17 Burst results for "University Of Buffalo"

"university buffalo" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:36 min | 2 months ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Ball like the weight of foul cold. They had to call something of that beat out top for the left wing. McKinley got that one that Evan laid a strong move down the pain. There was all sorts of contact and his team found Number two. Now on Arizona, Nelson have abandoned the foul line after all right now shooting two for the Buffaloes. On the General Baker Baker on the offensive and mark really see that go to his right hand, So they got to take that away. First free throw by having bad that one rattled iron. I'm kinda shit pops down when I correct myself. Mandarin picked up the foul that is his first so far within the board. That's one of the keys of the game We talked about before We'll keep tabs on all my long 73 right now for remand advantage for Colorado having baddy fires, you know Well, it was kind of that one. That thing on film painfully the front of the room and somehow trickled in. So he's three or four for the foul line. He's got seven points. Baker's sits down Terrell Brown is the ball game is a grand transfer out of Seattle from Seattle University Buffaloes downtown play to 13 40 to play in the first hand, Terrell Brown has to Tabliki bounces left side to Baker pulls up and he fires and drains the three ball from downtown. That was a heck of a shot that gives Arizona Only quickly, according to Kelly, tries to answer won't go rebound deflected around taken by the Buffaloes in the quarter Matics tales for three he fires and Mrs in the weeks have rebound yanked away by. I really want to stop by Matic quickly up court. Other right wing wasn't lava.

Baker Baker Buffaloes Terrell Brown Arizona Seattle University Buffaloes Matic McKinley Kelly Seattle Evan Nelson Colorado
"university buffalo" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

08:19 min | 5 months ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on Ideas

"Okay well I'M GONNA, start with the reality of the West because with grows out of that and to Americans the reality that West was that this was a region it was a place. It was an idea where Americans could remake themselves. But in the imagination, the West became something much more fanciful cartoonish than that with the help of some larger than life real. But Fictional Heroes, okay Buffalo, Bill Gates Buffalo Horse Okay and Buffalo Bill was a good example of the West as circus. His name was William Frederick Cody. But young and old. Rich and poor. He's known as Buffalo Bill Buffalo Bill's wild west was live outdoor theatre, which ran for thirty years from eighteen, eighty, five to nineteen fifteen. Thousands of spectators would pay to catch a glimpse of the exotic wild west. The bill show was an early version of the Hollywood westerns of the Mid Twentieth. Century me is he was part of the circus and just as people would go to the circus to sea lions, which they would never see otherwise and elephants, which they would never see otherwise, they would go to these wild west shows to see characters like Buffalo Bill, and there were Indians in the shows, and so this was a way of bringing a taste of the West to the East my name is Philip Gloria I'm the professor of Native American Indigenous Studies at Harvard University Buffalo Bill's wild. West is. Like one of these kind of flash points right where you can identify a set of cultural ideas that are sort of been amorphous than they take shape in different kinds of things plays and poems Buffalo Bill you know he's touring for thirty years his grandstands hold eleven, thousand people. There are lot of people who see buffalo bills while West and see the ways in which he has taken folk wisdom, amorphous kinds of things, old narratives and crafted them into a very precise set right of stories that are justified through the whole discourse of authenticity that Buffalo Bill uses. These are real Indians these are real cowboys you're seeing the real thing just barely converted into a show. Speculate transcribed tales of the dark and tragic round of the wild frontier. The saga of fighting men who wrote the Rim of empire and the dramatic you're sitting with eleven thousand people in you're seeing something. Something happens there. Right. The gear start turning internalisation process really happens. That's the trick right there. The internalisation processed Americans take buffalo bills amped up version of the West and they soak it in and the flood gates open up more poems more plays early film Memoirs Frontier Stories Dime novels all you add it up his a massive cultural infrastructure right of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century that convinces everybody that there is this thing called the frontier and that it does matter and that it's important. Remember about the Sheriff said ownership until the sun goes down that what he that's close enough brother drinks on the. Hollywood cranks out scores of silent Westerns in the nineteen twenties. Double danger the gambling fool sundown slim. Simple. Tales of law and order and claiming the wild including the people who live there. They are stories of loan cowboys like Medieval Knights putting things right for the sake of social progress. The motion pictures reached to the West as a perfect dramatic backdrop to drive home what ideas of America's are supposed to be, and so just looking the number of films made in the very early decades of the twentieth century. How many of those speak to the cowboy, the law man, a conic classic Westerner making his way in the great spaces of the American West as drives the myth further how do you portray the West people who've never been there never going to go there in the nineteenth century you had to bring people from the West who had some authenticity? Of the West in the twentieth century, you could just take the casts and crews and take him out to Monument Valley and Film on there. My name is Stanley Kokin. I'm a professor of film and Media Studies at the University of Cincinnati in the first phase of talking films after Nineteen, twenty seven. West weren't that popular, but they became increasingly popular around World War Two, and then really popular during the Cold War and one of the reasons they became. So popular during those periods is because they're a great means of promoting nationalism they're kind of the distinctive American John. This is my town of nobody's GonNa run me out. Kid wants to shoot it out with me I'll be here. I learned this argument agent when I was so high that is strong the weak and the smart thinking wait Mr All By the nineteen fifties these over hyped ideas of forbidden frontiers in empires and America's. March where the template for the Western movies ended up turbulent battleground rides a mysterious figure destined to carve glorious placed among the conquerors of the West a reckless adventure. Films that have embedded in them the the myth of conquest and they allow us to look at capture of lands as inevitable as great as American in what they do is they provide a kind of shorthand to American values, individualism, self reliance, and kind of fitness for the West fitness. Okay. Let's get some specific examples red river. So Red Rivers is kind of a capitalist fantasy. Rowena Missouri with ten. Thousand head. Let you all know what you're up against. Thousand Miles to go. And Miles a day will be good. Luck. No, quitting along the way not by may not by you. Red River is a Howard hawks picture. It tells the story of the cattle drive. John Wayne owns the Cadillac he's driving them to market. Montgomery. Cliff is the younger right hand man. On one hand, it's a story of a generational divide. It's a real. Of the first cattle drives. So Red River makes John. Wayne. into our ranch who can be more heroic than John Wayne driving his cattle to market. But. There's this modern subtexts or modern for nineteen forty eight and it's about how John Wayne runs his cattle business as a tough guy boss with a lousy sense of modern labor relations. Stopping them for. What eight here looks pretty good alerts water three or four miles on ahead. The men have beat had a pretty tough day I think in. The thanking even gone. Red River tells the story of this. Character character. I driving his cattle to the rail head in Abilene Increasingly Wayne style greats against the sense of the people work for him and they find him increasingly oppressive and Montgomery clift intervenes in order to make them more humane and it becomes a kind of parable of management styles. About, fifteen miles away only. But today dry well, who's been to stay behind and drive the hurt? Nobody. I don't blame. We're going together and taken the heard with us. That's the days. We'll all have a cup of coffee. You might tell the rest of them in maybe. A So it's a workplace drama. saw about workplace I. Mean it has certain conventions that you need to have. But yeah, I, mean the whole thing is about enterprise in work. So is the idea that John Wayne, the hero, the old style driving his his cowboys too hard. Threatening them is is not the way to do business in the world anymore in the Montgomery, clift characters a little more it representing something kind of a new management style in the United States in the fifties.

