19 Burst results for "University Of California San"

"university california san" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty On Demand

Armstrong & Getty On Demand

07:54 min | Last month

"university california san" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty On Demand

"The armstrong and getty show five lights has released a new line of hard sauces with full flavors. Flavors include pumpkin. Spice maple pear apple crisp and toasted marshmallow. It sounds like the perfect beverage for anyone. Who's always wanting to drink a yankee candle. Sean used to say pumpkin spice is a bully. Spice flavor bully. That's the term flavor. Bully flavor bully. Yeah we gotta to check in on old sean topic for another day. So i read this with interest the covert endgame is the pandemic over already or are there years to go. Yeah i mean come on. That's what we're all thinking about what we're all concerned about. We're wondering how long till it's more twenty. Nine thousand nine hundred and mark fisher wrote a piece for the washington post. He says the answers coming to kaleidoscopic cavalcade of scenarios some suggested with utmost humility others with mathematical confidence. I think we're all a little tired of the scientists making a pronouncement with mathematical confident. That reminds me. I've got to get to the survey of virus specialists. And how they're treating the copa de give you an idea how out of whack they are with mainstream thinking the pandemic land because deaths finally dropped to about the same level or accustomed to seeing from the flu each year or it will end when the kids are vaccinated or will end because americans are finally exhausted by all the restrictions on daily life and then he gets into a numeral predictions over the course of the pandemic of come up blame and some scientists have sworn off soothsaying but others have built models and make projections and described the hurdles that remain before people can pull off the mask blah so monica gandhi who've quoted before who's an infectious disease specialist and professor of medicine at the university. California san francisco says. I truly truly think we're in the end-game the cases will start plummeting mid to late september of soon on moines by mid october will be a manageable place because the where the viruses a concern for health professionals but not really for general public. We're currently averaging one hundred and fifty thousand cases day. Fifteen hundred deaths a day still. I would have never predicted that. Yeah yeah now. Gandhi basis her optimism on the fact that all previous epidemics of respiratory viruses of ended through the acquisition of immunity whether by vaccination or natural affection although they keep changing they mutate quickly at a cost to themselves and they get weaker over time she says and she thinks that the delta variant that hit the us so hard this summer will mark the peak of the viruses strength. And we'll be in really good shape really soon others disagree Let's see are disagreeing. Because it gets more clicks. That's the question or yeah. I do wonder Some of the nation's most prominent epidemiologists and public health experts. Say we are already at the point that it's no longer a pandemic it's end democ meaning it morphs into something. That is no longer an emergency but rather an annoyance an ugly even painful fact of life that people simply learned to cope with like the flu or common cold. I think we are absolutely in. In conservative. Leaning america self reliant life comes at you. Take some knocks. Sometimes you fall down america. we're already there it. I like to be afraid. Collective blue america. Oh they're still wildly in favor of vaccine mandates and lockdowns and the rest of it says j. batak araya i think i'm mispronouncing that we'd quoted him before from stanford the emergency phase of the diseases over now. We need to work very hard to undo the sense of emergency we should be treating covert is one of two hundred diseases that affect people. I like the cut of his jib Others think now it's not going away but we are clearly at the point where we can't alter life so much anymore. I just i can accept that that there's a certain amount of danger Some people are vaccinated. The government still idiotically refuses to acknowledge that people with natural immunity. Don't need the vaccine or don't need it for a while anyway. Let's move on with life so Stat news is a site that looks at statistics and they said one problem with the listened to your public health. Experts is that the experts often come off as paranoid morbid neurotic. Risk-averse not balls and that's based on this in may of twenty twenty one so that's just a couple of months ago. They asked a whole bunch of epidemiologist about various things. They're comfortable doing or still not comfortable doing around the kobe. The one that stood out the most was What percentage of you've done this recently. Run errands in person. Ninety two percents of epidemiologists had but there were eight percent who had not run errands. Wow brought in mail without precautions. Seventeen percent of epidemiologists are still worried about their mail and will not bring it in without precautions. Do you know anybody who's actually living that way. So these are the people that are informing your county health inspector or your your your school board or whoever about how to treat the covert. They're still worried about getting covered from their male which is seventy four percent had hiked her gathered outdoors with friends but almost a quarter hadn't. Wow wow i only have like eight hundred times right over it began. Yeah which is why i'm dead. I'm speaking to you from beyond the grave. Got a haircut at a salon and barbershop about half had but had not. Wow still found that to be too dangerous bunch. A longhaired paranoia about this. One saw dr for a non urgent appointment. Sixty three percent. Had i like looking at the flip number source so nearly forty percent of epidemiologists won't go to the doctor because it's too scary to be there with all the covert around. I have repeatedly and frankly. I'm enjoying hell so far again. I clearly been killed. Many times over by recklessness again these are the experts that are l- informing our politicians are schools are businesses hugged or shook hands when greeting a friend. Thirty nine percent had done that recently but the other sixty percent of epidemiologists had not. Oh my gosh. that's that's not the way the rest of us are living and it reminds me of that classic piece of medical advice. Were doctors caution. You you know about going to a surgeon. Look if you go to a guy with a knife he's gonna wanna cut. That's what he does. Well if you go to an epidemiologist and ask them what should we think about constantly and alter our lives over what should be our highest priority. Disease disease disease on. They have no ability to balance the other aspects of life in which makes life worth living in mental health than the kids and their needs and education. The rest of it. We've asked obsessive mono maniacs for how we should live our lives. How dumb people that are still scared of their male. Wow get them counseling. No kidding anyway as a person said they come off as paranoid and and certainly out of step with everybody else in the way. We're actually living. Of course these are people that want to cook your steak. Well done all the time. The cdc crowd.

monica gandhi mark fisher flu america batak araya getty armstrong the washington post infectious disease Sean sean moines Gandhi apple san francisco California
"university california san" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:07 min | 9 months ago

"university california san" Discussed on KGO 810

"University, California, San Francisco. Has engineered a tiny antibody capable Neutralizing the coronavirus isn't a piece written and UCSF magazine. And I was like, Yes, I went through this on by trying to wrap my head around What I was saying, Um, I felt like I always do about science that you know. That's science works slowly, deliberately on magnificently. You know, throughout time, we know that it doesn't always work on a on on a scale that we want, but it does work. So I saw the story and I thought it run it by the smartest guys. I know. Dr John Sports Berg, professor Emeritus School of Public Health Division of Infectious diseases and backs analogy, is also part of a joint program. At UC Berkeley and you see ourself, Doc. Thanks for being here. I appreciate it when you saw this. You were you familiar with this before I send it over? Yeah, I I've been following it since April. It's really exciting. Okay, So let's talk about Let's talk about the strange world of viruses and what this proposes. Well. The strange world that you're talking about? Really? Connexus with llamas. And guanacos and camels. It's really interesting. So researchers that you CSF we're looking at a really small Molecules. There's sort of like antibodies, but they're much, much smaller than antibodies, and they were looking at a variety of reasons. We've known about these for about 20 years or so and One thing led to another, and they discovered that some of these really small molecules called nano bodies that were found in llamas, for example. Um some of them mapped pretty well, too. Sites on the virus that causes co Vered. And not only Mapping to some of the sights on that virus, but specifically on the sites that attached to ourselves and if they potentially could block it. And that's what led to them. Studying this further and then Mass producing now these nano bodies with the hope that Maybe they would be a very good and safe therapeutic. Okay, let's back up a second. So the coronavirus it's called Cronin because it looks like a crown. It's got these spikes. And it's also kind of enveloped in this this kind of like this protein coding, right, So when it when it comes up to a cell on and it does it Does it force its way in through through the spikes? Is that the deal? Um, on Or if the vaccine is not, you know, hasn't produced the right antibodies to fight this. It's pretty successful about getting inside and then taking over the machinery of our cell and then reproducing. How did these nanny bodies that do? They stick to the spikes? Is that the deal? Yeah, It's really cool Chip. What? What happens is that well, let's let's first talk about how these viruses get into ourselves. They've got these spikes that you're describing. And there's the virus is now floating around in our bloodstream are floating around in there knows, for example. And not in her bloodstream, but in her nose and her back or throat, and those spikes will attached to Projections that come off of ourselves, but only specific projections that come off of ourselves. What do you mean projections? What is that? Well, there's structure that come off of ourselves, and they're called Ace to receptors and they're used for oneself. So one cell can communicate with another. So the cells in the region and the cells throughout the body or able to communicate through in different ways, And we have lots of different kinds of receptors on ourselves. These on the membrane of the cell, the singer on the surface of ourselves, Okay on this first cell on the top of the side, or I mean or the bottom. I mean, we look at a cell Yeah. If you picture the nose, let's just pick the nose. The lining of the nose on the surface that was exposed to the air. You're gonna have these cells with ease. Receptors coming off of them. And so along floats this virus with this spike, and that spike attach is directly to these ace to receptors and when they walk onto that ace, two receptor. That receptor in the virus is pulled inside of ourselves. And once inside of ourselves, the virus takes over our cellular machinery and starts reproducing itself in the millions and millions of numbers. So what we've got to do is we've got to prevent. That attachment of the virus to those receptors on ourselves, And that's where the nano bodies come in Those really teeny Nah, nobody's specific ones. Will fit onto that spike. The portion of the spikes that attach is and so when the virus starts floating by and Finds us finds a receptor It can't attach because that nano body is stuck onto the virus and that spike portion It's almost like putting mittens on. Kind of it Sort of is, Yeah. It's really just a blocking in a But it just blocks the ability of that virus to attach from here the implications, so it's like Well, you could. You could have an atomizer just something that would spray these nana bodies into your nose or into your throat. If you got exposed to SARS cov to the virus that causes Cove it you could just spray that in and the virus that has a virus particle viral particles that haven't attached. It won't be able to That's interesting. I was assumed that when I inhaled it, it got into my bloodstream pretty quickly. How long does it take when you and if I were in a room and I inhaled some stars, Kobe to which I remember reading it like you could fit 20,000 of these on the head of a pin there pretty damn small. If I inhaled them, they would obviously get caught in. And could they go all the way down into my lungs immediately and getting in my blood that quickly happens? Yeah. What happens is that you inhale them, and they the virus values. Those receptors gets inside of ourselves and starts replicating and that whole process takes a few days typically On average. And then is more and more viral particles are being produced. More more cells are getting infected, so it starts to cascade and more and more cells become infected. In your throat then and then it can go down into your airways and At some point, the virus can get into the blood, although it doesn't need to do that, But it certainly can. And unfortunately, these ace to receptors are not just found in our nose and throat in airways, but they're found in the heart. In the gastrointestinal tract in some other organs, So when the virus can get into the bloodstream, it can get into a variety of places. It is a matter of fact, sometimes when it's just in the back of our throat will swallow it, and that's how it gets into our gastrointestinal tract..

