Donald J. trump is a killer is a killer and I guarantee you that most of the legal analysts on cable TV certainly an MSNBC in constipated news network in virtually every one of the hosts in virtually every one of the commentators have not read it we get as I call it on freedom of the press thanks to professor Daniel borscht in the late great professor university Chicago then later director library Congress pseudo events after several events I ended the first hour by saying there wasn't any violence in Richmond Virginia the pro second amendment pro liberty protests were enormous number of people showed up we had pseudo news as the president rightly calls it fake news the governor of Virginia formally a blackface fine formally of post birth abortion has now figured out how to win approval by the Washington compost on the left will get the washing campus yes move hard left any brings in all these law enforcement agencies wares county.

Democrats president Donald J. trump MSNBC Daniel borscht Congress Richmond Virginia United States Senate professor professor university Chicago director Washington
"university chicago" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'll keep something in mind the Democrats have already put their proverbial best foot forward right that's what they've done they've already put forward the proverbial best foot presidents floors haven't anything so the Democrats will get there twenty four hours over two days the president's lawyers will get there twenty four hours and for today and I suspect they're going to even disarray but the Democrats have done because this filing today the proceedings before the United States Senate trial memorandum of president Donald J. trump is a killer is a killer and I guarantee you that most of the legal analysts on cable TV certainly an MSNBC in in virtually every one of the hosts in virtually every one of the commentators have not read it we get is I call in on freedom of the press thanks to professor Daniel borscht in the late great professor university Chicago then later director library Congress shoot events after several events I ended the first hour by saying there wasn't any violence in Richmond Virginia the pro second amendment pro liberty protests where Norma's number people showed up so for days we had pseudo news as the president rightly calls it fake news the governor of Virginia formally a black face thing formally of post birth abortion has now figured out how to win approval by the Washington compost in the left will get to the washing campus yes move hard left any brings in all these law enforcement agents various counties from the state other states have dot com ready for war then they got peace you think there's an anti fur protests he brings up Charlottesville he wants you to think all these honorable tax paying Americans we're trying to protect their liberty and the constitution and the bill of rights that indeed applies to Democrats including the governor of Virginia that the white supremacists that they're neo **** and that's what the media was trying to portray thousands and thousands of audible hardworking taxpaying neighbors of yours as something they're not just like the Covington Kentucky boys who dared to wear many hats how they tried to destroy them they're lawyers they're trying to destroy you when the president they are a dangerous bunch of people they really are here we have a montage of the news media in nineteen ninety nine during the Clinton impeachment trial Eleanor Clift Dan rather al hunt Peter Jennings.

