17 Burst results for "University Of Cambridge"

"university cambridge" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

05:33 min | 2 months ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"So let's have a miniature archaeology. We have various timelines of archaeology, starting with the Paleolithic Goto, the Neolithic. Uh, capitalistic or chapecoense won't be Presumptions early forms a beautiful vase made from stage by an age I need to weigh Have Hellenistic Roman didn't time Arab say the optimum moment right up until the present day. So don't be talking about today. Well, today we're talking about a road in great that you called me a 14. So our A roads are regarded. I could almost away so the most aerated generally wide straight on our neighbors are usually called Jule Carriage rays, which means that you have a carriage way or freeway on either side of the road. And these are very, very good roads. Now the 8 14 upgraded. If they work started to three years ago. It's actually finished eight months ahead of schedule, which is a miracle because most roads schedules are being sort of go over them. I'm cold misery, but even interesting road that connects from those fingers off England, where I now live in the county of Suffolk. It's a very important road on this road go through a part of the country of the county called Cambridge on cable is very elements with our beautiful university, Cambridge University that we can't down to hard facts. What did they find? Well, They found 11 really member. Three complaints. Willie Rhinos, skulls dating back nearly 100,000 years ago, they found three realistic Hentges. We've sort of settlements which between 4 5000 years old, with several prehistoric burial grounds, mostly of the bronze age. I'm very interested in because I work. Directly world in world problems. They were 15 Hide age room and settle with three aglow section settled one diverted pretty evil village. But it gets better because they found a 50,000 objects to the authorities about not not the road menders all the roads technician. I found coins approaches on work and the 500 human barriers informations on more than six tons of poultry. Five terms of animal boat. This is the really interesting bit for those of you who really like there? And you think the British good book about how out there is the author just found on the side of the road under the road Signs over Iron age group. Which is thought to go back. As far for 100 BC, they actually found grain's actually grew itself alone. This is just, you know, extraordinary who thought that by digging up a and though you would suddenly start to find Some of the earliest physical evidence on activity and treatment, instead taking place in jolly old old England. So those are some of the things which they found, and I understand. The Ark ofthe theological Exercise hasn't finished yet. How many Roman chariot hubcaps. Did you find that that they that they haven't and they didn't find any ulcers or when we dig up are roads we find hubcaps from 19 forties cause come on, go back farther than that. That that is a reflection over time, Right? And I'm saying that whole June respect America is one of the newest countries off this on this planet. I will culture very rich, but your culture is linked to technology. So you know, just think in a million years time if human civilisation is still here, and I see the trucks will be if somebody start digging up onto the ground, have a they're going to find some amazing Apple backs. Back reference source of fantastic These people eat people got rabbit. Speaking of linking culture and technology on next guest does just that. And he happens to be from your part of the world and he's designed just designed something that you may be digging up 1000 years from now when they dig up the road. Yeah, with us, not a CZ. Let me introduce you to one of your countrymen Paul Wraith, who is the chief designer for the new Ford Bronco. And He spent most of his career and in Britain. I understand, but we were lucky enough to have him. Come over here and design on new Bronco, which looks fabulous. Paul, tell us about how you did it. Good morning. 70 Sharing thinking about one girl for me went back has been a real privilege to.

Ford Bronco Have Hellenistic Roman Paul Wraith Paleolithic Goto Cambridge University Ark ofthe theological Exercise Willie Rhinos England Suffolk technician Britain Apple America chief designer
"university cambridge" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:39 min | 2 months ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Your brain power Like how quickly your brain works. Can you copy? A complex drawing? Can you remember Five words? Um ah. Can you remember things later on, So there was a 14 Excuse me a 12 point improvement in this brain. It's a tough brain touched. There was a a 12 point improvement in the spring testing people who were suffering What memory loss. So that's an important finding. Man. It's not the on ly finding like this. They're they're funding the same thing at a Trinity College in Dublin. Oxford University, Cambridge University. At the University of Cork. A number of universities in the United States. I mean, they're finding that are now in Japan. They're funding a probiotics to help bring power. So it's a very interesting thing, because probiotics helps so many things. The five strains I picked for our probiotic Hx include the by feet a bacterium Brody Include Lacto spore. Include by feet of bacterium animal. A sub species lack tous include Lactobacillus Plan Tarom on like the Bacillus Ram, No, CeCe. So here's the aggregate of what you're going to get. If you take the probiotic that I designed one, you're not going to get analogy. We don't have milk in there. We don't have We eaten there. We don't have slaying there. Two. All five strains have been used in numerous human clinical trials that have been published in medical journals. All five strange in my product have been used either separately or together. In human clinical trials. We know they're safe. We know they give benefits. We know how much to give. So if you take one of my probiotic hx, not only that it survives antibiotics. And it survives all those cleaning fluid You're using around the house now, and that's a very important point. When you lack probiotics, you're more likely to develop food allergies, food sensitivities. Tree pollen allergies, dog and cat allergies because you're immune system gets confused without the good bacteria on it starts to attack things that are Innocuous, innocuous means safe. Two analogy is your immune system attacking something that's normally safe. Like dog dander and cat dander and, you know, eating a shrimp or eating Ah, grapefruit or something. Or inhaling pollen from roses. So when you lack good bacteria develop allergies, when you take good bacteria, you help to get rid of your allergies and food sensitivities. And food allergies. Dog and cat ology is pollen allergies. Allergies to all different foods, including wait, believe it or not. Now. Beyond that, when you lack good bacteria, you get either constipation or diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome. You could develop crones disease and collide us. This is true. Um, for a number of reasons, which we're not going to go into right now, because that takes a long time to explain, And we have a lot of stuff to explain. Today. When you lack good bacteria, your immune system doesn't work. Well, that's harder to protect your lungs and your heart from viruses and bacteria. So our probiotic has strange that have been proven to survive antibiotics and survived cleaning fluid because when you inhale the cleaning fluid, it kills your good bacteria. And that's a really important point. Right now. This is another reason why I put the probiotic HX on special. You're washing your hands. All the time on your cleaning surfaces with things like Windex and Fantastic and Liesel. These things get into you and they kill your good bacteria. This is the truth. They've done studies like this. They've taken people who clean hotels and ah date dare jobs like cleaning ladies, etcetera, and they see that it destroys their good bacteria on when you destroy your good bacteria, your immune system can't fight off infections. All of this cleaning that we're doing now cleaning the surfaces in our house all the time and washing our hands all day long and doing all these things. It's killing your good bacteria. You have to put him back or your immune system will not be strong enough to fight viruses because without good bacteria, your immune system starts to flounder. That's what happens in older people They don't have the good bacteria on your immune system gets modeled on and on instead of him, helping it to fight a virus or a bacteria or yeast. Instead, it's it's mixing up the body and causing inflammation throughout the body on the corona virus is make no mistake. Ah, hi Inflammation disease. If you get covered 19 what it really is, is super inflammation. That's why it's destroying people's lungs and the heart and kidneys. The intestines, the brain. That's why strolling off blood clutch, So the Corona virus is inflammation. That's how it's killing people, but they're already pre inflamed. Like a lot of these people are very heavy. They're very obese. What they have severe diabetes or severe heart disease there already inflamed or day longer, inflamed with things like asthma, emphysema. Or they have certain kinds of diseases like macular degeneration daughter involved with certain parts of the immune system that inflames them. And then they get the Corona virus and now they're super inflamed. And that's what's doing the men. When you get probiotics. It's one of the step you take against fighting off inflammation because they've shown that certain strange of probiotic bacteria reduce inflammation in the brain. Reduce inflammation in your lungs. You really want that right now Reduce inflammation in your heart. You really want that right now and reduce inflammation? And your circulatory system, a lymphatic system on your bowels all of these places to Corona virus and flames and destroyed Do you want probiotic Right now, You only need one a day on within two weeks. Your inflammation is going down, but your immune system gets better at fighting viruses. You better believe my wife and I my two sons on DH. Their wives on my stepson in my stepdaughter on my granddaughter and Shan Francisco are all getting probiotics. They're all getting probiotics right now. I demanded offthe. Um I had some of them were resistant and they kept on whittling away. And finally they're doing it on their also getting vitamin D. I should listen, no matter what else you do you have to get your vitamin D. I have to get your program. Cause they're all young and.