Um gastrointestinal tract professor Emeritus School of P California UCSF San Francisco Dr John Sports Berg UC Berkeley Vered Cronin Kobe
"university california san" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:14 min | 11 months ago

"university california san" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"It was like in the middle of the interview with Dr Gandhi. I knew that people were going to react to this based on how I reacted to the doctor. Now. The whole purpose of the conversation was why we have lost faith in public policy elected officials, experts, people who claim they have science on their side and the fact that it's all been highly politicized. That was the purpose of the interview on purpose of having Dr Gandhi on and and in broader terms. She agrees with me, but she still remains a professor at the university, California, San Francisco, So I knew the moment. She said that she disagreed with how the Trump administration handled this thing. The interview. Could have gone to ways I could have either, you know, picked a fight with her on that Iraqi. I wouldn't pick the fight. I would be responding because she picked the fight on defined out what she didn't like about it. Then I would get into a back and forth with her on that. Or I could have done that, or Could have pulled on that threat a little bit unstable. What? Well hold on hold on a minute because the point she was making about the Trump administration was less about what the Trump administration did in the pandemic. Then it was that she believed that many scientists and doctors and experts Based their opinions based on their their their public profile. What they said on television how they advised other elected officials based on the fact that Trump was in the White House. That means that's the real story here. You disagree with how the White House handled the corona virus pandemic? I'm less concerned about that. Then you wrapping yourselves in science and your PhD and your doctor didn't a lot of these doctors don't even have Medical doctor. It's their public policy, doctorates and whatnot, wrapping yourself in your expertise and giving us your scientific opinion about a virus. And have it be completely shaded and colored and influenced by your own personal political opinion. And that's exactly what she proved. Now a lot. I'm seeing a lot of call. You know what? Go ahead and stay on hold. I'll take your calls on this because it's worth the conversation. And if you if you say you should've defended Trump how many times you have to tell you my job is not to defend.

Dr Gandhi Trump White House San Francisco California
"university california san" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

04:22 min | 11 months ago

"university california san" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Might wanna listen to the show we did on weight loss, and we go really in deficit, the neuro physiology and the brain function of what happens when you eat. I used the fat so I could say the f word. And so I totally get what goes on in your brain with that. It's really hard. But the number one thing I want you to do and you need to do it now, more than ever is get the bad food out of the house. If you have cookies and cakes and doughnuts, or, like someone recently who I know very, very dearly had a half a pumpkin pie in his house, namely me on Git was even sweeten with stevia. So it was like a little better than 90 80% better than a regular pumpkin pie. But it was there. What did I do with it? I eat it. And so you got to get the bad foods out of the house. Because if they're there, you're gonna eat them. Don't bring him home. Don't let people give you cookies and cakes and chocolates. And if they do, here's what I want you to say. Thank you. Don't break somebody's heart. Don't ruin the fact that they thought of you that they went out of the way to make something you bought something and said here. I want you to have this and you say I don't eat that stuff. Now you say thank you. I mean, I'm vegan. I've been vegan for 34 years now and When people still give me cookies and cakes and things like this. I was Oh, my gosh. Thank you. That's so wonderful of you. Thank you for thinking of me, and then I Throat away sometimes, but I can't have it around. I won't eat it. First of all the time vegan. But even if it's vegan, it's still It doesn't mean it's healthy for you so Stress can make you gain weight researches. Miami found that people find themselves in stressful situation or more likely consume consume 40% more food than normal. When you eat foods, especially sugars. It releases it stimulates the part of the brain called the nucleus Documents and nucleus. Documents releases dopamine, So you're getting high. When you're eating sugar And so it's certainly now with cookies and cakes and everything else that's so readily available. You have a little bit and you want what you want more And that goes for crackers and breads, doughnuts or biscuits. So when you start putting sugar in the body, the first reaction that occurs is I really like this brain says I like this. I want more. You listen to our show we did on addiction, and that'll explain that a little more in depth for you. S so you can gain weight It could make you look older. Researchers University, California, San Francisco discovered that stress shortens your telomeres. Telomeres are little flag, yellow little tails that's in your jeans at your blue jeans for genes in your body. And as you get older and as a telomeres get shorter, and that's actually a way we can measure the aging process in your body. And the new cells don't grow is quickly If the telomeres are long and functional and so stress can shorten your telomeres and you get the wrinkles, the weak muscles, the poor eyesight, all that occurs. With damage from the telomeres, and that happens from mental, chemical and physical stress. Once again we can measure that stress. We could do a cortisol test in our office and we can measure where your stress level is, from a chemical standpoint and then monitor it. But we want to find out why Why do you have this stress? And nice part is that most cases you can control it and again with pain. If you want to make an appointment, come see us. We have offices and marry out of the loop. Stockbridge in West Cobb. We have chiropractic. We have medical. We could do prp injections. Prp is like the I believe it's going to be the next wave and health care. Where we take your own blood cells take out the plate. Let's spin him down, concentrate them and re inject them back into the body. And for arthritis, knee, arthritis, shoulder, arthritis, spine arthritis folks, If you have it can't imagine wouldn't do this. It's really silly not to and in our office is not just prp. We can adjust the bones back into place to take the stress off the bones. So it's not just an injection. It's actually a whole protocol to put the bones back in place. Get to die, it straightened out. And in most cases results like off the charts. The research is very, very clear. NPR pee on Def You want to follow us on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. I want you to do that at Dr Joe Esposito. That's really important to do that for me, so we can build a bigger social media presence. And then that's my that your that your feet. All the advice. I give you that your fee for the show. Dr. Joe, calm, just follow. Just follow us that Dr Joe Esposito on Dad's gonna help build up our following. And if you do want to make an appointment, if you're just sick and tired of being sick and tired, just go to our website do with It's usually 3 75. We've reduced that first visit to 1 99 exam X rays consultation, first visit going over the X rays on the next visit and going over nutritional protocol for you all that's included. We accept most insurance is for treatment after that. And if you've ever been in a car accident.

Dr Joe Esposito arthritis physical stress dopamine California cortisol Miami Researchers University San Francisco West Cobb Facebook NPR YouTube Instagram
"university california san" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"university california san" Discussed on 710 WOR

"With that brain. And they gave them the chair 30 NFL players who had memory problems. They would depressed. They were losing their personality. They weren't interacting with other people. It's a very bad sign. Catch the university, California, Irvine School of Medicine. Take a day gave him basically a multi vitamin. Officials on alcohol with a lock on it really hoped it was restoring their memory that was restoring her personality that was restoring their their their ability to control their anger and their emotions. There were remembering things like they're supposed to meet somebody for lunch and had a real effect on them. It had a real effect on him. It's in the Journal of psychoactive drugs and had a real effect. So I'm going to talk about Alzheimer's patients. But of course, if you're listening to me and understanding what I'm saying, you do not have elsewhere. Most people will not get Alzheimer's, but it does happen. About up to 25% of people over the age of 60 developed mild cognitive impairment, which al car with a light helps to slow down. The brain has shrunk a bit. They're really having problems with their memory. And having problems understanding things, you know, like directions to do things, etcetera. The problem is, most of those people develop Alzheimer's most of those people so alcohol with a lift if you like that data is as a way to help lower the risk of developing Alzheimer's. It really stabilizers to bring But if you already have Alzheimer sadly, I mean nobody's winning with that disease that slows down. The progression of the pathology. It helps these people keep their memory for a longer time. So here's the journal Molecular Psychology. That's the Department of psychiatry. The University of Pittsburgh Medical School on there talking about al car. They said in a double blind controlled study a randomized controlled study. Al car helps with major depressive disorder. That's a kind of depression that occurs in ageing people. Alcohol is great for depression in ageing people because it's really safe. It works really quickly that doesn't have side affection. It's really good for the brain. And they said what Alzheimer's disease. And he said both of these diseases are highly prevalent in the geriatric population. They're talking about all the different ways that al car helps protect you from depression and house farmers on that it even helps what treatment So his current medical research and opinion that's the Department of Geriatric Medicine Weddington Hospital in London, England, and it's a randomized, double blind placebo controlled human clinical trial shorts instead of your trial. It's 24 weeks, so it's about six months. And it gave people with dementia Suspected Alzheimer's, because you never 100% No, it's Alzheimer's until postmortem. They gave him 1000 MG of al car twice a day or placebo. And they said there was a an improvement and these people remembering names on remembering people's faces on who they were. Their memory was improving aspects of short term memory. That's what they lose quickly. That's why he asked you to sing same question repeatedly like that. You'll sit down and with somebody with Alzheimer's, and they'll say, Is it raining today and you say No, It's not raining, Mom. On a minute later goal. Is it raining today and you're and you're tempted to take. Mommy already asked me, but that that's not fruitful, She'll say, No, it's not raining today on in a minute later, they'll say, Is it raining today that short term memory That's the first thing to go with Alzheimer's. So they said that that to short term memory was improving. Aspect of short term memory were improving with the alcohol, and they said that there was less deterioration they were holding on to their their memory and their personality and a recognition of things longer. So his University of Pittsburgh Medical School as to journal Nora Biology of aging. Once they're talking about al car and people with Alzheimer's disease. Now we don't treat Alzheimer's. I mean that stares, doctors on hand and these places where they treat people in Alzheimer's. But I'm saying if it's good for Alzheimer's imagine how good it is for your brain. Okay, so they gave ALC are the people with Alzheimer's. Compared to placebo. Andi, they found it really meant something. And improved that many mental status there many mental test status, you know, recognizing the word horse and what horse looks like etcetera. Knowing what country Iran and what month it is. On the Alzheimer's disease assessment scale. But they found that it was repairing a brain cells. They were getting the Foster Atala Colin on a foster title Ethanol amine and a foster title of Masha tall Andi oils from krill, oil and fish oils. On the foster total sharing back into their brain cells because these make the brain cells Ana, and so it normalized all these things, and it also allowed their brain to make energy again. All of these things are trashed. What house commerce issues. So University of Pittsburgh medical schools saying Hey, al car is useful. So his university apartment in Italy the department of Internal Medicine, I know they make that that cold cut over there in Parma. They're famous for that. I forgot the name of Kohl cut. I don't need Cole coach. Yes, The International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Research. And they gave patients over the age of 65 with memory impairment. They did not have Full blown out there had mild levels off dementia, very mild levels. They were just started about dementia. There were all 65 years of age or older. They had mild mental impairment. They gave him 1000 MG of al car twice a day for three months or placebo, and they found the same thing. The ALC are really improved their behavior their self control. They did better on memory tests. They did better. What paying attention. They did better. What? Having conversations and remembering words and faces and names. They said the stuff was therapeutic. On. They said One of the things that was doing was restoring a shuttle calling, which was shut to you before before. Now I have more studies on Ah, on AL car with people with with With Alzheimer's, and I have studies off Ayla and people with house farmers barren man al Coronel work better together. So in the studies, they're using them separately. They actually will work better if they're using together. But then both two studies with the L. A, like two year long studies was preventing further progression on worsening of memory loss. And people with mild Alzheimer's on their studies of people without card. I just read your I mean, I've studied from a university, California, San Diego. I mean, from all over the place from U C L A. This stuff works. They also believe that it helps lower your risk of developing Parkinson's disease. When we come back, I'm going to discuss how al Car restores your release the brain derived neurotrophic factor. I think that pistol ball out.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease University of Pittsburgh Medic California memory impairment NFL Irvine School of Medicine ALC al Coronel depressive disorder Journal of psychoactive drugs University of Pittsburgh Department of Geriatric Medici depression Department of psychiatry Molecular Psychology Andi Parkinson
"university california san" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"university california san" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Eyes anywhere from the low sixties coast to low seventies around the bay to the eighties inland. Time for forum on at 907. Welcome to forum Michael Krasny. The Bay Area has been suffering some of the worst air quality in the world in recent days, and this morning on forum, we're going to get the latest on the air how to protect yourself and your loved ones and when the region might get some relief. And we want to hear from you right now. What questions do you have about a requalify? You can email us forum dot org's That's forum at Torgau or call us at our toll free number, which is 8667336786. Joining us now is Brian Garcia. He's warning coordination meteorologist for the National Weather Service in the San Francisco Bay Area in Monterey, and welcome Brian Garcia. Michael. Good to have you also wanna welcome John Bombs who joins us for the segment professor of medicine and air quality expert at University, California San Francisco Welcome John Bombs. Thank you, Michael. Glad to have you both here and Brian. Let me begin with you. Let's get a little weather forecast here. We've been through a record breaking 28 straight days of Ah, spare the air, and it's apparently at least according to forecasts, I believe going to improve and maybe even changed today is that Yeah, You know, there is going to be some marginal improvement today. But really, the Marine layer is locking this poor air quality into our area and so long as we don't mix that out, it's going to stick around. And we really don't see that mixing out really kind of the big broom from the Pacific coming in and sweeping it out until late this week in through the weekend as we get a broad Pacific system actually sweeping across the area. Well, the Windsor shifting in the temperature's air cooling, so we're going to get clear skies and some better air quality and especially in the North Bay. Yeah, that will occur definitely will see a little bit better. Air quality will see the smoke kind of mix out in the lower layers a little bit, but we're still gonna have a lot of smoke over the area and any time that we start to calm the air, in other words, not a lot of wind. We can allow some of that smoke to fall into the lower layers. And then every night is that marine inversion sets up. It gets trapped in that lower layer, and that's kind of what's been bringing us. The low visibilities. The poor air quality just kind of really uncomfortable. Shins and let me talk to active bombs with you about the effect of all this on health. There are no specific studies about the effect of welfare smoke on covert 19. But preliminary research actually has linked air pollution, too. Over 19 susceptibility, severity and death And we do know the world for smoking air pollution generally. Is of great concern, especially in worsening preexisting conditions that we definitely know. That's correct, Michael. There's actually a lot of literature supporting respond. Torrey Health effects from while fire smoke, especially for people with pre existing Chronic illness like asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. COPD. Usually caused by smoking. But while fire smoke in tobacco smoke are similar, except there's no nicotine and the wildfire smoke, So we know that people with asthma and COPD will suffer exacerbations at an increased rate. During these 28 days of bad air. What we've learned the last couple years is that cardiovascular outcomes also increase During this bed air period due to a wildfire smoke. There's a study from the 2015 wildfire season in California, so not as bad as the last few years. It showed that while fire smoke fine particles, increased health care utilization that's emergency department visits and hospitalizations for heart attacks and strokes. Yeah, and neurological complaints as well. Like strokes. You mentioned the cardiovascular. There's really also what we're talking about. Here is the greatest concern over these microscopic particles. Air About 2.5 microns in size about 30 times smaller than the width of a human hair, and they can be inhaled deep into the lungs, and they can cause all kinds of information. That's correct. They cause lung inflammation. So that's the direct effect on people like with asthma COPD, but that inflammation can spill over into the systemic circulation and affect the heart. And you mentioned stroke as inner logic condition is also a cardiovascular condition. Basically, stroke is like a heart attack of the brain. Get on best of most age advice. Stay home shelter in place with the windows closed and, ideally, maybe get an air purifier. Yes. You know, my wife has asthma. And we have two portable HEPA air filters, one for our bedroom and one for the dining room where I am right now where I've been doing most of my work since I've been locked down with covert covert 19 epidemic thie. Other thing to remember is that If you have to go outside, not to exercise because exercise, especially if you're jogging or cycling to the point where you have to breathe through your mouth that increases the effective dose of the wildfire smoke. When your muscles need more oxygen, you have to breathe more called increased minute ventilation on you bypassed the filtering mechanism, Mother nose when you breathe through your mouth, so we highly recommend people not exercise, especially when we're in the purple zone. When the air quality index is above 200. Time bombs is with us professor of medicine and air quality expert at UCSF and Let me go to a caller. John has a question about air purifiers. John. Join us. You're on the air..