Red Rivers John Wayne William Frederick Cody Bill Gates Montgomery clift Hollywood America Montgomery West Mid Twentieth Harvard University Buffalo professor of film and Media St Stanley Kokin United States Philip Gloria Monument Valley Howard hawks Rowena Missouri Native American Indigenous Stu University of Cincinnati
"university buffalo" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

10:10 min | 2 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"Area of research has been somewhat disappointing, and we don't really have clear answers yet from human genetics about the of complex psychiatric disorders MandA genetic. Studies to my understanding have not really lid yet to affective treatments. So I think with the the course of that research. It is a Nabl scientists and the general public to be more open to other paradigm 's. So I think that's an important aspect of how this idea seems a little less kooky because we're now open to other other realms in terms of our understanding. It is we've said a few times is all in the early stages. But I wanted to talk about some of the intriguing findings that have emerged people with GI disorders have higher than average rates of bipolar disorders and depression. People schizophrenia often have blood markers that suggest inflammation and people on the autism spectrum have higher rates of J problems everage population. So although we know this isn't the early stages stages. What are those findings tell us? Well, I mean, I would I would make some comments and then turn it over to Dr mayor. I mean, I think these associations they're very consistent. And they're very intriguing, and I think they highlight that there is an association among the brain the immune system, and the gut, but they don't tell us really what what's the direction of that association, and what is the causal ity. And again, we're studying these phenomena in animal models, and we can talk to the extent that animal models of psychopathology have relevance to to human disease. But I think they provide a very solid foundation for this area of research. I would comment on this with you know. I've seen a skeptic. I mean, that's one scientists. And so, you know, I believe something one once villi had the definitive poo fort in. And I totally agree with the the problem that we have it's really twofold one is that the most exciting studies and results about the communication between the microbiome and the brain have come from ffom ousted most behavior. The mice can't talk the the mice. Don't have this highly complex bring that we have for the the prefrontal cortex. So it's like it's like comparing a HP hand held calculator with the Watson IBM supercomputer. And and and the second thing is the the mice. So there's hundreds of defend mouse, strains says actually a panel with all these different. Mouse, strains, you can do an experiment in one. These strains with the microbiology and brain, and you won't see an effect. And then you do it in defense, strain, and you see fit. So we don't know which one of these scientists pick the ones where they see the victory. Don't Renault that relates to you meant, and I think the French it. So the the brain got in traction, and particularly attraction of the brain with the guts associated immune system, sip because of our immune system that sits into that's kind of a well established into the and field of science. We knows twist changes the immune function. We know that immune activation in the. You know can lead to. To to to withdrawal behavior that's often been. Taken as as depression like behavior, and many studies have looked at his actually I would say there's some studies have proved quality from the rain to the gut and to the immune system and vice versa. The problem with microbiome. We don't have that yet in humans. So it could easily be. And I'm gonna tell you study that I think in some ways supports that it could easily be that all these changes were seen gut microbial composition and function and metabolite production in patient in patient populations different brain psychiatric disorders or a consequence of the output of the brain disease in to the got which changes a lot of functions has fix on the the environment that Mike Levin, but also directly on the microbes. Were if if if there's really primary changes in the microbiome that neither started in in infancy. Were related to intake of medications, which modulate the microbiome and then generate signals that they contribute to or cause the brain disease. So this and just give you one example, this many Saudis now in mice monkeys humans that psychological stress can change the relative, abundance example, decrease in lacked Brazil, lying on a change in troop defend metabolism. It's related to this lecture bacilli, and we recently completed a study with flak ner at university buffalo that showed. That the patients who underwent these patients with IBM did underwent cognitive behavioral therapy. We looked at the responded sources anonymous bonders in the respondents showed not only changes in the brain. But also in the relative abundances of of microbes in God securely, an improvement at the brain level can have an effect on on gut microbial composition. So I think. If have to be really careful on until we have these these longitudinal interventional studies before we can say this really quality in one direction versus the other. Yeah. Went to talk about a recent study or you enter interviewed about NATO, micro nature micro-biology, and that was not the link between gut bacteria and depression, so in that study was of twenty one hundred adults Senate found that people depression at different groups have got bacteria than people without depression. So what are your thoughts about that study as well? Yes. So it's again, it's it's a nice study. Because it's a large study. It's. It's it's also has the same limitation because it's a. It's it's a association that that's been shown does does a lot of the reaction that goes into a study like this. It's not like mice. If you studied seven mice seven term free, mice and characterize the maladies metabolites, and then relate this to behavior. Here you have tremendous variability in in terms of genetics of the the participating subjects and. They're the dietary habits medications at dawn coom abilities that that all could play a role here. And as I mean, the the gut brain interaction is very sensitive to a lot of factors stress is one that we understand quite well. So it's it's limited by that. I mean the association that they found with was certain of tax. And deficient and quality of life. Is is interesting. It does not, you know, foof Kasali in in any way. And it's the some similarities with so there's a few of these persons studies in in patients with major depressive disorder, the findings that they have or not necessarily all consistent is some Kelly bacterium shows up in in several in most of them, actually. That's that's interesting. And I think it's definitely something that should be followed up in in in most studies. But I would look at this really with. Still with with a significant skepticism than it, it proves a causal relation. He has. I think you know. I'm really this. We've talked about your times is that there's all this intriguing research. But before we get carried away there needs to be more research and more worked on in this in this space. Dr Dickerson, I know you've been doing research of people with bipolar disorder. You talk about what you found in your work. Yes. Our studies are different. And and present a different look in a different way of investigating this topic. The study that was most recently published last of full in the journal bipolar disorders was not of the microbiome directly. But was a clinical trial of probiotics and probiotics have become very popular they're widely used and and advertised as having a health benefits, which they may have and probiotics are micro Oregon organisms that are introduced into the body for beneficial qualities. So their compounds that contain actually alive organisms that are thought to have a health benefit. So in all of this research are. Ultimate goal, obviously is to improve the symptoms and the lives of people in my case patients who

depression bipolar disorder IBM Nabl psychological stress HP ffom Dr Dickerson Oregon Mike Levin foof Kasali university buffalo Brazil Kelly NATO Senate
"university buffalo" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on This Week in Science

