11 Burst results for "University Of California Irvine"

"university california irvine" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Welcome back by friends. I'm dennis prager and a professor on todd. Zoecke z. y. W i c k by a professor of law george mason university and a fellow at the cato institute in august believe it was august. Let me see here. you wrote a piece in the The wall street journal was august professor. There why gogga's that's right down is so you wrote a about why you're not going to follow your universities. Demand that you get a vaccination for cans covert in order to be able to return to campus and you cited the fact that you had in fact cova and in fact was was when you took tests. You've had the antibodies to kovin. They stay continued to stay in your body and so you sued. george mason. Is that correct cats correct and it's okay. Yup no no you go ahead. Yeah so i so. I tried to resolve this the nice way. Then it's wages. I tried to torch mason claims to the place the respect science that Respects truth so. I reached out over the summer After i contacted by immunologists and i did a full immunity workup including an anti bodies tests. That showed that my anybody's level With comparable to somebody who had been fully vaccinated And And there's more there's more than you needed that but this is sort of a slam dunk case is this is how you measure of somebody's immune protection listens how they measure whether somebody needs a booster shot for any for any disease whether it's measles or covert or anything else And so. I reached out. And i said here's here's the evidence They blew me off. I reached out to again. And i'd attached an affidavit from my immunologist as well as to leading public Stoller sir. I'm sure you're familiar with jay body charge at stanford martin cool dorks harvard. The presenting all the evidence to show this george mason again. Just blew me off Issue their policy saying that everybody had to get back and and so i reached out to the new civil liberties alliance at that point and some ask them to represent me so we brought a lawsuit eventually george mason and they're giving the medical exemption after all this In civil and changed the rules so that wasn't being disadvantaged as much as i had so the lawsuit itself has been resolved. But now there's you know many cases now following raising the same issue as vaccine mandates of spread around the country. What do you mean. Many many have followed. I don't follow that where you mean in many universities or at george mason university so For example a doctor arab out orange county who's up Medical school professor university california irvine has sued challenging california regents. Some first responders up in oregon have sued because they've all had covert And there's a lot of other cases against public agencies. That adds the deadlines are coming. Do more and more people are challenging. Saying i've had covert i've seen the evidence. Natural unity is at least protective. And it's pretty clear at this point. Dennis that it's more protective vaccination in terms of prevention against reinfection and particularly the community spread. And so they're basically saying that You you have to recognize that. I have natural immunity if you're gonna not require me to get vaccinated name. One example example of any progress made in any court in any judge's courtroom in the united states with regard to covert rights. I cannot well the Not not that much. i mean obviously. The supreme court has recognised Religious liberties issues but ironically enough dentists There are actually some cases that go back to the beginning of this year. We're all things. Federal prisoners have Sued for only released from prison. Because there's a coke outbreak in the prisons where they reside and the judge has denied that are calling for early release because the prisoners had previously contract and recovered kovic so the doctors actually said You because he's got cove recovered you You have more protected than the average inmate and denied their claims. So i guess. I'm just asking to be treated by employers wells. Federal law federal employees federal prisoners get treated by the federal courts. Well i stay with me. Because i i don't know if courts will come through for liberty. We'll be back in a moment. The dennis prager shares of america's known as the only no compromise gun lobby in washington from lobbying in the halls of congress and the executive branch to battling in the courts wherever your second amendment rights are being infringed o. a and their grassroots army are there jiawei has never compromised on the second amendment..

george mason gogga george mason university dennis prager stanford martin cool dorks har civil liberties alliance cato institute cova Medical school professor unive The wall street journal todd Stoller mason jay orange county oregon Dennis california supreme court america
"university california irvine" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Audie Cornish. The fight over voting in Texas is far from over. Even though Democrats in that state stopped a restrictive voting law from passing on Sunday, the Republican governor Greg Abbott, is threatening to withhold lawmakers pay in retaliation. He's also promising to call a special session to try and pass the bill. Now this fight is happening on the state level. But Texas isn't the only one trying to put limits on the access to the ballot. Several Republican led states of past or are trying to pass more restrictive voting laws. Georgia and Florida to name a couple To talk about what role the federal government has. In this process we've called on Rick Hasen, he's professor of the University, California, Irvine and author of the book election Meltdown, Dirty Tricks, Distrust and the Threat to American Democracy. Welcome back to the program. Especially Now, um, just to give people a sense of the kinds of laws were talking about some of them restrict the early voting laws, some of them imposed new or updated voter identification requirements. Some of them are about purging voters from registration list and the one people are paying a lot attention to is, um, bills that kind of bolster and officials authority to override the decision of local election officials right when it comes to Maybe some ballot announcements. So all of this is state. Where does that leave the White House? Well. First of all, the federal government and especially Congress, has the ability to pass laws regulating congressional elections that override state laws. It's right there in the Constitution. Article one, Section four The legislation would be the best way to deal with it. Contestants will set that up for people they're having more than trouble, right? I mean, languishing in the Senate. Is this for the people lack? Ah, lot of people are looking at Senator Mansion in West Virginia because he is not inclined to vote for the bill as it is presented by Democrats right now, So let's say you have to table Congress for a minute. Is there any other thing? That the executive branch can do. Well, One important thing is that the Department of Justice can help enforce voting rights laws, part of the Voting Rights Act, which is up right now, before the Supreme Court in a case called Burn a bitch. We learned by the end of this month, likely whether that's going to remain an important tool for policing laws that make it harder for minority voters to be able to register in to vote. And so pretty aggressive department justice as it did when it went after Texas's voter I D lost some years ago, successfully and bringing a challenge under Section two, the Voting Rights Act. That's probably the most important tool that the that the executive branch has to deal with these kinds of laws. The president has also signed an executive order in this area. Can you talk about what that is? And how if, anyway, it makes a difference. Well, Executive orders congest tell the federal government to be enforcing voting laws. You know, we care about things like cybersecurity so it could be directing the parts of the government to deal with security to do that directly to part of justice. But you may remember back when Trump was president. There was all kinds of concerns about what could the president do to interfere with elections and it turns out The president directly has has very little power over how elections a run there run by states and localities subject to the rules imposed by Congress. So this is really the most important thing that Joe Biden could do is get your mansion in a room, figure out what he wants to get a voting bill through. And then push that through Congress. In a way we know what he wants. The senator has promoted this idea of basically restoring the part of the Voting Rights Act, known as pre clearance that was struck down by the Supreme Court. That said, Look all of these states that used to have kind of Jim Crow era voting barriers. You now have to go to the federal government to get permission when you want to change your laws, and he wants to expand that to the rest of the country. Is that? Is there an appetite for that? Well, I think there's two problems. One is, you know that a political problem? Can you even get mansion to agree that not only would he support the legislation, but overturn the filibuster rule in order to get a bill through because you need 60 votes ordinarily to get something through the Senate, so His two hurdles there. But there's also a legal hurdle. It's not clear that the Supreme Court, which struck down the earlier preclearance provision in 2013 in the Shelby County vs Holder case, what uphold nationwide pre clearance they might see it is tilting the scale too much in favor of federal control. So I'm hoping that there are other things besides pre clearance, although I think that is necessary. Other things besides preclearance that magic and get behind like requiring paper ballots in every state so that if there is a dispute over who won an election, there's a tangible record that could be counted by a neutral court or neutral body. Fundamentally, do you have the same fears that some liberals have that this is like laying the groundwork for an election that could be overturned or challenged in the future. Yeah, I think we have to realize that there are two different issues going on at once. One is voter suppression, making it harder for people to register and vote. But perhaps an even bigger danger is the danger of election subversion. The idea that we might make it Easier for partisans to mess with how those are counted and how election winners air declared. That's really the number one thing on the agenda for 2022 2024. That's right. Cousin law professor of the University of California, Irvine. Thank you for your time. Thank you. Hurricane season starts today in the Atlantic, and it's looking like a bad one..