Eleanor Clift Dan Clinton Covington Kentucky Washington director professor university Chicago professor United States Senate Peter Jennings president Charlottesville Norma Richmond Virginia Congress Daniel borscht MSNBC Donald J. trump
"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:37 min | 3 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Ten o'clock and then this hour it's time for our resident philosopher al Jeannie how genie is a professor of ethics and business ethics at the Clinton school of business at Loyola University Chicago he joins us every month here on the program he has become a resident philosopher talk about the big picture to also talk about the big ticket items in our society we talked about leadership we talk about virtue we talked about the seven deadly sins we we've gone down the less I we've got we that we have really tackled all things that that make us tick as human beings the one thing we haven't talked about lying and tonight we talk about the true thing we talk about the live professor Ginny could see buddy I always go to zero it's but it's been awhile but I'm I'm glad we're back together again and let's make a disclaimer let's start off right away I love them we start with this claim absolutely described this is not for my wife services you know that her lawyer incidents that are but whether you're a supporter or critic of Mr trump and who hasn't ended I I undeniably Mr trump confuses fact with fiction a and an opinion and objectivity in truth announcers we're not talking about Mr trump even though they he has this each man hearings are tomorrow yeah certainly if there's a question of lying Democrats do it as well as Republicans and extend the truth it's better so what are you trying to talk about here is cheating some understanding of the nature of a line and what it does for us as individuals in a society and what it gives us and and and takes away from us and it does give us a lot that's why it's such an interesting phenomena in our lives yeah we'll get to three one two nine eight one seventy two hundred and say you know whether it's your Democrats Republicans I mean the the concept of being a politician now is to do the best you can to stretch the truth it's almost like lying is an art form it is an article I mean lawyers have a down to an exact science it's it's a quote Mr Clinton it depends what you mean by the word is and and how it changes everything and colors of things but I think we're talking about line meaning something much more commonsensical then we get into the political aspect to tell a lie to tell a falsehood to falsify to fear is too intensely create the wrong impression or to misrepresent a series of facts are to remain silent or misinformed to be a live here means you intentionally and knowingly do not tell the truth about ourselves about facts about situations that is we give a different picture of what's in and front of people that might be nefarious to cover up that also might be to embellish to make it seem like there are bigger than we are like that and there's actually a reason for life and I'm the one one of the major reasons for line of course is to deny the truth but you know denial isn't always a bad thing then I was not just a river in Egypt as my uncle used to tell me and I always love that light is in a great line that was very helpful thing in our lives hi I've got I've got to cancer and so I'm going to deny the fact that perhaps my life options are limited now and I want to deny the fact that my child has not contacted me for months I want to deny the fact that my my marriage is falling apart none of those things are true right gentlemen I'm lying about them personally but I think that I was way the whole thing's at bay I mean we it's impossible to deal with all of reality so did now can have a positive since we're talking about here is denying the truth when somebody ask you do you have my pen user no I don't and you just picked up and put your pocket toward talking about a different kind of the now I think we live also to expand the truth of the tall tale the yard people tell stories all the time and and I think that we could use there's two kinds of line here I think we just tell a lie no I didn't do this yes I did do this yes even telling a joke or telling a story because that's clearly not necessarily true and it is returned create a metaphor credit charge created now just sort of terror but I think very often people simply we have the truth because they want to make more themselves one embellish themselves I think of people like to claim something that that that is not to say I did that or I didn't do that are was there are wasn't there are met him once I have this amount of money it's either it's either then line also hides the truth and over at you know resident we we we want we want to hide something worn it we want to suggest something else is there basically it distorts the truth and in fact when you apply to a person you distort that reality you're changing the facts of the game and that really becomes clear the okay I want to pick up on that yeah because one of the worst that keeps getting thrown around as truth yeah and and I feel like we've we've we really bought gotten apex point here when it comes to politics in the country about what truth is yes there's one set of troops for one person and there's another set of trees for another that it once seemed like a maybe hasn't but it won't seem like truth was truth and everything came around it now there's arguments and debates and and miss provision truncations of what the truth actually is right and I and I think that if we look at the of the impeachment case right now it all revolves around the Latin term silicon none that that what that for that this for that or a pretty quick pro clubs usually clear because this for that and I don't wanna get lost in that but I think we're talking about it in truth is fair representation of the objective world it's not always totally accurate but it's a fierce of greed upon so fair fair and I think for example the the great the physics example as there is no such thing as color the color is a function of light and how are our eyeballs perceive as we all kind of agree what red is kind of agree with blue is evident better and then there are big reason yeah you know I think is my own brand to trivial but anything about what happened on the internet a couple years ago when they showed a dressing yeah we'll have to people thought it was one color and have to write a song as a different color right and that that kind of gets back to the idea that not everything looks the same feel same and we talk about fair and and affair understanding of what's what's the objective right world we live in again it gets a great break it and we're talking about truth here we're not talking about ultimate truth to I have insight into them ugh because no I understand life after death is there such a thing as I have that I'm talking about can we agree on these facts can we agree that rat poison is dangerous only given to rats to kill them do not please do not ingest can we agree that if I do the following this may upset the people I love and they will they will be out of sorts we're talking about sex you're not scientific checks for things we agree on and kind of a common sense Lydia world and lies distort that infected to go all the way to the end of this argument lies destroy our ability to make serious decisions about get big the given world in front of us so if you lied to me and said yes I did in fact two acts and I after the fact you did accent I wind up breaking the Germans say you've just credited me but also kept me from an objective and it's also a house a car right did there is no senator is right right right right right federal genies my guest here our resident philosopher he's with us every month here on extension seven twenty talking about the big ticket items in in the world we live in we're talking about the truth and of course the lie the nature of lying to night three one two nine eight one seventy two hundred is our phone number take our first break come back and get into some of the different because we want to talk about I want talk about purpose yeah because there's a big difference between sort of function and purpose yeah right the idea of the white lie verse the you know the the ultimate lie in NY we like why why why yes vencer al genie in studio here stay with us tomorrow morning news traffic weather sports in the meantime maybe think about doing something about that morning.