Allergies Inflammation disease Corona Trinity College United States Oxford University University of Cork Brody Japan diarrhea diabetes Shan Francisco Cambridge University Dublin bowel syndrome
"university cambridge" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

06:05 min | 2 months ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"And. For the savings talk I'm going to be interesting subject which is. Central to but his chicks. But it's difficult to understand they say understanding that. Craving. And how that actually fits into a modern day lifestyles. Especially for those of you. Traditional Buddhist and you know in order to schools put a sense. We have something called the fall novel visits and the second doubled foods stays quite bluntly the craving is a source of suffering. And so his push especially to somehow let go craving have no desire. Is. For that how do we empty practice not Indian is. Much we do. This is much movie what? was that mean we should all just become and non. So just give ipod shops into Steve on the street mother copter our kids and I have the latest crowds. What does they really mean? Difficulty, for many Buddhism for many. To into reconciling lifestyles with the idea that suffering the suffering is close by craving. So I'm going to investigate what that really means especially is today. And we can actually stop just nothing that saw pressing world. is in great danger because says the untrammeled are unrestricted craving of species quarantine walk more. and. Obviously that kind of sustained. Guy were talking about this Oh. Nice I've talk about global warming. Interesting to see what comes next but always seems to come by just using too many resources. And it's tough being a modern western person to say, how can we actually deal with this because maybe once be finished our house we can actually start why about global warming wants Lico what we need to we can actually try to help out the people. I've fortunately that sometimes that's many sufficient to save our future. And we say not so many wars and so many arguments. Seventy competition of limited things that we wanted. It says the well, we really want to bequeath to our children and this will be really wants to ourselves. As far as Twenty five hundred years ago. But was consent saying that the biggest problem here? It's the crazy. Sure that yeah, we know you want to try and do some of the global warming wanted to have peace on earth and a half capos being outed happening together. We want to have people sharing the resources of our planet, but some co craving gets in the way. This is problem. However that craving does it mean not science this is going to be the central points as talk today. IS A. Is A K but we deciding the wrong things in life. Would decide. Things rather the spiritual things measuring people by possessions rather than by. Qualities, which is compassionate virtue and peace. We, actually having goals in on life you know which allows is to pay off our mortgages. But we never have enough time for those and I loved ones. So the hot of this toll today as. Well we have to have this is that's part of being a human being of having a mind some of the decisive a worthwhile. Type of this is, do we have in our life? Have being amount having a position simply because you do. have acquaintances across the spectrum. Poor people to wealthy people from presidents to prison this multi multimillionaires the people on the Dow. And waiting to all these stops of people, and now you can actually see that it's not really the economic circumstances which determines the happiness. This was one of the first inside psychotic when I was. A. Relatively wealthy. Western that and I say this even hours a student with very little money and holes in my jeans. I had holes in my jeans because I couldn't afford that watts not because it was a fashion statement. Ahead of my time because these people by straight from the shock remained holes. The Bible But the guy into priceline northeast caught and in villages along way right from many weather there was subsistence farmers who just had very spag catch I would live on the. Economy just growing rice and whatever they could catch especially fish in the rainy season and building that houses of what Abbott can be found in the forest. Fields. And you saw that that some of those people which just oh Pau. Compared to the poor student. I thought I was I was actually a wealthy compared to them. For one of the things which I did notice it's living in that village. Yeah. Sure. Many of those poor people are happier than the people I knew. So Great University Cambridge. But I also saw some miserable people in affects. I when I saw this miserable people enough is I want to find out why that some people will miserable? When they had a few things. I found out that Basically, they were like this heavy house had a water buffalo, which they used to plough the fields and..

