5 Burst results for "University Of Alberta"

"university alberta" Discussed on Burn It All Down

Burn It All Down

07:45 min | 2 months ago

"university alberta" Discussed on Burn It All Down

"Women on the university schedule in volleyball team. I know there's one other girl on our team okay. So but predominantly your frequently in sports spaces in particular the only indigenous woman in that level of elite sport. So do you get people coming up to and asking about what it is actually. After that game. I had like i wanna say upwards of twenty dams on instagram oke of people who are at the trinity game asking me like. Why are you doing this like what. What does this mean But we were actually in regina one day playing a game and that were six girls who are in town for were from reserve and they came to the city to play volleyball game or a tournament with the the city schools. They wanted to take a picture with me after and they were like. We can't believe you're doing this like this is so awesome. Ama- started crying. Because i was just like i didn't realize how many people had reached like these girls were at high school and it's not like i have a connection to girls in regina either So i just thought that. That was really amazing. And what's madge. Do chanel what she did for you. You're passing that on your paying forward and then maybe hopefully if there's no restrictions and if there are these young folks in indigenous folks than their allies fight it like fight those restrictions on being because we know that very often and sport. There's there's an attempt to cease any discussion. That's considered political where this isn't a political discussion. It's about the right to life for sure in someone in your space. 'cause you're starting setter. You're like you're the core of the team quite frankly like you're the you're the bones of the of the squad. I'm a volleyball mom. So i absolutely understand my son's a middle blocker but unlike boy like i know the importance of what you do and how you carry it in the composure required and this month has arguably been extremely difficult but how you still training and focusing on sport. Sport is your is your response. It's her passion but it's also a place where you advocate for justice. So how do you reconcile lately. It's been quite hard just because we're kind of on a break right now. We don't really do a lot of training and if we do one on one I went to. We did a scrimmage the other day and i just finished walking with rory in one of my teammates who's walked probably at least half of the kilometers as me. She said you wanna walk after the game. And i said sure But going into the game. I just remember thinking like most of these girls are going to go home. Lived in her and watch a movie and go to bed and do whatever and not think twice about it. And i just about these children who are who taken from their families and never returned on. I just that's a that's a really hard part for me is when i go into a space. That's not indigenised lot Not aware of these issues. It's really hard for me to be focused on playing to be honest with you and it's just something that's these last few weeks. It's been really hard to do anything without thinking about it. Think about the people around me and how it doesn't affect them in that is wrong and so if your teammates are people listening can support your campaign. And i do actually want to ask you about rory and how he came into your life and how high made the decision. But before i get there. What is the way that folks can help by supporting the campaign or you know. There's there's a free course than indigenous history in this country from university alberta. What do you suggest that people do. So you know because we feel that way. We feel as racialist communities that have experienced trauma through colonization and through violence. We feel that way. All the time in the weight of grief is quite heavy. So what do you say to people who are listening right now. It's funny that you ask to have. There's a a girl few years younger than me and she frequently we talk via instagram. And she comes word games and Great person she's a settler and she's very aware of the issues and It's just she dami and she said what do i do like i lost. I feel like nothing's ever gonna get better. I wanna help. And my first reaction was to read books into because as a visibly white person like. I'm not Nobody would know Spoke to me And i recognize that. That is a huge privilege. But i know learning for for me comes from reading night. You know you pick up a book like block water and you. You read about indigenous man's journey back to finding himself from growing up being told. Oh you're indigenous. But like no. I just don't tell people that and he grew up in the same city that i didn't so listening to his stories and internalizing those stories you know. He went to a primarily white school and everyone knew that he wasn't white but nobody really asked and so he never he never wanted to be indigenous. And i just thought wow like growing up in a primarily white school where you see primarily white figures you read primarily white authors. It's just it's so hard to wanna grow up to be an indigenous person that reading Can go so far for educating Reading a story like that you. It's not just a sexist. Not just a lecture is not okay. Here's here's the issue the man that's that it's you really get to connect with the person and their story and and realize it's there's so many others like that too and you kinda get to connect that to the statistic or connect that to stereotype. And it's just. I feel like it's not more much more personal at that point so i would just say read i would so cover book grab grab a book and i mean i think that's a very fair thing to say. Is that the way that we've been taught and part of the system as i mentioned was us not knowing. Yeah and you know. There's a couple indigenous authors. I mean i would. If i may chime in the inconvenient indian by thomas king is essential and anything by tanya tolaga who wrote about yes thunder bay in messina. Ten issue there and this is like the system in this part of the country. Because you and i are in different parts of the country as well I think that's like everything you've said is just so keen so important to everything and how i'm hearing you say you can't put your identity aside even as an athlete we make. Usaa insurance for veterans. Like listen mike when they got a bigger car for their soon to be bigger family. Usa held them get covered and find savings. That was easy usaa. What's your made of were made for. The economy is made up of real people doing real stuff and it affects everything which were obviously no since. You're a real person doing real stuff marketplace's here to help you get smart about everything beyond the what of the day's business and economic news we dig into the how and the why with the real people driving our economy from big tech and interest rates to small businesses and what's happening at the fed marketplace breaks it all down so you don't have to listen to marketplace where ever you get your podcast.