al Jeannie professor Loyola University Chicago Clinton school of business
"university chicago" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

07:03 min | 3 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"The medical bills of zero you can not use a person's medical bill history AS eight predictor of if they're going to live or die but the data was working we showed less was being spent on black patients because they receive less care is a black patients occurred roughly eighteen hundred less in medical costs annually than white patients with the same level of six researchers say this is due to a myriad of factors of the lack of insurance lack of access and even unconscious biases from doctors there for the machine rings white patients equally at risk of future health woes as black patients were actually sicker they say correcting these biases of the algorithm what more than double the number of black patients flagged for additional care following the findings the study was replicated on a different data set of three point seven million patients and I found a black patients collectively suffered from eight it's forty eight thousand a vision of chronic diseases compared with white people although the study was conducted on just one health care algorithm the researchers say similar biases probably exist across a number of industries now the lead researcher was down percent hill who will lie Jonathan he's a professor of computational behavioral sciences university Chicago said it's truly inconceivable to me that anyone else's algorithm doesn't suffer from this I'm hopeful that this causes an entire industry to say all my we've got to fix this so all right what is I mean for your eyes what it means is as we go more high tech and eight I it's all about algorithms okay so if you're a man or woman that fit the textbook yeah high cholesterol diabetes high blood pressure they're gonna probably have you flags appropriately as high risk for heart disease okay if you're a woman that let's say has no family history of breast cancer never went to a doctor for a breast lump had a couple babies you're not going to be considered rest at rest for breast cancer and so you might be put on a lower risk category we get less reminders to go get your mammogram I'm telling you right now women who have had breast cancer I can't see how many people I've met said they never had in the family and they never had a previous long and then they found something then they went to the doctor so medicine is tricky it's unpredictable health issues are unpredictable and I don't want somebody saying well you're good because it's not in the family see I don't have a lot of diseases in the family because most of my family died before they get get diagnosed with the disease so when somebody says but look at all your father never cancer so you know how do you know you're at high risk for these types of cancers ago he didn't have cancer because he died of a heart attack before you could ever have the diagnosis of cancer all these algorithms looking family history and your family got killed in the Holocaust or a car accident or a you know over does we're not gonna have family history we're not gonna have any algorithm you have people out there who are adopted and they have no idea what the family as uncle let's just assume they have some sort of cancer and heart disease or whatever and let's just assume it's in your family because if I don't assume that I'm not gonna test you and I understand that there's a big liberal push for us to have more socialized medicine or government run healthcare and government run healthcare is going to need to save money government run healthcare is not going to be able to I individualize for people a government run healthcare system is not gonna like a doctor like me that because what will will will believe it's only that there's something wrong with you which is apt and I've found things I'll either god spoke to me or some that person had a guardian angel but I'm like something's wrong with you ends up having a major aneurysm somebody else having thyroid cancer I'm like I know you're here for something else but something's wrong I need you to do me a favor go and check out your favorite I don't like the way you look I know the hospital said you and heat stroke heat illness or whatever I think it was a heart attack all right there's a cuts there's got all reactions there's instincts there's just something not right that humans could pick up on that computers can't and aren't supposed to computers are not design to pick up on things like that computers are designed to do the best job they can whether it's a ninety six percent accuracy or ninety two percent error because your whatever the better than the other computer and they're designed to save money to the poor for the person using the computer you know we talk about high blood pressure medication I can't tell you how many times I saw African American men and women treated with the wrong blood pressure medication because everybody was so afraid that they were going to be politically correct say look I need to give you a different medication because our bodies built differently than a Caucasian all right African American women seem to lose their potassium more with diuretics I have seen it hundreds of times that's not racist in fact it's racist to not if the knowledge that and say you know what we're just going to treat you like anybody else okay I mean you're hurting people if you're not embracing the racing you're not understanding that we have differences I mean you know people keep trying to fight that women and men are not different and girls and boys are not different physiologically biologically we are were very different medically were different you don't I will support you if you choose to change your gender I will support you in your decision and you know help you if I can but if you have an ovary and you want to be identified as Steve in my medical chart I have got to put that you still have your ovaries because those can turn cancerous same thing with Mary who's a transgender woman if you have **** I need to know about that if you have a prostate I need to know.