Michael Krasny John Bombs COPD asthma Brian Garcia Bay Area professor of medicine San Francisco Bay San Francisco Monterey lung inflammation UCSF North Bay National Weather Service California nicotine Chronic illness
"university california san" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"university california san" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Could cast a little bit of a Paul. Although everybody knows it's sort of a rear view mirror and looking at this morning's mood, it's fairly steady. The dollar's a little bit lower. That's kind of a good sign. Bureau training at a dollar 18 47. Dalian at 106 57. The yield on the 10 year last traded with the yield of 70 basis points, W T. I could $42.31 out of earnings coming today and this week. Companies like Hong Kong exchanges and clearing JD dot com Alibaba loss again Wal Mart and Home Depot this week so lots of micro data as well as the macro All right. That's enough data on markets. Let's get news with that. Baxter in San Francisco head Alright, Brian. Thank you. New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda ardor and has delayed the election for four weeks to October 17th she says. After careful confrontation consultation with all party leader, she says it's the best way to manage the election fairly. Taiwan has formally signed an agreement by 66 of the latest F 16 jets built by Lockheed Martin. Partial restoration of diplomatic ties between the U A e and Israel established Israel drops annexation plans of the West Bank. Democratic virtual convention begins tomorrow in the U. S runs through Thursday. Trump administration backs off the President Birther conspiracy theory regarding Kamala Harris Victoria has extended its state of emergency as the death toll from Cove in 19 has surpassed 300 now extended by four weeks to September 13th. South Korean officials are warning of a potential virus flare up. At a soul church. Toki reports the largest number of infections now being reported in the 20 to 30 age demographic, and the Italy is going to follow Spain's lead and closed down nightclubs again in San Francisco. I'm Ed Baxter, this is Bloomberg. Kathleen. Ed. Thanks so much. Let's get right back to our guests. Brett Ewing, He's chief market strategist. At first Franklin Financial Service is joining us from Tallahassee were bred, I guess. States certainly had its its rough Covad ride recently. As you said, it's peaked and come down. I want you, Teo. Connect the dots between your views on How the drivers has shifted in a nutshell, but then connecting it to epicenter stocks, which you think are going to start rally again. What epicenter stocks Well, we like to think of everything but the Kobe stocks, right all your large cap tech that has been leading this rally for the last three months. Way feel that they have done their job. And the reopening or the epicenter. Stocks are going toe pick up from here as the we believe, as states and counties start reopening and continue to reopen a CZ long as we have Some positive news with these cases continuously declining Hospitalizations and also eventually death, which we think occurs later this month. Economic revival theme. It's It's a big complex. We've seen the money flow into all kinds of asset classes, but that's one area where not much money has flown. If you look at value encyclical, how do you separate the Companies that are most likely to benefit from the ones that may be troubled for some period of time. Well, it takes a lot of research. You've got to get in there and do the hard work and dig through the rubble. There are some Jim's out there that just aren't evaluations. I mean, it's just unbelievable. They just got left behind that. No money flow came into this area. If if you couldn't game, a company like Amazon or Google, um, earlier on in this in this pandemic. Then no money really would would flow into that area. And so what? We're what we believe you're goingto occur through the end of the year in 2021. Whether we get a bar, a vaccine or not. We do believe that the reopening trade is there and you've got to start getting ahead of that. If you wait for vaccine to come out, I think the opportunity will be the most of that opportunity will be already be missed. When there's all these other things that are happening. The UCSF Unity Unity University, California's San Francisco Every surgeries have got you looking at Nono bodies to give you something a nasal spray to prevent the virus, so there's so much happening. Give me some names or more specific industries where I should be looking to dive in now to be ahead of this curve that I'm going to miss, if I'm not there. Well, I think that there's opportunity within the materials Industrials and the financials, I think, also in real estate. I believe, though there is just Have it moved as much. And by the way, if you look at a Reed index Not all reach our created equally. So you've got to get in there and dive around were were bottoms up firm and we we get in there and do a research. We love the small cap and mid cap space right now. And by the way as this reopening trade, it started to occur as cases have been falling. You can see that through the I w N or the Russell 2000 and what we've seen is a lot of money flow coming into those. And you, you're witnessing a breakout from the junior high. That were set back earlier, So the reopening trade was going on early and then we started getting as we reopen cases came up in July, and then it got stalled out. We think it's opening back up. On that same theme. If you look at areas that haven't had a lot of attention, what about especially if you look at most companies are global now so they might be listed in Hong Kong, they might be listed. You know, in a place like China, but they are doing global business. Would you look at Asia? You know, I think that if If this dollar move Gets a little more get more legs on it, and it gets more verified. I think that if you had a move like we had in the seventies, with dollar decline or.

San Francisco Hong Kong Ed Baxter Dalian Israel Alibaba Home Depot Covad Wal Mart Asia New Zealand Taiwan UCSF Unity Unity University Kamala Harris Victoria Brett Ewing Teo Kathleen Lockheed Martin President Prime Minister
"university california san" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"university california san" Discussed on KGO 810

"Siri's checkout kgo is John Rothman show. I was thrilled when they changed my middle school from Garfield to Martin Luther King. I don't think we have to have all of our schools named After all Dead white President Washington really created this country. Jefferson defined this country Should we change the name of Washington D. C. I'm in politics. How about taking down the Washington Monument? The Lincoln Memorial, the Jefferson No, I'm not in favor of that. I was a teacher in Oakland for 40 years. The kids need to see themselves reflected in the faculty. They need to see themselves reflected in what we have values for. So if every name is someone dead white presidents not dead white presidents. This's George Washington. This is Thomas for standing here with the label there. But George Washington, But if it weren't for George Washington, we wouldn't have a country. I don't agree with that at all. Join the conversation with John Rothman weeknight 6 to 9 on KGO Aten. Franklin Show continues. We're making it easier for you to listen at home simply say Google play KGO 8 10 Once again, Here's Chip Franklin. All right. Phone numbers 80 88 10. We're kind of in the middle of a nightmare right now trying to figure out exactly where we're headed in this pandemic with leadership that we have. It's frightening to say the least. I'm going to get a quick call in but saloon conquered by Louis on KGO. Thanks for calling. Up. There's no Lou Lou's gone sorry. See what I'm gonna ask you to hold because I'm and I'll bring you up with questions for my next guest is Dr John Schwartzberg. He's a clinical professor Att. UC Berkeley and the part of their joint medical program with the University, California, San Francisco. He's a specialist in infectious diseases and vaccine ology. We can talk to him about sending kids back to school, and we can answer a lot of your questions. If you know about masks, if you and I will throw you in it if you want to hang on. I'll put you on to talk to him and you can ask questions, and I'll just kind of I'll try to stay out of it as much as I can. Because I know a lot of you have questions I want to talk about, you know, again, some of our guests and you know the 76 year old caller from Marin, who was going to the grocery storm with all those pre existing conditions. It seems to me that somebody should be delivering groceries to her. You know, if you were my mom, that's what I would have said. So I mean, you know, thes Air times to help each other out. And these are the times to try to encourage people to wear masks instead of screaming.