Great University Cambridge Guy priceline Steve Abbott
"university cambridge" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

06:07 min | 5 months ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"The first up. It's been a good news. Bad News kind of weak in the coronavirus pandemic. We've seen the launch in England of the test and trae system is aimed at isolating the context of Covid nineteen positive individuals, and it should if it works movie, Go some way towards suppressing the spread of the virus, but we've also had some bad news about one of the drugs hydroxy chloroquine that was being hailed as a possible treatment more on that story shortly, but first let's begin on a more positive note with some intelligence from Australia. One of the biggest challenges posed by the pandemic is telling who is most at risk. Eighty percent of people have very few symptoms, and maybe half of those may even have no symptoms at all, but one in five people will develop more severe on in some cases life, threatening disease, now a project between the University of Cambridge on another university, literally on the opposite side of the Earth may have a solution, a chemical fingerprint present in the bloodstream that detects whether or not is destined to get a very mild form or a more severe form of the disease. On this matters because knowing in advance, who is likely to have trouble with covert means, doctors intervene earlier with drug and other therapies, potentially preventing severe deterioration. Spoke to Jeremy Nicholson from Murdoch University in Perth. Western Australia the challenge that we set ourselves. Use a range of advanced technology platforms, very rapidly profiling the chemistry of blood and possibly urine samples from covid patients to try and predict how severe. Disease will become so at the moment. We have a number of different ways of testing full the presence of the virus. And potentially how you immunologically relax contract the virus, but what we say, nearly the early stages on. You're going to need to be on critical. All and if we could detect a signature of that, then we'd be able to manage these patients much more efficiently. What might the signature looked like Jeremy and how do you go about finding it? We use a range of advanced technologies. Normally find in a chemistry laboratory. They measured hundreds or thousands of different molecules. Your blood or your urine, so the first real question is, can we find out whether or not using this range of different chemical technologies, the covered patients on different to everybody else I'm what I can tell you. Is that our initial tests show that that probably is the case, but what really we want to whether weather, signature predicts the severity going forwards about what we need longitudinal sampling, so we have a series of different samples taken from a bunch of patients, and we follow them through, and we build a model of how the chemistry changing with time at. At the end of the patient journey we will know who is to be and what we going to do is look at the earliest stages of the chemistry to see if there was something very specific associated with that turned toward severity, so it's not just one molecule that changes. You're talking about a whole constellation of molecules and how the levels of those. Those different chemicals relate to each other, and there might be a particular spectrum which is very specific to people who are going to get severe disease compared with people who are not if that's present before they even get infected even or very early in the course of the disease, you can say those are the people that we need to intervene earlier. They're the ones to watch. We could reassure the rest. That's absolutely right. I mean we made you probably as many as twenty twenty five thousand compounds using different technology that's lots of different types of small molecules, but the signatures come down to a much smaller number subset of those Maybe only ten to twenty of those things will be really reporting. Information relevant to the specific and sensitive disease, and also reporting on how the disease is likely to progress. How will you find them in the first place? Though because this to me is is hunting for a small number of needles in massive biochemical haystack. So how do you know what those needles are in the first place? Well the way that you make the predictive model is that you have to have samples that you know off from people who shall we say only had the mild disease and others which went on to get the severe disease, and then you do statistical analysis to find out which of all different combinations of metabolites in that are the ones that are most closely associated with the biological question, which is the prediction of severity. Where the song who's going to come from? You're going to analyze this just Australia. Eventually samples from several places in the world but Nicole is. Your own institution Cambridge University. Cambridge, I, think the admiral hospitals handle more samples than probably going through the Australia so there is a there's some very well designed studies there on posted patients at different stages of the patient journey, different degrees of severity, and we are in the price of having an arrangement to ships. I'm alive samples and do a comprehensive analysis. And just lastly some groups have stood out as being potentially more vulnerable than others. I'm thinking older people people with mile sex also people from certain ethnic backgrounds. We don't know though to what extent CEOS socio economic factors is playing the role. So is this going to help us to disentangle? That does well. Well all of that background information would be important Meta data that we would co analyze. And of course there are lots of different reasons why all of those things could contribute to your risk, for not just because it nineteen, but the loss of other diseases as well, the important thing is though you're measuring the contribution from genes and environment and Diet and oil lifestyle into your individual metabolic signature so when we run. There fancy machines we are picking up the signature of your life and.