"university chicago" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:58 min | 3 years ago

"university chicago" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Into Greenspan inform university Chicago admissions dean Ted o'neill tell I want to ask you one more you kind of glossed over a little bit but number one how much individual time does a stint as an application to get and sexually are do you look at stuff starting off financially need blind and things like that or you start building the mosaic right away will depend on the school I mean at Chicago we were look in lucky enough we have enough resources and erected in the right direction so that we were in fact completely need blind so we didn't the mosaic was the number thing that we we designed initially to include low income and high income and so forth if we just let those chips fall where they may so that that's how we began the process every everyone was equal we we we understood that their inequalities behind what we were seeing that we're expanding certain people but it wasn't a matter of who had who had enough money or who didn't how much time I would say in my time in the admissions office which is now going back eight years ago we were probably devoting about twelve minutes reading it and each file was read at least twice and then by other people and many were discussed the committee so that adds up to a fair number of minutes and we had fourteen thousand applications now all at the university of Chicago and through a lot of schools like it we have thirty six thousand applications but just read in the college newspaper and how many minutes can be devoted to thirty six thousand I can't even compute now that means that in many cases outside readers are being brought in three we stay out of growing much larger than they used to be in order to not just accommodate the flood of applications but to encourage more the desire is always there for more because colleges are judged by by the red meat race by how many applications that yet so it's not that anyone is sitting back and relaxing you know within a course numbers can be much higher I mean if you if the it's a lot sixty thousand I don't know I lose track of it it's just a different world in in the space of eight years but how many minutes he's devote to sixty thousand applications well if Kim I can pick up on what had was saying all the more reason than with all these applications to be able to separate yourself from the pack with a story to tell and remarkable extracurricular endeavor a compelling authentic voice in an essay all of those things are really critical years ago there was a great book written then I'm short tennis familiar with about the admissions process called the the gatekeepers in which Wesley and opened up its doors to shocks I think Sternberg was his name yeah who is the education correspondent for The New York Times and he tells this one story of an admissions officer sitting on his porch sipping diet coke this they awake at eleven o'clock at night getting through his quota applications that day and I think of that admissions officer in my mind when we position our students and I think of him the T. sitting on his porch and how can we wake him up how can we present to him a student with an authentic compelling different story to tell and that's just to me so critical especially when you have thousands upon thousands upon thousands of applications I mean here in Florida for example the university of Florida receive forty one thousand applications this year talk fourteen thousand students are and consider that twenty years ago if received fourteen thousand applications so that's a three fold increase in the number of kids who are applying so it is very difficult it is very difficult to fairly evaluate every student who submits an application let me ask you ended with a front end here because I remember I'm interviewed students for tufts and I'll get somebody for instance who will say I want to apply early and you know I see earlier is a great shot to take were where if you decide to go because it does help you get in they want folks to commit and I'm telling you right now you will not really be able to get into tufts and I think you you know you're better off not wasting your your animal on the school that you can't get into how do you go about that front and adjusting folks and it really comes down to that you know you make your own experience where ever you go to college well where you go to college does not predict where you go in life that that perhaps the most important thing to understand and sadly the parents in this admission scandal did not understand that and not appreciate that I mean in a lot of cases we do suggest strongly that that our students apply early decision because if you look at the statistics you know for example at Columbia they took five point one percent of all out this year but they took fifteen percent early decision so if your a reasonable shot at her school and it really is your dream school sure tried to apply early decision we strongly recommend at the start at the same time I was gonna say at the same time you know it's it's important to get a clear understanding of where you sit in the bigger picture and we have a tool called not be on which provides a pretty sound analysis of where you are in that picture in terms of your GPA in terms of your estate he in terms of your AC three you know are you in the conversation or is it a scratch and if it's a stretch on you probably shouldn't apply early to do attend let me ask you on that can you tell right away when a parent has written the essay and how important are those essays true to you folks are you can tell right away and because you never know the the thing about the essays which were important to us you know we thought of ourselves in a certain way I represent a certain kind of college electoral project was most interesting to what's most important to us and then we found that students remote impressive were ones who could write with not with not perfectly but with real ideas there was something about their sentences there is something about the way they wrote that indicated a mind at work now that could be a parent I think he is one of the ways we try to combat the possibility can ever eliminate the possibility but combat the possibility that parents were doing this or that through through or unduly influential in the writing of the offices we have our own efforts we're kind of famous for them are you still does the if they had their own because some sometimes kind of wacky but they were usually very thoughtful and over to the thoughtful response now with the advent of the common application thing is helpful of his the organize their a college applications with the common application really F. so does very uninteresting kind of generic questions and if you get a lot of workers and generic answers who write them in a way it doesn't matter because if they're not interesting it doesn't matter whether the kid wrote the murder or parent wrote the murder counts for a what you need is something that is so thoughtful which is what I always tell students to no one the people with the most don't they think they have to be a gimmicky or say something shocking or new you know we have to kind of represent the kind of thinking you doing college in Europe and when that when that happens it comes through and basically we thought it wasn't when we heard it from students and of course when it corresponded to the other things that were being said about their grades and whatever I mean the essay was important because the test scores I think are utterly unimportant interesting I think they're completely collectible they told us very little about the way a person thing tell me nothing about a way of food with it within my first year humanities course healer learn more if you could then you couldn't always because sometimes there was to remove a between you and the student because of intervening thing but you really wanted to hear it in their essays he wanted to hear teachers say certain things that were important to us and you know you forty one the the transcript that represent a good hard work overtime and during choice's let's talk with Jim Kelly better final segment coming up next your in charge of hiring and indeed has solutions like company pages where you can get people excited about working for you and we give you this toy monkey which will bang it symbols when the right resume appears there is no monkey.