Joe Biden Mary Louise Kelly Rick Hasen Trump 2013 60 votes Audie Cornish West Virginia Voting Rights Act Congress Texas Sunday Jim Crow Democrats Republican NPR two problems Senate White House Department of Justice
"university california irvine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Graham. The Department of Homeland Security paused remain in Mexico shortly after President Biden took office. The policy launched under former President Trump required tens of thousands of migrants to wait and often dangerous Mexican border towns and camps for their hearings in U. S immigration Court. Biden administration has already allowed thousands of migrants enrolled in the program to pursue their asylum claims in the U. S. In a memo formally terminating policy, DHS Secretary Alejandro My or Kiss says it did not adequately or sustainably enhanced border management. Republican critics disagree. They argue that ending remain in Mexico is contributing to the recent spike in the number of migrants arriving at the southern border. Joel Rose. NPR News a state ordered investigation into the Virginia Military Institute found institutional racism and sexism are quote present, tolerated and left unaddressed. Member station, W. V. T. F. David Seidel says the report's authors also accuse school administrators of trying to derail the investigation. A law firm hired to perform an equity audit of V. M. I found racial and gender disparities and that a culture of silence and intimidation prevents efforts to address them. The authors also say the school's leadership tried to keep members of the community from participating in the audit and warned that without substantial changes via my will remain a school for white men. The school has hired a new superintendent, installed a chief diversity officer and remove statues related to the Confederacy. But the report notes. Those steps came after intense. In a statement, VM I's board president said the school will take additional steps to address the findings for NPR News. I'm David Sidle in Roanoke, the biotech company Moderna announced today it has begun the process to receive full approval to market its covert 19 vaccine as NPR's Joe Palco reports right now the vaccine is available under what's known as Emergency Youth are use authorization because the covert 19 pandemic was deemed a health emergency. The Food and Drug Administration allowed manufacturers to distribute their vaccines as soon as they were shown to be safe and effective. But that authorization is contingent on there being a health emergency. So of companies want to continue distributing their vaccine. Once things return to normal, they'll need to apply for full license, sir from the FDA process that typically takes many months. Visor began the application process for its covert 19 vaccine last month. Now Madonna has followed suit. Joe Palka. NPR News makes close on Wall Street Today the Dow Jones industrial Average was up 45 points to 5 34,075. The NASDAQ was down 12 points the S and P fell two points. This is NPR. This is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm Shawn Carlson. New Yorkers who fell back on their rent due to the Cova 19 pandemic can start applying for emergency rental assistance starting today. Those who qualify can get up to 12 months of back rent, which will be made directly to landlords Ogle so Maris is legal counsel with the Rent Stabilization Association, one of the largest landlord groups in the city. She says. Property owners are relieved that the program is finally starting. I think that a lot of landlords are really waiting for this program through allow it have been with bated breath for quite a few months. Already, the program is being covered by $2.7 billion in federal relief funds and is being administered by New York State. It will also provide up to a year's worth of back utilities payments. Officials say they expect up to 200,000 households to benefit to find out who qualifies and how to apply. You can go to gothamist dot com. New York Public Library is reopening its biggest branch today with extended services and ours. The central Circulating facility on 40th Street and Fifth Avenue was formerly known as the Mid Manhattan Library. It will now be called the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library after $200 million renovation. Branch, which had been opened for grab and go service will now offer limited browsing and by appointment, computer use. Several upper floors of that library will remain closed. With the New York primary just three weeks away, Democratic candidate Maya Wiley is looking to pick up progressive votes. WNBC reporter Richard Burton says Wiley is continuing to put out TV ads and she's announcing the details for housing plan. Bergen says Wylie also was secured endorsements from key political leaders in Brooklyn. She's got strong support among the congressional delegation. Their Hakeem Jeffries, Nydia Velazquez of that, Clark. And she also has a very powerful union behind her 11 99 s e a U With three weeks until the primary. Some of Wylie's progressive rivals are dealing with some challenges. Diane Morale is his campaign is facing a crisis over alleged pay disparities and toxic work culture. Scott Stringer has been accused of sexual misconduct. Next Democratic debate for New York City mayor is tomorrow night. It's at seven o'clock. Tonight we will see mostly cloudy skies love about 60 Cloudy tomorrow still hung. You're 75. It's six. Oh, six. Support for NPR comes from Heather, Stir Tega and Paul Gee, hey Gah Supporting African Wildlife Foundation, working to ensure wildlife and wildlands thrive in modern Africa. Learn Maura's a WFP dot or g'kar. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Audie Cornish. The fight over voting in Texas is far from over. Even though Democrats in that state stop too restrictive voting law from passing on Sunday, the Republican governor Greg Abbott, is threatening to withhold lawmakers pay in retaliation. He's also promising to call a special session to try and pass the bill. Now this fight is happening on the state level. But Texas isn't the only one trying to put limits on the access to the ballot. Several Republican led states of past or are trying to pass more restrictive voting laws. Georgia in Florida to name a couple To talk about what role the federal government has. In this process we've called on Rick Hasen, he's professor of the University, California, Irvine and author of the book election Meltdown, Dirty Tricks, Distrust and the Threat to American Democracy. Welcome back to the program. Especially.

