17 Burst results for "University Of Albany"

"university albany" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:41 min | 2 months ago

"university albany" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Than they would be for me were just talking about the idea earlier with Don Schmitt that back, you know, some 73 years ago. You know, when we were talking about Roswell, and then we were, you know, six times I tried to debunk Roswell and now all of a sudden they've had a change of heart and they're even talking about ofthe world aircraft. What does that mean off world aircraft? Policy has always been denial. Denial denial forever since understands 47. So it is a fundamental change is a big change. One would get status to the change in number. Increasing frequencies that having these encounters and the release of these videos off world World spacecraft as they was put it. He said that he witnessed things that Have not been possible would not be for us to create human kind, Nothing Earth based, so there was Eric Davis, who said that What is your opinion on that? By another here, nor there on that. I have not witnessed anything like that. That would give me because to have an opinion one way or the other tried to save objective about this. We're fact based, science based organization together Observable Tze, and our goal is to make a meaningful contribution to science. This is your pretty ex Right? Well, they were saying anything the you know they're going to speculate anything from reverse engineering aircraft or what have you? I mean, you're looking at a year in a space program that seems to be pretending that it's rudimentary when in reality, it may be far more advanced. We realized Would you agree with that? Just no doubt that whatever we're encountering is far more events than anything we've seen before. That's why we put together a European organization of ex military and NASA that eras were put together. These were some of the people in the U. S. S. Nimitz that kind of attack. We've got Kevin Day He was the radar operator. We've got Kevin Communities, a State university, Albany professor who was done work in the area, and we put together a kind of a tiger team to get together and do ah. Techno technology based and a state of observable measurements of these in our atmosphere, So our first expedition was initially planned for November of this year. We're going to go back to the Catalina Islands where the U. S s Nimitz incident occurred and try and get us more remote observation with the best technology equipment was just sonar radar, etcetera. Pentagon. They came out with this and coincidentally, was like several weeks after the Senate version. The Intelligence Authorization Act, which require the director of national intelligence is secretary of defense to work with a variety of intelligence and law enforcement agencies. And they were doing so to prepare for what the government finds of this, you ape ape issue isn't going to be that shocking that they would have to work with law enforcement and intelligence groups in order to find a way to delicately tell the American people or others that they have found something that is done. Sir. I think they found something They have known about it for years already, and this is just finally coming around to be a public disclosure. So you're you're calling? You want disclosure? The first reaction. The first reaction of the public to the December 2017 York Times article and the matter was basically indifference today, no matter what the Mainstream media has said about this public reaction has pretty much been nonchalant indifference, not even really carrying one where the other one sitting in the next episode of friends Or the coming election and whether or not we're alone in universe. Exactly. It seems it seems like that's what, but maybe it's because of preoccupations with covert 19 when you say All of those. Of course, that's a fact here, but this rediscovered 19 going back to the 2017 December New York Times article on better That's true. Believe me, because the biggest public change today now that's true about you. And of course, though, you know, the media has been focusing more or less on politics. Rather than what's going on out there, And you're right. I mean, it does predate Coben 19. But of course, you're also looking into Ah news organization, 24 hour news service that looks into Russian meddling an impeachment and then now now they're focusing on covert. 19 on people are worried about you know where they're going to make their money, how they're going to live, and they don't have too many concerns about what's going on on and on in space where they really should be having that kind of concern, and I think that that would also be a reason why people Wouldn't be paying attention to this, but certainly it's worthy of discussion. We have the man on the program to talk about this most certainly someone who would be qualified to speak about it. That's Christopher Altman, physicist. Quantum technologist. International diplomat. NASA trained commercial astronaut He's with us tonight. Ground, sir, to give his views on this.

Don Schmitt NASA Roswell Eric Davis U. S s Nimitz S. S. Nimitz New York Times Senate Catalina Islands Christopher Altman Pentagon Kevin Communities Albany York Times State university physicist
"university albany" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

06:17 min | 7 months ago

"university albany" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"On their backs when they went to bed this is stuff the doctors are figuring out from their own clinical experience but really what we should have his literature published by the CDC that delineates what's working and what's not so doctors can take a more systematic data driven approach these things then he he couldn't be better or more qualified a couple of things come at younger people are in there I interviewed someone today thirty eight years old was near death was able to come out of it hydroxy chloroquine definitely helped I wanna get your take on that first off to from when you talk to your colleagues in the medical profession are they hearing about younger people getting it absolutely Brian I have some colleagues who were you even more on the front lines that are working in the eyes to use my old roommate from medical school runs the emergency room at northern Westchester and in the beginning we were told Hey listen if you're young and healthy and you get this thing you know you're gonna be fine I was even you know feeling that way myself I'm in my forties and I thought well if I'm out there doing my job if I get it I'll be fine I'm I'm young I'm I'm fit I'm going to be fine I will tell you something I'm concerned you know for myself as well because we are seeing young people who don't have to call morbidities who don't have the the chronic illnesses thankfully it majority of people who do poorly are older and sicker but there are lots of stories of young healthy people who go in there and we still don't know the factors that contribute to that we really don't know what makes one healthy person you know crash and end up on a bench and what makes somebody else to feel like they had a Snapple we're just not sure about that right and I also saw that a very low percentage if you go on a ventilator recover when I understand too is a longer run at the body stops doing it by because okay you got another way to breed I'm gonna stop and they do so that's very the death sentence absolutely true the longer that you're on the worst we really need to focus on keeping people off of these things and that kind of leads into the hydroxy Corcoran argument and I've been listening to you and all the other staff on fox talking about this and I heard doctor on this morning I heard talk about you the other day and you know every decision in medicine is a risk versus the benefit you know there's very few decisions early in life where there's not some kind of a risk and is not some kind of a benefit you know the really difficult decisions are where the risk and the benefit is about the same when it comes to the hydroxy Cork when it's not risk free there are potential side effects there is some potential B. cagey changes that some cardiac issues but the risk is relatively small compared to the potential benefits and the early studies are very promising I actually just reviewed some data from this morning actually my parent organization north wealth is running some really amazing studies internally and there is some early indications that using the hydroxy Cork and is most effective four people get critical and using it early on people who are still out in the community and that kind of tied into the telemedicine thing where I'm evaluating people you know on day two or three and if we get people started man before because what happened I'm not sure if it's out there in general knowledge but the people who do really poorly it tends to be on page six seven or eight they do what they get sick for the first three four days then they might even feel like they're getting better is an improvement and they might even have less even as a boy I think I'm kicking this thing and then they crash on B. six seven or eight and those are the people that do really poorly so if we can intervene earlier and that's a problem in New York state right now the FDA last week said okay you guys can get on an individual basis the doctor feels that a patient will benefit from this medication you can go ahead and prescribe but the New York state does yeah well no only in a hospital setting you know we want to and I understand that additional thought was to try to preserve it for people who were taking it for rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic illnesses to make sure the people had access to it but Hey this is war and let's use the tool to get especially that P. it's an approved so he's really sick here's a potential side effects include everything from if you haven't read me up the other day do an EKG before you give it to somebody they say because it could be fatal if you have a harder with mia it could lead to vision loss you're ringing vomiting mood changes skin rashes and hair loss those are the hardest which is exactly like the medication on the thirty second commercials we watch on television every day do this it'll be great to reduce your cholesterol but by the way I'll be taking your more likely going to get hit by a bus what is your risk and so what I did I tell people when I prescribe the medication and then they call me six hours later I miss you know I read the the password on this thing it sounds terrible as well you know if you're ready the pamphlet on Advil and aspirin you would never take that either you know every night I'm not saying that every single person who thinks they have called it or test positive for cold it should be on a drive to court when it is really an individual doctor patient decision by in real well as my left foot my last point is is gonna run through four thousand people in New York state are being treated with hydroxy Cork win right now university Albany's proves covered hills of deserving the drug's impact among the things that are happening is bill Melinda gates foundation give nine point five billion dollars to buy to buy this truck and give it to people who need it when do we get the results I think we're starting to get some results already you know I think but I guess at Northwell is doing some early thirties are getting it from international sources as well and so far so good I know that you know we'd love to have better data be blessed to have the randomized controlled studies but I think we gotta move on this now and it again the risk is low in the benefit is great go get em all right Dr Frank cut cut to says that thanks so much appreciate it thank you so much for having me run say well you got it.