Ted o'neill Greenspan eight years fifteen percent twelve minutes twenty years one percent
What does exposure to gun violence mean for our mental health?

The Takeaway

01:46 min | 3 years ago

What does exposure to gun violence mean for our mental health?

"About what exposure to gun violence means for the mental health of young people. We have Marie Richards with us. She's a psychology professor at Loyola University. Chicago who studies the effects of community violence on lessons and Sandra Galilea is the dean of the Boston University school of public health MAURICE. Let's talk about solutions are their best practices to help children who were exposed to gun violence in their communities, particularly talking about black and Brown. Low income children who are facing a variety of stressors not just gun violence. Yeah. So we know that families are very important to kids, obviously. So when the work I've done many others have done is we find that. When families are supportive of kids that they they demonstrate warmth that parents are able to listen and show concern and care about the feelings of kids the kids do better. When kids feel connected with their parents, when they they spend more time with their families, and they feel close to the mothers and fathers the outcomes are better than mental health is is better, even when they're exposed to high levels of community violence, so families are really important, obviously. But the other thing is that we find that neighborhoods when neighborhoods are more cohesive. In other words, neighbors look out for each other. They look out for the kids in the neighborhood. They're safe places for kids to play that helps kids to do better in life. And then there's schools where teachers are understand trauma when teachers and administrators are trauma informed. Kids are more supported within those contexts, and you know, obviously, kids spend lots of time in school.

Marie Richards Chicago Loyola University Boston University School Of Pu Sandra Galilea Brown