Mary Louise Kelly Paul Gee Rick Hasen Joe Palco Shawn Carlson David Sidle Scott Stringer Richard Burton Nydia Velazquez Diane Morale Joe Palka Stir Tega Hakeem Jeffries Maya Wiley Brooklyn Heather Virginia Military Institute Joel Rose Madonna tomorrow night
"university california irvine" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on 790 KABC

"You need to listen to what they have to say, because it's gonna be helpful as we move forward. In 2021. I first want to start off, though. Just, uh, thought on Valentine's Day. Valentine's Day gives us the freedom to love and I'm just not sure why. In our society today there aren't more people that are taking advantage of this basic freedom. Ah, freedom to love. Am I love having the two guests that I want to introduce to you now on with me. They are Experts in constitutional law and other areas of law as well as probably life, but we're not going to get into the Life lessons right now, But we're going to talk a lot about the Supreme Court and constitutional law. First, I want to introduce to everyone or when Shemenski, who is the dean of Berkeley law, and he's been the Dean Berkeley law since July, 1st 2017. Before that, he was the founding dean and the universe of the University, California, Irvine School of Law and the Raymond Pike, professor of First Amendment law. Irwin is the Jesse H. Chopper Distinguished professor of law at Berkeley Law. He is the author of many books. His recent books include We, The People of Progressive Reading of the Constitution for the 21st Century. And closing the courthouse doors how your constitutional rights became unenforceable. He's written many law review articles he writes for the Sacramento Bee, frequently argues appellate cases, including in the Supreme Court, and in 2017, he was named the national jurist magazines dean of Shimmering Sea what has the most of influential person in legal education in the United States? Some high praise. Also joining us for a little bit of a fun debate. Our debates ever fun? I don't know, I I thought so back in school. I was invader and there were a lot of fun so hopefully people look at things in a lighter way. Instead of the ad Hominum Z and the criticisms and everything that we see in today's world. Delia Solman is the law professor at George Mason University. When I say the law professor, I mean, he is the law Professor George Mason University. He's a scholar at the Cato Institute. He blog's for the Velika Conspiracy. Eugene Volokh been on the show many times. He's a former co editor of the Supreme Court Economic Review. He's the author of Free to Move, Foot, voting, migration and Political Freedom. He's also authored democracy and political ignorance. Why smaller government is smarter. He often participates in The New York Times. Room for debate forum. He's a prolific writer as well. In all media. Both Irwin and Alia can be found anywhere if you Google them, so take Ah, look at that. Gentlemen, welcome back to Garvey's law. Great to be with you. See, we're pretending like we actually have a studio audience. But of course, we can't have gatherings except maybe if we call it a religious event, and we're going to get into that case shortly, But I'm really happy to have you both on I haven't spoken to both of you for a long time. First. I want to start with you everyone before we get into the nitty gritty here. Tell us a little bit about how things have been going at Berkeley law and how you've been doing as the dean and what's happening in the pandemic. And how are your students doing? We've been entirely online since March, 16th. All classes at the end of less spring. All classes last fall and all classes distant. Mestre are done remotely. Stack Alteon students have done a remarkable job of adapting to it. Undoubtedly, for some students, there's real hardship. Many of our students have struggled with illness or family members have struggled with illness. Some students struggle more for learning online. But overall, I think everyone's doing well and just looking forward to hopefully being back in person and some semblance of normalcy in August. I think everyone is looking for to that. And you know, I really appreciate what you just said. You don't realize. How honest you are. When you talk about some of the problems that have existed. My kids go to private school here in L. A there, seven and eight years old, and we're getting e mails from the administration, saying every kid is where they should be. Everything is wonderful. And they've been, of course, remote learning, and I can tell you for a fact watching the zoom calls that everything isn't Wonderful and every kid isn't where they should be. Just this week. I was watching a zoom call. There's kids eating their kids playing with pets. They're kids playing with their siblings. There's kids who just disappear. You don't know where they are. There's kids who are talking to other people. So Professor Shemenski Dean Chemerinsky, when you talk about this You Everyone really has to be ah, little bit sympathetic for some of the kids who may not be doing as well in law school or any other school. How do we Get back to normal when we can get things back in school. There's so many levels of complexity and answering that question. You know, when you talk about elementary school or high school, you're talking about some students. Who have Not been able to advances. They should I worry it could I focus on the law school level? What's that going to mean? For us? You know, 567 years down the road in terms of the students who were disadvantage. Let's also be honest. There is a class dimension of this student from disadvantaged backgrounds are going to suffer more. Race and class correlating our society. I worry about. Black and Latin ex students struggling more so it's enormously difficult on in law school right now, let's going to face that problem. I think the immediate question is going to be for the fall semester. Is it realistic to expect that everyone is going to be able to be in person and back to normal? Will we need to have some form of blended classes with summer in the room and summer online? How do we go about doing that in a way? That's effective education for everyone. It this stage. It's just too soon to make plans for the fall 2021 semester. I think we've got to see how vaccinations go in the public health situation and wait really for a few months before you make any choices for the fall. I hope that people, especially in the administration will be somewhat creative and be able to Change programs if necessary, because I think if you take the perspective that you're just going to get back to where you were, whenever that will be that maybe a little too optimistic, turning to you, Elliot, tell us your experience as law professor George Mason University..

Delia Solman Elliot 2017 Jesse H. Chopper United States August July, 1st 2017 March, 16th 2021 Cato Institute 567 years two guests L. A Shemenski seven Alia George Mason University Eugene Volokh Valentine's Day Irwin
"university california irvine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Now the Contagious new strain of the Corona virus. Mutation that the mutation that apparently started for the UK has now officially made it to the United States, according to Colorado health officials. The covert 19 vary it That Prime Minister Boris Johnson had warned to be 70% more transmissible. Has been identified in a Colorado man in his twenties, according to the Colorado governor. The governor Jared Policy in the statement, said quote There is a lot we don't know about this new covert 19 variant, But scientists in the UK are warning the world It could be significantly more contagious in the core. We're gonna talkto Our next guest about all of this, Dr Jeffrey Barkey. Is a board certified primary care doctor in private practice over 25 years, completed his medical school and family practice residency at University, California, Irvine. And he is a board member of the Orange County Medical Association will talk to Dr Bark E in just a few minutes after you take a break. So, Dr Barkeep, please don't go anywhere. He's also reserve deputy and technical doctor for the local law enforcement SWAT team. Well. Served as an elected school board member for 12 years. And is the co founder of a free public charter school in Orange, California. Man is busy. Dr Jeffrey Barkey will be joining us in just a second, is also author of Covert 19, a physician's take on the exaggerated fear of the Corona virus. We're gonna talk to him about whether not asymptomatic people can spread the coronavirus. And what about California? Now being ground zero for conduct covert 19 cases. Even though we were the most severe lockdown.

