35 Burst results for "University College London"

"university college london" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"university college london" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Between the veterans memorial and dusan lakeshore draw, the ride is much improved. 16 minutes, 95th outs out. That's traffic. I'm Japan too. Here's the latest Chicago weather update, mostly sunny skies this afternoon high into the mid 80s, southwest winds of 5 to 10 mph, tonight mostly clear low near 60. By Friday sunshine high 85°, Saturday partial sunshine develops in a high of 84. Sunday chance for showers and storms, cloudy high of 74, and on Monday chance for rain and storms a high around 69. From the weather, weather center, I meteorologist Jennifer vuit ski. Currently, it's 76. I'm doctor Anthony Liz, and this is climate connections. As billionaires race to space, they could harm the climate back here on earth. Heloise moray is an associate professor at university college London and co author of a recent study on the climate impact of rocket launches. She says that some rockets use carbon based fuels that produce heat trapping greenhouse gases when burned. There are also other kinds of byproducts that contribute to climate change, water vapor is produced by some of the rockets and that is a strong greenhouse gas as well. But there are also other pollutants that aren't necessarily classified as greenhouse gases like black carbon or soot, and those can have a warming effect as well. The effect is particularly strong when rockets release the pollution directly into the upper atmosphere. As they are launched, they release pollutants all the way from the surface of the earth to their destination. And these pollutants can last in the upper atmosphere for longer than they last at the surface of the earth. And so they can persist for two, three years, maybe more. So although the number of rocket launches is still small, moray says it's important to consider the risks

dusan lakeshore Jennifer vuit Anthony Liz Heloise moray veterans memorial university college London Japan Chicago moray
VR, AR and XR in Human Factors- In discussion with Prof. Bob Stone - burst 02

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

01:23 min | 1 year ago

VR, AR and XR in Human Factors- In discussion with Prof. Bob Stone - burst 02

"That walls doing psychology undergraduate degree at university college. London and i even though i enjoy things like clinical psychology and social psychology. I was always. I was always more attractive. Worse than the occupational psychology side of things. And then i discovered by absopure chance that literally across the road from garrett street was the original economics unit is remote more governors and rachel belichick bombers most rachel benedict today and went over there initially to ask if i could to ask him a barrel their their their police breathalyzer because i was doing a study on the effects of alcohol on 'em second-largest skills dr in other words dark throwing an incredibly popular student experiment. Believe you mean talking to an harry. More absolutely inspirational. I'm thinking and they did things like control panels. You know going back to jerry anderson and it just seems like cheap chains and go to go to and coalmines and some of the courses were held at the institute. What was the baby. Manson army personnel research dente. Fauveau this is. This is the do so i i took the nfc down then. Never looked

Tonight Kirby Today ONE One Individual Lincoln Haitians Rachel Belichick Rachel Benedict University College London Jerry Anderson Manson Army NFC
Goodhart's Law in Reinforcement Learning

Data Skeptic

04:11 min | 1 year ago

Goodhart's Law in Reinforcement Learning

"Student at university. College london minds researches mauka manipulation if you have self trading algorithm does it learn to manipulate markets. And then going from that. How'd you stop it for many players in the market on cutting more generally how do you tell algorithm which runs a policy. How do you tell it. The certain things are illegal. Should be done. So it's kinda taking me on more security journey than i thought it would because of going into the world of experimental psychology lower because not market knows very interested in intent lieutenant and they're also interested in coz -ality my work at the moment is trying to establish will Like for an hour them and the what the beginning to be talking about today is connected to quality so is an area that really came up in my kinda full mold machine learning education and it was only probably just over a year. When i read a book by judy. Appel will the book of why a restarted get interested in the subject to causality and realize that it's something but isn't tool on isn't handled while a machine learning at all. And if you read the book. Paul is very adamant about the importance of alexey. In housing types of analysis simply can't walk without taking into account so it drew a question in my mind is wide or how machines machine learning techniques reinforcement dining. what when there's no explicit treatment of causality. it's all so that led to the dog brought to pipe official quoted by fulminate cool cool combo good health law enforcement butting so a reinforcement learning should be all about causality. You have an agent. He chooses actions that she's actions. That somehow changes the world. They receive some kind of award the world changes and so on so you think that reinforcement learning calls aleksey guy well together and actually if you to believe bill. They can't walk reinforcement. Dining should be able to work if causality isn't explicitly treated. But if you look at sutton a barter which is the canonical text on reinforcement. Learning a search for the wet causality. Causal anything like that pays exactly zero times in the book. So someone's gotta be wrong. Eva wrong in saying that actually k. nikon generate any kind of policy to solve a problem or reinforcement dining extremely lucky so far in the Questions that they've studied have contained any kind of interesting causal structure. I agree that the word causality is suspiciously missing from most of the reinforcement literature. Books and papers. I've encountered but it almost feels like it could be there implicitly. Could this just be a matter of semantics. Well that's the great hope from deep reinforcement dining. I guess that ye somehow by involving date neural network in order this somehow in that your network which is unknowable. Mysterious does the job of analysing causality. It doesn't automatically so you don't need to think about it. And it's done you don't need to worry about to me fulfillment dining works. So let's move on. And i guess there is an element of that because reinforcement dining does work. But it just made me think about if you look in science. In general there's a long history of humans discovery techniques which work with before actually understanding why they work so i was thinking about i on the on age was five hundred bc even saudi arabia and to make land. You need to take on all you. Smelted with coke and the coke burns in the air that produces carbon monoxide to carbon monoxide displaces. The oxide in the side which then lacey with real on so at what point in human silenced. It be realized that was happening. Probably two years lights may be seventeen eighteen. Hundreds ole is time. We still had on tools. Said he didn't really matter that we didn't know why what it did kind of walk on. I like bit to reinforcement learning. Maybe the process. Which does what. It's a bit mysterious. Maybe ego to do things to get it to work. But the actual understanding as to white wax isn't diane. I think without an understanding of sally cardi understand. Why rainbow sledding works. I can pull out a textbook or maybe go