"Dental insurance and dental hygiene, or whatever you have you wanna qualify to a a subset of the population. That has never gotten it or doesn't get it. That would be very interesting, wouldn't it? I might be it might be. But you know, I think it's great that they've got a molecule. You've got a molecule now where maybe it'll work, and we'll be able to block that protein and solve a lot of that problem. So you'll be able to have your poor hygiene and not worry about it. The other. There's there is another Alzheimer study out this week from a university buffalo university of New York buffalo looking at Alzheimer's disease and influences in what? Way that we could possibly reverse memory loss. They have a paper that they just published identifying epi genetic factors that contribute to the memory loss. If found ways to temporarily reverse them in a mouse model, and it's a very exciting study other than the fact that they've cured Alzheimer's in mice and not in people. So they gave mice a familial Alzheimer's disease, which means that it's genetically carried and passed on from generation to generation, and they looked at genetic changes occurring in the mice. They discovered that. There is a loss of glutamate receptors critical to learning and short term memory and found that many sub units of glutamate receptors in the frontal cortex get down rate regulated and disrupt excited, Tori signals, which impairs working memory. So if you have bad working memory, you're not able to keep things in your mind to build remember things. So anyway. Licking you sleep on just for a second. Just maybe jumping ahead of the story. I apologize. That's fascinating to me because I always considered. Things like Alzheimer's to be the destruction of the stored memory. It's it's it's not about an unification. Yeah. You're talking about access. So there's a difference. There's a never heard there's a huge difference between the access to a memory in the actual storage of it somewhere. The imprint of that memory somewhere in the brain. Exactly. So glad I was able to help blow your mind there this evening. That's awesome. Anyway, they found that that the loss of the glutamate receptors is part of what is called repressive his stone modification, which gets elevated in this in Alzheimer's disease. And this is something they saw in mouse models and in human postmortem tissue. They looked at this abnormal modification, the diminishing glutamate receptors, and they ended up looking at it found a bunch of drug targets that have to do with enzymes. And so they gave the animals an enzyme inhibitor and saw the rescue of cognitive function which they confirmed through valuations of memories recognition, spatial and working. And they say that they were quite surprised to see such a dramatic cognitive improvement. And they saw the recovery of glutamate receptor expression and function in the frontal cortex, they looked at it only for a week. So these improvements for one week, and they're going to see if they can create compounds that penetrate, the brain better and our longer lasting into the future. And so that's where they're going. If created an enzyme that can restore memories for Alzheimer's disease in mice it ever hear that cures something into disease. I wonder if just make my undeserved brain stronger, and if I could do if I could take this would I remember stuff that I haven't thought about for a long time. Just because I shut down the access to the memory or something that you lost after a night of heavy drinking, perhaps there we go. Yeah. Never. I'll never get that back again. They probably don't want to get that back. Right, right. Tell me another story just in. Oh, no. I have more. Oh, shoot. I hope. I have more. Okay. Oh, yeah. This is a separate skeleton suggest to be from disparate early. Hominid species are as it turns out sourced from the same species. Eighteen of anthropologists have surmised the research appears he's special issue of the journal paleo anthropology, which I wish somebody would send me and as part of a series of articles that offers a comprehensive accounting of Australopithecus sediba.

Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer paleo anthropology university buffalo university Tori one week
"university buffalo" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

07:10 min | 2 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"So we're talking about this smart women smart retirement program that you've got coming up at the university of Denver. Well, some of the charitable organizations that you and your team at the paradigm group are involved with wounded warriors. I think we all get that one. But also the Colorado foundation for women and your staff, you've got EMMY a Colorado university buffalo and Laurie and that's something that's near and dear to their heart as well. I think. Yeah. Absolutely. I always say that the smartest people my firms. Not me, it's the women in the firm. So look, they you know, we had a client who invited us to that. And and the in the organization is about empowering women, and it's such a strong message. Right. And they felt very strong and aligned with that. And so just like they're aligned with the smart women, you know, smart retirement, finish rich book in that process. But that's something. They wanted to be involved this. So as a firm, we said, look that would be great. Let's get involved in that. Let's get and so they take that and run with it. And they're very proud of it. And I think it's a it's a great thing. Yeah. And they should be. That's the Colorado foundation for women. What about wounded warriors winds that one important to you? Well, you know, obviously, that's a pretty easy one. And we do things like on our Facebook page, if he likes us will donate five dollars to that. We also do that for the Alzheimer's Association as well. And if you'd like us on Facebook, and you can follow our Facebook page, and if you like us we we do that as well. And those are just two areas that are so important anybody that's dealt with or has a family member associated know somebody who. You know, we in the wounded warrior else in, you know, dealing with something like Alzheimer, those things should just know