Australia Cambridge University Jeremy Nicholson Bad News Covid England chloroquine Murdoch University Perth Cambridge Nicole
"university cambridge" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"What about breast cancer a lot of women are afraid of hormone replacement therapy because there is a connection with breast cancer and there is a connection with other cancers as well and mutual cancer so what about green tea will greet he's been shown to lower risk of breast cancer so that's another advantage but how does it affect bone well like I said building bone is a mission that's achieved by a lot of different participants and one of these participants is a growth factor called osteo Protagoras so let's talk about that when you're young your building bone solid bone at the same time that you're removing old weekend broken down below trust won't get you stop bone only last ten years that's bull gets broken down it's getting removed and replaced by new solid bone that's pretty much in balance when you're young if you eat a healthy diet you don't have to go to any like H. extraordinary steps to build bone when you're young just make sure you're getting your your minerals in your vitamins and your antioxidant several unofficial stroll in public now show what builds upon you remove about ten percent of your bone each year but you also replaces so building bonus of the cold steel protek grin and removing bone is something rankl reckless also involved with breast cancer in older women show to green tea works by inhibiting rankl that slows down a removal of old bones but yet it stimulates austere protek room to replace bone shoulder should be filling in the holes and bony filling in the Swiss cheese hold on the phone with New Hope people that's called your blaster genesis ask your blasts order bone building cells osteoclasts remove bone short slows down after cluster genesis and osteoblasts build and replace bone stimulates osteo plus to genesis so here we have three important things for actually the green two dozen cause breast cancer like hormone replacement can in some women in fact it probably lowers the risk of breast cancer by about nineteen percent that's where all the many many scores of studies show the second thing it does of course blood clutch and actually lowers the risk of a stroke and heart attack significantly even a bleeding stroke a lower risk of yeah it does start the process of building bone and they've shown that older women that shop a lot of green tea they have sh thirty your bones they have a much lower likelihood of having a hip fracture I'm much more lower lunch men to all the mental I work for both men and women you know some things may work in women are not men something's working men and women to green tea works in both sections I guess today you have to say all the structures and nothing wrong with that now let's get back to it green tea I have it on special because it helps prevent the flu the flow and green tea I have it on special because it helps check your brain but first let me read you this study as from cancer prevention research cancer prevention research is published in Philadelphia so this is the university of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute but a whole bunch of other places to university of southern California Keck school of medicine university of Minnesota medical school down in Minneapolis the Virginia pepper Cancer Institute Ernest Mario school forms you know that's raptor university all these people working together can green tea help protect women from breast cancer now I make that statement it's not bold it's true there's many many scores of study showing a green tea relations to prevent breast cancer and it does it by apparently inhibiting rankl rankles the thing that breaks down bone reckless the thing that is strongly connected to breast cancer in older women so here's what they say now this is on the university of Pittsburgh catcher institute and the university of southern California Keck school of medicine and a Virginia pepper Cancer Institute so they're all good academic research institution epidemiological studies and animal studies suggest a protective role of green tea against breast cancer then they want to say basically how does it work so they did a phase two clinical trial that's important it's a randomized double blind placebo controlled phase two clinical trial one thousand seventy five older women they were healthy and they gave them either a lot of green tea capsules or placebo every day for twelve months in my opinion they gave too much green to do giving four capsules a day I just don't think you need that much and then they used what they called the Medina computer assisted method for assessing monographic breast density and they found it in the younger women that it was reducing presidentially that's important every two suppressed density by four and a half percent after menopause your fibrous tissue in your breast disposed to decline and if they give you a mammogram initiators a lot of member graphic breast density that's strongly cried unto the risk of breast cancer and this among other studies are showing that when you shop green tea one of the things that those to protect brush it probably does other things too it reduces monographic Preston shitty shawl nobody has proven it yet they've proven that if your precious too dense after menopause you have a heightened risk of breast cancer has anybody proved that if you reduce the density reduced risk of breast cancer that's early stage research but here we clearly show green tea lowers mammogram breast density and women right after menopause and we also know from other studies that inhibits rankl which is strongly connected to breast cancer in older women Rachael supposed to drop with age if it doesn't you're in trouble now what about the brain won't green tea has an effect on the brink this is our drinking tea at least four times a week improves brain efficiency okay it's thirty six old ripples I let me just put it in a nutshell without reading this whole five page long of study the twenty university Cambridge in England a university of Essex in England as published in the scientific journal aging a couple months ago and his rotation they did a previous study that green tea reduces the risk of cognitive decline in older people cut it in half a new study is saw thirty six adults over the age of sixty and they looked into their psychological well being into a exercise and wanted to eat and all that and then they were doing neuro psychological tests you know bring function tests and brain will almost touch and they did MRI eyes of a brain powerful and Roger bring user imaging tools to see how the brain is working I'm a film if they drank green tea frequently over a twenty five year period their brain was better connected the brain was more structured when your brain is structured properly information travels better for you bring another word simply drinking green tea R. as a habit was keeping their brain healthier and more structured in preventing de queda brain cells that's important but I really have the green tea on special today not just for your bones not just a lower risk of breast cancer but a weight also to what degree is helpful also the reduced risk of prostate cancer that's what I'm worried about what one of my brothers has very advanced prostate cancer and he's using those very expensive drugs now and it's working they're keeping the prostate cancer in check but he has a life threatening form of prostate cancer I'd rather.