CDC
"university albany" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

04:17 min | 9 months ago

"university albany" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"CBS news on the hour with Norah o'donnell nor is on assignment I'm Pam Coulter caucus chaos in the Hawkeye state twenty one hours after it began we are expecting at this hour to finally have some results from the Iowa caucus CBS is the vitamin is in des Moines and joins us live and Pam we are waiting for these first official results from Democratic Party officials and I where they are now addressing reporters as you mentioned twenty four one hours since the caucuses began we have been waiting for those since that time for these first results now these initial results will not be complete we will get sixty two percent of the results they come from all ninety nine counties we are told that the parent malfunction with a new app is to blame for this the lady and of course much attention's already focusing away from the Hawkeye state east to New Hampshire that's where the first primary of twenty twenty takes place one week from today but right now we're working for these first results live in des Moines Steve Futterman CBS news pundits have been having a field day with the democratic promise the Democrats problems in Iowa none more so than president trump who tonight will deliver his third state of the union address CBS is Stephen Portnoy has a preview tonight before a chamber filled mostly with Democrats who by their voted to impeach him or will soon vote to convict him the president intends to offer what aides call a relentlessly optimistic vision a spokesman says the word impeachment is not in the prepared text the theme of the speech the great American come back advisers say the president will reflect on the promises he's made which they say he's kept Michigan governor Gretchen Witmer will offer the official democratic response to the state of the union I have tomorrow's impeachment verdict senators took to the floor to explain how they'll vote Majority Leader Mitch McConnell used his time to criticize Democrats wealth managers or venture argued the program could not about acting in the national interest because he acted inconsistently were their conception of the national interest minority leader Chuck Schumer accused Republicans of a cover up it's a serious charge publicans refuse to get the evidence because they were afraid of what it would show and that's all it needs to be said it was a good day on Wall Street economists gust voce says tech companies led the rally we had good news today on factory orders so that's an indication that perhaps businesses are buying more tech equipment in and just generally I think there is a sense that consumers will continue to buy tech products and that is going to be stronger than in the short term impact from the corona virus the Dow soared four hundred and eight points nasdaq rose one ninety four this is CBS news you can listen to CBS news radio twenty four hours a day seven days a week on radio dot com or the radio dot com app downloaded today five degrees at KRLD good afternoon it's four oh three John little here with David ranking in two sisters from garland have been identified as the ones killed on the Texas a and M. commerce campus yesterday care all these Austin your cast the update they sure mats was a freshman in pursuing a bachelor of science in public health sister Albany was also killed she was not a student at the university Albany's two year old son was shot in the leg he has been treated and released to family members campus police have released a nine one one call from a student who found a bullet hole in her next door dorm room at all room nine long and and on the other side directly across and name in my calendar it looks like someone was shot through the wall police say the shooting appears to be a targeted isolated event however they're not identifying the shooter or of talked about any arrests Austin York newsradio ten eighty carefully prosecutors calling up the current Dallas police officers to testify against an ex police officer in January of two thousand seventeen Dallas police found a stolen van near Ferguson and I thirty when the driver Jenna bees Dawes started the motor and slowly back into a squad car officer Christopher has opened.

Norah o'donnell CBS
"university albany" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"university albany" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Space seventy five approaching parkway and two eighty five down down down the black and gold bunching up university Albany you up to like twenty three the first place like all the recorder between seventy three athletics road all aboard the case study by point by WSB WSB news time is seven oh two this is it land is morning news here's Chris camp and just think about the president trump is distancing himself from two American businessmen connected to Rudy Giuliani the president's personal attorney they are waking up in jail this morning facing campaign finance charges related to the ouster of the U. S. ambassador to Ukraine who is expected to testify before a congressional committee later today I'm Jeannie do pre in Washington wrapping up a week of major developments former ambassador Marie von of which is certain to be asked about any efforts in Ukraine to dig up information on former vice president Joe Biden and his son the ambassador was removed in may by president trump has some Republicans complain she was biased against the president Mr trump called her bad news in a phone call with the Ukraine leader house Democrats of subpoenaed energy secretary Rick Perry the president says it was Perry who teed up the July phone call with Ukraine's president somebody wants me news time seven oh three no routine surgeries being performed at the VA Medical Center indicator right now the Atlanta journal constitution reports this morning that until management and equipment issues are resolved its emergency operations only normal operations are expected to resume to the end of the month in what is seen as the latest sign of significant issues at the hospital today marks the start of Atlanta pride weekend three hundred thousand expected in town says mayor casual and bottoms we.

"university albany" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"university albany" Discussed on WSB-AM

"The NASCAR this October eleventh thirteen teletech as to who's. live team coverage of traffic and weather come on in here mark McKay come on and give the bad news here in midtown downtown Atlanta getting out or Friday afternoon under the best of conditions this is bad most of I eighty five doors shut down at Georgia four hundred only right shoulder getting by the Georgia pointed on ramp to the rollover crash multiple left lanes are blocked. recall basically from the university Albany one sixty six on the connector north that'll have an impact negatively impacted by twenty east to west feeding on to the downtown connector in the seventy five is going to be affected it is right now in northwest Atlanta a real slow right trying to get into the city on that northwest freeway Peachtree people Cheshire Bridge it incredibly midtown Atlanta empathy for spring connector. if you run into the final date yet to divide you sound still jammed up on the south side for my eighty five getting over your Jonesborough road were earlier trouble has clear also seeing an early delays in the same area two eighty five west and southbound already filling in on the outer loop Peachtree industrial Boulevard around two I twenty north town interlude delays from ice what I twenty up to I seventy five east and south bound and really jammed in four hundred down two memorial drive how's the I. twenty right David haven't actually some good news I twenty westbound there was rightly block with construction on right around highway ninety two that is going always back open you're still slow back to thorn row tripling traffic ninety five point five W. space. service meteorologist Kirk knowledge only a couple of isolated thunder showers afternoon or evening record high around.

mark McKay Atlanta Georgia Cheshire Bridge David NASCAR university Albany Jonesborough Kirk five W
"university albany" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"university albany" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Jeff Smith head job with the needs of what an incredible coaching career I Terry still young man he might be back in a few years somewhere but obviously took some time off his son Levi Metheny I standing inside linebacker it's a university Albany so he was probably out of town last night watching university Albany play but he decided it would be a better way to spend this time always Katie still active and not right in the world for doing that I know that this is no doubt Dan dates of Bethel park team that has plenty of story lines surrounding it recording including quarterback Anthony check it the six to one hundred ninety pounds senior more on him coming up in just a moment with Robert Mangino the third member of our broadcast team but when we look at Woodland Hills we're talking about another story story just loaded up roster consists of guys that are going to another power five conference when we talk about Woodland Hills you have to talk about the Virginia commit Josh rouse Josh drawings is looking looking looking at him warming up this is bigger and stronger faster everybody one of the things we'll hills is having trouble doing had trouble last year and had trouble against Calver hall the the first week of the season we zero is trying to get the ball in his hands and might not be able to get it down field you have to somehow get him more involved in the offense I think the mustard and his staff realize at and I think we'll see more of Josh Rawlings with the bonus he is stand by because a heartwarming story comes your way next as a pertains to the quarterback of the Bethel park Blackhawks Anthony chicken we'll hear from Robert Mangino down the sidelines when we return your listing the high school football on KDKA radio this region of see this tax tag when there's just some leeway with no sauce my dog likes it but not with the flame of a ticket out of land land that is key commands teriyaki marinated soft drinks and a mom who's this barbecue meat it's a party.