George Washington Dr John Schwartzberg John Rothman KGO Aten Washington Monument Washington Lou Lou Jefferson Siri Martin Luther King Franklin Show Lincoln Memorial Chip Franklin President Garfield Marin Google Oakland Thomas Louis
"university california san" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

09:13 min | 1 year ago

"university california san" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Have tried to shoot to you know bounce a check or or whatever they were supposed to call there and he'd maybe you had a few pops as far as breaking dawn and it you know that's what some people say it was a new breed or whatever and they go from that to their on his knees one officer in particular for nine minutes he goes into distress and he dies it's all on video and then you find out there's several other angles of it their whole thought well he was rich he was resisting anything people should be in our people should be pissed off people should probably show social distancing just put it out there but you have a right to be pissed loosely but then it becomes something that it shouldn't become we don't need to nobody wants to see it in the community and that's a lot of times what happens is a lot of people come from other parts of communities and they come there to raise hell to cause chaos to do something absolutely ridiculous because not interested in anything other than themselves as self serving and see what I can do and data and then they do something stupid it ignites something next thing you know you're burning down buildings attacking people all the stuff happens and then you go back to wherever your community is and you leave a message for those people who want justice who knew him who want this thing to be seen all the way to the end of the conclusion in a right way and having their voice heard to clean up the mess we don't need that nobody wants that and you don't know what's to come I urge all protesters be safe doing the right thing and make sure that Mr Lloyd remains the center of this and we don't get distracted by somebody's momentary outrage it is it would not be what it will not uphold Mr Floyd's dignity to do something like that no it doesn't it doesn't everybody should be pissed now right everybody everybody should should look at the situation and be upset and frustrated and at the same time seeing this thing through in the right way without the kind of stuff that we saw last night is is what we need to have happen three two three five three twenty four twenty three at Chad Benson shows your Twitter you tweet as you could text the program as well yes two point one million people filed for unemployment last week down a little bit from the week before overall though since the pandemic started forty million people have lost their jobs some have well their jobs may never come back some they've been furloughed and they'll probably have the opportunity come back a good portion of people but what comes next right like that's the big worry at this point now where are we in the middle of the the I. are we getting to the point where the eye of the storm right so the big storms coming there was some but there's either storm that calm in between are we going to have a second wave or is going to dissipate and break up that's you know we're hearing all of us the second wave it's this that the other I don't know could disappear altogether these absolutely there is a possibility that that that you know bracing for a second way we don't get a second way and there is a possibility the second wave could be coming because it could get to the point where we see the saying slowly but surely go away and then we have some calm and then the second wave isn't much if there is one we don't know what the future holds but obviously something is going to have to come out of this and everybody's doing the best they can and that's guessing you know we often talk about the possibility of a second wave or of an outbreak when you re opening we don't have to accept that as an inevitability I'm particularly when people starting thinking about the fall and I want people to really appreciate that this could happen but it is not inevitable and that's that's good it's not inevitable it's not inevitable it's a possibility thank it may come back but not as bad it may come back but the instead of saying you know it comes back more like a flu as far as the the rate of in fact I mean these are all things that are possible remember we we thought we're gonna have viewed two million dead and yes we passed a hundred thousand mark and you know trump save we can keep it under a hundred thousand that's good I don't think we get past sixty thousand but we have but I know that we're gonna get that two million so it's not inevitable but we still need to figure out how we get to the point we have a therapeutic that we can really really rely on it while we find a vaccine and that is who knows when but we take the right steps and this is the problem with the right what is the right steps that's the problem right like you hear about you talk about you know Hey we can do a lot of things if we do the kinds of things that we're putting in place now to have the work force the system and the will to do the kinds of things that are the clear and effective identification isolation and contact tracing we can prevent this second wave that we're talking about if we do it correctly but here's the problem with that there it's a novel virus they know more than we do but they're also in the same situation that they don't understand it completely without you said that over number I'm not the expert in this I'm not an expert in this I in this particular virus and there's a lot of things that that that he's learning and that all the other doctors and scientists across the globe are learning experts now say what six feet may not be enough what yeah six feet six feet so we've been told six feet six feet six feet increasing evidence for sars cove dash to cover nineteen suggested six feet which the who recommends is probably not enough so we've been told six three six three six three now that may not be enough she on one of the national sun Yat sen university Taiwan committee Prather and Dr Robert Schooley of university California San Diego said a large portion of the cover nineteen spread appears to be occurring through airborne transmission of aerosols end of the six feet it just may not be enough so now you're like okay so you told me this now it's this and there's over here it's the frustrating side of things of we're finding things out kind of as they do and then we hear one thing and we go with that we think we're doing a right only finance and and that's the frustrating thing I think the best thing we can do and every doctor will tell you whether it's the flu or its scope in nineteen washing your hands trying not to touch your face in particular all eyes and your nose is going to what is going to really eliminate probably ninety five percent of what could infect you and that that's it good hygiene goes a super long way but six straight mmhm good god that was not wanting to really tell me was it twenty feet and how we get a social distance at a hundred feet at this point in time three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three that's events and shows your Twitter tweet at me wouldn't pop project all of them talking Ernesto tomorrow they are it's weird because times are people are struggling a a you know we were talking about you know giving and people still giving doing all they possibly can but they're the focus of giving stuff is changed to a lot of what's going on with with Kobe but oddly enough is that we're so busy because we have so many first responders or helping with it with with the dogs and he's got a new dog she's trying to you know he's got a foster is they just finished out their thing out here in Phoenix and it's it's it's a really interesting situation at but they need your help if you can give it's it's an amazing organization these animals are are are out there and they're helping our first responders our veterans who come home wounded and struggling with PTSD to to rejoin society in such a way and have that that part of them that is with them always you can give in so many ways cash is great you go to smiled on Amazon dot com the supporting group but if you have.

officer
Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

On The Media

06:54 min | 1 year ago

Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

"President trump who's told states to fend for themselves has had female blocking orders for vital equipment secured by governors some of them anyway so the government can buy them instead this week FEMA see is that in order for five hundred ventilators from a private company obtained by democratic Colorado governor Jared Paul is only to have trump give back a hundred of them at what he called the request of the state's endangered Republican senator Cory Gardner Thursday's Denver post editorial declared trump is playing a disgusting political game with our lives but the trump administration says it's got a plan and that it's working White House adviser Peter Navarro April second these guys up here doing a heck of a job organizing the supply chain well I think that's news to a lot of medical providers no I'm levy is a national health care reporter for the LA times trying to follow the cultic nineteen supply chain I can't say I've talked to many hospitals or doctors offices or clinics around the country who feel that the supply chain is being managed in anything close to a rational way that's for sure and we can't seem to get answers from FEMA or the White House about what system if any is being used to balance the needs a couple weeks ago I was speaking with the head of the Texas academy of family physicians who working with the golfing buddy of his managed to in about a half million masks over the border from Mexico and then spent about seventy two hours getting them to rural hospitals and doctors offices around Texas because the state of Texas didn't have anything to distribute so you've got the system in which everybody's running around trying to get masks and ventilators and everything else and then on top of that is a totally opaque system of what appears to be haphazard intervention by the federal government on some supplies but not all of them everyone is completely perplexed we hear that trump is having no problem directing to Florida whatever Florida seems to need so zero which is the agency that is allegedly responsible for distributing supplies from the strategic national stockpile has claimed that they have some formula for distributing medical supplies that reflects states in large metro areas relative populations and the relative severity of corona virus outbreaks they are actually shipping things across the country however it's impossible to find out what that formula is whether or not allowances are being made in one way or another four criteria that have not been identified president trump hasn't been shy about claiming that he's willing to reward its friends and punish his enemies the conspiracy minded person might think well is there some nefarious methods to how these supplies are getting distributed or not we just don't know what difference does it really make if we know or we don't know what the formula is for distributing this stuff this is taxpayer money that we're talking about private actors in the market of course don't have an obligation to be transparent about what they're doing because there's no expectation under normal circumstances that they're acting in the public interest we hope that the government is acting in the public interest but without transparency who knows who's accountable for this who's in charge is it rear admiral John Paul love check who's at the head of FEMA's coronavirus supply chain task force is it FEMA director Peter Gaynor is it Peter Navarro who is reportedly coordinating private and public sector communication maybe it's the Jared Kushner or the invisible hand isn't really fundamentally the president and no one else you know without clear lines of authority things are not getting done as far as we know in a particularly efficient way nor do we know that however they're being done is being done in a lawful way frankly if for example the president's son in law is dialing up private companies and asking them to give support in one way or another to the supply chain challenges what assurances are being made to those companies about what they can expect I'm talking about promises that are made the company acts that if they help out that they'll be made whole in the end with they'll be reimbursed at a certain level without a process all of that is open to question is there a way to have an informed data driven approach to this as Jared Kushner said the federal government was engaged in if in fact the federal government isn't engaged in an informed data driven approach can big business small business health officials state officials do this on their own so the facts on the ground suggests that this can't happen on its own no that's not to say that there aren't a lot of efforts by individual actors some of them quite influential to play a constructive role I mean we've seen a number of large companies including apple for example say we are going to use our connections to the supply chain to procurer masks and we're going to distribute them the owner of the New England Patriots flew the patriots plane to China to go pick up a shipment of masks and flew back to Boston the problem is when you have this sort of thousand points of light approach to procuring and distributing needed supplies what ends up happening is that well connected medical centers that have relationships with large companies either because they do business with them or because they're located in their backyards are often times at the top of the list so for example sales force made a donation to the university California San Francisco Medical Center because they have a long standing relationship both being based in San Francisco does UCSF knew that equipment more than a hospital in New York City or New Jersey that's a lot to ask of sales force to try to make that determination they don't have any expertise in