Dr Jeffrey Barkey Colorado Dr Barkeep California UK Dr Bark E Orange County Medical Associat Boris Johnson Jared Policy Prime Minister United States asymptomatic Orange private practice Irvine co founder
"university california irvine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:04 min | 2 years ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Of the 7000 elderly people that died in New York voted and then also, if Gavin Newsom wants to stop the spread of a virus, I hope he'll work on stopping the spread of the cold and the flu and everything else. But in the meantime, the remedy might be his being able to hand up Paul. Citizens. Up to 10,000 more care home patients may have died from covert 19. Then where we recorded all of that we're gonna put to my My guest who's written a book called Covert 19, a physician's take on the exaggerated fear of the Corona virus. We talked to him last week. He is a board certified by the American Board of Family Medicine. Associate clinical professor University, California, Irvine School of Medicine Department of Family practice. Please welcome back to the program. Dr Jeffrey Barking doctor and on four performance if you don't mind It's nice to be with you. Thanks for having back Dr Ben Carson Contract ID. The coronavirus said he was his words desperately ill is now out of the woods, apparently because of treatment that he got that pair of President Trump intervene in order for him to get access to. Can you talk to us about what happened? Absolutely, you know, stage I've had the opportunity to meet Ben Carson on a couple occasions and he is just incredibly bright and a very compelling person. So listen. Ben Carson is almost 70 years old, by his own admission yet significant underlying health conditions which puts him at high risk. You know, we know if you look at all deaths from Cove, it 94%. In patients that have had significant underlying health conditions, on average, about three conditions. That would be something like Heart disease or emphysema or diabetes or obesity, which should be a message to all of us that first we need to take really good care of ourselves and hopefully improve our health. If we do contact Cove it that we're in a better position to survive. Ben Carson, fortunately had access to medications that We don't have access to as an average person, although I read yesterday that the FDA approved emergency use authorization for one of those products made by Regeneron, and that's a monoclonal antibody. It attacks the Corona virus, and Carson himself gives credit to this product for basically saving his life. So I'm glad to hear now that that will be more widespread. Available to patients that get ill from Covitz. How expensive is it? Um, well, you know, President, Trump said he'll make this product free to all Americans, so I don't know what the rack rate is. We know that the rendez of your product that's used Impatient. Hospitalized patients is very expensive thousands of dollars per dose. I don't know what the price tag is for this new Regeneron product. My guess is Dr Jeffrey Barkey, author of the book Covert 19 in position to take on the exaggerated fear of the Corona virus. I think Dr Today I've now heard about the third drug manufacturers come up with the vaccine that allegedly it's over 90% effective. Yeah, I think that's great. And I hope it's correct. Let's remember that he's uh, did these drug manufacturers the companies that make these vaccinations have a financial incentive to bring them to market as quickly as possible? But I am very optimistic that they will be successful that they'll be safe and that they will make a huge difference. Moving forward in the covert 19 pandemic. We don't know yet All the data isn't yet available for peer review for the public even look at it so I'm cautiously optimistic, but I'm kind of on a wait and see basis until I've had a chance to review the data and then ultimately make recommendations to my patients. Dr. Barclay, do you think we have a good handle on the accurate number of people who have contracted the coronavirus? 100%. No. So first of all the testing at its best is not accurate, So I've had multiple patients that have been tested. One test is positive. One test is negative that guide a patient that canceled a Very expensive, kind of like a bucket list Golf trip because he tested positive. Then he brings his wife to the same testing center and decides to retest himself on Lee to find out that he's negative. So there's testing just is not as accurate as we'd like it to be. We heard from Elon Musk, who tested himself. Four times in a row for different testing centers who were positive or negative. So go figure so we don't really have a good handle on it. We have asymptomatic people testing positive. We have patients that are that have symptoms that are testing negative. And although the testing companies himself claim this 99% accuracy, I think in clinical practice, we're just not seeing that. My guest co founded Personal Care, the first primary care concierge medical group in Southern California. He wrote a book called Covert 19. Physicians Take on the Exaggerated Fear of the Corona virus. How soon are are far away? Are we from getting a home test that you think would be accurate? Well, the accuracy part is the challenge and it is in question. I know Now you can actually buy a home test kit through Costco. Now you need to register the mill. You had a kid and it goes back to the lab. Theocracy of it, You know again, if you if you look at the pharmaceutical company that makes his product they claim a very high level of accuracy. I can't imagine it's is accurate as a test administered at a lab under very strict protocol, as opposed to relying on a patient themselves to administer the test of themselves. So I just don't know. I think the more we put this kind of information and testing in the hands of the consumer, the better, but we're still a ways off before we have precise testing like we do with other diseases where we can actually rely and count on the accuracy of the test. After assuming Joe Biden becomes president of United States. Do you anticipate some sort of major shift in how we approach the coronavirus? I think of several things are gonna happen. We're going to see more mandates come down. Government mandates government mandates from asking government mandates eventually for the Corona virus vaccination itself. We're going to see things like you're not going to be able to get on an airplane without documentation of of axity vaccinations..