volleyball regina rory dami Ama chanel instagram alberta tanya tolaga thomas king Usaa insurance thunder bay messina usaa mike Usa fed
"university alberta" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"university alberta" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"These chemicals so the link between these cells that are meant to be very tight so that we're protected from anything coming in is weakened by these chemicals and pollutants that we breathe in that allows in the case of the current problem the cove in nineteen virus for example that allows the virus to get into the body where it's normally kept out by these layers of protection. There's also the issue of the Silia. Which are the the fine beating structures that come out of these epithelial cells and they're constantly moving? They're they're really beautiful to see especially when they're working normally but when we're exposed to these pollutants these silly at these these beating structures that are meant to push all the bad things up and out of our bodies. These civilians are damaged. It don't work as well. So that's a second factor. That is problematic in trying to defend ourselves and then finally would not really finally because there are many aspects to this but another major factor. Is that the mucus which is bent to trap again. These foreign substances this mucus becomes thicker in the face of these pollutants and it becomes so thick that it's hard to move again up out of the body as it's intended choose. Those are three important parts of the problem and there are others That compound or come together to make us susceptible invulnerable in this setting so the lungs sweeping system that normally sweeps the floor and to get everything out is just not as effective. What needs to be swept out is thicker and harder to move. You said it perfectly by better than me. So you've described how pollutants can make it easier for the virus to get into our tissue and into the cells. But do they have an effect on the immune system? Wants the viruses in there they do. And this gets into the balance of cells that we have. So we have a whole bunch of different cells in the immune system and they're finely balanced in. What's called homies? Stasis is basically a word used to describe this state where everything seems to be working right where there's not too much of one cell or too little the other. For example one of the type of immune cells that's critically important are the lymphocytes and the lymphocytes include cells that are called t regulatory cells. Keyword there is regulatory. Because they're going around the system looking at the other lymphocytes in saying you need to back-off in one case or you need to increase your activity in another so. These are basically the the headmaster if you will the lymphocyte system. And the evidence shows that pollution will alter the amount of those t regulatory cells or these housekeeping cells. That keep everyone else in line and by doing that this system then does get out of whack and glass able to protect us. So these are part of that targeted adaptive responsive. We've heard about exactly. This is the adaptive immune system. We're when seeing new proteins or new chemicals. The body tries to develop a protective response by creating antibodies. The problem in the face of pollution. It seems that the particles that come when we breathe in cigarette smoke or pollution from traffic. Or what's called biomass burning in parts of the world where they need to burn fuel to heat their house. That antibody production system is thrown off dramatically in the face of pollution and then the CO exposure to whether it's a virus or Allergen or a bacteria becomes problematic because the antibody system is not working as it should so cells I just generally the pollutants and chemicals are just making it easier for the virus to do. It's nasty work as actually. Actually THAT'S A. That's a perfect summary Dr Charleston. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you Bob Dr Chris. Carlson is a professor and head of the Division Respiratory Medicine at the University of British Columbia. Hi I'm Bob McDonald. And you're listening to a special taped from my home with a head cold additional quirks and quarks. And don't worry it's just a cold now of course as the world has responded to the. Cova nine thousand nine outbreak. It's not just hockey games and concerts. That have been shot down. Some important science has ground to a halt with labs closing and research trips cancelled. We reached out to Canadian scientists to tell us how the pandemic is changing their work for the foreseeable future. And how they're coping with all this uncertainty. We'll be sharing their stories with you today. A little quirks quirks dwayne phrase Professor in the Department of Earth Atmospheric Sciences at the University Alberta. I mostly work in my team. Mostly work in northern Canada on permafrost and environmental change projects in most of north western Canada the Yukon the Northwest Territories. Today is a day that were essentially closing in the lab shutting down analytical equipment and checking our alarms and our secondary and tertiary alarm systems on our freezers and our collections. To make sure everything stays cold we've had to cancel our northern fueled work at least through this spring and the summer. You know we're still holding. Maybe some hope in the fall. But I think that's probably overly optimistic as I'm recording this. They're still Inoke. Ovid nineteen cases in northern Canada. So ethically there's really no way that southern based researchers could travel into these communities that are still covert free and you know potentially put these communities at risk in particular. We communities. Don't have a lot of to maybe deal with infections in those areas. So it's really a hit for the long term data collection. The student projects that we have that we will hopefully adapt to. But it's really a tough day right now. Trying to looks forward to to where we're going to be late in the summer. Hopefully we were going to get ahead of this. My Name's Isabel coattail. I'm a marine ecologist at Simon Fraser. University I'm also head of my department so to help faculty members decide whether their own fieldwork should go ahead. I made a little decision tree so it starts with how you're traveling to your field site if it's by plane or by public transit don't do field work if it's by car or other personal mode than okay but then you need to consider who you're traveling with his fits with people with exposure that you're not sure about best not to go if you're traveling alone or just with a handful of people that you know have been careful then go ahead but consider the place where you gonNa go if it's true community where you can pose a risk to people or people can pose a risk to you. Don't do the field work. The last thing to consider is where you're going to work in live if it's with many people and you can't maintain social distance. You shouldn't do that kind of field work but if you can live and work with Just a few people or maintain social distance than it's okay to go now that little tree. Really kind of eliminates most kinds of fieldwork. They should have been done in my department this summer. But there's a handful of projects that are doable. In these days of covy nineteen the government of.