Fema President Trump
"university california san" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"university california san" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This information age that we live in it was a pretty stupid to be the commanding officers of like this meanwhile president trump who's told states to fend for themselves has had female blocking orders for vital equipment secured by governors some of them anyway so the government can buy them instead this week FEMA see is that in order for five hundred ventilators from a private company obtained by democratic Colorado governor Jared Paul is only to have trump give back a hundred of them at what he called the request of the state's endangered Republican senator Cory Gardner Thursday's Denver post editorial declared trump is playing a disgusting political game with our lives but the trump administration says it's got a plan and that it's working White House adviser Peter Navarro April second these guys up here doing a heck of a job organizing the supply chain well I think that's news to a lot of medical providers no I'm levy is a national health care reporter for the LA times trying to follow the cold pick nineteen supply chain I can't say I've talked to many hospitals or doctors offices or clinics around the country who feel that the supply chain is being managed in anything close to a rational way that's for sure and we can't seem to get answers from FEMA or the White House about what system if any is being used to balance the needs a couple weeks ago I was speaking with the head of the Texas academy of family physicians who working with the golfing buddy of his managed to in about a half million masks over the border from Mexico and then spent about seventy two hours getting them to rural hospitals and doctors offices around Texas because the state of Texas didn't have anything to distribute so you've got the system in which everybody's running around trying to get masks and ventilators and everything else and then on top of that is a totally opaque system of what appears to be haphazard intervention by the federal government on some supplies but not all of them everyone is completely perplexed we hear that trump is having no problem directing to Florida whatever Florida seems to need so zero which is the agency that is allegedly responsible for distributing supplies from the strategic national stockpile has claimed that they have some formula for distributing medical supplies that reflects states in large metro areas relative populations and the relative severity of corona virus outbreaks they are actually shipping things across the country however it's impossible to find out what that formula is whether or not allowances are being made in one way or another four criteria that have not been identified president trump hasn't been shy about claiming that he's willing to reward its friends and punish his enemies the conspiracy minded person might think well is there some nefarious method to how these supplies are getting distributed or not we just don't know what difference does it really make if we know or we don't know what the formula is for distributing this stuff this is taxpayer money that we're talking about private actors in the market of course don't have an obligation to be transparent about what they're doing because there's no expectation under normal circumstances that they're acting in the public interest we hope that the government is acting in the public interest but without transparency who knows who's accountable for this who's in charge is it rear admiral John Paul love check who's at the head of FEMA's coronavirus supply chain task force is it FEMA director Peter Gaynor is it Peter Navarro who is reportedly coordinating private and public sector communication maybe it's the Jared Kushner or the invisible hand is it really fundamentally the president and no one else you know without clear lines of authority things are not getting done as far as we know in a particularly efficient way nor do we know that however they're being done is being done in a lawful way frankly if for example the president's son in law is dialing up private companies and asking them to give support in one way or another to the supply chain challenges what assurances are being made to those companies about what they can expect I'm talking about promises that are made the company acts that if they help out that they'll be made whole in the end with they'll be reimbursed at a certain level without a process all of that is open to question is there a way to have an informed data driven approach to this as Jared Kushner said the federal government was engaged in if in fact the federal government isn't engaged in an informed data driven approach can big business small business health officials state officials do this on their own so the facts on the ground suggests that this can't happen on its own no that's not to say that there aren't a lot of efforts by individual actors some of them quite influential to play a constructive role I mean we've seen a number of large companies including apple for example say we are going to use our connections to the supply chain to procurer masks and we're going to distribute them the owner of the New England Patriots flew the patriots plane to China to go pick up a shipment of masks and flew back to Boston the problem is when you have this sort of thousand points of light approach to procuring and distributing needed supplies what ends up happening is that well connected medical centers that have relationships with large companies either because they do business with them or because they're located in their backyards are often times at the top of the list so for example sales force made a donation to the university California San Francisco Medical Center because they have a long standing relationship both being based in San Francisco does UCSF knew that equipment more than a hospital in New York City or New Jersey that's a lot to ask of sales force to try to make that determination they don't have any expertise in doing that you know apple donated those ten million and ninety five masks for healthcare workers we asked them and they they wouldn't tell us do we know that they actually did nope what did you think of this piece in the Atlantic last month by Zeynep Tufekci she wrote that one of the major catalysts for the spread of the pandemic so much faster than it needed to was an over reliance on linear thinking we can trust that the ventilator shortage can be solved by making more ventilators but if we do we completely overlook the crucial factor of the system itself and the problem of fair and expedient distribution in systems quote multiple things can go wrong together it is easier to talk about well we just need to make more ventilators envisioning a successful civic minded distribution system I think it's more challenging healthcare in general no matter how complicated it is I've been covering health care for more than a decade I can tell you before this crisis I didn't think much about the supply chain part of the equation either okay thank you very much good to be with you thanks no I'm levy is a national health care.

president
Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

On the Media

06:54 min | 1 year ago

Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

"President trump who's told states to fend for themselves has had female blocking orders for vital equipment secured by governors some of them anyway so the government can buy them instead this week FEMA see is that in order for five hundred ventilators from a private company obtained by democratic Colorado governor Jared Paul is only to have trump give back a hundred of them at what he called the request of the state's endangered Republican senator Cory Gardner Thursday's Denver post editorial declared trump is playing a disgusting political game with our lives but the trump administration says it's got a plan and that it's working White House adviser Peter Navarro April second these guys up here doing a heck of a job organizing the supply chain well I think that's news to a lot of medical providers no I'm levy is a national health care reporter for the LA times trying to follow the cold pick nineteen supply chain I can't say I've talked to many hospitals or doctors offices or clinics around the country who feel that the supply chain is being managed in anything close to a rational way that's for sure and we can't seem to get answers from FEMA or the White House about what system if any is being used to balance the needs a couple weeks ago I was speaking with the head of the Texas academy of family physicians who working with the golfing buddy of his managed to in about a half million masks over the border from Mexico and then spent about seventy two hours getting them to rural hospitals and doctors offices around Texas because the state of Texas didn't have anything to distribute so you've got the system in which everybody's running around trying to get masks and ventilators and everything else and then on top of that is a totally opaque system of what appears to be haphazard intervention by the federal government on some supplies but not all of them everyone is completely perplexed we hear that trump is having no problem directing to Florida whatever Florida seems to need so zero which is the agency that is allegedly responsible for distributing supplies from the strategic national stockpile has claimed that they have some formula for distributing medical supplies that reflects states in large metro areas relative populations and the relative severity of corona virus outbreaks they are actually shipping things across the country however it's impossible to find out what that formula is whether or not allowances are being made in one way or another four criteria that have not been identified president trump hasn't been shy about claiming that he's willing to reward its friends and punish his enemies the conspiracy minded person might think well is there some nefarious method to how these supplies are getting distributed or not we just don't know what difference does it really make if we know or we don't know what the formula is for distributing this stuff this is taxpayer money that we're talking about private actors in the market of course don't have an obligation to be transparent about what they're doing because there's no expectation under normal circumstances that they're acting in the public interest we hope that the government is acting in the public interest but without transparency who knows who's accountable for this who's in charge is it rear admiral John Paul love check who's at the head of FEMA's coronavirus supply chain task force is it FEMA director Peter Gaynor is it Peter Navarro who is reportedly coordinating private and public sector communication maybe it's the Jared Kushner or the invisible hand is it really fundamentally the president and no one else you know without clear lines of authority things are not getting done as far as we know in a particularly efficient way nor do we know that however they're being done is being done in a lawful way frankly if for example the president's son in law is dialing up private companies and asking them to give support in one way or another to the supply chain challenges what assurances are being made to those companies about what they can expect I'm talking about promises that are made the company acts that if they help out that they'll be made whole in the end with they'll be reimbursed at a certain level without a process all of that is open to question is there a way to have an informed data driven approach to this as Jared Kushner said the federal government was engaged in if in fact the federal government isn't engaged in an informed data driven approach can big business small business health officials state officials do this on their own so the facts on the ground suggests that this can't happen on its own no that's not to say that there aren't a lot of efforts by individual actors some of them quite influential to play a constructive role I mean we've seen a number of large companies including apple for example say we are going to use our connections to the supply chain to procurer masks and we're going to distribute them the owner of the New England Patriots flew the patriots plane to China to go pick up a shipment of masks and flew back to Boston the problem is when you have this sort of thousand points of light approach to procuring and distributing needed supplies what ends up happening is that well connected medical centers that have relationships with large companies either because they do business with them or because they're located in their backyards are often times at the top of the list so for example sales force made a donation to the university California San Francisco Medical Center because they have a long standing relationship both being based in San Francisco does UCSF knew that equipment more than a hospital in New York City or New Jersey that's a lot to ask of sales force to try to make that determination they don't have any expertise in

Fema President Trump
"university california san" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:23 min | 1 year ago

"university california san" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Shared the department of medicine at university California San Francisco also author of a book on the digital doctor hope hype and harm at the dawn of medicines computer Asia telemedicine has changed a great deal because of us actually what we've been going through here and I want to find out about your thoughts about where we are and it certainly has made the triage a whole different meaning the for many who were practicing medicine for the hospitals throughout well the world I suppose it is saying is it was summer saints moment has arrived the telemedicine moment has arrived because of triage with corona virus but the health care system in particular reimbursement sort of go against this idea that we can do everything by telemedicine our we should be doing everything by telemedicine like your thoughts well I've been a fan of telemedicine for for years it seems logical to me that that for many of the things that we do that don't require a lot of hands on physical examination that we could do them well by telemedicine and save people that the the hassle of having to drive and park and come up and all that for a for a fifteen minute visit and so you see that we've been working on it for several years and we've developed a pretty good telemedicine capacity but frankly I think a lot of doctors were a little reluctant to try it they were trained in the traditional way I think a lot of patients were reluctant and so until a month ago about two percent of their outpatient visits at UCSF were done via telemedicine that number is up to sixty percent today because we really do not want people to come in and most people and we want people to be staying at home which is what they should be doing so I don't know that it's going to stay at sixty percent when we're done with this but it's never going back to two percent again and some of the obstacles that previously gotten away like the technology being good enough the technology's improved drastically some of the reimbursement policies had gotten away and those have been lightened that those have been made easier during this pandemic and I'm hoping that it'll stay that way there's some silly rules like you have to be licensed in every state that that you're practicing in that have gone the way of telemedicine there's no reason that if the patient from Oregon or Nevada wants to see a UCSF doctor by telemedicine that that doctors you have to go get their his or her license in that state and that rule has been relaxed so I'm I'm hoping that this this is not a temporary blip and I think it will be I think patients once they experience realize that that this is pretty nice in the idea ten years now the idea that I took half a day a week off from work to go see the doctor for fifteen minutes in the seem silly a lot of video health visits and these are escalating in number let me escalate the number of calls we get here let me go to another caller Marty you're on the air morning good morning good health and happy holidays to everybody thank you you see that the vaccine can be developed well it you know it's interesting that we're everybody is is is just holding on this this twelve to eighteen months the twenties out she talks about and what I think they don't realize is twelve to eighteen months is the minimum amount of time to develop a vaccine and tested be sure it's safe and be sure it works there's no guarantee that that will be true I'm hoping as much as anybody else because until there is a vaccine we're always going to be in this kind of weird place where we may have tamped down the virus to a manageable level but will never be able to go back to two hours to fully normal I think about HIV HIV was first read recognized in nineteen eighty one there is no vaccine to HIV and so it's not a slam dunk that we're gonna find one I'm hopeful that we will mostly experts believe that we will and if we do it'll probably be in twelve to eighteen months because the amount of intellectual firepower and resource going into it is unprecedented but it is not a guarantee and Marty I thank you for the call let me go to a listener named Leslie who says regarding criteria for testing uns UCSF to find the term symptoms one of the only symptoms loss of taste which now seems to be accepted as perhaps the only symptom of someone who may be positive for covert nineteen and we now have enough tests yet the answer is is yes and I believe that we have added loss of taste to our list of symptoms that will get tested is a it's a funny symptom that that appears to be relatively distinctive and in fact as we look at you know that there are there any symptoms that might actually told us to believing that you are more likely to have closer than other viral infections that what that's one that doesn't come up in regular flu very much so so the interest we right now have enough tests to be testing people with with symptoms and has our clinical understanding of alls including the importance of loss of taste we are able to expand our testing I think that the the real real questions are to come up again as we reach this next phase and in certain countries for a career most prominently they're doing you know testing at a scale far greater than the United States a lot of a symptomatic people are tested that's going to be a tricky to do in the United States we can't test three hundred and fifty million people even if you test negative now we're going to test you again in a week or two it gets unwieldy so we're gonna reach a point where we're testing everybody with symptoms and then for epidemiologic purposes we may be doing some random testing of a symptomatic people particularly high risk populations like in nursing homes or other health care workers to get a sense of whether it's out there lurking in the community because we cannot have come to understand this phenomenon of a symptomatic patients who actually have the virus it's it's it's it's not it's not incredibly prevalent particularly in a place like the bay area where we're not seeing a lot of iris but it certainly exists so we have to understand it better let me bring in more callers Lisa joins us now actually so thank you for waiting you're on the air hi yes Sir two questions on testing regarding the prevalence about a week ago the chronicle reported twenty six percent positive tests from the drive by in Hayward sample that was not based on our criteria for testing but it was a high high that twenty six with a hi incidentally regarding the five percent used in your hospital how do you screen out of false negatives understand every positive test is accurate but the negative maybe an actor yeah I mean that that's the problem is sort of what the gold standards in terms of of a false negative but we is it the the the test characteristics look pretty good at that we believe that if the test is is negative that we're we're using that now is since we're only testing symptomatic people and those symptomatic people should be home and should be staying away from other people that's what we tell them in any case this may change some once we have more effective therapies available we may need to to retest people who are negative who have symptoms that that could be consistent with with co that I hadn't heard the twenty six percent figure from Hayward I'd I'd want to look into that because it's it's quite surprising there have been numbers like that in in the hospitals in New York where when people come into the emergency room who are short of breath and have a fever and have infiltrates on their chest X. ray you know they had numbers like that when they test people for cove it it's twenty five thirty forty percent that's because the the virus is so prevalent in the community it changes the the probability of getting a positive test in the bay area and I'm not really all of California the prevalence in the community is is low enough that that's that's a surprise I don't doubt that that's true but it's a surprising number to me we've tested a whole lot of patients including including in patients patients who got admitted to the hospital with things that look like they could be called a disease including ammonia and even in that population we're seeing a positivity rate of about one in twenty let me think Lisa for the call and go to a question from a listener named Chris who wants to know given the two deadly viruses have been attributed to live animal crossovers what are the odds of this happening again even every year why aren't live animal markets banned worldwide well we talked about that a bit yesterday with epidemiologists Larry brilliant who is on the program and they're supposed to be banned in China but their on going and this is this is ubiquitous problem I mean a particular out of China your thoughts Bob Wachter yeah I mean it is it's it is scary and and we are seeing something like this is like this means a new viral infection that that people are not immune to we have been seeing something like this every two or three or four years if you think about sars in H. one N. one and murders and all of the others the difference is that this particular virus has a set of characteristics that make it particularly nasty and that is it combines being relatively contagious with being fairly bad and if you have just one or the other very contagious but very few people die of this war a lot of people diet but not very contagious you sort of can deal with it this one and I think I was being it was fairly clear in January when we saw what was happening in China this one just by random mutations came out of the came out of the box with these two characteristics of being contagious and and potentially deadly that led to where we are today there's no good reason to think that combination will happen again really the last time it happened was was the Spanish flu a hundred years ago but I do believe we are likely to continue to see things like this maybe every year or two or three which is why if we learn anything from this epidemic we have to learn how to keep a public health infrastructure that is ready to go to have how to have a pandemic plan that you pull off the shelf and push a button and an act immediately as opposed to the the whole thing and and fragmented response we've had for this one moving told by many including Larry brilliant home I just alluded to and Bill Gates and Laurie Garrett you can go on with the list that we need this public health infrastructure that we simply haven't been acting on.