Ben Carson President Regeneron American Board of Family Medic Dr Jeffrey Barking Gavin Newsom New York Dr Jeffrey Barkey flu Paul contact Cove Elon Musk California Joe Biden Irvine School of Medicine Depa Associate clinical professor Cove Costco United States FDA
"university california irvine" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on 710 WOR

"With that brain. And they gave them the chair 30 NFL players who had memory problems. They would depressed. They were losing their personality. They weren't interacting with other people. It's a very bad sign. Catch the university, California, Irvine School of Medicine. Take a day gave him basically a multi vitamin. Officials on alcohol with a lock on it really hoped it was restoring their memory that was restoring her personality that was restoring their their their ability to control their anger and their emotions. There were remembering things like they're supposed to meet somebody for lunch and had a real effect on them. It had a real effect on him. It's in the Journal of psychoactive drugs and had a real effect. So I'm going to talk about Alzheimer's patients. But of course, if you're listening to me and understanding what I'm saying, you do not have elsewhere. Most people will not get Alzheimer's, but it does happen. About up to 25% of people over the age of 60 developed mild cognitive impairment, which al car with a light helps to slow down. The brain has shrunk a bit. They're really having problems with their memory. And having problems understanding things, you know, like directions to do things, etcetera. The problem is, most of those people develop Alzheimer's most of those people so alcohol with a lift if you like that data is as a way to help lower the risk of developing Alzheimer's. It really stabilizers to bring But if you already have Alzheimer sadly, I mean nobody's winning with that disease that slows down. The progression of the pathology. It helps these people keep their memory for a longer time. So here's the journal Molecular Psychology. That's the Department of psychiatry. The University of Pittsburgh Medical School on there talking about al car. They said in a double blind controlled study a randomized controlled study. Al car helps with major depressive disorder. That's a kind of depression that occurs in ageing people. Alcohol is great for depression in ageing people because it's really safe. It works really quickly that doesn't have side affection. It's really good for the brain. And they said what Alzheimer's disease. And he said both of these diseases are highly prevalent in the geriatric population. They're talking about all the different ways that al car helps protect you from depression and house farmers on that it even helps what treatment So his current medical research and opinion that's the Department of Geriatric Medicine Weddington Hospital in London, England, and it's a randomized, double blind placebo controlled human clinical trial shorts instead of your trial. It's 24 weeks, so it's about six months. And it gave people with dementia Suspected Alzheimer's, because you never 100% No, it's Alzheimer's until postmortem. They gave him 1000 MG of al car twice a day or placebo. And they said there was a an improvement and these people remembering names on remembering people's faces on who they were. Their memory was improving aspects of short term memory. That's what they lose quickly. That's why he asked you to sing same question repeatedly like that. You'll sit down and with somebody with Alzheimer's, and they'll say, Is it raining today and you say No, It's not raining, Mom. On a minute later goal. Is it raining today and you're and you're tempted to take. Mommy already asked me, but that that's not fruitful, She'll say, No, it's not raining today on in a minute later, they'll say, Is it raining today that short term memory That's the first thing to go with Alzheimer's. So they said that that to short term memory was improving. Aspect of short term memory were improving with the alcohol, and they said that there was less deterioration they were holding on to their their memory and their personality and a recognition of things longer. So his University of Pittsburgh Medical School as to journal Nora Biology of aging. Once they're talking about al car and people with Alzheimer's disease. Now we don't treat Alzheimer's. I mean that stares, doctors on hand and these places where they treat people in Alzheimer's. But I'm saying if it's good for Alzheimer's imagine how good it is for your brain. Okay, so they gave ALC are the people with Alzheimer's. Compared to placebo. Andi, they found it really meant something. And improved that many mental status there many mental test status, you know, recognizing the word horse and what horse looks like etcetera. Knowing what country Iran and what month it is. On the Alzheimer's disease assessment scale. But they found that it was repairing a brain cells. They were getting the Foster Atala Colin on a foster title Ethanol amine and a foster title of Masha tall Andi oils from krill, oil and fish oils. On the foster total sharing back into their brain cells because these make the brain cells Ana, and so it normalized all these things, and it also allowed their brain to make energy again. All of these things are trashed. What house commerce issues. So University of Pittsburgh medical schools saying Hey, al car is useful. So his university apartment in Italy the department of Internal Medicine, I know they make that that cold cut over there in Parma. They're famous for that. I forgot the name of Kohl cut. I don't need Cole coach. Yes, The International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Research. And they gave patients over the age of 65 with memory impairment. They did not have Full blown out there had mild levels off dementia, very mild levels. They were just started about dementia. There were all 65 years of age or older. They had mild mental impairment. They gave him 1000 MG of al car twice a day for three months or placebo, and they found the same thing. The ALC are really improved their behavior their self control. They did better on memory tests. They did better. What paying attention. They did better. What? Having conversations and remembering words and faces and names. They said the stuff was therapeutic. On. They said One of the things that was doing was restoring a shuttle calling, which was shut to you before before. Now I have more studies on Ah, on AL car with people with with With Alzheimer's, and I have studies off Ayla and people with house farmers barren man al Coronel work better together. So in the studies, they're using them separately. They actually will work better if they're using together. But then both two studies with the L. A, like two year long studies was preventing further progression on worsening of memory loss. And people with mild Alzheimer's on their studies of people without card. I just read your I mean, I've studied from a university, California, San Diego. I mean, from all over the place from U C L A. This stuff works. They also believe that it helps lower your risk of developing Parkinson's disease. When we come back, I'm going to discuss how al Car restores your release the brain derived neurotrophic factor. I think that pistol ball out.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease University of Pittsburgh Medic California memory impairment NFL Irvine School of Medicine ALC al Coronel depressive disorder Journal of psychoactive drugs University of Pittsburgh Department of Geriatric Medici depression Department of psychiatry Molecular Psychology Andi Parkinson