what an impact it has. So those are just areas that we try to give back and in this much as we can. Yeah. Yeah. That's great. There's no question about if you find out more about mad and his team, you can certainly go to the website, redefining your retirement dot com. Lot of great information there. One of the things I think is really interesting. You are what they call duly. Licensed. What does that mean? Well, what it means is obviously we're licensed to to. You know, our fiduciary SEC manage money in that process of the business. And then we also have insurance licenses because when the end of the day, what you're trying to do is create strategies that work for you. And it's not always about Wall Street money in the market. Sometimes there's certain insurance products that work extremely well for what you're trying to accomplish. So whether you want to transfer risk whether you want to create income or whether you wanna create tax benef-. Fits there are certain products that do that better. And then obviously, you know, you need that money growing to outpace inflation and in the market. So how we feel so strongly about that? As what do we know what your plan needs to we sit down and talk to you. And most advisers focus on the tools, right? What are the tools? Well, mutual funds. Stocks bonds ETF's index funds, you know, bitcoin real estate, whatever. Baby, they focus on the tools and say, okay. I have the best tool in reality. What you need to do is focus on what your your goals are what are your values. What are you trying to accomplish? And once you understand that. And then you start to look at what strategies we can create then you can determine what tools are needed to accomplish that and make sure that aligns with your values and your goals, and I think that's where having a license can be very very advantageous to the planning process because I would imagine in. Everybody's situation is different. So we always stay that. But there are some people that are probably taking on more risk than they realize. I mean, if you have the 4._0._1._K retirement world, your money is all in Wall Street world, there's that's the world of risk. But it's also the world of growth the insurance world is more of the world of safety, and protection, you can get some guaranteed income from some different items and so forth, but it's really not about, you know, the the money so much it's about where is it gives you peace of mind at night that you can go to sleep. And you're not worried, you know, waking up that I've lost all my money. Certainly people back in two thousand eight Matt were not very happy. When Leno and Letterman were making fun of your 4._0._1._K's are now to a one k that's kind of what you're talking about as well. When it's kind of a blending of the two worlds, the the growth world of Wall Street, but the safety and protection world of insurance. Yeah. If you look at the last quarter of two thousand eighteen you know, nobody really wants to go through that. But see here's the real key to that. You got to understand the impact of all Tilleke on your money. See volatilities where we lose a lot of money and set up and down, you know, and you know, you go through a process of diversification to smooth out vol. Until you get better growth of a dollar, and I want to get too technical. But what I'm trying to make sure people understand is, you know, your capacity to handle risk. You know, if you think about it what you just talked about in dealing with it, you say, okay? Well, he's saved all this money. And I'm okay with twenty percent return. But if I said, okay, you have a million dollars. You're okay. Lose in two hundred grand. What's your response? And so you really got to put it in context for people what where their money is. And as you said, Mark, I I don't I think it's probably one of the biggest areas of of awakening people have is how much risk of my taking for the return on getting in. Are you comfortable with that? Does it fit your plan? I think it's again, I don't people come see us. And they're often often surprise that. They're just way too conservative or taking on too much risk for what they're trying to accomplish. We've got just a couple of minutes left. So I think we ought to finish with this big event. Coming up smart, women smart retirement based on David box book, the smart women finish. Rich is a program that David created. And that's one of the lucky advisors across the country being able to do this. And especially right here at the university of Denver January twenty second or the twenty four th and you know, when you think about that statement that we set earlier eighty percent of men die married. Eighty percent of women die widowed. And the average widow is at the age of fifty nine. That's incredible. This is a huge event. You've got coming up. It is. And I think it it's basically a workshop that is really designed to help women understand the the good news about it in the not so good news and some of the challenges they face, but what things they can start to do to really align their plan with their goals and their values. And and what do I mean by that will goals are tangible things, right? There's a specific monetary value. And that's really the BB honest with you. That's where most men focus, and when you think about values, right? Those are intangible desires, and they don't carry a price tack and and women tend to focus on that quite a bit. And so. There are differences just from that perspective. But I think everybody should really look at aligning their plan to their goals and their values because what does it do? It will give you a retirement a purpose to give your money a purpose. Right. And when you give your money a purpose things get pretty simple. And when they get simple gives you confidence in those are the things that I feel people walk away from this event women walk away from this is that it simplifies things, and it'll give them confidence that that where they wanna go they can achieve. They can accomplish in an empowers them to be able to do that. And that's really what it's about. So again, this is the smart women smart retirement event that that Nate or that Matt and his team at the paradigm group or.