Appel Alexey Aleksey Judy London Sutton Paul EVA Nikon Saudi Arabia Coke Lacey Sally Cardi Diane
Capitol Police warn of extended March 4 – 6 militia threat against Congress

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Capitol Police warn of extended March 4 – 6 militia threat against Congress

"The trump cult cunanan having failed to take the capital on january the sixth or hero roundup the deep state. Satanist cabal secretly controls the world on inauguration day had lately drawn a red circle around today march the fourth on which they believe. Donald trump will return to the white house and resume his presidency spoiler alert. He won't nevertheless fbi intelligence about another possible plot to storm. The capital has resulted in the implementation of extra security on joined with more on this. Jeffrey howard political philosopher. University college. London jeffrey with old you acknowledgement of the perils of taking any of the cunanan and associated. Nonsense seriously. why were they excited about march. The fourth march the fourth has a particular role to play in the broader cunanan story and the short version of it is that marched. The fourth was the original inauguration. Date for the us presidency so george. Washington's inauguration was scheduled for march the fourth seventeen eighty-nine as it happens it didn't actually occur in fact due to bad weather and so it had to be postponed to april. But for nearly a hundred and fifty years marched. The fourth was the inauguration date for the presidency until the twentieth amendment which was enacted in nineteen. Thirty three changed. The inauguration date a january twentieth for the reelection of franklin roosevelt. And so it's part of a broader aspect of cunanan ideology which very much anchors it at as in the american past in particular before nineteen seventy one cunanan followers believed that the. Us government has been wholly illegitimate Since the presidency of of ulysses s grant for very complicated and bizarre reasons we could get into. But it's that idea of march the fourth as the original. The right inauguration date for the american presidency that has given it such prominence in the cunanan ideology.

Cunanan Satanist Cabal Jeffrey Howard Donald Trump University College FBI White House Jeffrey London George Franklin Roosevelt Washington United States Us Government
European Scientists Create First Light-Up Tattoos For You and Your Avocado

