18 Burst results for "University Of Cambridge"

"university cambridge" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

05:35 min | Last month

"university cambridge" Discussed on Today in Focus

"We've talked about today. I mean this and other muslim optimism. I think is. I'm hoping for this world. Does that saying that on. It does not lie with mankind allies with a law. And i think honesty all the optimism that i derive is from having that hope that actually this is not the bill and will this world is not the only place and i think if i didn't have that god with overwhelmed with despair. Optimism is. I think we have more and more avenues to justice. And to resist unto really. I think live islam. We have really good opportunities to see. Can we be the muslims that we hope to be. Can we live muslim. Muslims as a practice and not just as an identity and so when i do meet young muslims and they told me they have a lot of fired i think his freedom that comes with having nothing to lose. It's the with the menace of the world. Nobody likes doesn't so in that sense. There's nothing to prove that we can actually just strive for what we believe in. Which is that we. It's incumbent upon us to seek justice on this earth and that there would for that is not in this world and that we don't need to worry about okay. Things going to get better before. I die in charlotte. They will hope that they will if not this world is not to be able to end. So that's might visit my thing mush stirred novell and you must be fueled kids come on. My view of things is a bit more blase. I think things will always exist like this to some degree and will be some trade-offs so like they'll be prevents more places will be held out and they'll be mom assumes in our schools teaching openly blah blah blah. But oh every now and then someone's gonna get their head kicked in on a friday or something that's just life. Nothing is new under the sun. Everything repeats itself. Things will continue as they are. That's the best we can hope for. This is is gonna be lows. I don't see things improving because too many of the things that make life hell for us happened to make billions of dollars for the people but at the same time. They'll never get rid of assault 'cause then who they have to blame for things. Subways hello is such a pleasure. Thank you so much. Thank you so much thank you. That was no bail out the receipt and sugiyama yukon. My thanks to them. Do check out. Sometimes poetry collection postcolonial banter and catching a bill live on his current tour statement given to today's focus by cambridge university. Red harassment of any kind is not tolerated by cambridge university. Cambridge is committed to creating a supportive and inclusive environment for all its students regardless of their background in two thousand eight hundred thousand more than one in four students from an ethnic minority background and more than seventy percent of students from state schools and in another statement a spokesperson for the home. Office said islamaphobia has no place in our society and we continue to work closely with community groups charities and schools funding projects to tackle racially and religiously motivated hatred. It has categorically not true that the home office run social media profiles encouraging violent extremism to entrap potential extremists ahead of tomorrow's anniversary we've been exploring the impact of nine eleven on british muslims but for an exploration of what life has been like for muslims living in the us. Make sure to book tickets on. G u dot com forward slash guardian. Live for fantastic livestream panel discussion hosted by the garden. Us next thursday. September the sixteenth. That's for today. This episode was produced. by courtney. Surf sound design was by rudy's adler the executive producers are film may not and archie bland. We'll be back on monday fast. Paced twenty four hour news cycle from top stories to breaking headlines. Wherever you are. There's a big story but there is no story bigger than this state. Farm has surprisingly great on car insurance. So you can get the coverage you need at affordable price and that's the best kind of breaking news possible like a good neighbour. st martins bear. This message comes from pager. Duty to be ready for anything in a world of digital everything teams need pager duty. Their digital operations management platform is the best way to control urgent mission critical work and keep digital services always on pager duty can be set up in minutes and combines the power of machine automation with human action giving teams more time to create better digital experiences for your customers learn more at pager duty dot com. Hello this is hannah from red-handed. Would you like to watch something scary. Line really scary so scary. Hide behind the safer. Then you need shudder. Shudder is the ultimate streaming service. 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sugiyama yukon cambridge university islamaphobia novell charlotte archie bland Cambridge adler rudy courtney st martins Us hannah hollywood
"university cambridge" Discussed on The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media

The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media

02:04 min | 3 months ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media

"Short warning. This story contains some tough themes including references to sexual assaults and to suicide. Some listeners may find upsetting and prefer to give this one a miss meetings happening for a reason which is not just i mean in some snow ruled sexual abuse about the people empower covering covering the up and i think the kind of cold clinical reality of what it takes to cover up something like that. I didn't think i'd really hit me. The people that i knew i would see someone walking around the college and that they could be so villainous they can be like the big bad evil people. They've been hearing about on the knees. This is a story about one student. And she's talking about her one case the story of serious sexual assault and it takes place at one university cambridge university pretty unusual university as it happens. It's a collegiate university where the student body is divided into one of thirty one little colleges. Her story specifically is about queens college. One of those tiny institutions. It's just a thousand or so students but her story of a botched process that let.

university cambridge universit queens college
"university cambridge" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:46 min | 9 months ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Everyone is suddenly talking about. The tech stock is set to create 50,000 new jobs right here in America. Donald Trump himself called what they're doing the eighth wonder of the world, and the company is collecting billions from the tech giants, including over 30 billion just from Apple, Nokia and Microsoft. Yet Here's the most intriguing part. This $3 stock trades under a secret name. Just go to one stock retirement now dot com To get the whole story. Morning Glory with Hugh Hewitt on 8 60 am the answer. Welcome back America to hear it. The Hillsdale dialogue sponsored by Hill. Tell college that you hear each week at this time is underway. All things Hillsdale collected it. Hil failed dot e d u I mentioned a great classical school in Orange County, which is Thea Orange County Classical Academy. It is one of the Hillsdale classical academies inspired by Hillsdale. Which teach the founding and Dr Larry on President. Hillsdale College is joined by Dr Kenneth Calvert. Dr Katz When we went to break we're about to talk about the founding up North Way discussed the laws of Virginia three weeks ago. People who go and listen to that. That's England transplanted. What is it that the pilgrims had in mind? And when did the Pilgrim's become the Puritans? And how did they diverge? And when does the Salem compact come into this conversation? Well, I think it's important to understand that James, the first of England was really attempting to create a culture built around the Church of England. Andre English, Christianity on and then what happened in the midst of that was that you have two ends of a spectrum kind of cut off from from inclusion in that one are the Puritans on one side, the other are those who choose to hang on to their Catholicism's And on the product inside the Puritans and the pilgrims were ones who really struggled with this idea of being you know, essentially forced into into the Church of England. The Pilgrim's being separatist left first went to the Netherlands and, um, realize that their Children were becoming Dutch more than they leaving behind English tradition. So what's very interesting about the pilgrims? And then the Puritans that followed them is that they were very much you know, Uh, Honoring the King and stand and Parliament of England. But they did struggle with the religious, um, on church structure that had been established. And so the pilgrims ended up coming to the northern colonies and the pilgrims being much more separatist, much more distinct in their attempt. T O be separate from the Church of England, the Puritans who came after them and again. There's a lot of discussion is how one really makes a distinguished distinguishes between these two groups. The Puritans. Many of them were from London. Many of them were involved in commerce and business. Many of them had been trained at Cambridge University, Cambridge University in that at that time, tend to be the kind of intellectual center Puritanism. And what they wanted to do in this new colony or new colonies in the north was to really establish Christian Republic, Um, still under, um You know the King and Parliament of England but to establish a kind of government again, As I said earlier, that might Be a a model for how Christians would live with and among one another, they established the first university in the colonies, Harvard University. Established. You know, in the name of John Harvard, who was a Puritan from Stratford upon Avon and in 16 36. This this college became a university was established. Train pastors and to give a high level of education to the leadership of the Puritan communities and Harvard College is located in Cambridge, which was man for Cambridge University. From which the Puritans came in large numbers. Correct, right right quite often. You know, there are all kinds of stereotypes that are thrown around about the Puritans. One of them being that, you know, being Such staunch religious people, you know, staunch Christians that they were not intellectually well informed. But it Zach Chua Li quite the opposite. They They were there. They were very intelligent and learning community Greek Hebrew, the languages of Scripture. Latin also studied And this tradition you confined in a zoo deep into New England. History is as John and Abigail Adams. They both had studied deeply in those languages. Professor. Is it fair to say I'm password in a little bit? That the enlightenment roots more deeply in the Virginia soil than it does in the Massachusetts soil. I think I think you can say that. I think the enlightenment Is kind of going on concurrent with all of this, And so you have to be careful about how you use it because it does begin to become much more prevalent and have it Z influences. In the later 16 hundreds. As these colonies begin to mature, you begin to see Maura. Enlightenment influence. Yes, certainly, you know Lightman influence in Virginia, for instance, which Jefferson But also a up north. You know, Franklin was from Boston Rob place from among the pilgrim's and accurate and community. Yeah, now in 16 29. The Salem Covenant is adopted by the in the records of the first Church in Salem, Massachusetts, the entirety of which reads. We covered it with the Lord and one with another and do bind ourselves in the presence of God to walk together and all his ways, according as he is pleased to reveal himself unto us in his blessed word of truth. That covenant is enlarged in 16 36, and I'm not going to read that because it has many nine different provisions. How do those covenants infrequently mentioned? Rarely taught new to me, In large part, the large covenant How does that? How does that figure into the early American story, Professor? Well, I think that the idea that, um In fact, in all of these colonies, Virginia, Pennsylvania, all throughout from A Christian conviction of is present everywhere. The question is, you know what brand of Christian does it take again in Virginia Church of England. Pennsylvania is going to be the Quakers a little bit more radical. Up in Pennsylvania. Europe's using up in New England. The Puritans definitely had this idea that they were serving God and that this this community that establishment of these communities all were to be established with the idea that they were going to honor God and they were going to be literally..