university California San Fran
"university california san" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:08 min | 1 year ago

"university california san" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is for Michael Krasny we're talking with doctor Bob Wachter he's here at the department of medicine at university California San Francisco also author of a book on the digital doctor hope hype and harm at the dawn of medicines computer Asia telemedicine has changed a great deal because of us actually what we've been going through here and I want to find out about your thoughts about where we are and it certainly has made the triage hold different meaning for many who were practicing medicine for the hospitals throughout well the world I suppose it is saying is summer saints moment has arrived the telemedicine moment has arrived because of triage with corona virus but the health care system in particular reimbursement sort of go against this idea that we can do everything by telemedicine our we should be doing everything by telemedicine like your thoughts well I've been a fan of telemedicine for for years it seems logical to me that that for many of the things that we do that don't require a lot of hands on and physical examination that we could do them well by telemedicine and save people that the the hassle of having to drive and park and come up and all that for a for a fifteen minute visit and so you see that we've been working on it for several years and we've developed a pretty good telemedicine capacity but frankly I think a lot of doctors were a little reluctant to try it they were trained in the traditional way I think a lot of patients were reluctant and so until a month ago about two percent of their outpatient visits at UCSF were done via telemedicine that number is up to sixty percent today because we really do not want people to come in and most people and we want people to be staying at home which is what they should be doing so I don't know that it's going to stay at sixty percent when we're done with this but it's never going back to two percent again and some of the obstacles that previously got in the way like the technology being good enough the technology's improved drastically some of the reimbursement policies had gotten away and those have been lightened that those have been made easier during this pandemic and I'm hoping that it'll stay that way there's some silly rules like you have to be licensed in every state that that you're practicing in that have gone the way of telemedicine there's no reason that if a patient from Oregon or Nevada wants to see a UCSF doctor by telemedicine that that doctors you have to go get their his or her license in that state and that rule has been relaxed so I'm I'm hoping that this this is not a temporary blip and I think it will be I think patients once they experience realize that that this is pretty nice in the idea ten years now the idea that I took half a day a week off from work to go see the doctor for fifteen minutes in the seem silly a lot of video health visits and these are escalating number let me escalate the number of calls we get here let me go to another caller Marty you're on the air the morning good morning good health and happy holidays to everybody thank you you see that exact scene can be developed to to fully normal I think about HIV HIV was first read recognized in nineteen eighty one there is no vaccine to HIV and so it's not a slam dunk that we're going to find one I'm hopeful that we will mostly experts believe that we will and if we do it'll probably be in twelve to eighteen months because the amount of intellectual firepower and resources going into it is unprecedented but it is not a guarantee and Marty I thank you for the call let me go to a listener named Leslie who says regarding criteria for testing uns UCSF to find the term symptoms one of the only symptoms loss of taste which now seems to be accepted as perhaps the only symptom of someone who may be positive for cover nineteen and two we now have enough tests yet the answer is is yes and I believe that we have added loss of taste to our list of symptoms that will get tested it's a it's a funny symptom that that appears to be relatively distinctive and in fact as we look at you know that there are there any symptoms that might actually told us to believing that you are more likely to have coded and other viral infections that what that's one that doesn't come up in regular flu very much so so the interest we right now have enough tests to be testing people with with symptoms and has our clinical understanding of alls including the importance of loss of taste we are able to expand our testing I think that the the real real questions are to come up again as we reach this next phase and in certain countries for a Tory a most prominently they're doing you know testing at a scale far greater than the United States a lot of a symptomatic people are tested that's going to be a tricky to do in the United States we can't test three hundred and fifty million people even if you test negative now we're going to test you again in a week or two it gets unwieldy so we're gonna reach a point where we're testing everybody with symptoms and then for epidemiologic purposes we may be doing some random testing of a symptomatic people particularly high risk populations like in nursing homes or other health care workers to get a sense of whether it's out there lurking in the community because we cannot have come to understand this phenomenon of a symptomatic patients who actually have the virus it's it's it's it's not it's not incredibly prevalent particularly in a place like the bay area where we're not seeing a lot of iris but it certainly exists so we have to understand it better let me bring in more callers Lisa joins us now actually so thank you for waiting you're on the air yes Sir two questions on testing regarding the prevalence of about a week ago the chronicle reported twenty six percent positive tests from the drive by in Hayward sample that was not based on our criteria for testing but it was a high high that twenty six of them hi incidentally regarding the five percent used in your hospital however you stream out of false negatives understand every positive test is accurate but the negative median after yeah I mean the the the problem is sort of what the gold standards in terms of of a false negative but we is it the the the test characteristics look pretty good at that we believe that if a test is is negative that we're we're using that now isn't for only testing symptomatic people and those symptomatic people should be home and should be staying away from other people that's what we tell them in any case this may change some once we have more effective therapies available we may need to to retest people who are negative who have symptoms that that could be consistent with with co that I hadn't heard the twenty six percent figure from Hayward I'd I'd want to look into that because it's it's quite surprising there have been numbers like that in in the hospitals in New York where when people come into the emergency room who are short of breath and have a fever and have infiltrates on their chest X. ray you know they had numbers like that when they test people for cove it it's twenty five thirty forty percent that's because the the virus is so prevalent in the community it changes the the probability of getting a positive test in the bay area and I'm not really all of California the prevalence in the community is is low enough that that's that's a surprise I don't doubt that that's true but it's a surprising number to me we've tested a whole lot of patients including including in patients patients who got admitted to the hospital with things that look like they could be called a disease including ammonia and even in that population we're seeing a positivity rate of about one in twenty let me think Lisa for the call and go to a question from a listener named Chris who wants to know given the two deadly viruses have been attributed to live animal crossovers what are the odds of this happening again even every year why aren't live animal markets banned worldwide well we talked about that a bit yesterday with epidemiologists Larry brilliant who is on the program and is supposed to be banned in China but their on going and this is this is ubiquitous problem I mean a particular out of China your thoughts Bob Walker yeah I mean it's it it's it is scary and and we are seeing something like this if you like this means a new viral infection that that people are not immune to we have been seeing something like this every two or three or four years if you think about sars in each one and one and murders and all of the others the difference is that this particular virus has a set of characteristics that make it particularly nasty and that is it combines being relatively contagious with being fairly bad and if you have just one or the other very contagious but very few people die of this war a lot of people die of it but not very contagious you sort of can deal with it this one and I think I was being it was fairly clear in January when we saw what was happening in China this one just by random mutations came out of the came out of the box with these two characteristics of being contagious and and potentially deadly that led to where we are today is no good reason to think that combination will happen again really the last time it happened was was the Spanish flu a hundred years ago but I do believe we are likely to continue to see things like this maybe every year or two or three which is why if we learn anything from this epidemic we have to learn how to keep a public health infrastructure that is ready to go to have how to have a pandemic plan that you pull off the shelf and push a button and an act immediately as opposed to the the whole thing and and fragmented response we've had for this one well we've been told by many including Larry brilliant ally to salute to him Bill Gates and Laurie Garrett you can go on with the list that we need this public health infrastructure that we simply haven't been acting on I mean you get the sort of not that it's our lives here but you get into all of the ways we have built up our defenses to try to ward off the mail on unseen military enemies of one sort or another in this enemy that now has come upon us should have been prepared for there's my is my homily for the day yeah I of course of course you're right Michael it's hard to do it really it it it it it certainly that it's not to forgive the stance that we've taken we got it wrong and we're paying we're paying the price but it is to say that humans are not very good in preparing for theoretical problems when there are current pressing need so it's it's it's and and the same Bob this is true for nine eleven and and and and and for climate change it is just a hard thing for you is to get their heads around to say let us take money and resources and attention and apply it to this problem that may never happen so with that we're ready for it as opposed to taking the money and people and dollars and and spending on things we know we need to that's just a tricky thing to do and you only do it I think it is certainly at the at the scale that you need after you've seen the consequences of not doing it so I think we will we have seen the consequences of not doing it I think we will aggressively invest in in public health and and and prepared this for the future but you know it's one of the nice had we done in the past and certainly they're not smart people telling us we better do it and will be sorry if we didn't and they were right I will go to another caller that's grace from Palo alto joining us good morning hello good morning and thanks for your time only seventy eight.