Terry Levi Metheny Katie Robert Mangino Woodland Hills Calver hall Josh Rawlings Anthony chicken Jeff Smith Dan Bethel park Virginia Bethel park Blackhawks one hundred ninety pounds
"university albany" Discussed on NFL Live

NFL Live

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"university albany" Discussed on NFL Live

"About being the news press coverage now again we mentioned this before but Jarran Reed will be suspended six games for violating the League's personal conduct policy as wrapped sheep reported significant in a number of ways but on the field huge blow to a delight pass rush that was already the teams biggest question mark and certainly this? Is You know especially on the eve training camp. Everybody's coming together and get ready and you're talking about what's new and turning the page. You don't WanNa hear this well. The seahawks had an idea that this is going to come out of pike eventually but think about what it means last year. Perhaps I mean he was in the conversation for most improved players in the N._F._l.. Yet three career sacks in two seasons after last year or she's been going into last year. He had ten and a half. This is a guy who does his best disruption from the interior of the defensive line. They do not have Frank Clark anymore. Obviously they use their first round pick on L. J. Collier at T._C._U. But their best pass rushing option this year was going to be Jarran Reed again. He's now out until October fourteenth teeth. I'd say decent chunk. I think the I mean it's significant. It's one of the now where like the you know the signing of Arcadia of Buccaneers Mingo obviously and then that's the one I'm thinking about Ziganda kind of was like a nothing to see signing which is interesting because he was a player that at one point I think a lot of people thought like hey this could be a double digit sack type of player we hasn't produced and so now does going to Seattle help him does that bring the best atoms at a hard our time staying healthy but now more pressure emphasis on him. I just think I'm sorry when you stink players have to understand that you know essentially when you do you're taking money away from from your families and from yourself. I think you just have to figure out as players as all all players across the league obviously as being former players take care of your business understand what you have to understand that you represent the shield in your family everywhere you go. There are so many things about playing in the N._F._l.. That are outside of your control. I think if it were me take care of the ones you. Can you know because there are those things that you control whether it's your work ethic the way you present yourself the decisions you make get the check those boxes man because there's a whole lot you cannot control. We talked about training camp because this is the week and next week that just about every team team will report a lot of teams twenty to thirty to do so at home and that's the thing now you know they building complexes and all that stuff but there are still those teams who pack up and go away. which do you prefer do not like to go away? I mean when I was with the giants and it's him you you remember these Albany days very well going onto university Albany being in those dorm rooms and I understand the camaraderie of it. I understand getting to know your teammates. When you have no one else to speak to and obviously you call him back home to your family but I like being in a comfortable hotel?.

Jarran Reed news press seahawks giants Frank Clark L. J. Collier Seattle Albany
"university albany" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"university albany" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"The radio shows are in other media outlets. I ran my school's radio stations grand that this past year <hes> I was hip hop director there for a bit then I was training director and then I was general manager this past year School University Albany go on in Albany. That's so cool yeah so anything interesting you WANNA point out about your internship here at the Elvis Duran Morning Show I love I love it. I was here last summer and now I'm back helping out with you. Guys is a little bit helping out on z one hundred. I just love all the cool people I've met the interns or super cool. I think we're definitely as interim class. Where a lot closer than last year yeah so it's really nice people but you live at you live in a in a very very nice apartment on central park very nice way to put it well most most interns living in small little dorm room somewhere nobody apartments in the past so instead of living in one of those I live in a one bedroom apartment with my retired mother that was built in the forties so that's definitely better show you do come from a family of privilege and so but but still your do you want to get out there in the workforce and do your <unk> own thing? I Love Your family football team. No big deal was also one way to put it. It's okay the Baltimore Ravens seem so my my great uncle was art modell so I shop at him all the time choice so your religion the modell's hanging out with the modell a big family. I have a very big family..

School University Albany director Elvis Duran Baltimore Ravens general manager football
"university albany" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"university albany" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"It isn't even say, what's I think is USA. Do we know at school is one of them was? Luckless kit. USC it might be maybe for listening to 'cause they're right there in LA. And it's not far, you know, you don't want to spend fifty thousand dollars to rig your your kids examined and heavy kid go off to the university of Louisville. And I keep an eye on her. That's all ideas that you wanna you want your baby close to you. So the the person that's really got the best deal. Here is William H Macy. They couldn't get him on anything. He was an Email. Smart guy, Felicity Huffman was sending hurston New York University. And while you, I guess, okay. I mean, that's not an easy school to get into either. I mean, they're something like the schools. I you know, I tried to apply to and got rejected by all the easiest schools in the state university of New York system and got and got rejected by all of them except one we'll give you an idea. What my grades were like. I mean, if I had the money, I probably would have gone for this too. I try why not? Why not? So how did just started a business than done with it? Yeah. Listen, here's the fifteen grand. Okay. I'll have somebody take the test for me. That's fine. But if I heard that my parents were going to cough up five hundred grand like Lachlan and her husband. I'd be like, I'll take the five hundred Gs thank you grand. Yeah. Give me a little seed money. Let me start my my my business. That's what I would have done. I think looking back on. I think they probably would have done the same thing received a lot of heartache that's for damn sure. So okay. So those who I've talked from time to time on the show about the haves and the have nots. The halves. Are the Felicity Huffman, the Lachlan's and the other parents in the scandal the have nots me. Well, besides Ron Hersey. Besides Ron Hersi. The the have nots include this young girl by the Briana. Watts Berina watts. Homeless living in a homeless shelter with a drug addicted mom who spent time in prison. Okay. So most kids who are living in a homeless shelter with a drug addicted. Mom, who's in prison are I have to in most cases are like throwing in the towel on this one. Maybe I'll get a do over in the next live. Let me see what I can figure out will hit the streets. I'll see if I can get some sort of a scam going, maybe, you know, get with a certain group of people do some, you know, sell some drugs, whatever it is. You're not you're not starting off with a great role model when your mom's drug addicted and you're in prison, right? This is why this girl is my hero. This girl managed to rise above all sorts of adversity thrown at her and she had not only excelled in high school because most of these kids I mean kids in these situations. Some don't even go to school even bother like, what am I going go school for sure join a gang? That'd be my family and mother father is not in the house. You know? That's how it works. Right. She despite all the distractions she excelled in high school and Golic twelve different colleges. Wow. Twelve here's the bad news that that's a good news. The bad news is Kim campaign for it. See? Okay. So so so she can't pay for it. She was accepted to a bunch of schools like Virginia state university Delaware state university university Albany, Alfred state university Monroe college SUNY Morrisville SUNY Plattsburgh both schools, I was rejected. Adelphi university hundred college rejected linen, college and John J college. Okay. So she was accepted all twelve of them. She's plans to attend Delaware state, university and studied business the universe about three and a half hours from this this homeless housing shelter. She lives in her mom out of jail now. And so I was trying to turn her life around as well. See here's the thing. And I've talked about it before if I was someone who had. You know, if I was like Jeff Bezos or someone like that I had billions or whatever it was even several hundred millions of dollars. I didn't know what to do with it. And I read this story right here. This girls going to school on me without blinking an eye. I'm finding out where she is. I'm taking care of her all her tuition. I'm taking care of her housing. I'm putting I'm getting her L close. I'm taking care of her. And I'm helping them onto how come I haven't seen anybody. And step up. She shouldn't have to suffer in this girl. This girl defied all odds to make something of herself. And now she can't pay for school. So I mean, her mom suggestion, she strips. But I I think that's a bad idea. On the poll. But you know, what I'm saying? I think I I wish I knew somebody who had that kind of money. I would send this story to them. What are we send us over to tomorrow Lago? Sounds like right up. But the trumpsters alleys because he you know, he he's been known to do these things from time to time. He was a nice a nice celeb- a nice 'cause good. He did with Kim. Kardashians. 'cause he pardoned that Alice rejoins. Yeah. But that one didn't cost him money. Really? It gets really gonna cost the put this girl through school not that much with the American education system. If you're a billionaire. All right. So thinking about him so. So who else is there? Bazo smart Cubans knock on Bill Gates is door. He likes to give money then. Bill Gates would be perfect or something like this. I think these people are aware of it. So that's our that's our job right now. Our job today. We have to figure out a way to get this information over to a bunch of billionaires. Bill Gates is number. Yeah. If anybody is Bill Gates number eight seven seven..