"university california irvine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Welcome back America. You here. It's so good to have you on this. Monday morning, The Senate begins its hearings on Judge Amy Cockney Barrett and whether or not she will be confirmed the United States Supreme Court I believe that she will be I expect that this week you were going to hear alliance defending freedom attacked in the Senate. Right Sponsors of this show great partners of ours for 20 years. That's because Judge Barrett Lectured a program of the lion defending freedom known as the Black Stone fellows. As have I. I've been lecturing the Blackstone fellows at least for a dozen years in the summer. I usually give them one lecture for an hour and a half or so on communicating effectively. And I'm in a position to do that, because I not only teach con law but I do this So I teach them how to make arguments or a lecture to them about how to be memorable. How to be persuasive about to be winsome how to conduct the conversation. They are typically one else. First year law students. And first year law. Students don't often get jobs or if they do get jobs. They're not very interesting jobs and don't learn very much. And if you're going to be And you want to get a great job you apply for a black stone fellowship. And the Blackstone Fellowship is put together by the alliance defending freedom because of donors like you. People like you support A T F. And they bring a couple of 100 law students together who are chosen from all over the country, and they've been doing it for so many years. They now have Blackstone fellows who are federal judges. Blackstone, Fellas, We're partners in major law firms. Blackstone, Fellas, we're teaching across the United States. They They started. Like the Federalist Society. They realised that legal academia To the extent that has any ideology, and it's very difficult have ideology in contracts. Ah! It's very difficult to have ideology and commercial paper. You know, there are lots of Cases that are not ideological, like evidence, not ideological, whether or not something is hearsay but nevertheless admissible, But there's a lot of the law that is very ideological. Most law professors. I would guess 90% of law professors vote Democratic. Or socialist? Maybe 95%. I am one of the few Who Is a reliable conservative, but I love to teach and teach the book. Teach the cases. You can't pass the bar unless you know what the case is, say. And I use Erwin Chemerinsky casebook and I've used her when Gemma and skis casebook 23 out of 25 years. I don't like any other case book Irwin, who is of course, Dean at Berkeley and very left. A friend of this show. When he was originally selected to be the dean at the University, California, Irvine law school. All of a sudden the chance we're out there got cold feet and wanted to fire when in John Eastman, My colleague Chapman and I rallied to his defense because we believe in Free speech and free ideas and we got Irwin. The job had been promised. And Herman and I don't agree on anything means very nice man. But we don't agree on anything. But I use this case book because you have to know the case is nevertheless. You can put a liberal spin on the court. You can put a conservative spend on the court. I try and Divide the case the coursework into here's the law. Here's what I think of it. Here's right. I think you are, you might consider is an approach, but I don't teach them other than the law. And Blackstone Fellows arrive that they're gathering early in the summer every summer, and they hear Eh? Traditional view of the law that believes the law to be applied not invented by judges and the Blackstone Fellows have benefited from great professors like when she was a professor, Judge, Amy Cockney, Barrett, lecturing to them. So because alliance defending freedom is Christian. And supports religious liberty of all sorts. They'll support it nonbelievers, right? They'll support of Buddha's two Jewish Muslim, the Catholic Mormon on evangelical Baptist. You name it, they'll support them in the in the public square, their religious liberty like they support free speech. They just Believe in the First Amendment, so alliance defending freedom What's this on? And Amy Cockney? Barrett lectured to it. So you're going to hear the alliance defending freedom attacked as being bigoted, which they're not attacked is being right wing which they're not. They're constitutionalist originalist like Scalia. Ah, like Judge Barrett is believed to be While they're being attacked. Would you please go toe and support them? How do you do that? You go to hughhewitt dot com. I tweeted this out earlier. If you go to hughhewitt dot com and you go to the very top. Of the page. You're going to see a banner that says Support religious liberty. Will you fight for your freedom? Will you fight for your freedom? The big word is freedom Question Mark. Give now. You give 50 $7500. I'd love for someone to make a big gift. Because I would love for them to shatter all their fundraising records this week when they're being attacked. Bye, Maisie Hirono and Dick Durbin and Kalla Harris when they're being attacked for defending religious liberty. Please go and support them and you can always find them at hughhewitt dot com..

Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Blackstone Fellows Blackstone Amy Cockney Blackstone Fellowship Senate United States Supreme Court America Irvine law school Black Stone Irwin Federalist Society Erwin Chemerinsky United States California Herman Maisie Hirono Berkeley
"university california irvine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Resource. Your host, Travis, Criminal managing partner with Westpac Wealth Partners with me this morning, Kelly Thomas Boyars, the executive director of Adam's place. Kelly. Thank you for being with me this morning. Thank you, Travis for having me good. The pleasure. The pleasure is all mine. Give our listeners from context, like who they're listening to today, your story kind of your background. How you came to be in Vegas, and I'll all the good stuff I could came from entrepreneurial reasons. I am a buckeye by background. There are a ton from Ohio. Yes, Many of us feel like we've had, like multiple people show from from Ohio. I think everyone's either right born and raised here or from Ohio. Yeah, because of the entire Like listening population for us? Yes, well, we We purchased a home health business. And so we purchased the business moved west and add a successful run with that one was 1991. So you've seen this town? Yes, we get here the same time when my family got here as well. So you were Have crisscrossed the entire time of lost this house was small that SOS a small uneasily get around. But, you know, even as we've grown, I really believe we still have kept our our travel routes pretty simple. And we're working with our growth, which I think is very smart are part of the community. I hope we've become a little bit more of a cycling community. But we're getting there. Yeah, we are right. You know, out in Summerlin, you have a lot of bike trails. You're out that her mom was cautious when I'm on my bike that I'm going to get splattered by a car. Which is always terrified. So you move from Ohio to Vegas. Did you think Vegas was going to be the end? Or do you think you're in a potentially back in Ohio? You know, I got to be honest. I visit Ohio a lot, and it's a perfect combo. Love being here a nine months out of the air, and then I try Tio go to conferences and do ah, lifelong learning opportunities for a couple months that allows me the best on my Whatever job I'm doing at the time, and Ohio has a great spot because Summers are temperate, and there's a little humanity, but that's too bad. That's not too bad. Well, Port Ohio Just outside of Columbus, OK, definitely, like, right muck. I Yes, right right around that. They say we bleed scarlet and gray we do here. You're in Vegas as well. The Scarlet Grace. So you kept the same college. That's that That's that's at least that's at least a good thing. So you still get back to Ohio? Go there, and that's what Vegas is home. Yes, it's home. So you moved out here for the home health care business? Yes. So I stayed and health care. And I ended up getting an MBA from the university, California, Irvine with emphasis in health care, and I was an administration and managed care organizations. Deposition contracting health education, So I Really got my roots into helping focusing a preventive medicine physicals, wellness knowing your numbers, and part of that is mental health and wellness. Married to physical health, so What I've been doing the last 10 years kind of marries all those things. That's it. So you had the home help services, but you've transitioned into something very Very different now. Yes, but it's not completely different. Sounds like you know, it's a spoke on a wheel. I like to say a spoke on the wheel. So give me some background, obviously, on Adam's place and and and how that came to be and how you started out well in 2007. My son, Adam was killed front due to injuries sustained in a car crash and Reno. Nevada was senior at Yoon are at the time I had my younger son was 16 and I thought, well, I'll find some resource is to support him after the loss of his only brother. There was a program in Reno called the Solis Training and, you know, I'll find something like it in Las Vegas and I came back. I spent a year researching and looking talking to physicians to social workers to clergy, Tio Ah, very wide swath of folks and there wasn't any programs available. So research tells us this pier supports very effective with Children. Place very is very effective with Children. Tio Ah learned to express emotional pain and and working ah to acquire coping skills. So we started the programme called Adis Place in 2009. We just are celebrating our 10th anniversary this seriously, Thank you. So we started during the height of the recession when homelessness and suicide was rampant. We were second in the country for suicide. And so our problem was