Kottke Ride Home

05:08 min | 1 year ago

European Scientists Create First Light-Up Tattoos For You and Your Avocado

"A team of scientists in europe have created what they say is the first light emitting tattoo using oh led based technology which is like the kind used in newer televisions and smartphones especially the folding kind. And well of course. This sounds totally awesome. If a bit frightening the team mostly propose practical uses like alerting an athlete when they're dehydrated or indicating when someone should get out of the sun to avoid getting a sunburn and tattoos for medical use are not unprecedented. I know a couple of people who have replaced their medical bracelets for conditions like diabetes with permanent tattoos on their wrists and radiation therapy often tattoos. Small black on cancer patients skin to use as reference marks for the machines and a handful of in the us tattooed kids with their blood types. During the cold war thinking it could facilitate blood transfusions in the case of a nuclear attack. And that's a real thing that happened. I'll put a link in the show notes if you want to read more about it and sort of grim as that sounds to our modern ears. There are still proposals around to people including children with their medical information. A team from rice university. A couple years ago developed fluorescent quantum dot tattoos that would only be visible through a custom smartphone app. At which time they would show a person's vaccination history something particularly crucial in hard hit rural areas. Where people sometimes don't have paper or digital vaccination records then no one's actually a pretty good idea even if it sounds a little big brother that the offset and unfortunately because of that. It's gotten pulled into a lot of covid nineteen vaccine conspiracy theories even though it's a tattoo not in any way an implant a microchip and not in any way related to the covid nineteen vaccines. It's being cited by conspiracy theorists as evidence that the covid nineteen vaccines are implanting tracking microchips into people. It doesn't help that. The original study was proposed by the bill and melinda gates foundation a lot of conspiracy theorists love to say that bill gates engineered the corona virus. Or something. I only bring all of that up in case you hear about it in relation to this vaccine history. Quantum dot tattoo study. So now you can. Debunk anyone spouting that false claim but anyways back to the light up. Oled tattoos in addition to some practical wellness related uses. The team also expects that they could be used for fashion purposes. Like having a light up tattoo or even fingernails and they could even go beyond humans to be used on produce. The tattoos could go on packaging or on the fruit or vegetable itself to identify when it's gone bad now. If you're imagining how impractical it would be to take a tattoo gun to a tomato. I should clarify that. These tattoos are applied more like a temporary tattoo is quoting university. College london the oled's are fabricated onto temporary tattoo paper and transferred to a new surface by being pressed onto it and dab with water and quotes now as gizmodo notes. Quote the idea of personally augmenting. One skin with glowing. Art isn't new either. But previously this has involved bio hackers implanting technologies like led's beneath the skin and the results don't have much practical use besides attention grabbing or inviting questions about why someone would do that to themselves. This new approach to light emitting. Tattoos is easier to apply more practical and temporary without requiring surgery to have it removed and quotes. So how does this one work well. The flexibility of the oled display is key so that it can move and bend along with the human or fruit skin beyond that quoting again from gizmodo. The electronics of the light emitting tattoos made from an extremely thin layer of electro luminescent polymer that glows when a charges applied measure in at just two point three micrometres thick which according to the researchers is about one third the diameter. A red blood cell. The polymer layer is then sandwiched between a pair of electrodes and sits atop insulating layer which is bonded to temporary tattoo paper printing process. That isn't prohibitively expensive. The tattoos can be easily washed off when no longer needed or wanted using soap and water with a current applied the led tattoos in their current form simply glue green but eventually could produce any color using the same rgb approach that oled screens. Us and quote won't professor franken says saline lead author on the study notes that they've demonstrated a proof of concept that d- tattoos can be made cheaply and at scale. There's still a number of kinks to work out. Like normal temporary tattoos these ones degrade pretty quickly especially when more on a moving human and they still need figure out how to integrate them with a battery or super capacitor in the lab. They're currently hooked up to an external power source so oily tattoos might not become into the public too quickly but the technology is there and it will probably happen before

Melinda Gates Foundation Rice University Diabetes Europe Bill Gates Cancer United States Gizmodo London Franken Saline
Science FAIL! Why it's good to do