Bill Gates Felicity Huffman Virginia state university Dela Alfred state university Monroe university of Louisville Kim New York University William H Macy USA. LA USC Adelphi university hundred col Lachlan New York Delaware Jeff Bezos Ron Hersey Ron Hersi Gs hurston
"university albany" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

14:56 min | 1 year ago

"university albany" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Thirteen eighty W A. Okay. Some companies are requiring potential and current employees to let them out of their social media activity politics thing crude or founding documents does not require us to agree on every contour of life community issues middle school in Atlanta. This is south of downtown on arrival officers discovered a student had been shot outside the building the issues that affect you can close on W. Caitlyn? WBZ in HD three W w one people stationed three. Hello everyone. I'm Amanda Cooper in. This segment of Atlanta up close. We are highlighting in featuring ordinary people in our community who are doing some extraordinary things today, we are featuring in our comm- radio Atlanta's very own Maria Poynton Maria, welcome to the show. Thank you. Amanda, this is such an honor. Because when I think about your body of work as a journalist, I don't really think our listeners are aware of how extensive your experiences and today, we are honoring you because you are being honored abide the state of Georgia. Tell us a little bit about that. And also give us more insight about who you are will Amanda, first and foremost like to thank you for wanting to sit down with me to conduct this interview. Because normally I'm interviewing everyone else I'm out in the field and covering their stories and. It is humbling to me to be here today. What I received from the Georgia. House of representatives is a resolution and from several lawmakers they and I liked it. Thank them immensely. It says a resolution recognizing and commending Maria Burlington on her outstanding service as a journalist, and it goes on for other purposes, a bunch of whereas is a lot of stuff that I didn't realize that. I'd actually accomplish that they were able to produce in a resolution, and I'd like to say that I am humbled by this. And it talks about the beginning the middle and present day. That's outstanding. I remember when you came in and you show me your resolution. I was so elated and so proud of you because that is not something that they just give everyone that's something that they hand pick someone to receive it in bay and take you because you're so deserving of this. And I know that most people. No you from the news. They know you from CNN they know you from v one zero three and thirteen eighty W A. Okay. As well as your involvement through the community, and through all of the activities that you do as a journalist. I remember you telling me that you are originally from Columbus, Georgia. I also remember you telling me that when you were in high school you were asked what you wanted to do. You said what I said I wanted to be a reporter because we had stations there, and I would say I'm Maria Poynton reporting and every with each honor, and I'm on social media. There's a young lady named Carol and we were on flat core together in high school. And she always says to me, you always said you want it to be a reporter. And that's how my life has has moved has. Transcended into the life of a reporter. I'm Maria Boynton. I feel honored to be allowed to do that. Because I feel that my purpose is that of public service. And in my job. I'm able to report I'm able to get to know others in my reporting and to allow others to get to know others as well. So you dream started out in high school. Yes, I I would save my dream started out actually when I was even younger than that. Because I had the television, and I was sitting there, and I would watch the TV. And then that of course, helped me realize that there were things that a little black girl could do on the television. And but I spent most of my time listening to the radio the radio was what moved my life. That's what we listened to. We listened to the radio the local radio stations their head news persons on them. And then, of course, the music was another. Thing. I am a country music fan. And so we had a gentleman by the name of cousin Allen my hometown. And I have to tell you. I would listen to cousin Al his delivery. How he was set of the music how they go to the news and how informative every bit of it was and I fell in love with it. Well, that's very evident. And the news has fallen in love with you as well. Now. I know you said that you knew what you wanted to do in high school were you involved in any journalistic clubs where you a news anchor for your school. How did you express that desire? Well, actually won the local radio stations. There had a scholarship, and I went and applied, and then when I got home there was a gentleman visiting my grandmother's home, and he says, I know you don't want to be a DJ. So kind of made me think, well, maybe I don't wanna do this. And so then I went off to school and lo and behold there was an audition for someone to read the news or southwest, Georgia. I was a student at Albany state university Albany state college at the time it was known as and so I went in and I and I got it. And so that was how you can say I was thrust into my career of journalism, and it was great to come into the dining hall, and people's hey, I just heard you on the news. I just heard you doing the news. So it was interesting. And then Dr James hill who was one of the deans at our college. He com into his office one day and said, I have an internship possibility for you and. So I guess we can say the rest is history. I started interning at a local station there in one or two weeks and they hired me. Wow. That's amazing. I wouldn't even say that. This is something that you wanted to do. I was say this is something that you are destined to do. There are a lot of young journalists out there who want to get into the business for the glamour and the glitter. You get that as well. But you truly do put in the work when we talk about your body of work. I know you went to Albany state what you're very involved, and I know that you received a proclamation from your own hometown down in Columbus, Georgia as well. Yes. I know you have a wealth of experience, and they honored and acknowledged your career in journalism your career expands beyond one three tell us a little bit about your journey in journalism on a no you were with CNN for awhile. Yes, CNN is one of them when I left Albany state. I went home and work. At some local stations there for Davis broadcasting, and then I got the call to come to Atlanta Georgia, and I went to work for WGST and the Georgia news network for a time, and then went to CNN for the CNN radio network at that time, I got married. So my husband, and I moved to the north and I worked in New York City for a couple of stations there at one I was a writer at another. I was on air, and we're we're talking about WCBS and W O R. And then I also lived in Pennsylvania during that time. And so I was doing some some per diem work for stations there as well. And so then had a family tragedy lost my husband, and I moved home and when when back to the CNN radio network and was there for more than a decade. And of course, we know as companies evolve, and they make changes. Some of us were let go they cut our particular network. And I had a moment I guess to say to be with my my family and being another opportunity came along and lo and behold, I ended up with intercom Atlanta Marie? You're always so poised and well put together, and if it's one thing that our listeners, instantly know is is that voice, it is that voice. Did you practice? The boys. Did you stand in front of the mirror when you were a little girl than just develop it over time? How did you get the voice it almost sounds like someone is rubbing silk over the microphone? I mean. It's just that smooth tell us how you perfect it the voice. Oh, amanda. Euro so kind actually when I was in school. I had a speech issue in reference to being able to differentiate between the C H is and the S H is, you know, the speech therapists came into school one day. And that was the issue that she found with me. So I became very much aware of that. And then at Albany state. Dr Martin dean Williams was one of my speech and audiology professors and one of the things that she was very conscious of and aware of was helping us to be able to vocalise better. And to be able to use the words in a way in which they made sense. For instance, we talk about pronunciations, for instance, the word asked, you know, A S K A D that was a word that we had so much fun with in school. Because we say ask whatever people don't know how to properly say that word all the time. So that's one of the words, and I always tell them when I see her ask ask she asked him. And so it it comes from practice. It comes from practice. It comes from wanting to. I guess you can say sound is though, I know what I'm talking about. And to be able to deliver it in a way where I put for the persona of believability and trust someone once told me, you have gravitas and. Okay, works for me. Yes. I love that word gravitas. But now I need to say it s gonna ask you to scuttle of. Yes. Maria. It's it's that voice in it's that level of commitment that have generated a lot of awards for you. You know, I don't think a lot of our listeners know, just how appreciate it. Your bodies of work have been I'm no just from reading your resume, which by the way is to pages long because it's so impressive. You've one how many Peabody's too. In addition. You've also won a DuPont who do punt Tuden ponts to Peabody's and a host of AP awards. Yes. So for our listeners who are not familiar with what eight Peabody is or what a DuPont award. Is there like the Grammys of journalism? Correct. Will. Yeah, they are and the DuPont's and the Peabody's for collaborative efforts when I was at CNN. And yes, these are like the Grammys of journalism and also won an award from Atlanta sociation of black journalists nominated for national association of black journalists or Sola data O'Brian and her works. We collaborate it when I was working at CNN. So it's been a wonderful journey. I don't know what's next, but the journey has been great when it comes to awards. I have to tell you the first award. I was shocked that I want. I didn't even go to the ceremony. It was for the Atlanta cessation of black journalists and the young lady who went for me a call back. I was on vacation as to how did it go? She said you one and I was shocked and amazed because I don't do it for the awards, but they are nice. They are nice to get. But I do it because we have so many who stories are on heard, and there are days when I just wish I could go cover this story, and that story, and and you know, I'm I'm down to cover a protest because as people exercising their first amendment, right? The right to protest the right to be heard. Speaking of which I have to share this story with you. I just got off from work here in a calm radio Atlanta downtown, and I had to go down to the capital went down to get a permit renewed. And while I was down there. I have has early ran into a protest. And I'm like, the news is just coming to me like a magnet, and I'm staring there. Looking at these people assemble in an I'm thinking, man, I'm tired all I came down here to get was a hermit renewed. In for a moment. I just stopped in. I was going to go. I'm just gonna go and get it and go home. But then I thought what would Maria do what would Maria Poynton do? And then I I said she would go she would cover this event. She would be over there, getting interviews taking pictures. So I went I covered the event because I knew this what you do. And as a journalist new to the industry, I feel is very important to emulate someone who has said as standard of excellence, and that's what you've done you've said, a standard of excellence for people to fall in place with and so the resolution that you've received from the state of Georgia is well deserved. You are so worthy of it. And I think it's such a high honor because it's from the state that you were born in the state will you head your dreams and aspiration. Of doing this. What you love so passionately and over the course of time you've had your ups and you've had your downs. But you've always stayed true in committed to journalism even here at Entercom radio Atlanta. Let's talk a little about that v..