England Virginia Church of England Um Cambridge University Hillsdale Pilgrim America Hillsdale College Salem Virginia Church of England John Harvard Pennsylvania New England Professor Massachusetts Hugh Hewitt Donald Trump Dr Kenneth Calvert
"university cambridge" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:51 min | 9 months ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Back America to hear it. The Hillsdale dialogue sponsored by Hill. Tell college that you hear each week at this time is underway. All things Hillsdale collected it. Hil failed dot e d u I mentioned a great classical school in Orange County, which is Thea Orange County Classical Academy. It is one of the Hillsdale classical academies inspired by Hillsdale. Which teach the founding and Dr Larry on President. Hillsdale College is joined by Dr Kenneth Calvert. Dr Katz When we went to break we're about to talk about the founding up North Way discussed the laws of Virginia three weeks ago. People who go and listen to that. That's England transplanted. What is it that the pilgrims had in mind? And when did the Pilgrim's become the Puritans? And how did they diverge? And when does the Salem compact come into this conversation? Well, I think it's important to understand that James, the first of England was really attempting to create a culture built around the Church of England. Andre English, Christianity on and then what happened in the midst of that was that you have two ends of a spectrum kind of cut off from from inclusion in that one are the Puritans on one side, the other are those who choose to hang on to their Catholicism's And on the product inside the Puritans and the pilgrims were ones who really struggled with this idea of being you know, essentially forced into into the Church of England. The Pilgrim's being separatist left first went to the Netherlands and, um, realize that their Children were becoming Dutch more than they leaving behind English tradition. So what's very interesting about the pilgrims? And then the Puritans that followed them is that they were very much you know, Uh, Honoring the King and stand and Parliament of England. But they did struggle with the religious, um, on church structure that had been established. And so the pilgrims ended up coming to the northern colonies and the pilgrims being much more separatist, much more distinct in their attempt. T O be separate from the Church of England, the Puritans who came after them and again. There's a lot of discussion is how one really makes a distinguished distinguishes between these two groups. The Puritans. Many of them were from London. Many of them were involved in commerce and business. Many of them had been trained at Cambridge University, Cambridge University in that at that time, tend to be the kind of intellectual center Puritanism. And what they wanted to do in this new colony or new colonies in the north was to really establish Christian Republic, Um, still under, um You know the King and Parliament of England but to establish a kind of government again, As I said earlier, that might Be a a model for how Christians would live with and among one another, they established the first university in the colonies, Harvard University. Established. You know, in the name of John Harvard, who was a Puritan from Stratford upon Avon and in 16 36. This this college became a university was established. Train pastors and to give a high level of education to the leadership of the Puritan communities

Dr. Kenneth Calvert on the History of Puritans

Hugh Hewitt

03:51 min | 9 months ago

Dr. Kenneth Calvert on the History of Puritans

"Back America to hear it. The Hillsdale dialogue sponsored by Hill. Tell college that you hear each week at this time is underway. All things Hillsdale collected it. Hil failed dot e d u I mentioned a great classical school in Orange County, which is Thea Orange County Classical Academy. It is one of the Hillsdale classical academies inspired by Hillsdale. Which teach the founding and Dr Larry on President. Hillsdale College is joined by Dr Kenneth Calvert. Dr Katz When we went to break we're about to talk about the founding up North Way discussed the laws of Virginia three weeks ago. People who go and listen to that. That's England transplanted. What is it that the pilgrims had in mind? And when did the Pilgrim's become the Puritans? And how did they diverge? And when does the Salem compact come into this conversation? Well, I think it's important to understand that James, the first of England was really attempting to create a culture built around the Church of England. Andre English, Christianity on and then what happened in the midst of that was that you have two ends of a spectrum kind of cut off from from inclusion in that one are the Puritans on one side, the other are those who choose to hang on to their Catholicism's And on the product inside the Puritans and the pilgrims were ones who really struggled with this idea of being you know, essentially forced into into the Church of England. The Pilgrim's being separatist left first went to the Netherlands and, um, realize that their Children were becoming Dutch more than they leaving behind English tradition. So what's very interesting about the pilgrims? And then the Puritans that followed them is that they were very much you know, Uh, Honoring the King and stand and Parliament of England. But they did struggle with the religious, um, on church structure that had been established. And so the pilgrims ended up coming to the northern colonies and the pilgrims being much more separatist, much more distinct in their attempt. T O be separate from the Church of England, the Puritans who came after them and again. There's a lot of discussion is how one really makes a distinguished distinguishes between these two groups. The Puritans. Many of them were from London. Many of them were involved in commerce and business. Many of them had been trained at Cambridge University, Cambridge University in that at that time, tend to be the kind of intellectual center Puritanism. And what they wanted to do in this new colony or new colonies in the north was to really establish Christian Republic, Um, still under, um You know the King and Parliament of England but to establish a kind of government again, As I said earlier, that might Be a a model for how Christians would live with and among one another, they established the first university in the colonies, Harvard University. Established. You know, in the name of John Harvard, who was a Puritan from Stratford upon Avon and in 16 36. This this college became a university was established. Train pastors and to give a high level of education to the leadership of the Puritan communities

Hillsdale Thea Orange County Classical A Hillsdale Classical Academies Dr Larry Dr Kenneth Calvert Dr Katz Church Of England Andre English England Hillsdale College Orange County Salem America Virginia Cambridge University James Netherlands Christian Republic King And Parliament London
"university cambridge" Discussed on Daily Detroit

Daily Detroit

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on Daily Detroit

"That goes along with a forty. Three new deaths bringing that grim. Total to more than seventy five hundred souls. Lost hospital capacity is shrinking quickly. Statewide there are more than twenty. Four hundred people hospitalized with suspected or confirmed covid cases and of two thousand four hundred ninety three beds in intensive care units across the state just four hundred and twenty two remain available. Michigan is the six fastest place in the nation that the coronavirus spreading according to new data from rt dot live and the incoming leader of the republican led michigan state. House has already doused hopes of the idea of a mask. Mandate floated by governor gretchen. Whitmer earlier this week speaker elect. Jason wentworth called the move. A stunt since administration imposed a mask rule through a public health order also in the state legislature michigan senate democratic leader. Jim anonymity said late friday that he has tested positive for covid. Nineteen plus. The university of michigan is changing courts from the fall now telling students to stay home for the winter semester university president. Dr mark scholl said that undergraduate students who don't need to be on campus should stay home for the winter semester and study remotely u. of m. housing will move exclusively to single room occupancy for those who stay ann arbor is in washington county and it's one of the many in the state where the virus spread and case levels are extremely high and here in detroit. A phase three vaccine trial is about to get underway at henry ford health system it will be site for johnson and johnson's clinical research study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of janssen's investigational covid nineteen vaccine candidate. Jam is owned by john jay. The phase three randomized double blind placebo controlled. Clinical trial will include about sixty thousand adults across the country with a focus on people over sixty years. old there's good news for general motors. The automaker beat wall street expectations in the third quarter. Thanks to their profitable trucks and suv's the adjusted earnings per share was two dollars and thirty eight cents. It was expected to be a dollar thirty eight on pretext quarterly profit margins. A fifteen percent. Gm's north american operations earned more than four point. Three billion dollars in the third quarter up forty four percent from last year. This comes despite. Us sales being down nearly ten percent earnings for its international operations were just barely above water at ten million dollars. Although the company declined to give guidance for the rest of the year because of what they called the moving pieces of corona virus and a potential federal stimulus. They're getting ready for a fourth quarter. That will not be as strong as the third joining me. Virtually.

Michigan university of michigan Jim anonymity Jason wentworth general motors Whitmer john jay gretchen henry ford health Dr mark scholl johnson suv detroit House washington county ann arbor Gm president
"university cambridge" Discussed on "Diary of an Unemployed Actor"

"Diary of an Unemployed Actor"

08:40 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on "Diary of an Unemployed Actor"