Michael Krasny Bob Wachter university California San Fran
"university california san" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"university california san" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Told a news conference right now and expected to go a little harder on them quarantines and state of birds and stuff like that but we'll see so let's go over this for many years at the university California San Francisco I held a bio hub panel on covert nineteen which you are calling it now we're not calling a coronavirus anywhere either calling a code nineteen or the Wuhan virus because China doesn't want us to run a virus is described coronavirus is a is a family of viruses like sars and birds are also a corona virus so it's not accurate call Kuroda okay so here's a couple things from this from this panel of like five or six topics which are we don't know if it's seasonal right this is all talk all the flu seasonal first all the flu is not that seasonal it's not a seasonal as we think it is but some picks it is but not like not no one gets in the summer it's but we don't know if this one is because it's new we don't know some are some corona viruses are some aren't so murders that's not seasonal the Spanish flu was seasonal back in nineteen eighteen and it came back it was a little bit in the beginning and end of nineteen eighteen and then it came roaring back in the end of the winter of nineteen that's what it was huge huge and it actually came back a third time they're actually three sweeps of of the Spanish so what is after it said the only I can only tell you two things definitively definitively it's gonna get worse before it gets better and we'll be dealing with this for the next year at least our lives are gonna look different for the next year they say one more factor than I wanna go to Jake we talked before about how your taxes before you're symptomatic it looks like people are in fact infectious fourteen days after the onset of symptoms fourteen days after you start to get a fever or whatever and sore throat whatever coffin fourteen days later you could be still past the soft people and all that with a good news actually bleach hydrogen peroxide alcohol based stuff like all that cleaning stuff Leslie killer on services and all that's that's that's good news there's a lot of good news is actually doesn't affect kids although they can be carriers of it it's not as fatal as the plague prices are good news still throughout this but also yeah we got tickets here so go back to Jake Jake how are you brother well here are you good much take on well I have a tendency to agree with you I think this is pretty serious but I think what needs to happen is we need to put the politics aside for awhile we need to realize that the federal government is going to be in that and helping us if we're gonna have to start looking out for those like you said that we know third elderly it will today have aids or cancer or compromised immune system and help each other and take care of each other you know I I really think that that's what's going to get us through this is us coming together as a country in quick warning Peters and saying you know trump did this wrong if we have Medicare for all and blah blah blah blah blah because there's always so much the federal government can do they they cannot they cannot legislators to help the future we're gonna have to do that ourselves we're gonna take care of each other and start being a little kinder and gentler to each other and hundred percent Jake thanks for the call and then when this is all over we'll go back to record each other's throats out I know you're totally right we haven't talked one lick of politics on the show over the last week or something I have no interest in I've watched one like a cable news it's all total garbage totally who said this the bill the top I've no interest in that I've taught like totally over that I've been slowly reading medical journals and the firm virologist at all these doctored terms I don't even know what they mean and like I didn't do nothing but that for eight hours a day no time for cable news nonsense I agree with you Jake and we you know we need we need the Cajun navy to step up big time in this country and that's just regular people particularly it comes to helping out the more vulnerable among us so if you know anyone over the age of sixty wash the CDC toyed with banning anyone over the age of sixty from flying so maybe the presence of some like that here right now all right there we go to the the president luckier to challenger through luck call it whatever you want but through very collective action and shared sacrifice national determination we will overcome the thread of the virus I also announced Wednesday night following the advice of our medical professionals who are doing a tremendous job we appreciate it very much sick we're suspending the entry of foreign nationals who have been to Europe for the last fourteen days from entering the United States citizens permanent residents and our families many of the families returning from Europe will be subject to extra screening as well as self isolation for a period of fourteen days as the world health organisation confirmed today many of the things that what we said were one hundred percent correct including our designation before them of Europe like earlier very aggressive actions with China this measure will save countless lives I appreciate the number of the folks behind me a lot of numbers of people behind me said that that saved a lot of lives that early designation but it is only the beginning of what we're really doing and now where in a different phase which is a very old and obsolete rules that we had to live with it worked under certain circumstances but not under mass circumstances they were there for a long time they were in place for a long time and we're breaking them down now and they're very usable for certain instances but not for this to unleash the full power of the federal government that this effort today I am officially declaring a national emergency two very big words the action I am taking will open up access to up to fifty billion dollars of very importantly very important and a large amount of money for states and territories are localities in our shared fight against this disease further into the order emerging every state to set up emergency operations centers effective immediately you're going to be hearing from some of the largest companies and greatest retailers and medical companies in the world just anyway behind me in the side of me I'm also asking every hospital in this country to activate its emergency preparedness plan so that they can meet the needs of Americans everywhere the hospitals are very engaged and New York and various other places are also very Singh aged just poke with governor Cuomo we had a very good conversation then well working very strongly with the many states including New York divergence yours I'm issuing today will also confer broad new authority to the secretary of health and Human Services the secretary of HHS will be able to immediately way for visions of applicables laws and regulations to give doctors hospital all hospitals that health care providers maximum flexibility to respond to the virus and to care for patients this includes the following critical authorities the ability to waive laws to enable telehealth a fairly new yeah and incredible thing that's happened in the in the not so distant to pass to tell you what they've done with telehealth is incredible it gives the remote doctors visits and hospital check ins.

university California San Fran
"university california san" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:42 min | 2 years ago

"university california san" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Even if you have a map you only know where you are the purpose of the ultimate issues our is to help you know where to go. and that unfortunately is not nearly as much as where we are. by I I could I tended to say back by popular demand and I think that would be accurate actually is a professor of astrophysics. UC university California San Diego Brian Keating. his book losing the Nobel Prize a story of cosmology ambition and the perils of sciences highest honor. is that out in paperback he also presents a very popular Prager you video what's a greater leap of faith gogue. all the multi verse so the whole issue of scientists science garb. the V. related subjects. yes Sir Keating welcome back to the Dennis Prager show. it's a pleasure to be back at the Dennis how are you. I am very well thank you. so I was discussing an issue in the last hour my let me too good a renewed actually the enter. are you by any chance I don't expect you to be familiar with caught in the astronomers a book by Robert Jastrow. yes I am planning an update god in the cosmologists to that book. really is that right. well it may in part I mean I think it's impossible to not think about the the question of god's existence or lack there of and discuss cosmology and astronomy is mostly concerned with you know property the stars and perhaps exoplanets and really fascinating things I hope we can touch upon today but but cosmology is really you know the story of what happened you know perhaps before there was a history of the universe you know the ultimate map makers in the universe are cosmologist and that gives us a certain sense you know maybe perhaps hubris but it should in sometimes give us some humility and I I hope we can discuss why that is so cosmology is the study of that you know you're very acquainted with that hair and make up and now no it's not if it's the study of the universe the cosmos a shirt that same prefix cosmos with cosmetology and that's because that prefix means beauty and it means state and the universe presents a face to us that we can reveal into some that might reveal the presence of god. so the Jastrow book offered and he I knew him very well as by sheer coincidence that I I really adore him he's a very special man anyway he who was the the the head of the Goddard Space Center at NASA. the problem with the strong member of his time so he wrote the bat he was shocked to find out how many astronomers. were upset by the news that there was probably a Big Bang because they had full or not full on old put many of them had really bank. psychologically on the proposition that there was no beginning that the universe always was because to be giving suggests of course our creator where is no beginning suggests no creator so we said well they didn't really they weren't neutral scientists they had a bias so my question to you is do you agree with that thesis and Pete is it still true. well those are those are two really good questions all answer the second one first and the first one not at all knowledge but the questions the usually you impose a one question policy on your on your call. in case the you know the question of whether it's true is perhaps the most interesting question I claim and all signs of my colleagues would disagree because it is so intimately connected to whether or not the universe had a beginning is intimately connected to this prospect of the existence or lack there of of the multiverse in the multiverse you know kind of hypothesis if you will that is sort of a modern day incarnation if if you will of the previous generations in the fifties and sixties the original opponents to the to the Big Bang theory were devout atheist as you say and particular Fred Hoyle who coined the term Big Bang apparently as a pejorative euphemism for a certain type of that act that I won't say on the radio it is more appropriate for the male female our but but any event this this pejorative was March because he was a devout atheist and he actually claim that one point that scientists believed in the Big Bang because they are overwhelmed by genesis one one and nowadays you know I don't think you quote this particular character in that rational Bible but but that's laughable right no scientists we think of trying to today is as the brightly so as I say in my Prager you video yeah seventy percent or more of the National Academy of sciences do not affirm or actively seder atheist so nowadays that's completely you know and they'll be a laughable opinion to hold in the case of whether or not the universe had a singular beginning that question is extremely hotly debated and in fact there's evidence that some of the greatest in a proponent of the original theory Madonna's inflation that protected the multiverse are now coming back to try to kill off that theory enter meeting incredibly fierce resistance not the least of which comes from Nobel Prize winners who are you know held up you know rightfully in some cases not so much in others perhaps but as having a halo the fact that really bestows upon the more credit credulity in their. opposition to the theories that are presented that conflict with the multiverse so it's extremely hotly contested question and it couldn't be more relevant to today's sciences I discussed in in my book. right so that that again raises the question about I'm not looking for a certain answer I I'm just curious. is all put even more directly than is science affected. by non scientific biopsies. that's that all over even with that now you you've got to be joking yeah course trying to thank this do themselves a disservice when they purport to perpetuate or this mythology that were somehow you know walking wikipedia's that just have a tremendous amount of knowledge but you know I would point out you know wikipedia has a lot of knowledge but it has your wisdom and the fact that scientists are sometimes the least aware of these blind spots and this goes back to ancient times too as I always talk about my hero Galileo in the book he was notorious for strain after what his eyes and his heart wanted to show mainly in his case a correct theory which is the current can model that the sun is the center of our solar system which over through thousands of years of orthodoxy going back to Aristotle but this question of whether or not we are the center of the universe that was deeply ingrained upon him as being wrong in a prima facie show on it you know absolutely incorrect so everything he did was seen from that perspective and he even went to such great lengths as to you know have an in correcting explanation for house that's prosaic affect on earth such as the tide that we see at the ocean or how the Milky Way appears the galaxy our galaxy and that was biased by his desire call confirmation bias to appeal to what he wanted to be true so I absolutely and it still holds true the court I gave you from Fred Hoyle and it holds true in the modern incarnation of the multiverse and if you could kind comments on policy logically with something else that maybe we'll get into called authority by which we tend to look up to an associate and almost impenetrable halo around fine since when we scientists are mere humans and I think that that an important thing for listeners to keep in mind scientists tell humans and we have the same prejudices biases and proclivities as any other human being and to say we don't does a disservice to science because it prevents people from going into our field that have the capability to be fine because you know people say I'm not as smart as that's. I into some negative nine never I make mistakes but scientists don't so I think it's it's important to disabuse people of that notion. I raise the V. well it's very important your answer and I raised that issue you don't even have to come with all this additional explain to you because you've been here at and to those who might not have heard I raised it in conjunction with the issue of of global warming and that there's no doubt in my mind in this regard that the pressure of any climatologist any any scientist involved with the climate the pressure to sustain the notion that we are in on an irreversible journey toward extinction is tremendous because to say over what he's is is to risk reputation and livelihood. very unfortunate and I would say the thing I love about cosmology is that there's no Republican constellation there's no democratic comments out there and it's mostly a political but you're right my colleagues to complain about this you know off the record.