Georgia Atlanta CNN Maria Poynton Maria Amanda Cooper reporter Maria Poynton Albany state DuPont Albany state university Albany Columbus Maria Burlington Peabody Maria Boynton W. Caitlyn Albany Pennsylvania New York City Carol
"university albany" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"university albany" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Got it. Would you are talking my language? Oh my gosh. Okay. So I was thinking like a marketing strategy for you. Right. And what's a little bit interesting is you're attacking like from a B to B perspective. The maybe you need to do a separate marketing campaign, attacking the employees. Because if there's one thing that I realize is that they can get more done for you in a conversation with an employer who thinks that idea stupid. No for real because what I remember with the sprinkler Jesus app. Right. For some reason. Maybe it was a little ego. Right. I wasn't getting booked at churches. And so I was like well what's going on? I don't understand. I'm probably one of the most influential Christian people in the industry right now, why aren't churches actually booking me to get paid? So then we started brainstorming. I was like, you know, what these pastors are acting like they don't know who I am. Or maybe they're afraid of the the resistance the difference. The that crazy young kid, right? And so what we did was I put out a tweet on my social media. And I said I'm looking to feature the top ten pastors in the country on this sprinkle of. Jesus app. Guess who was tagging the pastors the people? I mean, I mean over three four thousand people were tagging their passage, then got the pastors attention think B two B, it got the business owners attention is like oh my gosh. I should add this to my company you get what I'm saying. So sometimes make the people be your driving force in marketing and make them tell the employers who maybe have like something there on the app where they can literally search quote unquote, search for their business, and it's not there, and you say, hey, request this or tell your employer you want this and the now you have a bunch of data to go back to the employer and say, hey, I have over forty eighty employees saying they want this. And then it becomes a no brainer. You ought to sell them because their employees already wanted. Yeah. Like almost like a grassroots movement. So one way that we kinda do that. And that's a fantastic idea to really go out with that full force. Right. So are kind of sales strategy right now is a top down and bottom up simultaneously. So top down is we use a lot of Lincoln tunnels to go after. The HR, you know, the gyros or if it's small a smaller organization just the sea level directly. Then at the same time for select organizations, so say like, you know, or media here, we did this for them was we ran very specific Facebook ads campaigns and Instagram campaigns to their employees, basically saying. Okay. Job basically, making a video saying like, hey, do you work at the Intermedia? So when you. So as an employer can I set a budget for this? It's a dollar per employee per month. Right. So the way we work. It is the first three months or for all eligible employees. And then that's where one quarter then subsequent quarters. It's audited. So it's for your only active employs? So you're not paying for a clear, I'm just paying a dollar per employee per month. And then they get the coupon and they get to go use it, and they save money on the food. Exactly. How do you make money? This is actually the first phase in a multi-phase kind of master plan. Oh, come on broker breaking down. So we make a sizeable chunk of change on the dollar per employee per month. Right. So you hit eighty four thousand users you're at a million dollars a year. And that's really not that many users eighty four thousand so coming in Q three of this year. We're actually releasing a co branded card as a payment vehicle with that. Okay. Can actually loan money on behalf of their employees on reward or incentive basis. That's good. Yeah. So we have a lot of interest from that, especially with companies out west the Golden State Warriors literally like it was just a coincidence. Honestly, we were talking to the people that run their benefits, and they were like, hey, you guys do this by the way. And we're like we're in the middle of building it right now. That's awesome. Yeah. So when I talk to you on the phone, I said, we are a small firm, but cell, gene, right across the street. And there would be a good target. So there's this one little pizza place. Everybody goes to this little pizza place. It's not a chain. It's just one little place. But I know that our employees, especially two of them lunch. Every day. Absolutely love this. And you said you can you would approach even small businesses. Absolutely. Yeah. So for the restaurants, having our base of forty five thousand right now, what we do from here is we ask clients and their employees that exact question where do you like to eat and from there, you say we'd like to eat it this pizza place across the street. We're literally going to go out and do our very best to bring them on. And it's free for the restaurants to us. So it's a no brainer. And I could only imagine later down the line when the platform begins to grow businesses are going to be begging you to be on there. And I even do this with the bible. We have a beauty supply store just like WalMart and just like target. They have to pay a slotting fee every single brand has to pay a slotting fee to get on some pretty sure that'd be another stream of revenue actually charging the businesses to be on. Because honestly, even if they're the points aren't being loaded or they don't use them there. You're still advertising to a bunch of people, and that's valuable so absolutely. So around that like. Our montage the second side. So, you know, we have our demand, which is the user and supply, which is the restaurants is actually big data play. So non personal data in nature. It's just your unique behavior on our platform that actually we can create a separate platform for these restaurants to go on and say, listen, I want you know, this demo in this geography to get this behavior. We say these are the deals coupons that you need to offer x y and z at these times in this way. And this is gonna get you that behavior. I'm so excited for you. Oh my gosh. I wanna see. That is totally awesome business, and and thanks for being on the show. How again can we get in touch with you? So you can reach out to me. Yeah. Or yeah. Of course. Tell your employers if you want it, you know. Set up much money. A funny story about kind of intellectual property with much money. Right. So when I created the name in a silo, basically, no outside influence and going through the process, I found out that the university Albany calls their dining dollars the university. Weird, but we actually own the trademark. Yeah. So it's not a problem. No problem at all. It was just like happenstance, but it's funny. Well, good for you for getting that trademark literally nationwide. When you're global people are gonna want that.

Golden State Warriors Facebook university Albany WalMart Instagram million dollars three months one quarter
"university albany" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"university albany" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Zero three one WG wine top story, the country said goodbye to president George H W Bush in the nation's capital on Wednesday. Now, he's back home in Texas for one last ceremony before he's taken to his final resting place. Fox's Ray Bogan president George H W Bush made his final flight home to Houston his body in repose at his longtime church. Saint Martin's episcopal the public got a chance to view his casket one last time. He left. I love that. A private funeral service will be held inside the church Bush's grandson, George p Bush and former secretary of state James Baker will deliver eulogies to about twelve hundred mourners later today. A special train will carry the president's remains to his final resting place at his presidential library at Texas. Am university. Albany police are investigating an attempted obstruction WG wise, Mike Patrick responded to the four hundred block of Sheridan avenue, Tuesday following reports a man tried to force a teen into his vehicle. The victim told officers she was walking on central avenue when a man approached her on the sidewalk and tried to engage in conversation. He told the man she was an interest in walked away the man then supposedly approached her once again, grabbed her by the wrist Magana polar toward a dark-colored as you victim able to break free and notify police Mike Patrick NewsRadio eight ten while three one w. GYN first of its kind event at the Albany field office of the FBI today special agent in charge James Hendrix says with the bureau looking to bring nine hundred men and women on board in the coming year. They're asking the most qualified applicants to meet with a special agent today. So we just want to have this event on that evening for folks could come in and just have a conversation with an agent asked the questions that maybe they were always wanting to ask but didn't have the opportunity Henrik speaking during a recent media open house at the field office. He says well counter terrorism remains the bureau's number one priority finds himself more and more concerned about recent incidents of violent crime in the capital region. Some good news about a severely malnourished dog found earlier this week near the basketball courts at freer park in Troy, please say he's doing well and eating deputy chief data wolf is good. So hopefully, he's gonna make a full recovery. That's the silver lining to all of this is that the dog is probably going to be okay. We'll says investigators are still trying to find the dog's owner says the male mastiff hound mix was not dirty or muddy as. He might be if as if he were a stray, and there were science he'd been cared for in some fashion group called responsible animal care USA is offering a five hundred dollar reward. For information might lead to an arrest and conviction. Joy city council will vote tonight on a highly controversial resolution to declare the city a sanctuary city measure was authored by Democrat, David December who has said he's concerned about what he's seeing at both the national and the county level with illegal immigrants the executive Steve mcglaughlin said Tuesday night. No matter what the city does Rensselaer county will not become a sanctuary county. W G Y morning news time is eight thirty five. Our next update at nine. I'm Reid shepherd. Now, more Chuck and Kelly on News Radio one zero three one WG y Catalan regions breaking news, traffic and.