breast cancer nineteen percent twenty five year twelve months ten percent ten years
"university cambridge" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"About what democratic socialism means that it's like that governments take over the private sector, in fact, in my opinion, we should be scared right now because corporations have taken over our government, and the reason for that is because governments allowed it. If you guys didn't take the money it's like the drug epidemic. Right. If we didn't do. The heroin and all of the stuff that we do. Guess what cartels would have nowhere to sell it here in America, we consume it? If government collectively said, we're not taking any more money for lobbyists. We're not gonna do this anymore. We're going to be about the people the free market would work. Well, it's crony capitalism. It is but capitalism still better. You don't think socialism as cronyism my God look at Venezuela. And why it matters is because she's not just the one that she's the new shiny object to some people said. Yeah, she is in some ways. But there's a lot of young kids in America. That are looking at her and saying I like what she says because they've been through the same school the same indoctrination at a college level, and they're buying into all of it. Right. Listen to this. This is a new poll. Millennials and gen Z government should provide universal healthcare. Sixty six point seven percent is the total but millennials in seventy three point two percent. Government should provide free tuition. Total fifty six point two percent millennials and gen Z sixty seven percent. See where this is going. They. Are all into this stuff? Right. What you break it down for him. And you say, okay that sounds great. So you want free college free. Call junior college in Europe is not college. Like here there's university. And there's college those are separate things university and college college Farnborough sixth floor college where I was over there in England. It's it's like a junior college like thirteenth grade kind of thing right university, Cambridge Oxford, those university, totally different right much different scenario. But we'll go with you want healthcare healthcare has great you tell them. This is what it is. I want free healthcare. Okay. It's free. But you got to pay for it. Well, wait a minute. What? No way, bro. Oh, yeah. You're gonna pay for your taxes and not just any tax, right? We're going to pay through it for a lot of different tax because everybody got participate in it. Secondly. And this is vitally important. We're going to limit your choice. On where you can go. So if you're sick, this is your doctor, you can't get in to see another doctor. Here's your little precinct of doctors. You can go to there. Maybe three or four or five. This is where you go, and we may have a shortage of doctors. And if you can't get any can't get it. When I was sick in England. And I had my NHS car was national health insurance. I couldn't get in. And I'm looking at the people going why can't I get in? They'll like well. This is what we can get you in. Yeah. But I'm really sick now. Well, then you should I guess you're gonna have to go the hospital. This is ridiculous. So when you start to explain it. But when they talk about stuff, and this is where in Bernie Sanders was an hour. Yes. He was an Iowa. Because you know, that's where you go. When you want to make sure that everybody understands what's going on. He's getting it. Right. So he goes to Iowa. And he says this those radical ideas that we talked about four years ago. Well, today, virtually all of those ideas are now supported by about Giardi of the American people because they don't know how it works. Right. And once you start to explain it to them they step it back a little bit. I mean, they're all sounds nice. Right. Like, everything sounds great. That sounds amazing site. Oh, wait what? And why it matters is because when you look at a Costco Cortes, and you look at this younger generation this younger generation for those of you not keeping score. They are. Really? Running a lot of things. And a lot of people are nervous, and you've got three or four of them that are commanding a lot of bliss city. And there's a lot of Democrats and went in. There was a centrist. It's just the democrat. And it's not enough. They came there to get some stuff done and try to work with the Republicans and tried to do the best for their constituents, and they're not going to be heard because there's a movement afoot. And these people are essentially saying you're going to either get on the bus or you're gonna get run. Over is tells us something else to how much power Nancy Pelosi does not have over the Democrats in congress. Now, the young Turks are running the show. Yeah. But why it matters is because the young generation feels again having gone through. All the indoctrination through school, and we've talked about we've had many progressive professors on here who wouldn't vote for Trump. If he was the only person to vote for and if they didn't vote for they lose their life. They would not vote for Trump. Right. And guess what they say, it's an indoctrination. It's a one size one sided story. And this is what it is. So they're coming into the world. They're going to be almost forty percent. Oh, the voter elect in two thousand twenty. Doesn't mean short. But the reality is it's very probable that. They're going to show up. And when you've got people believe in these things, you got Bernie saying these things, and they're trying to tell you. It's the Nordic models the Nordic, it's not the Nordic model because the Nordics will tell you the Swedes Danes, right? They'll tell you. We're not those things were not socialist. We tried socialism and failed us gloriously. Everybody moved away in the seventy s it's worth a damn. We didn't have any money to pay for stuff. Now what we have is everybody shares. We've got a homogenised society where everything for all intents and purposes is kind of the same with high taxes, but everybody does their share. We don't have that in this country. Part of the have and have nots is because the haves a lot of times are willing to do above and beyond and go extra. And there's a lot of people out there of the have nots. There aren't willing to do that. And here's the other thing. It's VAT value added tax as huge. Means everybody participates you buy something for a hundred thousand dollars. You're gonna get twenty five thousand dollars in taxes on top of that. There's a lot of things that go into it. But they'll tell you they're not that way. But when you hear Bernie talk about this. Remember he praised who go job is at one time. He's talked about the likes of of of many dictators for all the stuff he talks about right? He's praised Noriega at times. He is praised the the regime in Cuba on more than a few occasions. Right. And on top of that right on top of all that he's been in Soviet Union. Not Russia the Soviet Union. Those are the things that scare people because those are the things when you look at Venezuela. What's socialism is? That's the moment. So yeah, it does matter. The other people are going to sit here and tell you about she's a ditch. She's a ding Dong. No, she's not. She's smart. She gets it. She sees the opportunity, and she knows she's got a little bit of power, and she's enjoying every second of it. But remember the people that she's talking to have the same kind of vote you do one vote, and there's a lot of them coming three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow is your Twitter. You can tweet at us. It is a nother crash for a Boeing plane, and it is not good. It was October.

Bernie Sanders Venezuela England America Soviet Union Iowa Trump heroin cronyism Nordics Europe ding Dong Twitter Nancy Pelosi Russia Cambridge Oxford NHS Giardi Boeing
"university cambridge" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"When he's in very good company. You can see the other people. Before pay good focal pages. Musk governor Brown governor Brown. My blurred. If I may, okay. From climate change to biotech to artificial intelligence science sits at the center of nearly all decisions that civilization confronts to assure its own survival, Martin Reese as created a primer on these issues, and what we can do about them. So that the next generation will think of us not as reckless custodians of their inheritance. But it's brilliant shepherds of their birthright. Wow. That is great. That makes people actually want to read them. So Martin let me just give people just a little background. I don't know if I told anyone this publicly, but when I was a graduate student at you were eminent now and forever you've been eminent in my field is an astrophysicist at the university of Cambridge in England with the original Cambridge was from. Okay. Bridging. Starter cambridge. And as a graduate student at one of our sort of society conferences, I think I had a poster paper where you you. You're not sort of Farner for long for them to let you give a talk. So you just you put your paper up on a poster, and you wait for people to come by so passive delivery of your of your science, and you came up to my paper, and you looked at it. And you ask me questions about it. And you didn't have to do that. And I felt that my future as a participating scientist was blessed. If you will. And so I just want to thank you. Well, I don't know what you how often you do that. But I just want to thank you because what may be little for. You was big for me at the time. The great. So now, it's it's the other way round. It's great for me. Yeah. But but then of course, you're at Princeton University. This wonderful calls which I didn't attend. But I read the book about you did. Okay. Yes. Post doc at Princeton. Then I've talked there. But so just want to thank you for all the work you've done just and you're like he's like the last gentleman. Oh. Oh. That's really good for science to because they think ethics and morals I needed in science, right? So I'm just saying there aren't they don't make them like him anymore. Do you had a good book for you, the smaller? You'll books are the better they sell your turns out. You don't like to read. I think. Yeah. Yes. Now in the it's tweets. Read, you know, two hundred character, the image of you were you like in a row of graduate students, and then the reasons just start walking by and you're like pick me. The bachelor. I'm sure he's supposed to more graduate students than me on that day. So let me just go down your your four line bio here astronomer Royal this didn't Edmond Halley have this or something. But that's right. Because it was the person who ran the bench observatory, but that became a museum from the nineteen sixties on budge. When of course, we could have telescopes under clear skies. Elsewhere, but they kept the title. I so I have this just as a title, and there's only one astronomer, Royal? Yes. But there are no juices just Honore, and I'd like to say that Jesus so executives I could do them. Plus, you Mr.. Awesome. Somebody else would like the role. Yes. Wow. So strana road. That's so. My day job is a professor at Cambridge professor in Cambridge. So you're previously master of Trinity College director for the institute of strana me at Cambridge University. And you are currently professors that we have similar ranks professor of astronomy. Yes. At university, Cambridge. Yes. Yes. And a member of the UK house with Lewis, I'm bit of a politician to I got the member UK house awards and former president of the Royal Society, which is like you'll National Academy National Academy. Good, okay. Our National Academy is where scientists elect the most eminent among us. So it's a peer voted representation of who in what we are internationally into the government, especially..