Dennis Prager scientist Nobel Prize professor UC university California San D Sir Keating Brian Keating. seventy percent
"university california san" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"university california san" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Other ways you can be part of this program and get in touch with us now on Twitter and Facebook we're at KQED forum or email any questions or comments the forum at KQED dot org a listener writes my mother's ninety five years old and she still works out at the Y. four days a week she had won the replace fifteen years ago and the other one is going now mom needs her knee replaced so she can continue to work out and have a good quality of life however it's unlikely the physician will do the surgery because the return on investment is not there is not a sad state of our healthcare system I think if you if in many cases if you're over AT forget it they're not going to do surgery on you right actually the US we've gone the other way off and where we do surgeries without ever studying them in older people and I've had some bad outcomes as a result other countries have been more eat it restrictive based on age but actually we're just beginning to discuss what we talk about both over treatment which is giving someone a treatment that's proven to be very helpful in fifty and sixty year old but does harm to them and then under treatment not treating someone just on the basis of age alone when we should be looking at functions so for a ninety five year old if you can work out at the Y. depending on what she's doing she might be a good candidate we also UCSF now have something called a pre hab clinic and so pre have is a bit like rehab so that's why it should sound familiar but you the person goes before hand so we maximize their health and function so that their chances of doing well during and after the surgery are increased and this thing should exist everywhere right because it's actually stop people say well we don't have money for all these programs will actually if the person gets out of the hospital sooner and doesn't require skilled nursing because you've done pretty happy with them then you are saving huge amounts of money because there's nothing patient care is a fraction of in patient care but you do hear these arguments and wonder how you dress them about you know the longer life is extended particularly if it's bad quality of life for people are real the more problems we have because we have fewer resources we can't sustain caring capacity can only go so far Karen capacity can only go so far but let me give you another example of again because we keep coming to fall so we know all kinds of interventions that decrease fall so for example sending someone to try chi class regularly that costs you know hundreds maybe you know a couple thousand dollars over here but we don't do that instead after they fall they can call an ambulance the ambulance will take him to the emergency department where Enos already now you have spent more than you would spend on the year of tai chi in the emergency apartment so physicians see the person blood tests then they get moved into the hospital then they get pre op to that probably involves some specialist then there's the operating room the anesthesiologist the surgeon then there's the post operative care then there's the skilled nursing care right now we could have paid for tai chi for the entire neighborhood of that person who fell so when people say there's not enough money what I say is we're spending it in the wrong places we are totally ready to help you if you need intensive care but we are not ready to keep you out of that intensive care unit read a comment for many uses well actually these are comments the more questions or comments so I'll save them until after the break but remind listeners you're welcome to join us for geriatrician lease Aronson she's here with us in studio and she is also a professor of medicine university California San Francisco and author of elder hood redefining aging transforming medicine reimagining life and there.

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"university california san" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"university california san" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"He was pressed on the impacts of the tariffs on the U. S. so if there's any consumer impact is very very small I'm Terry Moore NBC news radio fired FBI agent Peter struck is suing the government over his termination struck was fired over anti trump text messages he wrote with an ex lover a now former FBI attorney your listening to the latest from NBC news radio job openings in hiring across the U. S. are falling the labor department reports job openings fell thirty six thousand in June to a seasonally adjusted seven point three million the job opening rate fell one tenth of a percent to four point six percent hiring also decreased by fifty eight thousand to five point seven million in June and the hiring rate was unchanged at three point eight percent Nobel winning author twenty Marcin has died at the age of eighty eight Morrison died last night surrounded by family and friends at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx following a bout with pneumonia she is best known for her novel beloved which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in nineteen ninety three Morrison became the first African American woman to win a Nobel Prize for literature in twenty twelve former president Obama presented her with the presidential medal of freedom the highest award for civilian and the U. S. Morrison was also a long time creative writing professor at Princeton University Kristin marks NBC news radio New York a new genetic studies using information from an unprecedented number of U. S. veterans to try and learn why posttraumatic stress disorder affects only some vets it's an urgent question because suicide rates are higher among veterans have ring from PTSD the study of more than one hundred sixty five thousand people is the first PTSD analysis of genetic information collected by the V. A.'s million veterans program researchers from Yale and the university California San Diego I'm looking for patterns of genetic variables that can guide future treatment of many diseases Lisa Carter NBC news radio nearly eighty years after disappeared beneath the Pacific Ocean part of a World War two submarine has been discovered the USS grunion the ballot has been found twenty seven hundred feet under water off the coast of Alaska's Aleutian Islands the rest of the sub was discovered over a decade ago but the bow is missing searchers recently found that the bow has slipped on a volcanic embankment and settled about a quarter mile away from the.

New York Pacific Ocean Lisa Carter Princeton University NBC FBI Terry Moore Aleutian Islands Alaska university California San Dieg Yale V. A. PTSD Peter professor U. S. Morrison Obama president
"university california san" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:54 min | 3 years ago

"university california san" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Gives me an opportunity to thank Zimmer. Who has composed this music, which we have used since nine eleven. That has been the theme of my show. It's from gladiator that great, Phil. Because in fact, we are in an existential fight. Not not against carbon emissions. The existential fight is between western civilization and leftism. Every day. I bring few examples of it. And they don't even deny except when you confront them with. Then what are you talking about? That's ridiculous. But of course, it's not ridiculous. Virtually every university now regards great literature as as a foolish concept. Great art foolish concept. It's just the white male concept even objective truth is now dismissed as white male. That's why the university California, San Diego can say that we our greatest aim in the parliament of physics is for diversity. The aim of any science department should be scientific truth. Not diversity. So yes, there is an existential existential fight. Yesterday. At this hour was the male female our was on the attempt to get rid of cheerleaders in pro football. How many sports writers and others are writing about how demeaning of women? The number of emails was fascinating people who were related to cheerleaders. And so the idea that it is demeaning is so absurd. Why would people eight intelligent people aim to do something that was demeaning for free? If you know if you people will do demeaning things like for for example, teach gender studies, but they get paid for it. So. And as I said yesterday by. Daughter who was choosing between a cheerleader and gender. Studies. My heart would break if she went into gender studies. The most moronic field of study in the western world today where they where they teach the opposite of truth there based on the opposite of truth. One more time. I will tell you yesterday. I noted that Don January first two days ago in New York City a law went into effect that when your child was born you can list on the. On the birth certificate x where it says sex, or maybe they say now, gender male female or x so it's not even a matter of accepting people who say that they are the opposite sex of their biological sex. This is a parent saying I will not state the sex of my child, even though my child is of Baylor female sex. I will not say so am I will not raise the child was male or female if that is not a form of child abuse. I do not know what child abuse constitutes. Is the sickness the sickness that pervades the left? New York City, California. They these people are the fools of our age, destructive fools, and yet I mentioned this, and it it doesn't do anything to what leftist. I don't know. How you live with you cognitive dissonance of the damage you people do your side does. And you still stay on the left. What do you have to do? What does the left half to do for you to realize is Alan Dershowitz a lifelong liberal does? He's far more afraid of the left and the right? What does the left have to do? What chaos does it have to? So what destruction does it after week? For you to realize that the enemy of all that you hold and cherish. That is good. It's not the right. It is the left. That moral fraud called progressivism. I don't know if there was a clear, nothing if this if this law in New York City does not motivate you to be anti left. If you are a liberal, nothing will nothing. It is legalized child abuse. Right. That's clear. One air another another sick. Leftist idea that pervades leftist cities like Seattle and San Francisco. In in the great city journal crimes of survival new trend in criminal Justice reform rationalize is stealing the latest fan and criminal Justice activism is the concept of survival crime the theory holds that the homeless the poor and people of color commit property crime and low level infractions in order to secure their basic survival. Any enforcement of these laws is thus violation of their basic human rights, and should be relaxed. That is local government should stop enforcing any laws that criminalize quote, criminalize, homelessness and criminalize poverty. That's sick understand that. So, you know, you realize that in California, for example, if you steal under thousand dollars, it's a misdemeanor. It's like jaywalking. How many stores are now? Suffering massive losses. As a result. Doesn't matter though. The enemy of the left. This is the little storekeeper piece of capitalist crap in their view. Survival prying theories, the flip side of broken windows theory. They deal with the same class effects mainly property crime drug possession and public nuisances in precisely the opposite way broken windows theory argues that everyone is responsible for their own behavior. And that if we permit low level crime, it will lead to a general breakdown in law and order survival crime theory by contrast argues that local governments should decriminalize these offenses because vulnerable individuals have been compelled by social conditions to commit them. That's right. So if you are poor black or homeless, and you steal. You are exonerated normal. Moral rules, do not apply to you. That's that's classic left-wing theory. The idea of survival crime is not new and it's been floating around in academic circles for decades ago, you how much college damage is done. How much damage college has done and for people living in a slum in Caracas, pa-, shower or Khartoum? There might be a moral argument that stealing food for oneself or one's family is justified survival crime, but the United States is not Venezuela, Pakistan or Sudan. The federal government currently spends more than one trillion dollars a year on anti-poverty programs, including general assistance, food stamps. Housing vouchers SSI and WNYC every city in America has a network of churches, food banks and charities that offer direct assistance and more broadly. We're living in an era of record low unemployment and in cities like San Francisco, New York and Seattle record high minimum wage. The problem is that cities like Seattle and San Francisco have dot just decriminalized homelessness or decriminalized poverty. They have increasingly decriminalized crime. It's a leftist idea to be criminalised crime over the past five years the classification of survival crime is expanded well beyond stealing the proverbial loaf of bread in California proposition, forty seven downgraded I was just telling you this downgraded theft of property valued at less than nine hundred fifty dollars. To a misdemeanor. Meaning that the police are unlikely to pursue even habitual shoplifters and thieves the predictable result a statewide rise in petty theft, Seattle and King County that's the county in which then recently released new guidelines calling on police officers to stop arresting individuals for all homelessness related crimes with the goal of quote, eliminating racial disproportionality and ensuring that policies quote, do not penalize homelessness and poverty. Get it. You're so it's not the crime that's penalized. If you arrest somebody. Who is poor and robs. A store. The European allies. Ing poverty. Meantime, city and county. Prosecutors have dropped thousands of misdemeanor cases against quote vulnerable populations. All this is caused widespread. Frustration among residents and law enforcement officers. As one veteran Seattle Cup told me. We have basically stopped enforcing the law against the homeless population political leaders don't want it and prosecutors.

New York City Seattle California San Francisco property crime Zimmer Phil university California Alan Dershowitz Don January Seattle Cup football theft Caracas San Diego Baylor federal government