George H W Bush president Texas Henrik George p Bush David December Rensselaer county Mike Patrick NewsRadio Mike Patrick special agent in charge James Baker James Hendrix Albany Albany field Saint Martin Reid shepherd Ray Bogan Am university Fox USA
"university albany" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

14:05 min | 2 years ago

"university albany" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Some companies are requiring potential and current employees to let them out of their social media activity politics being rude or founding documents does not require us to agree on every contour black community issues middle school in Atlanta. South of downtown on arrival officers discovered a student had been shot outside the building the issues that affects you can do close on W W HD three Atlanta w HD one station. Three. Hello everyone. I'm Amanda Cooper in. This segment of Atlanta up close. We are highlighting and featuring ordinary people in our community who are doing some extraordinary things today, we are featuring in our comm- radio Atlanta's very own Maria Poynton Maria, welcome to the show. Thank you. Amanda, this is such an honor. Because when I think about your body of work as a journalist, I don't really think our listeners are aware of how extensive your experiences and today, we are honoring you because you are being honored by the state of Georgia. Tell us a little bit about that. And also give us more insight about who you are will Amanda, first and foremost, I'd like to thank you for wanting to sit down with me to conduct this interview. Because normally I'm interview. Everyone else out in the field and covering their stories. And it is humbling to me to be here today. What I received from the Georgia. House of representatives is a resolution and from several lawmakers there and I'd like to thank them immensely. It says a resolution recognizing and commending Maria Boynton on her outstanding service as a journalist, and it goes on for other purposes, a bunch of whereas is a lot of stuff that I didn't realize that. I'd actually accomplish that they were able to produce in a resolution, and I like to say that I am humbled by this. And it talks about the beginning the middle and present day. That's outstanding. I remember when you came in and you show me your resolution. I was so elated and so proud of you because that is not something that they just give everyone that's something that they hand pick someone to receive it in mayhem take you because you're so deserving of this. And I know that most people know. No you from the news. They know you from CNN they know you from the one zero three and thirteen eighty W A O K as well as your involvement through the community and through all of the activities that you do as a journalist. I remember you telling me that you are originally from Columbus, Georgia. I also remember you telling me that when you were in high school you were asked what you wanted to do. And you said what I said I wanted to be a reporter because we had stations there, and I would say, I'm Maria Boynton reporting and every with each honor, and I'm on social media. There's a young lady named Carol and we were on flat core together in high school. And she always says to me, you always said you want it to be a reporter. And that's how my life has has moved has transcended into the life of a reporter. I'm Maria Boynton. I feel honored to be allowed to do that. Because I feel that my purpose is that of public service. And in my job. I'm able to report I'm able to get to know others in my reporting and to allow others to get to know others as well. So you dream started out in high school. Yes, I I would say my dream started out actually when I was even younger than that. Because I had the television, and I was sitting there, and I would watch the TV. And then that of course, helped me realized that there were things that a little black girl could do on the television, and the, but I spent most of my time listening to the radio the radio was what mood my life. That's what we listened to. We listen to the radio the local radio stations. There had news persons on them. And then, of course, the music was another thing, I am a country music fan. And so we had a gentleman by the name of cousin Allen my hometown. And I have to tell you. I would listen to cousin Al his delivery. How he was set of the music how they would go to the news and how informative every bit of it was and I fell in love with it. Well, that's very evident. And the news has fallen in love with you as well. Now. I know you said that you knew what you wanted to do in high school were you involved in any journalistic clubs were you a news anchor for your school? How did you express that desire will actually won the local radio stations? There had a scholarship, and I went and applied, and then when I got home there was a gentleman visiting my grandmother's home, and he says, I know you don't want to be a DJ. So. Kind of made me think. Well, maybe I don't wanna do this. And so then I went off to school and lo and behold there was an audition for someone to read the news or southwest, Georgia. I was a student at Albany state university Albany state college at the time it was known as and so I went in and I auditioned, and I got it. And so that was how you can say I was thrust into my career of journalism, and it was great to come into the dining hall in people's. Hey, I just heard you on the news. I just heard you doing the news. So it was interesting. And then Dr James hill who was one of the deans at our college. He come into his office one day and said, I have an internship possibility for you. And so I guess we can say the rest is history. I started interning at a local station there in one or two weeks and they hired me. Wow. That's amazing. I wouldn't even say that. This is something that you wanted to do. I will say this is something that you are destined to do. There are a lot of young journalists out there who want to get into the business for the glamour and the glitter. You get that as well. But you truly do put in the work when we talk about your body of work. I know you went to Albany state where you're very involved, and I know that you received a proclamation from your own hometown down in Columbus, Georgia as well. Yes. I know you have a wealth of experience, and they honored and acknowledged your career in journalism your career expands beyond V one. Oh, three tell us a little bit about your journey in journalism. I know you were with CNN for awhile. Yes. CNN is one of them when I left Albany state. I went home and. Worked at local stations there for Davis broadcasting and then I got the call to come to Atlanta Georgia, and I went to work for WGST and the Georgia news network for a time and then went to CNN for the CNN radio network. At that time. I got married. So my husband, and I moved to the north and I worked in New York City for a couple of stations there at one I was a writer at another. I was on air, and we're we're talking about WCBS and W O R. And then I also lived in Pennsylvania Ed during that time. And so I was doing some some per diem work for stations there as well. And so then had a family tragedy lost my husband, and I moved home and when when back to the CNN radio network and was there for more than a decade. And of course, we know as companies evolve, and they make changes some of us were let go they cut our particular network. And I had a moment I gives to say to be with my my family, and then another opportunity came along and lo and behold, I ended up with. Intercom Atlanta Maria, you're always so poised and well put together, and if it's one thing that our listeners, instantly know is is that voice is that voice? Did you practice? The boys. Did you stand in front of the mirror when you were a little girl and just develop it over time? How did you get the voice it almost sounds like someone is rubbing silk over the microphone? I mean. It's just that smooth tell us how you perfect it the voice. Oh, amanda. So kind actually when I was in school. I had a speech issue in reference to being able to differentiate between the C H is and the S H is, you know, the speech therapist came into school one day. And that was the issue that she found with me. So I became very much aware of that. And then at Albany state. Dr Martin dean Williams was one of my speech and audiology professors and one of the things that she was very conscious of and aware of was helping us to be able to vocalise better. And to be able to use the words in a way in which they made sense. For instance, we talk about pronunciations, for instance, the word ask, you know, A S K E D that was a word that we had so much fun with in school. Because we say ask whatever people don't know how to properly say that word all the time. So that's one of the words, and I always tell them what I see you're Ascot Ascot. She asked him. And and so it it comes from practice. It comes from practice. It comes from wanting to. I guess you can say sound is though, I know what I'm talking about. And to be able to deliver it in a way where I put for the persona of believability and trust someone once told me, you have gravitas and. Okay, works for me. Yes. I love that word gravitas. But now, I need to say it s gotta ask it. Yes. Maria. It's it's that voice in it's that level of commitment that have generated a lot of awards for you. You know, I don't think a lot of our listeners know, just how appreciate it. Your bodies of work have been I know just from reading your resume, which by the way is two pages long because it's so impressive. You've won how many Peabody's too? In addition. You also won a DuPont to DuPont to DuPont to Peabody's and a host of AP awards. Yes. So for our listeners who are not familiar with what a Peabody is or what a DuPont award is there like the Grammys of journalism, correct? Yeah. They are and the DuPont's and the Peabody's or for collaborative efforts when I was at CNN. And yes, these are like the Grammys of journalism, and I've also won an award from Atlanta association of black journalists nominated for national association of black journalists or Soledad O'Brien and her works. We collaborated when I was working at CNN. So it's it's been a wonderful journey. I don't know what's next, but the journey has been great when it comes to awards. I have to tell you the first award. I was shocked that I want. I didn't even go to the ceremony. It was for the Atlanta association of black journalists and the young lady who went for me. I call back. I was on vacation as to how to go. She said you one and I was shocked and amazed because I don't do it for the awards, but they are nice. They are nice to get. But I do it because we have so many who stories on heard, and there are days when I just wish I could go cover this story, and that story, and and you know. I'm I'm down to cover a protest because as people exercising their first amendment. Right. The right to protest the right to be heard. Speaking of which I have to share this story with you. I just got off from work here in a calm radio Atlanta downtown, and I had to go down to the capital went down to get a permit renewed. And while I was down there. I have hazard early ran into a protest. And I'm like, the news is just coming to me like a magnet, and I'm staring there. Looking at these people assemble in an I'm thinking, man, I'm tired all I came down here to get was a permit renewed for a moment. I just stopped, and I was going to go just going to go and get it and go home. But then I thought what would Maria do what would Maria? Bullington do. And then I I said she would go she would cover this event. She would be over there, getting interviews taking pictures. So I went I I covered the event because I knew this what you do. And as a journalist new to the industry, I fill is very important to.