Science Friction

05:25 min | 1 year ago

Science FAIL! Why it's good to do

"We've all made mistakes right. But sometimes i can make us fundamentally confront who we are and who we want to bay beck in twenty four eighteen neuroscientist. Dr been to has had a damn good reason to be excited. It was it was such a shalit's basically there was years of work at prestigious scientific journal current biology had just accepted a paper by humidity supervisors based on his phd project but not without rigorous peer review. I of course reviews as good and tough questions and lots of extra analyses. I did when finally the email arrived and said yes. The paper is accepted. it was just. It was a very happy moment. A piper in a high impact journal. That's a big deal for. Young scientist then investigates how we perceive the world visually. So as your brain stitches together sane in front of you what you see is rematch spatially. Onto a part of your cortex at wrinkly atalaya of brian. So if you think of the cortex is old crumbled up that if you would flatten it out like a sheet could see on this flat surface neighboring points on the critical surf representing neighboring points in the visual field in the scene in front of us then put people in an mariah scanner to see what happened to the map when he distracted them using different visual cues. He came up with a k. For design for study and think we scan a total of twenty seven people which was at the time by far the largest study using this type of method and the method was kind of knew. He said there was a lot to figure out. It was computational so there were some analyses that literally took weeks every weekend machine would run through that stuff when it crashed it would send me an email which is a dangerous thing to do because when you get an e mail on sunday saying oh your coaches crashed in your very tempted to go back to the office and start to fix it. That lots of careful data crunching and analysis lighter and he'd found something significant and surprising this aspect of the brain of the visual brain which part of the scene a given neuronal population of marin response to seem to be more malleable than we thought and it was surprising that it seemed to change with attention. Just through your attending a given power to seen more than an condition. There's a lot to this week but the shorter the long of it is. This was a robust finding worthy of journal. So fast four now to six years later it's june twenty twenty and bins running his lab and tame remotely in the middle of a pandemic lockdown in germany. He's home is three. Kids is a lot going on right and he gets an email. I received that email. And i have to say at i. If i'm honest i i. Wasn't that worried that something was wrong. Really wrong only been didn't understand what yet and he would have to make a career defining choice about what to do next today on science fiction. Something we can all relate to filing and why it's good to do especially in science but also wants wrapped up in a whole lot of stigma and shame again especially in science you know great successes are trumpeted and things. That are not successes. You don't want people to know about however failure is so normal to the day to day working of science we need to move towards a culture where we are actively embracing failure. We all know that air is human and assigned as you know we have to ask why and behalf to ask how and way we fe often leads to the next question we are asking and so does this theory much part of scientific process. It's very great suits of inspiration in many ways the into no signs. That's not the way it looks and sounds in science when a journal pulls or retracts a paper the stuff of nightmares for scientists. But he's angst about scientific integrity scandals scaring scientists away from talking more openly about making mistakes back to that email bend has received at the uselessly. Big university in giessen. It was from susanna stole. Who is doing pay at university college. London under the supervision of professor sam schwarzkopf. Now sam had been a post doc in the lab been had done his pitch in and susanna was building on original. Study when i first read and paper thought. The design. They've chosen was really beautiful and was impressed. Ben included a very extensive stepney mandatory material conducting analyses infect around thirty pages of supplementary data for just a two page paper. Susannah was impressed with half farah was but then she went to do her on experiments and she noticed something odd she was getting. The same results has been even with different experimental conditions. And that shouldn't be high s-. I really had no clue

Prestigious Scientific Journal High Impact Journal Shalit Beck DR Big University Giessen Germany Susanna Sam Schwarzkopf University College SAM London BEN Susannah Farah
"university college london" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"university college london" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Makes a final decision in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. There's a new study out that puts a different kind of price tag on the economic benefits of our current energy infrastructure, which is to say for now. Fossil fuels oil and gas and coal. We get modern transportation out of it. We get electricity and heating. It's a lot of benefits. But there are a lot of costs, too, to be sure, often talent in dollars and cents and increasingly in climate costs. And consider this 8.7 million premature deaths every year globally from air pollution from coal plants and tailpipes. Marketplaces got tongue has the details and the economic policy implications. 8.7 million premature deaths from fossil fuel pollution, the study from the journal Environmental Research notes That's double previous estimates. I don't think we weren't necessarily anticipating. An estimate as high as we did study co author Elouise Marie Researches air pollution at University College London, she says diesel trucks, gas cars and coal plant spit out Tenney particles often called shoot that we inhale. Those particles hang out in the atmosphere up to 1 to 2 weeks. As a result of this persistent they can also be transported long distances. Do you may not live next door to a power plant, but you can still be impacted by it. For instance, Marie says people in the UK can inhale pollutants from Continental Europe. Co author Joel Schwartz and environmental epidemiologist at Harvard says scientists knew this suit was deadly and now they know even a little bit in the atmosphere can kill. So once we did studies at lower concentrations, we discovered whoa. The effects, the larger these revelations should resonate with government's considering fossil fuel investments. That's economist Garnet Wagner it and why you We are doing lots of things to avoid death from covert 19. One of the worst things we could be doing is stimulating our economy with measures that then lead to more death on the fossil fuel front. To him. The better policy is green energy. I'm Scott Tong from Marketplace..

Elouise Marie Kimberly Adams Garnet Wagner Joel Schwartz Washington Scott Tong Environmental Research Harvard Continental Europe University College London UK
"university college london" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"university college london" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One of the agency's makes a final decision in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. There's a new study out that puts a different kind of price tag on the economic benefits of our current energy infrastructure, which is to say for now. Fossil fuels oil and gas and coal. We get modern transportation out of it. We get electricity and heating. It's a lot of benefits. But there are a lot of costs, too, to be sure, often talent in dollars and cents and increasingly in climate costs. And consider this 8.7 million premature deaths every year globally from air pollution from coal plants and tailpipes marketplaces. Scott Tongue has the details and the economic policy implications. 8.7 million premature deaths from fossil fuel pollution, the study from the journal Environmental Research notes That's double previous estimates. I don't think we weren't necessarily anticipating. An estimate as high as we did study co author Elouise Marine Research is air pollution at University College London, she says diesel trucks, gas cars and coal plant spit out Tenney particles often called shoot that we inhale. Those particles hang out in the atmosphere up to 1 to 2 weeks. As a result of this persistent they can also be transported long distances. Do you may not live next door to a power plant, but you can still be impacted by it. For instance, Marie says people in the UK can inhale pollutants from Continental Europe. Co author Joel Schwartz and environmental epidemiologist at Harvard says scientists knew this. It was deadly and now they know even a little bit in the atmosphere can kill. So once we did studies at lower concentrations, we discovered whoa. The effects are larger. These revelations should resonate with government's considering fossil fuel investments. It's economists. Internet Wagner it and why you We are doing lots of things to avoid death from covert 19. One of the worst things we could be doing is stimulating our economy with measures that then lead to more death on the fossil fuel front to him. The better policy is green energy. I'm Scott tongue from.