graduate student Cambridge University Cambridge Martin Reese professor scientist Royal Brown governor Brown Princeton University Musk National Academy National Acad National Academy bench observatory Princeton UK England Honore
"university cambridge" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on This Week in Science

"Well, Stanford energy modeling forum, EM progra project. This is the energy modeling forum. EMF project. They have examined economic and environmental impacts of a carbon tax kind of putting the tax amounts somewhere in the middle of the various models that have been been proposed so far and what the studies that they that they included in this model. Basically, we're pretty consistent in determining that. A carbon tax would be affective at reducing carbon pollution and would have a very negligible effect on the economy which would continue to grow. It wouldn't make the economy shrink in any sense. A carbon tax would allow the economy to continue to grow, maybe have a slight dampening effect on it, but the benefits of reducing carbon pollution and also air pollution is a result of a remote declining coal industry would have a much more positively beneficial effect on life around the planet and the economy moving forward. There you go. Yeah, new study carbon short term versus long term goals here. So I think that's pretty much it Blair the this. It is looking at what he what's, what do we need now? But the short. Term impacts that potentially the House Republicans are concerned about in or maybe lobbying against don't seem to be that large according to these studies. And so this model the Stanford EMF studies are basically putting evidence towards science towards promoting a carbon tax as a one of the possible legs of a solution for our climate change woes. But did the study say anything about the impact on campaign contributions from coal companies as a result of a curve decks because they're in grad student, I believe. But I do think overall focusing on human health that whole element of climate change is something that we don't see talked about very much and there is an economic impact when human health is. Involves. And if you're going to remove a stressor on human health. Economy always benefits. Exactly the economy the, yeah, remove the stress around health. The economy will benefit because more people can work and it'll be healthy and then yeah, so that that it's all part of it. It's a very, it's actually the the number of parameters that are variables that are included in these kinds of things. They're very large models. They're not very simplistic. It's not one thing in one thing out. Yeah, very large systems. But anyway, I just thought it was a very, as you know, you're coming back from your climate change meeting, and I thought this was a very interesting scientific stance on a on a policy issue. So for anyone out there at once again, this is the Stanford e. m. f.. Energy modeling forum project, and you can look for it. We will link to this article in our show notes Justin, you gotta story. I certainly do. I certainly do. It's around here somewhere. I just got a ha- four thousand years before the dawn of agriculture researchers from the university of Copenhagen. They, this isn't this. This is them now not. Now two years ago. Okay. Before before the donavan agriculture, it's not fourteen thousand years ago. It's right now. University of hoping hound University College London, university Cambridge have analyzed charge..

Blair Stanford e. m. f university of Copenhagen University College London Justin university Cambridge fourteen thousand years four thousand years two years
"university cambridge" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"So roland is the author of a spy named orphan the enigma of donald maclean's let's get the who what when we're why who was donald maclean donald maclean was the single most important versus spy for the soviet union in the twentieth century he shapes the second half the twentieth century to an extent he shape the world we live in today and also to me he was a really fascinating man a man of paradoxes a brilliant diplomat who believed in his country and believed in the system of communism and i also have family connections to my grandfather was his boston foreign office which gave me access to a lot of papers and and i also was lucky enough to be the first in to real lot of declassified documents about really how they failed catch him first of all what he did and how they failed catch him for years and years so in what ways giving a couple one major way that he did shape the world influence the world we live in he was based in the washington embassy between nineteen forty four nineteen forty eight and he gave away to stalin all the western allies britain and america church roosevelt was sending telegrams to each other about the conferences that would end the the second world war shape your after the war search for example we know that he leaked a a telegram between from churchill to reservoir saying we would like the borders of poland to be here but if molotov who was the russian firm secretary is adamant we will move from two hundred miles to the west so molotov new to be adamant and that's where the borders apparently where they got a lot more territory he also was a had a rat accessible areas pasta the atomic energy commission in washington off the wall which was really confined to very very senior member nobody quite knows how he charmed his way into that is he one of the reasons why stalin was not surprised at the news of us having a bomb or was that leaked directly from the manhattan project that came directly from the manhattan project but after the war mccain was able to leak when america was claiming to be able to make a massive number of bums mclean was able to leak the information that showed in fact they were able to make nothing like that number bombs which gave stalin the competence to build his bomb much more quickly two years ahead of what when it was expected dot came directly from the plane so pretty clearly mclean or orphan was a very good spy how did he get so high up without getting detected i mean people don't people know that the culture of trust in the foreign office he wasn't that was no vetting when momentum for an office and in the thirties he went to eight joined in nineteen thirty five that wasn't even the head of security in the foreign office in until the second world war which enabled him to take briefcases full of documents home every night meets his handler and having first graft and the briefcase for time to next day absolutely security and it was this culture of trust he was very left wing and communist university cambridge he was one of the socalled cambridge spies known to the kgb is the magnificent five and when he was austin his interview for the foreign office interview panel on which i believe his godmother was sitting they said we note you very left wing university mr mccain are you still too which is also was i'm working on it so that was quite simply this culture of trust that if a man had been to the right school and the right university no one would question him when it was discovered that that was the been.

roland two years
"university cambridge" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