CNN Georgia Atlanta Albany state Maria Boynton Amanda Cooper Atlanta Maria Maria Poynton Maria DuPont Peabody Columbus Albany state university Albany reporter Atlanta association of black Maria Pennsylvania New York City Carol Ascot Ascot
"university albany" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

13:35 min | 2 years ago

"university albany" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Thirteen eighty W A. Okay. Some companies are requiring potential and current employees to let them monitor their social media activity politics being true or founding documents does not require us to agree on every contour of life community issues middle school in Atlanta. This is south of downtown on arrival officers discovered a student had been shot outside the building the issues that affects welcome to close on W W V HD three WBZ Atlanta. People stations. Hello everyone. I'm Amanda Cooper in. This segment of Atlanta up close. We are highlighting and featuring ordinary people in our community who are doing some extraordinary things today. We are featuring intercom radio Atlanta's very own Maria Poynton Maria, welcome to the show. Thank you. Amanda, this is such an honor. Because when I think about your body of work as a journalist, I don't really think our listeners are aware of how extensive your experiences and today, we are honoring you because you are being honored abide the state of Georgia. Tell us a little bit about that. And also give us more insight about who are. Well, Amanda, first and foremost, I'd like to thank you for wanting to sit down with me to conduct this interview. Because normally I'm interviewing everyone. I'm out in the field and covering their stories. And it is humbling to me to be here today. What I received from the Georgia. House of representatives is a resolution and from several lawmakers there and I'd like to thank them immensely. It says a resolution recognizing and commending Maria Burlington on her outstanding service as a journalist, and it goes on for other purposes, a bunch of whereas is a lot of stuff that I didn't realize that. I'd actually accomplish that they were able to produce in a resolution, and I like to say that I am humbled by this. And it talks about the beginning the middle and present day. That's outstanding. I remember when you came in and you show me your resolution. I was so elated and so proud of you because that is not something that they just give everyone does something that they hand pick someone to receive it in may hand, take you because you're so deserving of this. And I know that most people. No you from the news. They know you from CNN they know you from three and thirteen eighty W A. Okay. As well as your involvement through the community, and through all of the activities that you do as a journalist. I remember you telling me that you are originally from Columbus, Georgia. I also remember you telling me that when you were in high school you were asked what you wanted to do. You said what I said I wanted to be a reporter because we had stations there, and I would say, I'm Marie Boynton reporting and every with each honor, and I'm on social media. There's a young lady named Carol and we were on flare quarter together in high school. And she always says to me, you always said you want it to be a reporter. And that's how my life has has moved has. Transcended into the life of a reporter. I'm Maria Bloomington. I feel honored to be allowed to do that. Because I feel that my purpose is that of public service. And in my job. I'm able to report I'm able to get to know others in my reporting and to allow others to get to know others as well. So you dream started out in high school. Yes, I I would say my dream started out actually when I was even younger than that. Because I had the television, and I was sitting there, and I would watch the TV. And then that of course, helped me realize that there were things that a little black girl could do on the television, and the, but I spent most of my time listening to the radio the radio was what moved my life. That's what we listened to. We listen to the radio the local radio stations. There had news persons on them. And then, of course, the music was another. Thing. I am a country music fan. And so we had a gentleman by the name of cousin Allen my hometown. And I have to tell you. I would listen to cousin Al his delivery. How he was set of the music how they would go to the news and how informative every bit of it was and I fell in love with it. Well, that's very evident. And the news has fallen in love with you as well. Now. I know you said that you knew what you wanted to do in high school were you involved in any journalistic clubs were you a news anchor for your school? How did you express that desire will actually won the local radio stations? There had a scholarship, and I went and applied, and then when I got home there was a gentleman visiting my grandmother's home, and he says, I know you don't want to be a DJ. So kind of made me think, well, maybe I don't wanna do this. And so then I went to school and lo and behold there was an audition. For someone to read the news or southwest, Georgia. I was a student at Albany state university Albany state college at the time it was known as and so I went in and I auditioned, and I got it. And so that was how you can say I was thrust into my career of journalism, and it was great to come into the dining hall in people's. Hey, I just heard you on the news. I just heard you doing the news. So it was interesting. And then Dr James hill who was one of the deans at our college. He commented to his office one day and said, I have an internship possibility for you. And so I guess we can say the rest is history. I started interning at a local station there in one or two weeks in they hired me. Wow. That's amazing. I wouldn't even say that. This is something that you wanted to do. I would say this is something that you were destined to do. There are a lot of young journalists out there who want to get into the business for the glamour and the glitter. You get that as well. But you truly do put into work when we talk about your body of work. I know you went to Albany state where you're very involved, and I know that you received a proclamation from your own hometown down in Columbus, Georgia as well. Yes. I know you have a wealth of experience, and they honored and acknowledged your career in journalism your career expands beyond V one. Oh, three tell us a little bit about your journey in journalism. I know you were with CNN for awhile. Yes. CNN is one of them when I left Albany state. I went home and work. At some local stations. They're for Davis broadcasting, and then I got the call to come to Atlanta Georgia, and I went to work for WGST and the Georgia news network for a time, and then went to CNN for the CNN radio network at that time, I got married. So my husband, and I moved to the north and I worked in New York City for a couple of stations there at one I was a writer at another. I was on air, and we're we're talking about WCBS and W O R. And then I also lived in Pennsylvania Ed during that time. And so I was doing some some per diem work for stations there as well. And so then had a family tragedy lost my husband, and I moved home and when when back to the CNN radio network and was there for more than a decade. And of course, we know as companies evolve, and they make changes. Some of us were let go they cut our particular network. And I had a moment, I guess to say to be with my my family, and then another opportunity came along and lo and behold, I ended up with intercom Atlanta Maria, you're always so poised and well put together, and if it's one thing that our listeners, instantly know is is that voice is that voice? Did you practice the boys? Did you stand in front of the mirror when you were a little girl and just develop it over time? How did you get the voice it almost sounds like someone is rubbing silk over the microphone? I mean. It's just that smooth tell us how you perfect it the voice. Oh, amanda. So kind actually when I was in school. I had a speech issue in reference to being able to differentiate between the C H is and the S H is, you know, the speech therapist came into school one day. And that was the issue that she found with me. So I became very much aware of that. And then at Albany state, Dr modesty Williams was one of my speech and audiology professors, and one of the things that she was very conscious of and aware of was helping us to be able to vocalise better. And to be able to use the words in a way in which they made sense. For instance, we talk about pronunciations, for instance, the word asking, you know, A S K E D that was a word that we had so much fun with in school. Because we say ask, you know, whatever people don't know how to properly say that word all the time. So that's one of the words, and I always tell them what I see your ask it. She asked him. And and so it it comes from practice. It comes from practice. It comes from wanting to. I guess you can say sound is though, I know what I'm talking about. And to be able to deliver it in a way where I put for the persona of believability and trust someone once told me, you have gravitas and. Okay, works for me. Yes. I love that word gravitas. But now, I need to say it s gotta ask us. Gotta yes. Maria. It's it's that voice in it's that level of commitment that have generated a lot of award for you. You know, I don't think a lot of our listeners know, just how appreciate it. Your bodies of work have been I know just from reading your resume, which by the way is two pages long because it's so impressive. You've won how many Peabody's too? In addition. You also won a DuPont to do Pont to Pont to Peabody's and a host of AP awards. Yes. So for our listeners who are not familiar with what AP body is or what a DuPont award. Is there like the Grammys of journalism? Correct. Well, yeah, they are and the DuPont's and the Peabody's or for collaborative efforts when I was at CNN. And yes, these are like the Grammys of journalism and also won an award from Atlanta association of black journalists nominated for national association of black journalists or Sola data O'Brian and her works. We collaborated when I was working at CNN. So it's been a wonderful journey. I don't know what's next, but the journey has been great when it comes to awards. I have to tell you the first award. I was. Shocked that I want. I didn't even go to the ceremony. It was for the Atlanta cessation of black journalists and the young lady who went for me a call back. I was on vacation as to how to go. She's that you one. And I was shocked and amazed because I don't do it for the awards, but they are nice. They are nice to get. But I do it because we have so many who stories are on heard, and there are days when I just wish I could go covered this story, and that story, and and you know, I'm I'm down to cover a protest because as people exercising their first amendment, right? The right to protest the right to be heard. Speaking of which I have to share this story with you. I just got off from work here in radio Atlanta downtown, and I had to go down to the capital. I went down to get a permit renewed. And while I was down there. I have hazard we ran into a protest, and I'm like, the news is just coming to me like a magnet. And I'm staring there. And looking at these people assemble in an I'm thinking, man, I'm tired all I came down here to get was a hermit renewed. In for a moment. I just stopped, and I was going to go just gonna go and get it and go home..