Facebook university of Denver Colorado foundation Matt Alzheimer Colorado university buffalo David Laurie Alzheimer's Association fiduciary SEC Mark Rich Nate Leno Letterman million dollars Eighty percent
"university buffalo" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on WWL

"With you do not draft profiles in a you'll may have led the road booty in han high school rogers university of buffalo safety in 10 thanks for joining us man habeen great well good luck um overall mantelet let's talk about your storage fascinating i think overall when you consider how you ended up at the university of buffalo and i was told by a former coach didn't kociu directly bit familiar with the hyogo program that you played several different positions at honda played linebacker play defensive back but i was told that if you had been able to concentrate on at safety our defence back for your tire career hand ville you and i had to go to university buffalo juku route and then university of buffalo you can play in the sec and alabama and and lsu matt kuchar fellow man a great guy wide work no salomon easy you know in a great guy all the while again man a bit of of what path we know you know every day had proven better way beyond what could have real i'd be with i did we would bet that could bring in not bitten blamed on linebacker outplay wrapping powder mccracken we operate hadn't been any weather because malaysia play etc i won't be with beckoned to poon club near polling in nevada had quit after uh in a bid had no among pre within that needed crowded manama all than a better term iconic becker weather about of them will work on and uh i didn't have the money to break new a wooden aiming you know um you know the weapon in the world i would like you know and i am not everybody knew i would argue more talent we nor had lifted could will be warning now would be mud during room but control everything is crazy ibanes work out so i get a cry for my boyfriend who remained inclement weather a pretournament accompli gluco and two philip a community carling who has uh library tokyo for california in a moment out there man widow nothing uh mcknight are act up on the floor with eight other guy you know uh in uh i admit backer rhonda means marker not worth the remaining with clearly remain there have been acting thought that i moved to a man a man who media group will travel in israel because value and other men are i believe they have nothing in um for our flip on.