BBC Inside Science

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

"The second largest while after the blue is mainly completes we've got the residual pelvis towards the back so we've any one of them say the other was threes and printed so that's that's the lost remaining vestiges of what would have been his back legs exactly and what's really striking about it is this is a baleen whale and say it's a it's a filter feeder you've got the bailey and you've got the actual fins in the mouth of the that you can see it's really exciting to see it mounted and get an idea of what this animal looks like in life it gives the impression do you actually know where swail came from this is washed up specimens washed up on a beach in seventy and at the time they had a train station constructed especially to bring the tourists to see it and then from that made its way to cambridge it's easy to get carried away when faced with sunshine spectacular specimen but as you progress into the museum you get to meet some even more bizarre giants from the post museum manager and selfconfessed australian mammal nerd his jack ashby this is proton which is an extinct relative of the wom by you just pointed to kangaroo of people look like the largest living marsupial about ninety kilograms loudest ever mossy appearance dipoto on how they weighed about two and a half tons so quite a lot bigger than a kangaroo shape till missing tiny like a one that's what they're most plac but this is the kind of giant one relative i approach it on when extinct about the two thousand years guy pootie thousand absolutely huge and it's just in frontal or to the side of what i think must be a rhino but is it pretty much exactly the same so and we know this is the most view yes up to date their questions study i had a bunch of giant mafiose up until thirty to fifty to sixty thousand years ago and in terms of how you've organized these these various skeleton so many all living organisms extents organisms and some like this like this giant extinct how how have you put them together the museums laid out taxonomic lace animals displayed within their threat tips museums pa university cambridge still use heavily and teaching down here where we are in the low calorie is mostly mammals but with the mouse with their families the big skeletons in the middle exploring stories of discovery annexation and conservation so this is this is part of an active so that conservation understanding so important for telling stories and conservation as well as being involved in research and conservation but museum is in school the david atom rebuilding the rest of the building is taken up by department so what are the university of cambridge and cambridge conservation initiative including the international union comes face your nature who come up with the rankings like endangered vulnerable threatened and we've we've put the status of the living with icn's thanks sakes just to communicate some of this stuff is incredibly i can't help noticing that we're now standing directly in front of an enormous leg from must be a mojo popoint that's that's about as soon as i am and it's just it's legs this is a giant flightless bird from new zealand the biggest ones could reach up to three point six meters tool these animals went extinct again not long after humans arrived in new zealand so this is about six hundred years ago and we think causes if as well we think it was it was my he's hunting moa for food to eat but this story about the mo for this museum as well feathers were found yeah well this questions about two million objects it's huge and one of the technicians china was was packing up specimens as he did every day came across the back of a covered this set of about thirty spindly feathers on it said feathers of moa to realized about unusual took it to collections i'm having jones by what did you think about this and it's incredibly rare immune we've shown into it does appear to be what it says is what we want to do next is to test dna and see if i really on that because that would be amazing and that's a real find yeah well that was precisely what it was gonna loss because museums are active research centers and now with the advent of.

sixty thousand years two thousand years six hundred years ninety kilograms six meters
"university cambridge" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Three w d t k one of the stories that continues to bubble up in the twenty four hour news cycle and i started to approach this story in the last hour on my show on wwl cuvee run to win the darryl would show and i didn't do a very effective job because i waited too late to start talking about this particular piece and i tried to squeeze in too much stuff at one time that the could could have been confusing to my audience but i'm going to try it here in a more simplified fashion right off the top of the program of course you are welcome to chime in but do you believe that there was an fbi informant spying on the donald trump campaign as we are now learning one of the latest revelations now coming out as of the last week week and a half i have an article from liberty headlines dot com from zero hedge that talks about this particular development and the revelation of exactly who the informant may be following two weeks of mounting speculation over the fbi socalled mole inside the trump campaign the new york times and washington post published separate accounts this past friday and he stories came out late with some other revelations that there may have in fact been as they detail in their pages infiltration of the trump campaign a scheme revealed in a wednesday report by the new york times in which quote at least one government informant met several times with misters page and popadopoulos who were campaign affiliates with donald trump they did not have a great deal of responsibility or visibility in the campaign but that didn't stop apparently certain clandestine operatives a from trying to interdict and coopt either or both of these individuals the wednesday report disclosed the existence of operation cross fire hurricane operation crossfire hurricane the fbi's codename for their early trump russia investigation eight hundred nine two three nine three eight five eight hundred nine to three wd t k thanks to friday's carefully crafted deep state disclosures by the washington post and the times along with actual reporting by the daily caller chuck ross we now know it wasn't a mole at all but seventythreeyearold university cambridge professor stefan helper a.

new york times donald trump fbi washington post chuck ross russia seventythreeyearold university professor twenty four hour two weeks Three w
"university cambridge" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"Carry on with it to be on this is a time when you do have to listen to other people talking money i think one one thing that's notable is that dyson spending supposedly seven billion pounds of week on research development of new product and the major question i meeting springs to mind is how on earth do you spend seven hundred seven million pounds a week on researching new product what you actually spending this money on eight million dollars but what we're spending on is a lot of engineers a lot of our hobo pay engineers and it's it's quite easy to rack up that sort of employed people and you have lots of facilities for them which expensive machinery perjure typing very expensive machinery we have a malware scanners and things like that and they're not cheap so you can very easily get through a million and this is separate of course to all the work you're doing in the education sector as you say you only diversity also that if funding's you have different universities cambridge i believe forty four to universal from the big projects at cambridge and imperial college and the royal college evolved and designed so yeah yes there's a lot of extra funding of of universities of out twisted giving to eunice which which we done now in university but that that subset always look at that set for me doing that out of profits two out of fear on your car to of a lack of knowledge coming forward in design and engineering or just a lack of people gang into locker people getting into in sixty percent of people reading engineering fishy universities from outside the eu and ninety percents of the researchers place graduate researchers impeached universities from outside the eu so we're just not interested in it as a nation said anything we can do to get people interested in engineering and science and technology the better.

cambridge eu eunice seven hundred seven million po eight million dollars seven billion pounds sixty percent
"university cambridge" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Over the years many have had the privilege of working closely with professor stephen hawking as he's developed his theories about our universe dr don page is one of those people he's a physicist at the university of l berta and he did his post doc under professor hawking many decades ago we caught up with him in tel aviv israel where he's attending a conference dr page welcome to quirks and quirks yes good to be here can you tell me how you first met professor hawking and did your post doc work with him yes i was a graduate student at at the california institute of technology in pasadena california and my pizza advisor kip thorne had invited stephen hawking to come visit there in nineteen seventy four to seventy five and since i was working on were closely related to stevens i was very delighted to be able to medium and then have a chance to work with him and write a paper with him when he was there and then after i finished my pc nineteen seventysix even offer me a postdoctoral position at the university cambridge and so i spent nineteen seventy six to nineteen seventy nine in cambridge and also you know wrote papers with stephen and then someone my own there will at what point was stephen hawking in his career in time in the seventies he had done very major work learning with his phd thesis on single areas in space time eat extended theorems that roger penrose had for singularity inside black holes to ply for the universe defectively show that if us the classical theory of gravity and other words ignoring quantum mechanics and it's certainly principle that given certain conditions which obviously seem to apply to our universe that our universe how the beginning a big bang beginning to the universe and he had also showed again using classical physics that the surface area of black hole the surface being what's called the adventure isan could not shrink but could only grow so he had those two major theorems that he'd proved.