"The feel-good I can't help but feel fine cuz you're still trying to make a living as an actor or a do you have day job these days? What do you what do you what is he up for the up to assist fast is going to sit here. Now. He's responsible hasn't been here in house. Oh my God, I can't believe it. Yes. So I'm all right. So in March, so you see I had a job as well an English teacher and then I lost that because of code the manic so went back to Ireland thought I was in Ireland from what I'm stealing on a bus Michelle holidays now and Portugal. Well, there's worse places to be stuck. I mean personally, I really enjoyed it off. And it is fabulous. I'm having a great. I've only been here like three weeks now, but all my god, I've been on the beach like every second day. It's wonderful and then like creative or you know, pretty hard and not going now. It's it's really hard but suppose we have to just keep going down the more creative in a way or be better creative because everything is just has turned like upside down. So we have tons of just everything is going to be even read this one. At first they have to read the code. They're going to put the covid-19 and they're making their image shows. Are they actually filming Fair City? Yeah, yeah. Yeah. I saw an Irish independent today. It was just yeah, they're they're filming like the cameraman were are with their masks and then the actors off the account for months, you know have to deliver the lines. Yeah. So yeah, they are filming at home stinking crazy line for anyone listening Fair city is a long-running soap opera in Ireland. So equivalent to you know, either of our lives or Another World in the US or honest. I have no idea what what British long-range bombers there are so I couldn't get married but whatever the British equivalent is a long-running exactly. So that's the challenge named Milo to just be creative to stay creative on one hand we have on you know, so many on-line climbing courses like writers courses and actors Club. Things online so easy to you don't have to travel anywhere. It's just there but at the same time, you know even stuff you miss being in class. I mean not personal. But you know space you. Have you been doing any of the classes? Like I've thought about doing something. But yeah. Yeah, I'm with you. I rather I'd be in the space especially as an actor cuz you feed off the other person so much when you're in the same space and I haven't really been motivated to do any acting classes and stuff cuz it just doesn't appeal to me like I don't feel like I want to do it. Have you done any or even in other type of online applications? Yeah. So yeah, I I've done a writer's course and so the university Cambridge has been a continuing studies and it's basically Yeah, you can do like a creative writers course there. So I did that for the month-long course really good and you get to kind of learn about I'm not sure if you learn about writing I learn about plots and you know, it's practice and you get feedback every every first or you write off a short story not scripts not film scripts know. Yeah. I'm not going down that path yet of roiling scripts for either. Have you been doing any. Yeah. Yeah I have and so so James Camp, he's he's my ex teacher in drama sensor London and Rome this all his classes have gone online. And so he does he does the workshop every Wednesday and he's really good and so music off. You know the company in the UK called efforts Productions and with his partner Sophie Sophie and they're they're really good life. I've never done face-to-face class. You can put I've done some online classes and and really good there every Wednesday and they would try to work with method acting so it's all about the inner trying to work on your inner life as an actor life and um, you can relate to see either or You wanted to see they're organized to TV both. So so you're basically the work was created by you. Yeah. So he's he was the co-founder of drama Centre in London. And yeah, he was he a kind of a revolutionary when it came to method acting off. So so this work is based on on three different characters. So I guess you try to simplify simplify it as much possible. You were either these three regards And and yeah, it's worked with you know, some of the best known and worked at Sean Connery worked with his Frozen and offer you our ex-drummer Center Loom annoying so and work with Colin Farrell's side column first. And so all of them would be would be aware of choice work. I what did you say? Yes from free under him and create this page where the co-founders of drama Central London and in terms of the Revolutionary Revolution is true that tried its best to get back to To find a method for actors. So it was very close to dance and yeah, very close to kind of y'all's a professional down. So he and he brought a lot of his War into acting so it was you know, when when I was in drama said it was basically a lot about using it for the money the work was made for the staged but like I went drums and a fifteen fifteen years ago. So obviously, you know, how may have evolved like Netflix television and every you know, all the work for actors is online now and so what I mean, I'm online platforms like Netflix and HBO, so I think James knew James from wage. That's or dramas and those work. Yeah, you know, he's on a modernized it so he he he he he knew that this is going to age. I knew the acting was going this way as in most of the work and most of the most of it was online. So obviously he adopted his best he could to work on money to train actors for you.

Ireland James Camp co-founder Netflix drama Central London actors Club US drama Centre Sean Connery Michelle Portugal Sophie Sophie Milo Colin Farrell London writer university Cambridge HBO Rome
"university cambridge" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"So let's have a miniature archaeology. We have various timelines of archaeology, starting with the Paleolithic Goto, the Neolithic. Uh, capitalistic or chapecoense won't be Presumptions early forms a beautiful vase made from stage by an age I need to weigh Have Hellenistic Roman didn't time Arab say the optimum moment right up until the present day. So don't be talking about today. Well, today we're talking about a road in great that you called me a 14. So our A roads are regarded. I could almost away so the most aerated generally wide straight on our neighbors are usually called Jule Carriage rays, which means that you have a carriage way or freeway on either side of the road. And these are very, very good roads. Now the 8 14 upgraded. If they work started to three years ago. It's actually finished eight months ahead of schedule, which is a miracle because most roads schedules are being sort of go over them. I'm cold misery, but even interesting road that connects from those fingers off England, where I now live in the county of Suffolk. It's a very important road on this road go through a part of the country of the county called Cambridge on cable is very elements with our beautiful university, Cambridge University that we can't down to hard facts. What did they find? Well, They found 11 really member. Three complaints. Willie Rhinos, skulls dating back nearly 100,000 years ago, they found three realistic Hentges. We've sort of settlements which between 4 5000 years old, with several prehistoric burial grounds, mostly of the bronze age. I'm very interested in because I work. Directly world in world problems. They were 15 Hide age room and settle with three aglow section settled one diverted pretty evil village. But it gets better because they found a 50,000 objects to the authorities about not not the road menders all the roads technician. I found coins approaches on work and the 500 human barriers informations on more than six tons of poultry. Five terms of animal boat. This is the really interesting bit for those of you who really like there? And you think the British good book about how out there is the author just found on the side of the road under the road Signs over Iron age group. Which is thought to go back. As far for 100 BC, they actually found grain's actually grew itself alone. This is just, you know, extraordinary who thought that by digging up a and though you would suddenly start to find Some of the earliest physical evidence on activity and treatment, instead taking place in jolly old old England. So those are some of the things which they found, and I understand. The Ark ofthe theological Exercise hasn't finished yet. How many Roman chariot hubcaps. Did you find that that they that they haven't and they didn't find any ulcers or when we dig up are roads we find hubcaps from 19 forties cause come on, go back farther than that. That that is a reflection over time, Right? And I'm saying that whole June respect America is one of the newest countries off this on this planet. I will culture very rich, but your culture is linked to technology. So you know, just think in a million years time if human civilisation is still here, and I see the trucks will be if somebody start digging up onto the ground, have a they're going to find some amazing Apple backs. Back reference source of fantastic These people eat people got rabbit. Speaking of linking culture and technology on next guest does just that. And he happens to be from your part of the world and he's designed just designed something that you may be digging up 1000 years from now when they dig up the road. Yeah, with us, not a CZ. Let me introduce you to one of your countrymen Paul Wraith, who is the chief designer for the new Ford Bronco. And He spent most of his career and in Britain. I understand, but we were lucky enough to have him. Come over here and design on new Bronco, which looks fabulous. Paul, tell us about how you did it. Good morning. 70 Sharing thinking about one girl for me went back has been a real privilege to.

Ford Bronco Have Hellenistic Roman Paul Wraith Paleolithic Goto Cambridge University Ark ofthe theological Exercise Willie Rhinos England Suffolk technician Britain Apple America chief designer
"university cambridge" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:39 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Your brain power Like how quickly your brain works. Can you copy? A complex drawing? Can you remember Five words? Um ah. Can you remember things later on, So there was a 14 Excuse me a 12 point improvement in this brain. It's a tough brain touched. There was a a 12 point improvement in the spring testing people who were suffering What memory loss. So that's an important finding. Man. It's not the on ly finding like this. They're they're funding the same thing at a Trinity College in Dublin. Oxford University, Cambridge University. At the University of Cork. A number of universities in the United States. I mean, they're finding that are now in Japan. They're funding a probiotics to help bring power. So it's a very interesting thing, because probiotics helps so many things. The five strains I picked for our probiotic Hx include the by feet a bacterium Brody Include Lacto spore. Include by feet of bacterium animal. A sub species lack tous include Lactobacillus Plan Tarom on like the Bacillus Ram, No, CeCe. So here's the aggregate of what you're going to get. If you take the probiotic that I designed one, you're not going to get analogy. We don't have milk in there. We don't have We eaten there. We don't have slaying there. Two. All five strains have been used in numerous human clinical trials that have been published in medical journals. All five strange in my product have been used either separately or together. In human clinical trials. We know they're safe. We know they give benefits. We know how much to give. So if you take one of my probiotic hx, not only that it survives antibiotics. And it survives all those cleaning fluid You're using around the house now, and that's a very important point. When you lack probiotics, you're more likely to develop food allergies, food sensitivities. Tree pollen allergies, dog and cat allergies because you're immune system gets confused without the good bacteria on it starts to attack things that are Innocuous, innocuous means safe. Two analogy is your immune system attacking something that's normally safe. Like dog dander and cat dander and, you know, eating a shrimp or eating Ah, grapefruit or something. Or inhaling pollen from roses. So when you lack good bacteria develop allergies, when you take good bacteria, you help to get rid of your allergies and food sensitivities. And food allergies. Dog and cat ology is pollen allergies. Allergies to all different foods, including wait, believe it or not. Now. Beyond that, when you lack good bacteria, you get either constipation or diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome. You could develop crones disease and collide us. This is true. Um, for a number of reasons, which we're not going to go into right now, because that takes a long time to explain, And we have a lot of stuff to explain. Today. When you lack good bacteria, your immune system doesn't work. Well, that's harder to protect your lungs and your heart from viruses and bacteria. So our probiotic has strange that have been proven to survive antibiotics and survived cleaning fluid because when you inhale the cleaning fluid, it kills your good bacteria. And that's a really important point. Right now. This is another reason why I put the probiotic HX on special. You're washing your hands. All the time on your cleaning surfaces with things like Windex and Fantastic and Liesel. These things get into you and they kill your good bacteria. This is the truth. They've done studies like this. They've taken people who clean hotels and ah date dare jobs like cleaning ladies, etcetera, and they see that it destroys their good bacteria on when you destroy your good bacteria, your immune system can't fight off infections. All of this cleaning that we're doing now cleaning the surfaces in our house all the time and washing our hands all day long and doing all these things. It's killing your good bacteria. You have to put him back or your immune system will not be strong enough to fight viruses because without good bacteria, your immune system starts to flounder. That's what happens in older people They don't have the good bacteria on your immune system gets modeled on and on instead of him, helping it to fight a virus or a bacteria or yeast. Instead, it's it's mixing up the body and causing inflammation throughout the body on the corona virus is make no mistake. Ah, hi Inflammation disease. If you get covered 19 what it really is, is super inflammation. That's why it's destroying people's lungs and the heart and kidneys. The intestines, the brain. That's why strolling off blood clutch, So the Corona virus is inflammation. That's how it's killing people, but they're already pre inflamed. Like a lot of these people are very heavy. They're very obese. What they have severe diabetes or severe heart disease there already inflamed or day longer, inflamed with things like asthma, emphysema. Or they have certain kinds of diseases like macular degeneration daughter involved with certain parts of the immune system that inflames them. And then they get the Corona virus and now they're super inflamed. And that's what's doing the men. When you get probiotics. It's one of the step you take against fighting off inflammation because they've shown that certain strange of probiotic bacteria reduce inflammation in the brain. Reduce inflammation in your lungs. You really want that right now Reduce inflammation in your heart. You really want that right now and reduce inflammation? And your circulatory system, a lymphatic system on your bowels all of these places to Corona virus and flames and destroyed Do you want probiotic Right now, You only need one a day on within two weeks. Your inflammation is going down, but your immune system gets better at fighting viruses. You better believe my wife and I my two sons on DH. Their wives on my stepson in my stepdaughter on my granddaughter and Shan Francisco are all getting probiotics. They're all getting probiotics right now. I demanded offthe. Um I had some of them were resistant and they kept on whittling away. And finally they're doing it on their also getting vitamin D. I should listen, no matter what else you do you have to get your vitamin D. I have to get your program. Cause they're all young and.