Canada professor Silia Bob McDonald Bob Dr Chris Simon Fraser Dr Charleston Cova University of British Columbia hockey covy Isabel coattail Department of Earth Atmospheri Carlson University Alberta Division Respiratory Medicine
"university alberta" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"university alberta" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Morning Jennifer thank a is back with three big things you need to know never one Gordon the Ukranian jet that crashed this week after taking off from Tehran appears to have been down to buy into Ronnie and surface to air missile intelligence indicates the Iranian military accidentally shot down the Ukrainian airliner with an anti aircraft missile all one hundred seventy six people aboard the Boeing seven thirty seven were killed including sixty three Canadians David Turpin vice chancellor at the university Alberta says ten of them were connected with his school words simply cannot express the grief that we are feeling on campus work we're a close knit community US intelligence sensors show it running an air defense radar locked on to the passenger plane Iran is denying the missile allegations and called on the U. S. and Canada to share any information they have never to house speaker Nancy Pelosi is says the Senate needs to show what the terms of engagement will be and president trump's trial before she turns over the articles of impeachment holding indefinitely of send another one and that will probably be soon hello she said she was unmoved by calls from Republicans and some Democrats to transmit the articles and reiterated she is waiting for more information from the Senate before naming impeachment managers and sending over the case number three Australia today urged nearly a quarter of a million people to evacuate their homes and prepared military backup is soaring temperatures in a radical winds fanned bushfires across the east coast fire conditions are expected to become extreme in several places accompanied by high winds threatening to further fuel flames that have already left thousands homeless in the alpine region on the border of the southeastern states of Victoria and New South Wales two fires were poised to merge and create a blaze over almost one and a half million acres Italian making Marcos decision to split from the royal family were apparently months in the making but it took social media only seconds to come up with some hilarious responses of the couple announced they were seeking to become financially independent that's what their time between the U. K. in North America the Chicago Tribune treated northwestern graduate moving closer to home after spending time abroad Markell of course attended Northwestern another to read wondered how Harry was going to get a real job without last name well another question if the movie was being made so Meghan Markle can play herself in the crown it's funny it was one of the few things social media is good FOR have great that prince Harry with no last name that's great six minutes in front of the hour on this morning America's first news coming up next surviving a.

Markell Marcos president Nancy Pelosi Canada university Alberta David Turpin Gordon America prince Harry Meghan Markle Northwestern Jennifer Chicago Tribune North America New South Wales Victoria Australia
"university alberta" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"university alberta" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Five point five W. asked me what was news and talk time is seven thirty I'm Scott slated WSB stop local story in Atlanta's morning news happening now a wet start to the morning rain across much of the metro the impact it's having on your commute that's our in depth coverage begins with a terrible get out of the second wave arrayed arrives at the boll the baby wait to get a late start this morning you're getting a rude awakening all the roads first off downtown the trouble is just cleared seventy five eighty five north at university Alberta but it's about forty minutes between the airport and it tells you had worked out there's trouble for the southern suburbs at the eighty five door that highway seventy four exit sixty one that crashed there is that the right place with that trouble if we get a junction of beta spun out at the plate eighty five south retreated to anybody at twenty five the rug that the gap or out of the realm is crawling on how to lead to the five northbound you're gonna slow from flat shows road all the way over to Georgia four hundred in sandy springs more minutes triple team traffic ninety five like five WSP her death live team coverage continues WSP here on his car mileage tracking the rain and what we can expect later today all rights got sing the back edge of the rain now in the Rome area that does some of the heaviest rain now stretching from the coming area over towards Gainesville and Swanee in Duluth Roswell sandy springs on through the heart of the city and I'm south towards Carrollton noon in Peachtree city Hampton and Griffin it's all moving to the northeast at about forty miles an hour but as expected the news making front much weaker than to other states to our west so the risk of damaging winds is not zero but it is very low rain the main impact for Lana amounts a quarter to half an inch on average temperatures will drop ten degrees or more by the noon hour down to the forties late afternoon and around thirty by tomorrow morning the rain ending between ten AM and the lunch hour live in the storm center I'm WSP meteorologist.