very needed at the time because families come to us and our program is free of charge. And it doesn't matter what demographic you are rich poor in between when you've had a sudden loss or a lost period, you know things are swirling Soto be ableto provide our program for free for the families. This one less stressor and families somehow pay forward and give back through the course of their relationship with us. And we want because we work. Our operation models based on trained volunteer facilitators is very cost effective and it is a on diffuse have healthcare background. We always talk about gatekeepers for how your primary cares the gate caper before they send you out the specialist Where we believe grief is a normal reaction toe loss, So we equip kids with the skills. But if there's other underlying issues or other grief that's prolong or too intense, and we need to refer out to a private therapist. Some kids can go to private therapy and do peer group because that's when they feel a little bit more normal amongst their peers. So it can be a combination and could be one or the other. But there's definitely a space and it makes cost effective sense to provide this program in the community. What What was it like going back? So, obviously you starting at, huh? One. You know you just experience a huge loss of of your own to then think of, you know, I motherly instincts kick in. And you're you're still thinking about? You know how I get my other son taken care off, so to not only be dealing with all of that To then, you know, create, you know a nonprofit and then not only create a nonprofit but created during, you know, the biggest recession of just about everyone alive. Lifetime. Yeah, you know, in process of writing a book about those, actually because it on When we help the takeaways from the recession is how do we do things that we don't have a large social service? No safety nous in Nevada because we enjoy a very Ah, reasonable tax structure, I would say, write it so it becomes incumbent upon us as community members to say where? How can we film the gobs? How can we provide some see some soft landings for different Issues that's cost effective. That gives other citizens on chance to volunteer. And so we fill the gaps and it's a responsibility. How do we look at things as a community? What can we help be as as a group responsible, and I had plenty of people when I was going through the saddest times in my life that were a shoulder T lean on and we like to be like so for families that are coming forward experience along loss, So it was a difficulty and you know if I had And we do have a business plan. We, you know, even though we're non profit, we are a business and we keep our eye on operating lean and mean because we know that there will be the next recession. There'll be other blips awfully small, Small blade, right? But it's our responsibility and we're local were local Come business. We started out of the way. The gap that needed to be filled. And so we do try to appeal to our community members to say, Help us Continue this moving forward, And I think there's sometimes folks don't under own. I realize that This isn't you know clergy. Other folks don't have the skills. This is a very specific skill set to support folks during after a loss, and we've We've put a lot of money in our training..

Ohio Las Vegas Vegas Adam Tio Ah Kelly Thomas Boyars Travis Nevada us Summerlin Port Ohio Reno Westpac Wealth Partners Adis Place managing partner Come business executive director Summers California Soto
"university california irvine" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:18 min | 2 years ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Number one is out we were trying to avoid anything with the word corona in it unfortunately for the beer manufacturer but they pulled a lot of the the product off the shelves we get past this is the way of global pandemic but we're till after five o'clock we rolled out the Canara wagon we had the man for Deeney help us with some stuff around the house we played stump the chef in the greatest stump the chef in the history of stomping of the shaft and then we they issued a brand new item into the roe Conn menu which is warranty no vino why are quarantined if you want cases of really great wine or six you know what the whatever you want one of the maybe about a mixed box of great wine because you've got to get through this quarantine and you want that wine to be I would say cheap the purveyors would say inexpensive we found the best bottle of ten dollar wine in the history of wine not literally since I know this is Good Friday and it's I don't wanna get all biblical with you but not since you know wine was used in the Bible has there been what better wine than at ten dollars then what we just found itself on the website at WJW it all up there people are very interested in what that is it's called lot tremenda and it is from Spain the Alicante region of Spain a modest rally is the great all right so that's all the WGN radio dot com and we're going to ask you a three one two ninety one seventy two hundred or untaxed three one two ninety one seventy two hundred tell us something good tell me something good you right now can do that and with all due respect and apologies to John Williams I know he does this on Fridays in terms of the bright side and this is just this is for a cannibal wagon Friday because we've spent such a dire dire number of weeks here we have a catchy song to play underneath the entire segment that whistling over the weekend at now I know that so that it sits in your room when you hear it and now I I can hear it now hum along in our heads well we do we we have come up with our own song for them so tell tell me something good which by the way that is a song so that's what we're going to use but let me give you some good news right now because our friend Alex stone stone pony is joining us right now from California A. B. C. news correspondent out there and there might be a bit of an interesting twist in this pandemic in the state of California what would that be Alex well I gotta go on your website right now that one of the greatest bottle of wine in the world this is that ten thousand important up but the guy who grew up in Sonoma county California I can't give the thumbs up anything outside as noble county but I will home high end your question yet so earlier this week we talk about how researchers were doing the antibody testing and what not that they were beginning their to do research at Stanford medicine looking at the the numbers of people in Santa Clara county one of the hot spots in California at your figure out how many people had that had had Corbett nineteen and they could tell that by the end body now they are expanding that to southern California as well USC and Stanford working together what they want to know now as they go deeper is why New York which has half the population of California did they've got fourteen times the number of dead in New York from corona virus and they've got a theory now it comes down to herd immunity they want to know you have cold at nineteen actually arrived in California from China out last fall doctors here reported in early and a bad flu season in the fall in California they think may be what we had with Kobe nineteen far sooner than we knew was even in China let alone in the U. S. is Victor Davis Hanson at Stanford's Hoover institute he says that they think they might be on to something here going on but we haven't quite found out yeah so what they want to know is did we actually have cove it nineteen back in the fall I mean I know in January and we came back from Vegas and I had a high temperature and all the things that now we know would be symptoms of cold at nineteen but supposedly it wasn't in the U. S. at that time now if they can prove herd immunity in California that could answer why four if you count it hasn't taken off in California or Oregon or in Washington except for nursing homes like it has in New York New Jersey DC Chicago New Orleans and they think it may come back to that real quickly Dr Andrew November at university California Irvine we asked him to explain herd immunity herd immunity is the concept that once a certain proportion of the population is immune to the virus has a really hard time bouncing from person to person and so what we want to get to you eventually is a situation where most people are immune and then the epidemic will die out it's road at jam herd immunity at the minimum you need fifty percent who have the antibodies the Max means old you need ninety percent they only believe melt most doctors a small fraction of Americans maybe one or two percent have the antibodies yet even though they may find now with antibody testing in California it's quite a bit more than that and we should mention they still don't even know