Allergies Inflammation disease Corona Trinity College United States Oxford University University of Cork Brody Japan diarrhea diabetes Shan Francisco Cambridge University Dublin bowel syndrome
"university cambridge" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

09:12 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on PRI's The World

"About the last time you took an exam in a classroom. You were probably being monitored by a teacher. Sitting behind their desk may be getting up from time to time to pace around hover over your shoulder. So how do you cheating in The Times? We're living in with students taking exams from home. The world's Lydia Amana Lido tells us how some schools are doing it next week under her webcams watchful eye. Naomi Lang. We'll take her first final. She's a psychology student at Tilburg University in the Netherlands exam is in itself already a very nerve racking experience and very stressful for many and now I have additional things to worry about. She's nervous because while she's taking the exam everything she's doing on her computer everything going on in her room behind her every sound she makes even her movement will be tracked using software. Her School is making her and other students download on their computers. It's called Pretoria. I believe for thorough is a very invading Software it invades your privacy in a lot of ways. Pretoria is a small Arizona based company that suddenly become really popular since the pandemic. It's been getting calls from university administrators. All over the place scrambling to figure out how to do. Test proctoring during a pandemic the largest growth we've seen is actually in Europe. Taking almost entire countries using our software Michelson is project-oriented founder and CEO. And here's other software. Works STUDENTS DOWNLOAD PROCTOR. Oreo on their computer and give it access to their camera. There microphone and computer screen during the exam. The program is recording and analyzing everything happening on and behind the screen using artificial intelligence and facial recognition. It flags things that seem suspicious. So if a student opens a tab and does a google search flagged if someone comes into the room and starts talking flagged if a student looks away from the screen for too long also flagged Olsen says. It's up to each school to decide what gets marked as suspicious. They really configure what they're looking for. Would they want to be notified for when the examined Generates report for the university. What is going to do is say okay at five minutes thirty in someone else came in front of the camera and is GonNa show that report and that faculty or that institution can then make a decision and decision about whether they think a student cheated. Olsen says only the university has access to the recordings and the data that's collected pourquoi is not the only company making remote exam monitoring software and reporting spike in demand. There's proctor you examinee responded to name just a few and as more university sign up to use these services. Students are pushing back including Naomi delaying at Tilburg. A lot of people were just scared and angry and I thought I need to make a change so then I started a petition. Thousands of people signed it students elsewhere. Like at the Australian National University also started similar petitions to get their schools to stop using remote proctoring software. One of dilemmas concerns is who has access to technology. I've seen students that don't have any laptops at the moment or don't have a leftover with a Webcam. Some don't have reliable wi fi or a room. They can have exclusively to themselves. During an exam. In the end Tilburg University decided to move forward with proctoring. We reached out to them for an interview but they declined saying it's a really busy time. Not all students at Tilburg will have to use the software. The ones that do like delaying say they wish the school would offer alternatives but the university has mentioned that the only thing that's possible is to take the exam on the later dates. You cannot call it an alternative. Taking the exam later could mean delaying her degree so next week. She'll do the test with PROC Torio. She's trying not to worry too much about things that are out of control that could get flagged and potentially land her a failing grade like if her spotty. Wifi goes out all she can really do is studying for her tests. She says and maybe practice keeping her gaze steady on the screen for the world. I'm Lydia mainly do. Let's do in school a bit longer. Universities across the world are facing an excruciating decision. When is it okay to bring students back to class? I'm talking brick and mortar instruction here being in an actual classroom. Many universities have already announced that they're moving much of their curricula online for the fall semester. Cambridge University in England is taking things further. No face to face lectures all the way. Through the summer of twenty twenty one smaller teaching groups could happen in person. If social distancing guidelines are met this has stirred up a debate whether freshman students should even bother to enroll in Cambridge or just defer their first year of studies reveal. Kapoor is a second year student at Cambridge. So what do you think about your school's decision to hold lectures online? I think it was a pretty obvious. Deficient a pretty clever decision. I mean lectures. Have Mine have about one hundred students. Some have up to three hundred students in them. That wasn't going to possible with social distancing so I think what they said was in line with what most universities will have to do but it's also because they wanNA focus on providing the small group teaching the seminars the lives on the practical in person. That's when I learned on those still going to happen with social distancing and what are your thoughts about the incoming freshmen because this isn't exactly the first year they were expecting. No I feel for them. One of my friends is coming to Cambridge. I don't think it's not exactly what you need. University is expected to be but I think just because it's not what we plan. It's it doesn't mean it's not GonNa be a university experience on. We're hoping that they can still come onto campus and live on campus and I by not to be a more important part of my learning than lectures Not My parents so just scanning through twitter. Several Cambridge students seemed disappointed that they found out about the news via social media. Instead of directly from the university was their problem thinking how the news was broken. Yeah I think I was a massive problem. I think that the headlines really didn't hatchet the news fully they came from a leaked email which you know indicated potential scenarios to plan for lectures being online. But they were completely walked to understand that Cambridge students went back to campus. But that wasn't actually true so I think if we waited to hear from a chance himself from the heads of the colleges themselves than we would have had a much clearer understanding than the misrepresented headlines. What was your first reaction to the headline my fast reaction to the onus was Sadness anger because I would say. I pretty invoke my college decisions and I knew that that wasn't what we had been planning for. I was completely taken aback and I sent straight to my parents and I was like what's happening. And then I read the Ascalon Ice Cube that the headline was you know misrepresenting and then I woke up the next morning and my uncle from Connecticut my seven year old grandma from India ghost message raping right. How'd you heard and I was like? Oh No is going viral. And it's Rome. When the news first broke a couple of days ago many undergraduate students not just at Cambridge Express fear and anxiety about having to pay full tuition for essentially getting an online education at top school. I gather you're also student body. President Revolt. What do you think about this? I think what we have to remember is that we have amazing professors amazing stall who all still going to be walking the same amount of time to make our degree happen moving lectures online for me. It means that I can close them. It means I can with them. If it's boring it means I can replay them. It will not be in some of my experience. I Dunno on more own the songs if like if I'm still getting education and the sauce is still important so whacking hard. I understand the value is river kapoor. A second year student at Girton College Cambridge University Cambridge England. She's and speaking with us about Cambridge's decision to hold lectures online because of the pandemic river. It's been a real pleasure. Thank you very much. Thank you so much. Let's face it. The nine hundred eighty s in the US and the UK wasn't exactly the pinnacle pop music history but West. Africa was exploding with great stuff in the eighties. Like this track yet. By singer and core a player Maury contact from it had dance floors all across the globe. Clubbers may not have been able to locate Guinea on a world map it still more contests hit brought attention to a lot of other exceptional west. African artists the eighties..

Cambridge Girton College Cambridge Unive Tilburg University Tilburg Naomi Lang The Times Cambridge University Lydia Amana Lido Pretoria end Tilburg University Australian National University Europe Olsen Cambridge Express google Arizona founder and CEO twitter Michelson
"university cambridge" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Institutions university Cambridge are the calculator takes data entry like gender age underlying conditions diabetes heart disease and also takes into account what's being done to limit contact among the general population and then you get a percentage of how likely you are to die and then you combine this data with health records of some four million folks in England researchers found about twenty percent of people have an underlying condition that could lead to further complications I did not check out this one calculator myself but if you want to we have a link to it overhead commanded a cop finally if you want to take a virtual trip to the international space station you can there are brand new simulator you have to be able to dock without crashing okay I will tell you I tried three or four times and I I wouldn't make it it would be I better just stick to radio if all goes to plan SpaceX is launching its new spacecraft the crew dragon later this month with the destination being the international space station of course and as a lead up to the big events basic just released an online simulator that lets you take a crack at manually docking the crew dragon with the station now I will tell you it's all about aligning the ship and then maneuvering using various controls like pitch and roll it's not easy I mean you know we always see these videos and it's like oh well they just kind of crime brought all their near like you know they probably had like you know bumper pads along the way or maybe I A. I was doing it all it's pretty hard even with the heads up display but if you are able to make the right adjustments on the control panel and as long as your patient you eventually well get I hear to the docking port the ISS but to just slow down don't damage the ship don't damage the station in a suddenly things like parallel parking looks a whole.

England SpaceX Institutions university Cambri
"university cambridge" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Institutions university Cambridge all the calculator takes data entry like gender age underlying conditions diabetes heart disease and also takes into account what's being done to limit contact among the general population and then you get a percentage of how likely you are to die and then you combine this data with health records of some four million folks in England researchers found about twenty percent of people have an underlying condition that could lead to further complications I did not check out this one calculator myself but if you want to we have a link to it over at commando dot com finally if you want to take a virtual trip to the international space station you can Sir I am brand new simulator you have to be able to dock without crashing okay I will tell you I tried three or four times and I I wouldn't make it it would be I better just stick to radio if all goes to plan SpaceX is launching its new spacecraft the crew dragon later this month with the destination being the international space station of course as a lead up to the big events basic just released an online simulator that lets you take a crack at manually docking the crew dragon with station now I will tell you it's all about aligning the ship and then maneuvering using various controls like pictured role it's not easy I mean you know we always see these videos and it's like oh well they just kind of clamp right on there and you're like oh you know they probably had like you know bumper pads along the way or maybe I A. I was doing it all it's pretty hard even with the heads up display but if you are able to make the right adjustments on the control panel and as long as your patient you eventually well get I hear to the docking port the ISS but to just slow down don't damage the ship don't damage the station in a suddenly things like parallel parking looks soul easy wow that's nothing all right we all shop online a lot and I'm doing whatever I can rather.