roger penrose postdoctoral advisor pasadena california institute of techno tel aviv university of l stephen hawking physicist stephen cambridge kip thorne california graduate student professor hawking israel professor
"university cambridge" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Over the years many have had the privilege of working closely with professor stephen hawking as he's developed his theories about our universe dr don page is one of those people he's a physicist at the university of l berta and he did his post doc under professor hawking many decades ago we caught up with him in tel aviv israel where he's attending a conference dr page welcome to quirks and quirks yes good to be here can you tell me how you first met professor hawking and did your post doc work with him yes i was a graduate student at at the california institute of technology in pasadena california and my pizza advisor kip thorne had invited stephen hawking to come visit there in nineteen seventy four to seventy five and since i was working on were closely related to stevens i was very delighted to be able to medium and then have a chance to work with him and write a paper with him when he was there and then after i finished my pc nineteen seventysix even offer me a postdoctoral position at the university cambridge and so i spent nineteen seventy six to nineteen seventy nine in cambridge and also you know wrote papers with stephen and then someone my own there will at what point was stephen hawking in his career in time in the seventies he had done very major work learning with his phd thesis on single areas in space time eat extended theorems that roger penrose had for singularity inside black holes to ply for the universe defectively show that if us the classical theory of gravity and other words ignoring quantum mechanics and it's certainly principle that given certain conditions which obviously seem to apply to our universe that our universe how the beginning a big bang beginning to the universe and he had also showed again using classical physics that the surface area of black hole the surface being what's called the adventure isan could not shrink but could only grow so he had those two major theorems that he'd proved.

roger penrose postdoctoral advisor pasadena california institute of techno tel aviv university of l stephen hawking physicist stephen cambridge kip thorne california graduate student professor hawking israel professor
"university cambridge" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Plenty of medical physics why we have at the university of cambridge you work in that department for few years five years you graduated from university cambridge did just about he was a close cool but i go there in the end so have you guys ever met steve hawking i saw him once but it was a talk he was giving that counts spotting an orchestra sea world you know he's going to be there so in my interview with him before getting deep into physics i just wanted to get to know him a little better as a person we had met before but we never really hung out like we did in this interview so let's check out the first clip professor hawking thanks for agreeing to be on star talk and we just start off with first question perhaps the most pressing question to us all what's your favorite food for me it's pizza actually new york pizza or easter's you'll slippery for me but that's cool okay how about your favorite drink teams i like pinochle ladas myself but if it's not alcohol i would do milkshake okay last question last question what's your favorite equation and now you've got one the i discovered relating the end rookie of lack whole to the area it's a riot in s say over four how many people get to say their favorite equation is one thing came up that's bad ass.

professor university of cambridge steve hawking new york five years
"university cambridge" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on The Science Hour

"She one to take off uh that will go in the next six months i would think and rocket lab will be launching as well again in the next six months but be prepared for of a small rockets to come in and launch these small satellites will be lots of them okay thank key and finally we guy from one does in space to wonders back here on earth now a lot of us find it relaxing to spend time in the countryside although if you're working hard is a former probably not say much past research has looked to the impact of spending time in nature on wellbeing but could it even improve your body image how about if you're not even outside but just looking at pictures of nature professor they're in swamy anglia ruskin university cambridge has tried this and he told claudia hammond how he did it well we call the economy as they move exactly how to give the impression of being real and in others if you look at an image of nature what that might do is in might give you a sense acquire it might give youth space in which to reflect new think about life the important things in life and one of those important things might be how you relate to your body's rather than thinking about your body in terms of its a staff sixyear focusing on its functionality walk can do how you feel about it why my you you take pride in your body those kinds of things could it be that it makes people think about s as you said at the the biggest things in life and to think about s you know the whole world's and this fragile planet and that then they stop pap's worrying so much about you know whether they like to be a little bit thinner than they are or whether they like that face to look slightly different from the way it does that they maybe they just think o one in the scheme of things does that really matter i that's one thing i i think as well in my also give people impression by paul ecology so there is this wide region system it's being damage and the possible as well so rather than worrying about what they looked like they might even watch i should be trying to protect the ecology at nine paul that coercion as well and when you.

professor anglia ruskin university cambr claudia hammond six months sixyear
"university cambridge" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on talkRADIO

"The university of medina in italy and literally they have grafted look bharat tree grow genetically modified skin onto small areas of the body such as part of the leg and this is the first time that such an mounts of body is being transplanted because he basically lost i think it is something not eighty percent of his body in this this this list the but this skin covering his body murphy lesser butchers children doug survived let's hope and pray the showman those from abu ramab feats of science this cuts be one of the pitch as of the day this is in the daily express doreen assume me bake in japan and this is of this this little british granny she's 85 surrounded by three if you'll finest as c my restless from japan boys cuba's they ablaze pais clash with them and this is a sensational this is doreen simmons originally from man nothing him share but she went to live in japan years and years ago by forty years ago she's a cambridge chef from a university cambridge graduates very bright some as she she was just wanted to go in a experience life living in tokyo ian that mater made it home and she called obsessed with seamer wrestling and she made it her a career outside of it and she's like the equivalent of the kind of the most famous common saying for a seamer in japan she's the of sumo yes she's the me so sea route and bukasa nhk which slightly equivalent of the baby say and japan a recognized her work styling effort for doing it all these years and given her a broadcasting career a prestigious order of the rising sun metal remarkable store that look great store percent is on the front of the sum if this is one of the ridi fantastic looks high winds they hear about this as the syndicates and the headline is anina o winnings and this is fake of.

murphy japan mater university of medina italy genetically modified doug cuba doreen simmons tokyo seamer bukasa nhk eighty percent forty years