honda sec nevada manama california mcknight rhonda israel rogers university of buffalo university of buffalo alabama lsu matt kuchar poon club tokyo
"university buffalo" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"No this they set their true priced competitively so they can win your business so when you're ready to buy a new car or a used car visit true car and enjoy a more confident car buying experience to stop being bombarded with all of these numbers online get the only number you need to know with true price from true car some features not available in all states hey listeners just wanted to take a minute to thank all our great sponsors and all of you great listeners for supporting this podcast we certainly couldn't do without either of you and i wanted to remind you that you can support our sponsors by going to our show pager podcast onecom clicking on the support this podcast button and there you will see all our wonderful sponsors that helped make this show possible thank you for downloading subscribing and of course supporting and now back to the show we are in winnings thursday afternoon later on today at university buffalo wild wings campus of the university of minnesota we'll be there from foreign so 536 them got some good stuff in salo to the nfc for tse promises to hug everybody do shows up there in a close look at the pimple whenever all that could hurt your game today will get a when we come back we were going to do create creeping up non gmo they're all steelers the like steering the hugged to the other g down to get away from them for tses going to have that pimple leaning on somebody who never got all these of your nice longline really western science doublebarrel going to be with regard to go on no parliament aaron rogers left his mark on the show in more ways than one he had three throws mick levin mick levin may have i don't know if you've hurt if you broke a bone or something but you've got iceland your hand now yeah item that will get an xray after the show hashtag warrior no big deal luca mounted super bowl and i just tape it up and i'm ready to go the way it should have happily ready to go to pebbled out even bring that up okay put the window we taped off wear.

nfc steelers aaron rogers iceland university of minnesota tse mick levin
"university buffalo" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"People like i just pulled up in their boom it comes out uber senior belt yeah yeah i'm hoping that i was hoping that that would give me an advantage over these guys are meet and greet thursday afternoon with the damage will have the results of uh danit's versus food tomorrow university buffalo wild wings thursday from foreign she'll 530 we asked travis kelsea if he wanted to come down and do some damage do some wings so i don't know how busy is the fact he thinks he could put up seventy wings is pretty impressive i wonder if clinton portas will be there on the hard now that was last night or yesterday what was that drafted the drafts that the draft we're we're at new york city chrissy teigen and john legend showed up what we keep trying to get them back to craig forrest the only people that showed up at your yes so we show up in new york city in our show is not on in new york but they do this meet and greet at buffalo wild wings and we show up in there is like the all nine people there including the waiters and we as this yes so ruutel ideas said i will make the best of it and then all of a sudden chrissy tiegen and john legend show up so i i i mean there through the most famous people on the planet now but ten years ago chrissy show and she couldn't have been nicer john showed up and make levin goes i think that's clinton portis so he's looking at this guy with classes in a bow tie on cern and that was the clinton portis look and we didn't want to tell me club in that.

chrissy teigen new york chrissy tiegen levin clinton portis travis kelsea john legend craig forrest ten years
"university buffalo" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"The exact opposite way and pick her cousins kirk cousin it doesn't seem like there's any consent his with the anybody about who's better speaking a man versus food we have these videos that we shot uh on sunday with kc web in the man versus food where's the danit's versus food i don't know if anybody one there but we got videos all this week a seat and got advice on how to tackle and and what was at ten pounds of food that you guys i think is six pounds a full six found tens head of housing calorie us america which is a is tough and i tried i'm using my secret weapon in the challenge which is my ever extending stomach the you know i can i have like a stomach and then i i compared it to uh the third row seating in an suv were also and you can fit seven people like just pull that up and later boom it comes out you losing your belt yeah yeah i'm hoping that i was hoping that that would give me an advantage over these guys uh meet and greet thursday afternoon with the dan and it's will have the results of uh dan versus food tomorrow university buffalo wild wings thursday from foreign she'll 530 we asked travis kelsea if he wanted to come down and do some damage do some wings so i don't know how busy is the fact he thinks he could put up seventy wings is pretty impressive i wonder if clinton porters will be there no doubt that was oh last night or yesterday what was that drafted the draft that the draft we're we're at newark city chrissy teigen and john legend showed up what we keep trying to get them back craig forrest air the only people that showed up at your yes so we show up in new york city in our show is not on in new york but they do this meet and greet at buffalo wild wings and we.

chrissy teigen new york kirk travis kelsea clinton newark john legend craig forrest six pounds ten pounds
"university buffalo" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"The minnesota campus is that we're we're going to be on thursday from foreign she'll 530 university buffalo wild wings roger goodell was he making the rounds yesterday or was he just on the heard uh with colin coward where he talked about the catch rule and here's the clip from uh his interview i'm not the concern i am concurred we could park hall of famer fever fan several coaches come to focus on the catch no catch rural you want there to be clarity from it officiating standpoint a coaching in a player standpoint they know what it is what it is a new draft the rule the competition can they look at it they bring it to the membership and they want that clarity but what happens is to stop the rule the people really want one of our hall of fame receivers said it well fancois catches and we've got some ideas of how to bring clarity to that it's particularly in the going to the ground that i think is created a lot of the confusing and i think that's what were focusing on it but that's the commissioner recalling cowherd yesterday i i don't know how you clean this up because it feels like they doubled down and then they tripled down and then they were so far down that they couldn't come back up to say you know at on second thought we screwed up the calvin johnson catch because that's where it started surviving the gra all i want it if you have the ball you've got it both feet in bounds after that if you go out of bounds the ball goes i don't care nothing out of balance should matter and these surviving the ground i it's it's almost like they kept coming up like lawyers came up with no how we confuse them more surviving the ground okay we'll throw that in every year it's a new phrase for them when you were growing up we didn't have this i just don't remember where you went uh i don't know did you complete that process their alex smith has been in the league thirteen years and he doesn't know would've catches that's wrong then you know.