England SpaceX Institutions university Cambri
"university cambridge" Discussed on Inspiring Adventure by Vertebrate Publishing

Inspiring Adventure by Vertebrate Publishing

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on Inspiring Adventure by Vertebrate Publishing

"Climbing a really began at university after faltering start. My academic performance had improved considerably a function studiousness rather than any real talent and I found myself with a scholarship to Cambridge University. Cambridge is in the funds famous being flat wet and Windy. There is nothing to climb will. Not quite nothing. These days I'm told Cambridge is demanding institution but back in the late seventies. It was almost impossible to fail. There was only one thing you could do that meant automatic expulsion and that was climbing on the college buildings. This of course made the idea irresistible. A lifetime. Friendship was created as I teamed up with fellow fresher. Bill Medlicott. Who had not in the undertaken in Taya weeks introductory climbing course in north Wales but was also the proud owner of a wrote We put up a bold. I sent the Southwest Ridge of Sidney Sussex Chapel. At least it was bold if you'd Betty climbs before I recall standing on the chapel roof bads abseiled down the ripe now dangling into the courtyard alive when a college porter strode by. I thought if he looks up that's it. We went to made even won. Miss he didn't of the antics followed a per se. East Rub found its way up to the college belltower and Park Bench on the gate of Kings. All this high-spirited fun came to a climax when a plan was hatched to put our sixteenth century college up the sale. We Julie gathered from around town all these state agents for sale signs. We could find these here enough. A known as the stolen property was suitably adapted during the night hung out on the college walls a harmless prank of course but not in the eyes of Police Constable Ron peers they feel bastion of law and order cornered very student members on a narrow. Staircase uncalled for backup. Bill was one of those Into the Black Maria and taken away to spend the night at Majesty's pleasure in one of the local cells. Fortunately he was able to secure a timely release in the morning on the entirely truthful. Grants that as a theology student. He was also Sacriston of the College Chapel. The same one we had previously climbed a native to prepare the holy communion. His prompt release was particularly welcome. Because that day he was receiving a visit from his parents his father being the then president of the Cantaloupe Society Happily. The president took these developments in his judicial streit. Meanwhile focus shifted to real rock an excursions to the peak district North Wales on the lakes as a kid to it spent most of his summers on bucket and spade holidays abroad. My eyes opened for the first time to the beauty of my own country. The climbing was self taught Vilnai guiding each other as we alternated places at the sharp end of the rope. It was a good test of nerve because while comes modern devices protect against the fall has been invented. We could only afford one prototype between us on main protection was still the legendary chalk or not the MOH say original very effective when suitable cracks in the rope available but no use a tool. When they weren't then life got serious. I took up a high pressure job. Unthought myself very important. I come to the USA for a couple of years to do an NBA and returned to an even higher pressure. Job persuaded the CY was now. Even more important Vilnai married different women not each other and children followed. We continue to climb but it was distinctly sporadic. We went exactly at the cutting edge or any other kind of edge indeed at the crack. Fella climates with sometimes gaze test dated gave us. They we were exhibits in acquaint Museum but we did keep going in one fashion or nothing in the summer of Nineteen ninety-two. My wife raise marine. I had just taken on a new. Hi I'm we're expecting a second child. I thought this would be an ideal moment my climbing trip to the Alps. Needless to say Rosemary was delighted. I took on a French guy. Bruno wretched with whom I previously skied. He was known among my friends is Mad Brunei but the HEIM CONSUMPTION. I rebranded him. Bruneta wary ray was not fooled nonetheless. Brenner and I headed In the Valais in a single week we climbed the breath on on the Kosta traverse the come and the Monterey and finished up with the matterhorn and the dumb this Pak-tai tinny was made possible by extraordinarily good weather. I came away thinking that this was climbing in the else was always like dark days since carrying from rain and wind in Chamonix have corrected all such delusions the following Spring Bruno. Introduce me to ski. Touring gentle introduction would not bring those big thing nor was acclimatization. He felt that a great way to have a go at ski touring would be to. Climb Mont Blanc on skis so having flown in from London the day before I joined him for the long gain up to the ground molay Huts from there. We send it at two. Am Following Day Turing Skis on our back to reach the highest summits of the Alps with the world's now beneath this. We step to gain into the skis of the first time I used them in downhill mode straight off the top. We descended the north face which sounds rather daring. But it's actually the Manson's gentlest side gentlemen. Not by the. I reached mid station if they outgrew Dimitri cable car. I was hyperventilating so badly that my fellow passengers clearly thought talks about to die and I wasn't sure they would mistaken. Within a few weeks Bruno was in hospital. Having fallen through a snow bridge into traverse he'd been an inspiring guide and had my tree sympathy. I did feel that was a message here. And with thoughts of my continued survival high in my mind. I reluctantly drew close to are climbing partnership with each ending. There is a new beginning. I was introduced by older wiser friend to a new guide. An Englishman few years younger than I was hit moved with his fiance to Shemi. Mock Seton had lived there ever since I'm with. Jane has brought up three daughters all extraordinarily good sketches his parental. Gt's inspired his other profession. That OF CHILDREN'S AUTHOR. He created mark the Mountain Guide. Mock was a young guy with considerable climbing ambition but that. I'm bishen included becoming an old guide. Mine Kenyon who had done much of his manton. Having in Scotland he bought that sense of caution that came from repeated exposure to the unpredictable conditions in the UK's frozen north. I sometimes known that he could interpret. Almost any weather. Forecast is bad. I degree of caution though seem to sensible counterbalanced my own tendency to go for it. Come what may ask. Anti climbing partnership was before something deep. Still a lifelong.

Bruno Bill Medlicott Cambridge Alps Cambridge University president College Chapel Sidney Sussex Chapel north Wales North Wales Constable Ron Mont Blanc Park Bench Betty Mock Chamonix USA Julie Vilnai
"university cambridge" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

09:57 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Caller right Cambridge university Cambridge university famous the worldwide for centuries for learning but also since the twentieth century famous for Russian spying activity that's right the Cambridge five very famous story the English never tire however this particular night February twenty eight twenty fourteen where Pembroke College panel room a dinner set for doing a distinguished visitor one of which is general Michael Flynn the then director of the defense intelligence agency a decorated combat veteran he's been invited by Sir Richard Dearlove the master of Pembroke College Sir Richard Dearlove is a veteran of MI six that's the CIA equivalent in the United Kingdom in fact the C. I. I derived its skill set from MI six also in attendance is the distinguished emeritus professor of modern contemporary history at the university Christopher Andrew who's very well known for his histories of Russian spying activity you see Cambridge the Cambridge five Cambridge university Christopher Andrew is the teller of tales I welcome now one more participant to that dinner Svetlana look kova Svetlana isn't M. is a British citizen she has a happy family and she has written a new book two new books I had the occasion to talk to a lot a straight line about his her historical work at Cambridge this bio changed history which takes us back to the NKVD Stalin the romance of the Russians in terrible leaving themselves into American academy American engineering in the nineteen thirties why because the Russians wanted to get ahead especially in aeronautics however the new book is this spider seven a helper and the dark web of a crew step Lana is publishing this book momentarily and here's why she's present now very generous I general Michael Flynn has been accused for years out of being a Russian agent of seeking to in some fashion influence if not past matches your messages to V. candidate trump the president elect trump and the president trump that was the allegation investigated by the molar team for years that came to nothing but Michael Flynn was always the window between the Kremlin and the KGB and Donald Trump that did not stand up Michael Flynn however did to the mother investigators acknowledged that he had deceived told a falsehood to the FBI interrogators I'm not going down that road other than to say there's news now that Michael Flynn will be exonerated by further information that is being kept from the public for years exonerated an important fashion however none of this exoneration none of the drama that we're about to witness over these next days would have come to anything without the recruiting moment the recording on it when the KGB FSR it has many acronyms send an agent to convince and subdues and compromised Michael Flynn at this dinner Pembroke College February twenty eighth twenty fourteen I an important detail if you've been following my argument none of the accusations against Michael Flynn are true they are entirely concocted by as yet completely not named people but important is this moment said Lana a very good evening to you congratulations for the spire changed history I enjoyed to deal of course we enjoy speculating about the motives of recruiters and spies and compromised agents in nineteen thirties but here we are on twenty twenty and you're in a new book the spider is about that dinner you were invited you are very privileged to invite be invited and your teacher Christopher Andrew is there and Sir Richard Dearlove was there and they invited you at the end of the dinner to sit next to Michael Flynn and show him a postcard what postcard and what did the general say good evening just a lot good evening John good evening Sir well Odeon so I was invited to dinner because gentlemen of course is the issue of intelligent words I'm of course the steering of intelligence service and won't I find Jennifer and wanted to you know go on the very important B. two B. can be intelligently now which I was a member I'm going to track the patient application earth is historical perspective because of course all the time change the techniques the message the operations they don't change and that means that somebody like me who has guided the hue circle very long time and writing and teaching it if somebody you know you you mainly because of the condition of the engine Hey I'm interested because I work with one another I anything that they can reveal about classified stuff that can help me with my research and as I've done on my you know original broken as well what I'm trying to kind intelligence and making the message back to break in the communique but that was that was the purpose all of my being invited to the same data no I didn't think next weekend I sat across the table from Michael Flynn the reason being I was little bored enough to you know anyway you're him but I said next to reach a deal out because I would be on the woman and in the rain and it was a month it's a wonderful British tradition that in this situation where there's only one woman shifted back to the heart the deal was the main name man you know you hear men talking about their love and respect the right talk about the whole dinner and would band of the I would doctor Scholl my research to general's name I had an I. total name on which I had a digital clock all of a police guard that so be it leader I do understand and when he will be here till he was actually a political fugitive on the run from Russian secret police while he was trying to organize a revolution he sent a postcard to a friend six knowledge that he escaped from the right and that was amazing document because you know everyone knows Stalin the dictator assigned the hoary leader but in the side of him being on the rod and if the judge messaging the price guide so I produce that on my I pad the quarterback of my original research and I punched my iPad we should be allowed I'm sure they should be allowed to get up and passed it on to general Flynn and that was the smoke smell you know commotion at the church I put from each other because it was such an interesting document and then I was also explained general saying across the table this story that I told you right and that moment it is critical that moment right then said Lana addressing general Flynn active duty decorated war hero head of the defense intelligence agency Svetlana a member up by fellow of Churchill college doing research at Cambridge university why is that moment important because three years later February twenty seventeen Svetlana who is now married with a child a new child a very happy child suddenly receives phone call after enquiring after phone call from most distinguished publications in London and Washington and New York all asking directly is she a Russian agent did she recruit general Flynn did she subdues general Flynn is she an operative for Vladimir Putin all asking her in the same burst of to us at that period the we know now general Flynn had been fired by the trump administration for reasons that have never been a parent but in any event general Flynn is no longer with the trump administration when discipline is receiving these phone calls all of that is important that moment said line unless you a direct question I've asked you before it when we've appeared in public together did you that moment have any knowledge whatsoever of Russia of Russian agents we are we what you were born in Moscow we are a nation of this these ex Soviet state now Russian federation at that moment stuff on no I've never been an agent or an intelligence agent the Russian and intelligence I never have been knowledge and I have a we'll be back then agent of any security purposes that I write about all right I wanted to establish sense that one understands because those phone calls are coming in in February twenty seventeen and it is critical to establish the this story the fable the hoax against general Flynn that he was recruited at that Pam broke college dinner on February twenty eight twenty fourteen when we come back what does this all mean for right now here in twenty twenty I'm John bachelor this is the John Batchelor show.