if having the antibodies will give you any immunity to Kobe nineteen they believe that they do but they haven't been able to prove that yeah well it is interesting outs down because it California's not besieged the same way that New York is now there is a lifestyle differential there's a transportation differential people in California as we all know legendarily use cars more than the use public transportation so in in New York it's exactly the opposite so there may be some other reasons for that but there's also hope in this because they'll be looking at people who reported or thought they had the flu during the flu season to check to see if maybe it was because of it so that'll be interesting and there's a different genetic strain on the west coast then there is on the east coast it appears that the east coast cases came from Europe and the west coast cases came from Asia so it's not that that that it necessarily change but it does pick up genetic markers along the way so it's going to be this is this is fasting because this this virus the good news here is that this virus is meeting us at him in a moment of technological ability to maintain a certain amount of the economy moving forward because of all the digital technology and the sciences so so so far ahead of where it used to be well yeah you mentioned that the how they've been able to track it in a yeah generally it hasn't you tainted much which is a great sign for getting immunity or one day getting a vaccine and they may mutate in the future but we're not saying like you typically deal with the flu but they do have those genetic markers that you mentioned so they can tell that that new York's mainly came from Italy which came from China but likely migrant workers that they go in and work in the apparel and a handbag factories everything else in Italy and then stay there for a while and then moved on to the east coast where it's California's has the markers and it came straight from China but the belief now least among these researchers as they say yeah we only found out about China again December and January they think it actually been there a lot longer and that there is so much trouble between California and China the likely if it was starting to grow in China you may have been brought to California very early on far earlier than we ever even knew about it let alone it being in the U. S. hi there is outstanding Symfony ABC news thank you Alex Pritchett you got it have a great weekend thank you to act to my weekends better now as a result of that Ross gonna find out how other people's weekends are better now three one two nine eight one seventy two hundred tell me something good that's all I'm interested in now cannot awaken is rolling they did so the it's time for the good times to roll because I don't Illinois is doing well in terms of of tamping down the curve the the nation seems to be doing fairly well in the states that have been doing that obviously New York is still a bit of an out liar maybe that was a little bit of an explanation maybe seniors but we want to play that game so on text at three one two nine eight one seven two two hundred on the phone lines three one two nine eight one seventy two hundred and if you do tax Kevin's got to read those texts for us because of the way that were worked out here so calls three one two ninety one seventy two hundred we've got now the traffic with Lauren lapkus but Estrin was hit by a vehicle on the northwest side of Oak Park Avenue a ninety first there's an accident involving a bus on the west side of Laramie in Jackson and seeing a crash on the southwest side I can see in sixtieth I'm more laughter from the adult traffic center reminding you to drive responsibly it really is a matter of life or death the following is a message from the law offices of Franken Verity do you have a service animal like an emotional support pig if so aw also you might be able to use taxact deduct as expenses and they know what they're doing they're just helping you to find every tax advantage you deserve so stop calling to ask if it's legal we're not emotional support lawyers.

"university california irvine" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"university california irvine" Discussed on KOMO

"Health district says it appears the mitigation efforts put in place last month are having an impact on the corona virus outbreak but doctor Christie's bidders says this won't be over anytime soon we're probably looking at at least another month of the current level of social distancing possibly a bit longer until those conditions are suitable to begin consideration of any relaxation he says there won't be an immediate return to the old ways of doing things even grand whatever changes occur are likely to be incremental in nature we faced in the current mitigation efforts and we will likely need to face back out of the doctor's bitter says there's a strong chance of another outbreak if people ignore the guidelines there is a major disparity in the number of call the nineteen infections between the states of New York and California and researchers at Stanford want to get to the bottom of it covering this for A. B. C. news is Alex stone who joins me now on the company's line Alex described this scenario that seems to puzzle the researchers yet Haley this is really interesting in that New York has half the population of California but New York has fourteen times the number of dead from corona virus and researchers at Stanford they have a theory now they're doing their antibody testing that we've been talking about this week and one aspect of that they were on a go pretty deep with that antibody testing and figure out get Colgate nineteen actually arrive in California and Oregon and Washington from China last fall that the doctors here we're reporting an early and bad flu season in the fall and now they want to know do we have some immunity to corona virus to Kobe nineteen years that's why is that why we're seeing fewer cases now and we're from Victor Davis Hanson at Stanford's Hoover institute he says something is going on but we haven't quite found out yet something is going on in that something being fewer cases on the west coast except for nursing homes but in the general community that it's not taking off like it took off on the east coast and his team wants to know if what we all bought with the flu or the cold wave actually cobit nineteen several months ago you're not the kind of California population one hundred schools this would all come down Taylor herd immunity and in the Californian the numbers and have enough got need to get herd immunity we talked to Dr enter November and even the university California Irvine instead explain what herd immunity is herd immunity is the concept that once a certain proportion of the population is immune the virus has a really hard time bouncing from person to person and so what we want to get to a bench really is a situation where most people are immune and then the epidemic will die out but here's a problem to get herd immunity you normally need a minimum of fifty percent of the population that to have the antibodies and some doctors believe maybe only one or two percent of Americans have had Kobe nineteen so nobody knows if this really is the case for measles you need ninety percent to get herd immunity and still nobody knows Taylor if even having the antibodies of Kobe nineteen means you get any immunity they believe you're probably do you typically do sorry you get three years of immunity but they don't know for sure lot of unknowns here but they want to know where we all X. photos several months ago let's releasing because I'm kinda at at least as the time line stands now which would line up right when it broke out in Wuhan China to yeah exactly and there is so much back and forth between the west coast of the U. S. and China the scientists are saying this all adds up that somebody that they likely had in China long before we knew what it was probably came to the the west coast of the U. S. and it began spreading but nobody was testing for it so we were just told you have a cold or the flu I mean I know I came back from Vegas in late January and came down with all the symptoms of now what we know is corona virus but it supposedly wasn't in the U. S. for that time well now they can do the antibody test and once or enough of them they can tell you if you had it but they want to know did people have it back in September October November and do we now have this herd immunity is that why our numbers are lower in you know early on they were higher in California Washington but they've stabilized haven't taken off like New York is that because of herd immunity D. B. C.'s Alec stone with us on come on is Alex thanks very much you got a picture of someone whose time one forty which exports a ten forty past.

doctor Christie