Scott Atlanta university Alberta Georgia sandy springs WSP Gainesville Swanee Hampton Griffin Lana Rome
"university alberta" Discussed on Surgery 101

Surgery 101

11:31 min | 2 years ago

"university alberta" Discussed on Surgery 101

"And Hello and welcome back once again to surgery one podcast brought to the help of the Department of Surgery at the University Alberta. I'm Jonathan White coming to you from Royal Alexandra Hospital in Edmonton Alberta. This week is the second in a series of two episodes all about trauma shock and bleeding last week. We left lift shock in some detail. This week will be considering bleeding. We'll be looking at the main types of hemorrhage on how you control it. We'll be talking about things like the fast exam exploratory laparoscopy on damage control techniques so let's get ready to get ourselves into some serious bleeding heroes surgery one. Oh one hello hello. My name is Tiffany Patsy. I am a fourth year medical student from McGill University. Today we are going to discuss our second episode in a surgery one podcast cast series on dealing with trauma I would I like to thank Dr White Surgery One on one podcast team for the opportunity to be here. I would also like to thank thank Dr Beckett and Dr Gorka Trauma Surgeons from McGill University for their valuable expertise on the subject in contribution to the podcast in the short series of podcasts. We're you're going to look at how to manage a patient who has undergone a trauma. We'll be following the same patient across two episodes last week we looked at the initial assessment mint and resuscitation of a trauma patient and this week will look at the management of hemorrhage after listening to this podcast students will be able to identify the two types of hemorrhage provide three methods to control external hemorrhage define the fast last exam why it is performed in the regions examined lists the six locations of life threatening bleeding and that define the difference between exploratory damage control lap. Rodney okay. Let's get an update on our patient who is brought by ambulance. After suffering blunt domino trauma following a motor vehicle collision upon arrival the patient was intimated for altered mental status and found to be hemodialysis unstable he was resuscitated with one leader. Ringer's lactate tate and three units of Pierre. BC's platelets and plasma the patients stabilized in no other injuries beside the seat belt sign across the abdomen where identified although the patient was human dynamic stable. Ongoing hemorrhage was highly suspected. Where is he bleeding from. How do you identify hemorrhage in a trauma patient. There are two main types of hemorrhage. One compatible also known as external hemorrhage and to not compress will or internal hemorrhage hemorrhage is typically visualized appears over a surface area of skin or the extremities for example a laceration to the scalp or Oren Open fracture to the Tibia depending on the type of external hemorrhage. There are different methods of management. Let's go over three types of management for external L. Hemorrhage one compression. This is typically done immediately. The open wound is packed with gauze pressures applied to try and compress the bleeding vessels else. It is important to mention that you must never remove packing. If the gods become soiled with blood you simply add more on top in continue to apply pressure removal of soil guys would also removed the newly forming blood clots to sutures or staples small aspirations can be suture immediately in in the trauma bay to prevent bleeding promote healing and prevent infection larger wounds may require the use of staples such as a bleeding scalp laceration tourniquet. Turn kids are commonly used for extremity bleeding. These are long belt like structures that are wrapped around the extremity proximal to the site the bleeding the tournament is then tightened to the extent in which bleeding cessation has occurred and distal pulses are no longer felt back to the case. What type of hemorrhage does arrogation have remember. When we did the exposure section of the primary survey. We did not identify any external bleeding in the context of our patients injuries. It is likely that he is suffering from internal bleeding. So what are you GonNa do now. How can you identify an intra abdominal bleed blunt abdominal injury causes compression of Intra abdominal organs in addition to Shear Shear Forces on vascular. Ns surrounding tissues which can result in internal bleeding the fast exam is an adjunct to the primary survey end. It's used as a method at the to rapidly identify intra abdominal or pericardial fluid fast dance for focussed assessment sophy in trauma. The examination consists consists of ultrasonography of the following regions won the right upper quadrant between the liver and the right kidney known as Morison's pouch to you the left upper quadrant between the spleen and the left kidney known as the spleen arenal space three the pelvis between the bladder and recommend males or the bladder and uterus in women known as the coach of Douglas and four the pericardial sac hyperbolic fluid identified on ultrasonography is highly Lee suspicious of bleeding and his record