Cambridge university Cambridge Cambridge
"university cambridge" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"University Cambridge university famous worldwide for centuries for learning but also since the twentieth century famous for Russian spying activity that's right the Cambridge five very famous story the English never tire however this particular night February twenty eighth twenty fourteen where Pembroke College panel room a dinner set for doing a distinguished visitor one of which is general Michael Flynn the then director of the defense intelligence agency a decorated combat veteran he's been invited by Sir Richard Dearlove the master of Pembroke College Sir Richard Dearlove is a veteran of MI six that's the CIA equivalent in the United Kingdom in fact the CIA derived its skill set from MI six also in attendance is the distinguished emeritus professor of modern contemporary history at the university Christopher Andrew who's very well known for his histories of Russian spying activity you see Cambridge the Cambridge five Cambridge university Christopher Andrew is the teller of tales I welcome now one more participant to that dinner Svetlana lacava said Lana is that M. is a British citizen she has our happy family and she has written a new book two new books I had the occasion to talk to at last that long about his her historical work at Cambridge this bio changed history which takes us back to the NKVD Stalin the romance of the Russians in terrible leaving themselves into American academy American engineering in the nineteen thirties why because the Russians wanted to get ahead especially in aeronautics however the new book is this spider seven a helper and the dark web of a clue that Lana is publishing this book momentarily and here's why she's present now very generously general Michael Flynn has been accused for years out of being a Russian agent of speaking to in some fashion influence if not past matches your messages to the candidate trump the president elect trump and the president trump that was the allegation investigated by the mother team for years that came to nothing but Michael Flynn was always the window between the Kremlin and the KGB and Donald Trump that did not stand up Michael Flynn however did to the mother investigators acknowledged that he had deceived told a falsehood to the FBI interrogators I'm not going down that road other than to say there's news now that Michael Flynn will be exonerated by further information that is being kept from the public for years exonerated in an important fashion however none of this exoneration none of the drama that we're about to witness over these next days would have come to anything without the recruiting moment the recording on it when the KGB FSR it has many acronyms send an agent to convince and subdues and compromised Michael Flynn at this dinner Pembroke College February twenty eighth twenty fourteen I an important detail if you've been following my argument none of the accusations against Michael Flynn are true they are entirely concocted by as yet completely not named people but important is this moment said Lana a very good evening to you congratulations for this fire change history I enjoyed a deal of course we enjoy speculating about the motives of recruiters and spies and compromised agents in nineteen thirties but here we are on twenty twenty and you're in a new book the spider is about that dinner you were invited you are very privileged to invite be invited and your teacher Christopher Andrew was there and Mr Richard Dearlove was there and they invited you at the end of the dinner to sit next to Michael Flynn and show him a postcard what postcard and what did the general say good evening just a lot good evening John good evening Sir so I would invite you to dinner because channels then of course there's a glitch in our of intelligent words I'm a poor historian of intelligence service and won't I find Jennifer and wanted to you know go on the very important because it to you they can be intelligent women out of which I was a member I'm not attracted to Cajun application if historical perspective because of course all the time change the technique the method the operations they don't change I bet means that somebody like me who have started their if you search for very long time and writing and teaching it if somebody you know you main intelligence workstation of ninety six I'm like the birth of because I don't want the naira anything that they can reveal about classified stuff that can help me with my research as I've done on my you know original broken as well what I'm trying to do in the current intelligent and intelligent back to back in the communique but that was that was the purpose all of my being invited to the same data no I didn't think next weekend I said to call the table for Michael Flynn the reason being I was not important to you know anywhere near him but I said next to reach a deal out because I was the only woman in the room and there was a long if the wonderful bridges division but in the situation where there's only one woman shifted back to the heart the deal was the main name man you know you hear him and hoping for that but a lot of it professor right okay and with the end of the day I would doctor Scholl my research to general stance I had an eye on me on which I had a digital clock all of a postcard that Soviet leader our job is done and what you want so if they're told he was actually a political fugitive on the run from Russian secret police while he was trying to organize a revolution he's a great character friends six knowledge that he escaped from the and that was in them amazing document because you know everyone knows Stalin the dictator assigned the warrior leader but not in the side of him being on the wrong end of the day I think in the place so I produce on my I pad the quarterback of my original research and I plus my iPad the service would be a lot I'm sure they should be allowed to go out and passed it on to dental claim and that was the smoke smell you know commotion at the church that I cut from each other because it was such an interesting document I meant I was not explained general saying across the table this story that I told you right and that moment it is critical that moment right there said Lana addressing general Flynn active duty decorated war hero head of the defense intelligence agency is fat Lana a member of by fellow of Churchill college doing research at Cambridge university why is that moment important because three years later February twenty seventeen says Lana who is now married with a child a new child a very happy child suddenly receives phone call after enquiring after phone call from most distinguished publications in London and Washington and New York all asking directly is she a Russian agent did she recruit general Flynn did she subdues general Flynn is she an operative for Vladimir Putin all asking her in the same person out to us at that period the we know now general Flynn had been fired by the trump administration for reasons that have never been apparent but in any event general Flynn is no longer with the trump administration when to set long as receiving these phone calls all of that is important that moment said line of last you a direct question I've asked you before it when we've appeared in public together did you that moment have any knowledge whatsoever of Russia of Russian agents we are we what you were born in Moscow we are a nation of this these extra beats St now Russian federation at that moment's problem no I've never been an agent or an intelligence stated that Russian and intelligence I never have been knowledge and I have a we'll be back with agent of any security purposes that I write about all right I wanted to establish aspen on understands because those phone calls are coming in in February twenty seventeen and it is critical to establish the this story the fabled hoax against general Flynn that he was recruited at that Pam broke college dinner on February twenty eight twenty fourteen when we come back what does this all mean for.