roger goodell colin coward commissioner cowherd alex smith minnesota calvin johnson thirteen years
"university buffalo" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Oh man the pierre in wings thursday afternoon with me of the nfc will be at be university buffalo wild wings thursday from ford you'll 530 come on down got some great prizes there as well and will be hanging out four to five thirty university buffalo wild wings buckle up everybody michael irvin's in town fell network analyst and a hall of famer mike always going to say it was so nice era you are rich together to now back together a now no one else would you got early early on over a fourletter network over there you know edison and a watch you guys back together it's just great both have your show i don't mind on mattel oilrich one day i had just had already you game it at black hit with their patrick show yeah we know what i had on the airport now miss it patrick won't be rituals like did you just sit next to me with a day shut up ever every year we be on at the super bowl and there's always not i don't know if it's drama but there are memories that we have a flood stuff the orleans was one of the one of our favorite range so hard in new orleans and michael sat down and all of a sudden dr ceiling started to collapse a little bit so it was like white sawdust that was on his general like girl in and majko's michael irvin can't have dust.

nfc network analyst edison patrick super bowl new orleans majko michael irvin ford one day
"university buffalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The yankees lost as good news for the himalayan in tibetan brown bears what what did you find out about these bears you learn something about them oh yeah well the himalayan brown bear now that we have people in the first new might upon you'll genome up them we know that they referee are representative of the most ancient lineage of brown bears which is really interesting it seems like these bears had migrated into this area and they've been isolate that ever sent and then the tibetan brown bear which geographically is located pretty close to the himalayan brown bear the tour separated by the himalayan mountain range they but we have had thought that perhaps the tibetan brown bear whereas more closely related to the two million brown bear but now with these better sequences we can see that there are actually very genetically dissimilar which suggest that the tibetan brown bear colonized that area in a separate migratory event now how big or the populations with a population of the himalayan brown bears are very small um they're they're endangered and there are estimated to be less than three hundred in the wild uh so it it has an important conservational perspective as well the all those yeti folks the bad news and what what about still sas question big foot in those others are they they distinct from yeti writer is this is the jury still out on those i hope that there has been some research into the south squash in north america and that they found that many simple once the dna was signal was sequence was there but in any case um certainly if somebody wanted to do a survey of fast wash samples they could take a very similar approach she what we did with yeti samples were asking for squad somebody wants to send us ask questions their welcomes do but not particularly asking okay we will tell anybody thank you very much for taking time to be with us today great thanks so much definitely go phd candidate in the biological sciences at malema mater university buffalo after this breakup president obama's net neutrality rules could be over in just a couple of weeks what kind of internet could we get as a result we've got lots of guests talking about into net neutrality after the breaking enqvist's give it a.

yankees himalayan writer north america phd candidate malema mater university buffal obama representative president
"university buffalo" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on WDRC

"Perfect intelligent medicine duct rome health in here you know commercials uh maybe of pain for you but there are actually a boon for me because i get to pause and look stuff up and the previous caller was questioning me about sharon's syndrome and i came across an article entitled gastrointestinal disease in show grins syndrome related to food hypersensitivity service and it turns out that uh many patients with show grins complain of abdominal pain bloating diarrhea uh and fa teague sometimes associated with the ingestion of certain foods they may have difficulty swallowing mobility disorders as i said a lack of pancreatic enzymes uh and abdominal pain diarrhea constipation bloating flatulence vomiting nausea so this pretty common and so in this study so small study but they took ten patients at does soon he buffalo and they tested them for food allergies where the tests called the igg rest food test and by the way this attests that's it was done a university buffalo bitter experimental conditions because it's no longer authorized for clinicians and new york unfortunately he can get it at forty nine out of fifty states in the union but here in new york were seen fit to ban that tests but it's useful so based on that tests they eliminated the culprit foods and they found a high degree of improvement in these patients when they eliminated the foods that were implicated by the ig test and then when they reach allenged them with the foods the symptoms returned so it is some warranted to undertake a workup for food intolerances either with a tester with a trial delimination diet in patients who have gastre symptoms insurance.

sharon abdominal pain teague new york bloating
"university buffalo" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on WDRC