as a positive fast exam he mowed dynamically unstable patients with positive fast exam will likely be brought directly to the operating operating room whereas patients found to be stable. Maybe sent for a cat scan to better identify their injuries. What if you're fast exam is negative this. They should raise suspicion for bleeding in a different location. There are six main regions which can result in significant life threatening bleeding one the scout to intra cranial three the thoracic cavity four the abdomen the pelvis and six the thigh. The staff is very impressed with your ultrasound skills you you identified a significant amount of free fluid in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen indicating a positive fast exam before you can even turn off the machine. The patient's patient's blood pressure drops to ninety over fifty two. What now are you going to give him more fluids. At this point. The patient is likely bleeding internally an needs to be controlled in a patient with blunt abdominal injury hypertension and a positive fast exam. Treatment is a trauma lab. Harada me back to the case. It turns out that the surgeons have another patient on the table right now in he can't take your patient directly to the operating room. The trauma team leader asks you if you would consider using the Rebecca until the or is ready. What on Earth is that. Rebecca stands for resuscitate endovascular balloon inclusion of the Aorta which consists of a catheter device with a balloon located at the tip. The Catheter is inserted through the federal artery and threaded to the level of the abdominal aorta. The balloon is then inflated using normal ceiling proximal to the suspect a bleeding vessel there are three main zones in which ribaud can be deployed zone wine which is just above the silly at branch of the Aorta Zone to just below the silliest artery and above the renal branches although zone is commonly not used often zone three above the bifurcation of the order and this region and is commonly used for pelvic bleeding such as complex fractures or damage to the Elliott vessels the location of Ribaut device can be estimated based on the measurements movements of the Catheter external landmarks or imaging the Boa Balloon a clued Ziada reducing visceral blood flow and therefore bleeding as well it restores systolic blood pressure cardiac perfusion and cerebral blood flow. It is important to note that the Ribaud is a temporary method method of commonly used as a bridge to operative management back to the case amazing the or just called and they are now ready after all. We won't need to use the robot today. The patient is brought to the or amid line. Incision is made from the life process to the pubic synthesis upon entering the abdomen. The fossil form ligament is taken down and all four quadrant of the abdomen are packed uninspected for bleeding upon examination. The patient is found to have shattered spleen and a small liver laceration. The battle is run to identify a Mezin teric Eric Hematoma with no hollow viscous injury. Let's think about a different scenario what if the patient continued to remain stable in the or despite resuscitation with with blood products in this case it is likely that an exploratory lap Rodney would be abandoned and the surgeons would go on to perform a damage control at Ronnie in in the case of abdominal trauma patients who appear to be in extremists will go for a damage control apparatus which is different from your standard trauma laboratory at Damage Control Apparatus Rodney is performed as a temporary measure to obtain he most stasis this can be done through packing organs were section end clamping of bleeding vessels patients are then left with an open abdomen and brought to the Intensive Care Unit for additional resuscitation typically. These patients are then brought back to the war on the consecutive executive day for definitive management of their injuries. Luckily for our patient. He remains chemo dynamically stable. His spleen was removed without complication end. The abdomen was closed. The patient went on to make a full recovery and was discharged two days later some key points to remember for this podcast one the two main types of hemorrhage our internal and external to three humane methods to control external hemorrhage include packing and pressure sutures staples N. tourniquet three the fast exam. Zam is an abdominal ultrasound exam used to identify free fluid in the abdomen or the pericardial sac the region's examined include Morison's coach the spleen on renal space the pouch of Douglas and the pericardial sac for the six locations sins of life threatening bleeding include scalp inter cranial throughout the cavity abdomen pelvis and thigh and five exploratory. Tori laparoscopy is performed in a trauma patient where intra abdominal hemorrhage is suspected. The procedure includes definitive management whereas damage control apparatus includes only life life saving measures..

hemorrhage abdominal trauma Dr Gorka Trauma Surgeons abdominal aorta Rodney Morison McGill University Dr White Surgery One Department of Surgery Royal Alexandra Hospital Edmonton Jonathan White spleen arenal Alberta University Alberta Tiffany Patsy Zam BC