Cambridge University Cambridge universit
"university cambridge" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:39 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"What about breast cancer a lot of women are afraid of hormone replacement therapy because there is a connection with breast cancer and there is a connection with other cancers as well and mutual cancer so what about green tea will greet he's been shown to lower risk of breast cancer so that's another advantage but how does it affect bone well like I said building bone is a mission that's achieved by a lot of different participants and one of these participants is a growth factor called osteo Protagoras so let's talk about that when you're young your building bone solid bone at the same time that you're removing old weekend broken down below trust won't get you stop bone only last ten years that's bull gets broken down it's getting removed and replaced by new solid bone that's pretty much in balance when you're young if you eat a healthy diet you don't have to go to any like H. extraordinary steps to build bone when you're young just make sure you're getting your your minerals in your vitamins and your antioxidant several unofficial stroll in public now show what builds upon you remove about ten percent of your bone each year but you also replaces so building bonus of the cold steel protek grin and removing bone is something rankl reckless also involved with breast cancer in older women show to green tea works by inhibiting rankl that slows down a removal of old bones but yet it stimulates austere protek room to replace bone shoulder should be filling in the holes and bony filling in the Swiss cheese hold on the phone with New Hope people that's called your blaster genesis ask your blasts order bone building cells osteoclasts remove bone short slows down after cluster genesis and osteoblasts build and replace bone stimulates osteo plus to genesis so here we have three important things for actually the green two dozen cause breast cancer like hormone replacement can in some women in fact it probably lowers the risk of breast cancer by about nineteen percent that's where all the many many scores of studies show the second thing it does of course blood clutch and actually lowers the risk of a stroke and heart attack significantly even a bleeding stroke a lower risk of yeah it does start the process of building bone and they've shown that older women that shop a lot of green tea they have sh thirty your bones they have a much lower likelihood of having a hip fracture I'm much more lower lunch men to all the mental I work for both men and women you know some things may work in women are not men something's working men and women to green tea works in both sections I guess today you have to say all the structures and nothing wrong with that now let's get back to it green tea I have it on special because it helps prevent the flu the flow and green tea I have it on special because it helps check your brain but first let me read you this study as from cancer prevention research cancer prevention research is published in Philadelphia so this is the university of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute but a whole bunch of other places to university of southern California Keck school of medicine university of Minnesota medical school down in Minneapolis the Virginia pepper Cancer Institute Ernest Mario school forms you know that's raptor university all these people working together can green tea help protect women from breast cancer now I make that statement it's not bold it's true there's many many scores of study showing a green tea relations to prevent breast cancer and it does it by apparently inhibiting rankl rankles the thing that breaks down bone reckless the thing that is strongly connected to breast cancer in older women so here's what they say now this is on the university of Pittsburgh catcher institute and the university of southern California Keck school of medicine and a Virginia pepper Cancer Institute so they're all good academic research institution epidemiological studies and animal studies suggest a protective role of green tea against breast cancer then they want to say basically how does it work so they did a phase two clinical trial that's important it's a randomized double blind placebo controlled phase two clinical trial one thousand seventy five older women they were healthy and they gave them either a lot of green tea capsules or placebo every day for twelve months in my opinion they gave too much green to do giving four capsules a day I just don't think you need that much and then they used what they called the Medina computer assisted method for assessing monographic breast density and they found it in the younger women that it was reducing presidentially that's important every two suppressed density by four and a half percent after menopause your fibrous tissue in your breast disposed to decline and if they give you a mammogram initiators a lot of member graphic breast density that's strongly cried unto the risk of breast cancer and this among other studies are showing that when you shop green tea one of the things that those to protect brush it probably does other things too it reduces monographic Preston shitty shawl nobody has proven it yet they've proven that if your precious too dense after menopause you have a heightened risk of breast cancer has anybody proved that if you reduce the density reduced risk of breast cancer that's early stage research but here we clearly show green tea lowers mammogram breast density and women right after menopause and we also know from other studies that inhibits rankl which is strongly connected to breast cancer in older women Rachael supposed to drop with age if it doesn't you're in trouble now what about the brain won't green tea has an effect on the brink this is our drinking tea at least four times a week improves brain efficiency okay it's thirty six old ripples I let me just put it in a nutshell without reading this whole five page long of study the twenty university Cambridge in England a university of Essex in England as published in the scientific journal aging a couple months ago and his rotation they did a previous study that green tea reduces the risk of cognitive decline in older people cut it in half a new study is saw thirty six adults over the age of sixty and they looked into their psychological well being into a exercise and wanted to eat and all that and then they were doing neuro psychological tests you know bring function tests and brain will almost touch and they did MRI eyes of a brain powerful and Roger bring user imaging tools to see how the brain is working I'm a film if they drank green tea frequently over a twenty five year period their brain was better connected the brain was more structured when your brain is structured properly information travels better for you bring another word simply drinking green tea R. as a habit was keeping their brain healthier and more structured in preventing de queda brain cells that's important but I really have the green tea on special today not just for your bones not just a lower risk of breast cancer but a weight also to what degree is helpful also the reduced risk of prostate cancer that's what I'm worried about what one of my brothers has very advanced prostate cancer and he's using those very expensive drugs now and it's working they're keeping the prostate cancer in check but he has a life threatening form of prostate cancer I'd rather.

breast cancer nineteen percent twenty five year twelve months ten percent ten years
"university cambridge" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"About what democratic socialism means that it's like that governments take over the private sector, in fact, in my opinion, we should be scared right now because corporations have taken over our government, and the reason for that is because governments allowed it. If you guys didn't take the money it's like the drug epidemic. Right. If we didn't do. The heroin and all of the stuff that we do. Guess what cartels would have nowhere to sell it here in America, we consume it? If government collectively said, we're not taking any more money for lobbyists. We're not gonna do this anymore. We're going to be about the people the free market would work. Well, it's crony capitalism. It is but capitalism still better. You don't think socialism as cronyism my God look at Venezuela. And why it matters is because she's not just the one that she's the new shiny object to some people said. Yeah, she is in some ways. But there's a lot of young kids in America. That are looking at her and saying I like what she says because they've been through the same school the same indoctrination at a college level, and they're buying into all of it. Right. Listen to this. This is a new poll. Millennials and gen Z government should provide universal healthcare. Sixty six point seven percent is the total but millennials in seventy three point two percent. Government should provide free tuition. Total fifty six point two percent millennials and gen Z sixty seven percent. See where this is going. They. Are all into this stuff? Right. What you break it down for him. And you say, okay that sounds great. So you want free college free. Call junior college in Europe is not college. Like here there's university. And there's college those are separate things university and college college Farnborough sixth floor college where I was over there in England. It's it's like a junior college like thirteenth grade kind of thing right university, Cambridge Oxford, those university, totally different right much different scenario. But we'll go with you want healthcare healthcare has great you tell them. This is what it is. I want free healthcare. Okay. It's free. But you got to pay for it. Well, wait a minute. What? No way, bro. Oh, yeah. You're gonna pay for your taxes and not just any tax, right? We're going to pay through it for a lot of different tax because everybody got participate in it. Secondly. And this is vitally important. We're going to limit your choice. On where you can go. So if you're sick, this is your doctor, you can't get in to see another doctor. Here's your little precinct of doctors. You can go to there. Maybe three or four or five. This is where you go, and we may have a shortage of doctors. And if you can't get any can't get it. When I was sick in England. And I had my NHS car was national health insurance. I couldn't get in. And I'm looking at the people going why can't I get in? They'll like well. This is what we can get you in. Yeah. But I'm really sick now. Well, then you should I guess you're gonna have to go the hospital. This is ridiculous. So when you start to explain it. But when they talk about stuff, and this is where in Bernie Sanders was an hour. Yes. He was an Iowa. Because you know, that's where you go. When you want to make sure that everybody understands what's going on. He's getting it. Right. So he goes to Iowa. And he says this those radical ideas that we talked about four years ago. Well, today, virtually all of those ideas are now supported by about Giardi of the American people because they don't know how it works. Right. And once you start to explain it to them they step it back a little bit. I mean, they're all sounds nice. Right. Like, everything sounds great. That sounds amazing site. Oh, wait what? And why it matters is because when you look at a Costco Cortes, and you look at this younger generation this younger generation for those of you not keeping score. They are. Really? Running a lot of things. And a lot of people are nervous, and you've got three or four of them that are commanding a lot of bliss city. And there's a lot of Democrats and went in. There was a centrist. It's just the democrat. And it's not enough. They came there to get some stuff done and try to work with the Republicans and tried to do the best for their constituents, and they're not going to be heard because there's a movement afoot. And these people are essentially saying you're going to either get on the bus or you're gonna get run. Over is tells us something else to how much power Nancy Pelosi does not have over the Democrats in congress. Now, the young Turks are running the show. Yeah. But why it matters is because the young generation feels again having gone through. All the indoctrination through school, and we've talked about we've had many progressive professors on here who wouldn't vote for Trump. If he was the only person to vote for and if they didn't vote for they lose their life. They would not vote for Trump. Right. And guess what they say, it's an indoctrination. It's a one size one sided story. And this is what it is. So they're coming into the world. They're going to be almost forty percent. Oh, the voter elect in two thousand twenty. Doesn't mean short. But the reality is it's very probable that. They're going to show up. And when you've got people believe in these things, you got Bernie saying these things, and they're trying to tell you. It's the Nordic models the Nordic, it's not the Nordic model because the Nordics will tell you the Swedes Danes, right? They'll tell you. We're not those things were not socialist. We tried socialism and failed us gloriously. Everybody moved away in the seventy s it's worth a damn. We didn't have any money to pay for stuff. Now what we have is everybody shares. We've got a homogenised society where everything for all intents and purposes is kind of the same with high taxes, but everybody does their share. We don't have that in this country. Part of the have and have nots is because the haves a lot of times are willing to do above and beyond and go extra. And there's a lot of people out there of the have nots. There aren't willing to do that. And here's the other thing. It's VAT value added tax as huge. Means everybody participates you buy something for a hundred thousand dollars. You're gonna get twenty five thousand dollars in taxes on top of that. There's a lot of things that go into it. But they'll tell you they're not that way. But when you hear Bernie talk about this. Remember he praised who go job is at one time. He's talked about the likes of of of many dictators for all the stuff he talks about right? He's praised Noriega at times. He is praised the the regime in Cuba on more than a few occasions. Right. And on top of that right on top of all that he's been in Soviet Union. Not Russia the Soviet Union. Those are the things that scare people because those are the things when you look at Venezuela. What's socialism is? That's the moment. So yeah, it does matter. The other people are going to sit here and tell you about she's a ditch. She's a ding Dong. No, she's not. She's smart. She gets it. She sees the opportunity, and she knows she's got a little bit of power, and she's enjoying every second of it. But remember the people that she's talking to have the same kind of vote you do one vote, and there's a lot of them coming three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow is your Twitter. You can tweet at us. It is a nother crash for a Boeing plane, and it is not good. It was October.