"Ovechkin children medicine duct rome health and here you know commercials uh maybe a pain for you but there are actually a boon for me because i get a pause and look stuff up and the previous caller was questioning me about sharon's syndrome and i came across an article entitled gastrointestinal disease in show grin syndrome related to food hypersensitivity service and it turns out that uh many patients with show grins complained of abdominal pain bloating diarrhea uh and fatigue sometimes associated with the ingestion of certain foods they may have difficulty swallowing mobility disorders as i said a lack of pancreatic enzymes and abdominal pain diarrhea constipation bloating flatulence vomiting nausea so this pretty common and so in this study it's a small study but they took ten patients at does soon he buffalo and they tested them for food allergies where the tests called the igg rest food test and by the way this attest that's it was done a university buffalo bitter experimental conditions because it's no longer authorized for clinicians in new york unfortunately he can get it at forty nine out of fifty state in the union but here in new york were seen fit to ban that test but it's useful so based on that tests they eliminated the culprit foods and they found a high degree of improvement in these patients when they eliminated the foods that were implicated by the ig test and then when they reach challenged them with the foods the symptoms returned so is some warranted to undertake a workup for food intolerances either with a tester with a trial delimination diet in patients who have gaster symptoms insurance disease and um it's food matters in many autoimmune conditions.

sharon abdominal pain new york Ovechkin bloating
"university buffalo" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"That protects land out here who had the idea of let's take some of the slant i'm carmen organically did someone come did you you went to them out of that happen so so two years before we actually came to an began set and and and hooked up with the puck on a clan trust they were ten families stettler you heard this about this idea of csn ain't an and you know from the beginning of it in western mass your parents not so they could they were coming that's right they were part of the from the first ten families and that's actually how i got involved because when we i lived in england for many years we came back bill said you want to come to this meeting about this community farm that were part of i i think they'll be slid wasn't part of it at that time and i'm twenty so nineteen eighty nine you came back nine that's right now what was dining like in your child and your relationship to food when you're child where you from so i grew up in western new york near buffalo place call tunnel wanna and what you do i do hit a lindor interesting job he ran a bookstore at university's he was but he was so good out at that he kept getting hired to go on to another university in so i like that living around the university in being part of that and so he ran the bookstore at the university buffalo and then at the university of washington and then finally at core now on so it's a coah became home in the end and i counted as my hometown even though it didn't get there until i was i think seventeen misery the end of your high school years yeah yeah graduated from issac a high school and it was immediately home you've and even though i don't i mean i've never been back to tunnel on actually and we're not a college and to college fifty miles away in binghamton harper college at the time it was called announce jimmy binghamton was so you know it's hard mcconnell and what was so what was the the relationship with food who can i think about my family.

england new york issac jimmy binghamton mcconnell buffalo place university of washington fifty miles two years
"university buffalo" Discussed on KFMB 760AM

KFMB 760AM

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on KFMB 760AM

"At the half the our he's a guy with you don't get average sort of background or university buffalo georgetown university loss school after last goalie clerks for thomas flannery on the us district court district of columbia was assist in us attorney and was in private practice at dick steen shapiro l l see for more than thirty years who do you say is on the phone sixteen shapiro's on the phone and they're looking to get play it was call darn right you know where you're messing west you know with dicks teams shapiro yeah and then what about it where the most here's some long term this side of the secret sir i don't get blake state totally golf i don't over see that have investigation and the national security and sears there isn't texting something no but when you know litigator now slipper the falls and i throughout my backed carrying the lawn mower on my rose i can work can i get some you know some of that eight hundred money any something like to come on put me up i was just find the biggest week and pleaded so national security experience get ago i it was that the well firm yeah bowles baby those maybe the theory and then you said we're got i want to john hey how you doing derrick and a quite a question is so when it actually two to questioned one is bam my i would look made little friends.

thomas flannery columbia us attorney private practice shapiro derrick university buffalo georgetown dick steen blake bowles thirty years
"university buffalo" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"university buffalo" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

"They didn't underwater test a wage underwater but you kids because that this is one of the truest forms of body fat he had the blowout all year you possibly couldn't they lawrie underwater worry up and so all of these are hey there to they just like dipped can for a few so already well known all your options camps great to so we we did that we did that we're is university buffalo in many got more complex now they have like skull the bought pod regis intimate mit it'll tell you after tanner fifteen minutes a being in their toes you would your body composition isn't we get one of those daughter lotta different ways to get it done now so who were some new guys that have stood out for you in camp guy some names that the fans may not be terribly aware of that could you know i'm not i know coaches don't like to play rookies and first year guys that much but you probably got some guys in mind that could be players for you down the line it right away yeah you know i think it's again it's it's some of the players that got a little bit of the taste last year no young player like devin shore who will be in the lineup to more night he missed most the camp with an injury a got hurt the second dick tampa came back and played last game last vegas and it had a real good traverse city in the rookie camp the rookie tournament where played all those games stephen johns again as it is another young player that you know came in late may year and played well late ne aaron through the playoffs facts who is just started his career again to it the second half of the year and so here some young players so some players a got sent down that are are real close where the likes of honker on jim a jim else madison our guys like that who who played big minutes for so we have eso in del virile young defense from the played a couple games last year that you know it's had a good camp in may two and will be a player shortly if it's not playing games immediately mike runner cordy davidson n danny bayless or live with the hard line monday through friday on the.

tanner tampa jim danny bayless stephen johns mike cordy davidson fifteen minutes