Georgia CNN Atlanta Amanda Cooper Maria Poynton Maria DuPont Columbus Albany state university Albany reporter Atlanta Maria Maria Burlington Peabody Maria Bloomington Albany Pennsylvania Carol New York City Allen Al
"university albany" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"university albany" Discussed on Super Station 101

"We are again tenure a monitor the tear incident which occurred earlier today and london we have for confirmed dad including me a silent and we've been now monitoring this discuss inept throughout the course of a lot hour and of course the last several years as route trying to make some gonna heads or tails i mean we're going to have a conversation now with professor of victor us saw what he currently serves of the chair of the department of public administration and i associate professor and the department affordable science he received his p a steve me university over maryland he is also a professor at the university albany as addition to that professor salty just courses on a world and compared to politics political violence impression negotiation and research design any is work in a variety of different capacities and perhaps perhaps numbers make a little bit a sense of any sense is the coming up for the attacks which occurred earlier today in london we welcome him into this edition of the might guard shallow professor how are you i'm doing good how are you michel i'm very good sir i so when you first heard the news considering your background obviously you you do courses on political violence as well as compared to politics give me are your initial feel injuring this'll thoughts in your the story okay so i know well crap okay i mean and the first thing we got to say there's got to be a huge cathy yeah that we don't know yeah it really what the factors are here if you got that i would be willing to bet certain out of money on on a couple of guesses but at this point we're still to getting stage because we don't know the identity of the attacker we haven't heard anything about who's claiming credit for the attacked and so we have to keep those cathy hot in mind but my first gattis in terms of this is this strike me being either a alone or what people are starting to call a connected walton kind of attack and this is something that in happening in western you're up i'm not so much in the uk a bit more in mainland europe a lot of and that's something i killer individual or group of individuals are making connections to her stuart in his nation cares target efficient necessarily on telling.

london professor maryland uk europe stuart associate professor walton
"university albany" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"university albany" Discussed on Super Station 101

"This discuss inept throughout the course of a lot hour and of course or go out several years as route trying to make some gonna heads or tails on it we're going to have a conversation now with professor of victor us saw what he currently serves as the chair of the department of public administration and i associate professor and the department affordable science he received his p a steve me university over maryland he is also a professor at the university albany as addition to that refresher assault ages courses on a world an compared to politics political violence impression negotiation and research design and he is working in a variety of different capacities and perhaps perhaps numbers make a little bit a sense of any sense is the coming up for the attacks which occurred earlier today in london we welcome him into this edition of the mike archer our professor how are you i'm doing good how are you michel i'm very good sir i so when you first heard the news considering your background obviously you you do courses on political violence as well as compared to politics give me are your initial feel injuring this'll thoughts in your the story okay so i know well crap if i mean what the first thing we got to say there's got to be a huge cathy i that we don't know yeah it really what the factors are here if you got it would've that i would be willing to bet certain i'm out of money on on a couple of guesses but the point where still to getting stage because we don't know the identity of the attacker we haven't heard anything about who's claiming credit for the attack and so we have to keep those cathy ott in mind but my first gas in terms of the is this strike me being either a lonely or what people are starting to call a connected walton kind of attack and this is something that happening in western you're not so much in the uk but more and mainland europe a lot and that some particular individual or group of individuals who making connections to her store gonna station the curse target is a shouldn't necessarily on telling them what to do with their inspired by the terrorist are going to say schmoe might be educated by the terrorist organization and and they're taking out an attack that would be a connected walton alone welcome to somebody has inspired.

professor maryland mike archer cathy ott uk schmoe walton associate professor assault london
"university albany" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"university albany" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"With to save yourselves ray saturday at eight forty five you can hear the university albany take on the vermont why in the american east championship connor now oh so she with him for a half so point there's a broncos you know i just for playing ray we are giving year the why it's bob twenty five dyar gives it's if they get because we appreciate you've been in brave enough last on the rest of the quite a major why what yeah okay here are the ones that it just recap here the ones that you man it's it's the mound st mary's mountaineers outs the st mary's gayle and is out one they wyoming cowboys which to get a half a point four the lehigh a mountain hearts and the vermont can amounts that's a hard one they're all lard loathe for much of any like the maple syrup the maple syrup i know re we we got this twenty five guard gets it's if they get to why it's bob that we will we will mookie up with we appreciate you being brave enough to come on yeah we'll talk soon is that was only harder than i thought you did you know off five before you look like jay the ones that i knew i knew before i look to my my new st mary's this too i knew wyoming yeah i knew vermont so i knew three of those the serb's the cat amounts remember when they had it i do that because they play hockey well and they had a ryan that he was a go remember that oh yeah yeah do you know what i mean you want me tennessee on the other ones yeah i know until north florida once are north florida or the hawks osprey i asked for it i've a bunch family members ago there anyway okay giving alright popped a layover ray might be able to believe me right okay your parents well you keep time for yourself to yes now okay here we go on keepin time so coming up next here on extra sports thirteen hundred mount st mary's which we does found out where the mountaineers will take on the same francis whitethe writers red flash what is that that's not even a thing friday and saturday at six thirty airforce hockey will take on the bentley white and the atlanta cocky quarter finals so often yeah wednesday.

vermont jay st mary hockey ryan north florida wyoming tennessee mount st mary francis whitethe atlanta