Bernie Sanders Venezuela England America Soviet Union Iowa Trump heroin cronyism Nordics Europe ding Dong Twitter Nancy Pelosi Russia Cambridge Oxford NHS Giardi Boeing
"university cambridge" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

13:15 min | 3 years ago

"university cambridge" Discussed on KCRW

"Roma is now playing in select and on Netflix. And Josh barrow host of KCRW's left right and center, we couldn't fit all the lawsuits in our show. So we've added a new one LLC presents all the president's lawyers a weekly examination of law liability and White House legal strategy. Get her on apple podcasts or at KCRW dot com. Welcome back. We're exploding with ideas from the truth. And my guess is Eric idle is back after a thirteen year absence the tug, whereas new book, always look on the bright side of life. But we are talking about this this explosion. And even in my favorite sections is the book is your relationship with Robin Williams. And I think the most touching things when he says I found my Tanya. I think that's really kinda wondering that. I just see what you Jesus dead you touch your yard. I just found that to be such a powerful sort of evocation of your friendship that moment that he that. You must have understood that how close you were when he said that to you. He was just read hot though, we were very close. I mean, you know, we swam Benyamin nine thousand nine hundred eighty so we were very close. But to get back to the the point. I think we were sort of discussing about that generation his Romans onto that he comes up to be a much younger is that I think in the end of the wall. There was just devastation all over Europe sixty million people had died and show DNA somehow house to replace all the men who are dead. And so this is all part of a sort of, you know, bus of of life and civilization and the fifties were so grim and bleak. When we grew up we had rationing, you know, if you want some butter. Oh, you know, go you had to have ration books and things like that. So it was kind of tough, and then they day through this over, and it was really a a very classic moments. I mean, smart if a young people now is people ahead of them and all the jobs, and they have to try and replace them. I'll get rid of that generation who won't go, you know, dragged kicking and screaming into retirement. So it's hard for young people nowadays. And they can't really imagine that there was nobody there, and they weren't doing this and the wasn't rock and roll. The the they sort of the Beatles changed England. They really did when and I remember being at university Cambridge, and they came through and we all still wearing you know, like bribes had revisited jackets and little leather patches. Saying would you like some Sherry, and then the Beatles came through and suddenly it was who's your favorite beetle? And let's go and buy some leather jackets. And let's so they had that effect on the UK they cheered everybody up. But it also feels that you're you're talking about DNA there, this there's this thing that happens where you have a goofy young people coming up who there've been wars fought for that first half of the twentieth century going from World War One World War Two, basically. And suddenly, you have this energy needs to be displays. There's going to something that's much more. Interesting much more constructive rather than just being part of these institutions are about keeping the military alive. And all of that generation grew up with our fathers overseas. So there wasn't a parent. There wasn't a father in the house pretty much. You talked about being with you agree with your grandparents going the way you grew up. Yeah. So so that meant that everybody even the artists all the photographers. They all have this thing in common, which is this this woo. War. This is shadowed over their lives and made them so poor. And they so then they are they burst out into into the each of their fields. And I think you can see it in poets, you sit and play rights you see it in. And it's it's very clear demarcation line is like when the dinosaurs extinct, probably shot, a rock star of rum it as rock and roll starter. Oh my God. Well, live styled again. Oh my gosh. But we're gonna continue with that that they can lineage then Robin Williams is almost the next generation after he basically his he's grown up with the energy rock and roll. But I know he grew up in the suburbs of Detroit looking for something to rebel against. And and basically sort of was subsumed by that energy that you and your generation set into motion. Yes, they are definitely much younger than I it was like Garry shandling Steve Martin, they were we sort of because they couldn't have comedy on television. We coming along and PBS putting it on has an enormous effects which was prize to us. But I think had an enormous effect on the holy grail being played in every college all the time. You know, they didn't pay us for twenty years, but it didn't matter because when we finally owned it, we could charge them all, but nobody seats it's forty years. I mean, that's shouldn't be really. I don't remember watching forty year old films. When I was watching movies love if we're going to sort of like make the logical extrapolation you go with if you grew up with Jonathan swift. And that becomes this kind of epochal moment in in satire and social commentary, then as the technology changes, and it goes from literature from print to to other forms of dissemination. Then why wouldn't something have that kind of lasting impact? Right. Right. I, but what was interesting to us was coming from England. There was nothing that said possibly that. America would take this this Dobson know, we were certain it would not go in America. We put our houses on it. I mean, it was just it. And it was only because there it was on PBS on Sunday nights and people found it he wasn't being measured. People didn't notice at the time. This everybody was being indoctrinated to walk silly or and then later on they all connect you found each other. And it was it was, you know, by the time, we were finally touring America ordering the Hollywood bowl. Everybody knew it. But it's a it's it was because it was cheap PBS could any. Yeah. It was really cheap to put it on on Sunday nights. Bbc didn't charge anything and being on television all time, really. It was on for twenty twenty-five years on PBS and that had a really big effect. I think people it did. I mean right down to Lorne Michaels in Chevy Chase meeting each other in line at a screening of Monty python and the holy grail net. Big leading to the kind of the creation of Saturday Night Live in this way. Well, long sold Saturday Night Live to NBC. As a cross between Monty python and sixty minutes that was just pitch, and he actually came and watched us do a show, although I don't recall beating him at that time. I met him when we when we finally appeared city center, and I met all of them Belushi and Aykroyd and Chevy Dino shit was there was a fine time to be doing American comedy. Then because they were really breaking boundaries that show if you think America comedy would be without actually now it's been like a university pouring forth. All these amazingly talented people for the last forty years. I thinking forty nine hundred seventy five going on going on fifty. Yeah. With fifty next year. Okay. Well, it's nine nineteen sixty nine. We're next year is on fiftieth anniversary sale. Yes. But this does Texas back to begin the conversation where the comedy was conceptual rather than being about dealing with was going on at the time each was eight all of the comedy. But matter who the the right is worth for in the pythons. It was all conceptual comedy. Which was the big break. I think with comedy that come before you talking about being dated versus not being dated that idea of wrestling with ideas, rather than trying to do something topical was the shift the quantum shifting Commodore grille. You're you're quite right, and buddy so deliberate shift because we followed the Santa boom. So beyond the fringe lead into a satire, boom and David Frost took it on. And they did that was the week that was the topic of stuff. Exact but we followed that who said, well, we can't do that. Everybody's done that. So when we had a minister, silly walks. He was generic he wasn't an impersonation of somebody that, you know. We wash to get the joke. And if you now look at some of the early S and L's you have to remember, oh, Gerald Ford fell over a lot. That's what Chevy's doing, you know, you you need more information than is contained in the sketch. And so our stuff lasts a bit longer. Because this nothing else that you need to know, it's often it's purely silly all but anything you you wanna now he's contain that. You don't use any backstory story. Are you talking about impersonations there were impersonations there? One reveal in the book, which finally clear something up to me as we John Cleese is doing as the director of Scott of the Arctic that accent, which is always been one of my favorite things reveal who that was in this book, which McGraw. Right. Although John also was doing in mcnaughton. It was also a Scottish incoherent Scottish director who liked the whiskey. Okay. Okay. But that doesn't mean that impersonation aside, and there were impersonation, but still I think this comes from your educational backgrounds the idea of tackling concepts that of even the people don't know them. There's still in some sort of vestige extent in culture, and that idea of taking something that people in one way or another. No and saying this is foolish and by showing you what is foolish about it. You respond to basically taking institutions apart brick by brick which is what art is almost always about isn't it? I mean, isn't that to some extent what you're doing is coming? I think it's interesting that we do make the switch. We pull out of doing television comedy. And we go into we'd made warm very bad film called an adverse having completely different which is awful. And then come on. Bust my child at air took control. We wish we have on television. And we said that anybody called Terry could direct until we. Because we didn't want them directly. Judge job. It's bad enough axiom riding around after to where she. So, you know, the I think is interesting what we did. I think that the holy grail sketch show. And then when we came back to it we made it all about our Therion. And then the next film was all we already had an idea. Bryan was always going to be about religion. So and that was my fault because I think at the opening of holy grail. Sammy said what's your next film going to be an I said Jesus Christ lust for glory. Yes. Big mouth anyway. Any, but John told that was very interesting. He said, that's a very good idea. Nobody's ever done comedy about religion. But doesn't this an all this kind of circuitous conversation takes back to where we start which is about which is that so much of what you guys almost ninety percent of it was conceptual, which was the big break. I mean, as you're talking about the evolution from one film to the next is still about conceptual comedy. Yes. Rather than than than narrative. I mean, charged with the break from and I'm not saying that that's not tertiary bump saying in bold strokes. What it's about and always defined python. To me is it's conceptual comedy rather than being strictly about narrative or strictly about anything topical. Am I mistaken? I think that's right. I think the only one that has narratives Brian. And then it was essential to have a story. I mean, that became more importantly exist as much in terms as it does narrative terms. I'm not saying that these a divorce from that. But that's still no because it was examining the concept of religion. Yes. That was the thing saying, well, what is going on when people do this? And we decided we wouldn't laugh Omar Christianity because you can't really mock mom person says turn the other cheek forgive off to the poor was looking at the bright side of life. Well. But you you you can't mock that so we said, well what you can mock other religions to tell you what you've got to believe or we'll kill you. If you don't believe with that. So the shoe will be a sign if you don't wear the shoot. No, you must wear the shoe on the left side. So it was like dealing with all of medieval European history, which is about dividing institute and trying to kill the other lot. Why is essentially what he was from from the chew. There's really. And that I think was worth examining. And I think the people who are religious actually do enjoy that film because they see it's not mocking Christ Christ Sydney twice once these buffs when they come to the wrong one..

PBS America John Cleese Robin Williams Chevy England Saturday Night Live Beatles Eric idle Josh barrow KCRW Netflix Benyamin Roma president Sherry Europe UK