Elouise Marine Research Kimberly Adams Scott Tongue Washington Joel Schwartz Environmental Research Harvard University College London Marie Continental Europe UK
"university college london" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"university college london" Discussed on KCRW

"Final decision in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. There's a new study out that puts a different kind of price tag on the economic benefits of our current energy infrastructure, which is to say for now. Fossil fuels oil and gas and coal. We get modern transportation out of it. We get electricity and heating. It's a lot of benefits. But there are a lot of costs, too, to be sure, often talent in dollars and cents and increasingly in climate costs. And consider this 8.7 million premature deaths every year globally from air pollution from coal plants and tailpipes. Marketplaces got tongue has the details and the economic policy implications. 8.7 million premature deaths from fossil fuel pollution, the study from the journal Environmental Research notes That's double previous estimates. I don't think we weren't necessarily anticipating. An estimate as high as we did study co author Elouise Marie Researches air pollution at University College London, she says diesel trucks, gas cars and coal plant spit out Tenney particles called shoot that we inhale and those particles hang out in the atmosphere. Up to 1 to 2 weeks. As a result of this persistent they can also be transported long distances. So you may not live next door to a power plant, but you can still be impacted by it. For instance, Marie says people in the UK can inhale pollutants from Continental Europe. Co author Joel Schwartz and environmental epidemiologist at Harvard says scientists knew this suit was deadly. And now they know even a little bit in the atmosphere can kill. So once we did studies at lower concentrations, we discovered Whoa! The effects are larger. These revelations should resonate with government's considering fossil fuel investments, says economist Garnet Wagner. It and why you we are doing lots of things to avoid death from covert 19. One of the worst things we could be doing is stimulating our economy with measures that then lead to more death on the fossil fuel front. Him. The better policy is green energy. I'm Scott Tong Marketplace.

Elouise Marie Kimberly Adams Garnet Wagner Scott Tong Marketplace Joel Schwartz Washington Environmental Research Harvard University College London Continental Europe UK
"university college london" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"university college london" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"University College London. Professor. It's good to speak with you this morning. I'm based in the nation's capital, and the level of security that is in place around Washington, D. C. Is At a level that we use the word unprecedented a lot these days, but I think it certainly fits this time around. What kind of message does that send? As the nation prepares for what traditionally has been a peaceful transfer of power. Well, Nathan. It is definitely unprecedented as you said, and it is a significant message that this inauguration is going to simply be different than ones we've had in the past. That was going to be the case regardless because of the Corona virus. Even before the events of January, 6 Biden had asked people to just stay home watch from home not to come to the national mall like they usually do. But of course after the events from two weeks ago, we have seen very heightened security in Washington, D C. Upwards of about 25,000 National Guard. Remembers being called in to support the D C. Metropolitan police and also the Secret Service on a number of road blocks the whole area not only around the capital, but really round the whole central D. C. Core essentially blocked off to the public. So this is very different Optics for sure. But at the end of the day, Biden is going to be inaugurated all these steps. We just see is necessary right now, given the current context, But the process will still move forward, and that's what matters most for providing and for the country. Right now. There are so many challenges this incoming president is facing. He already campaigned on Trying to heal the divisions in the country, and now they seem like they've really been intensified over the last couple of days, particularly around the events surrounding the U. S. Capitol. What is the challenge? For President elect Biden as he prepares to steer the country forward. Well, Nathan, you said it. Biden was already entering in this period of multiple crises with the pandemic with the economy and then already with very high polarization in the United States even before January, 6, and then it seems now at such a low. Biden did campaign on this messaging of healing of trying to bring the country together. That was always going to be an uphill battle for him, and it will probably be even not much tougher now with that said By then, it's probably one of the better position politicians to be taking over the office of president Right now, she has a long history in Washington of walking across the aisle, he has a number of bipartisan relationships. And these relatively he's coming forward as a pragmatic moderate is really I think trying to send the right message is of empathy, but it's going to be hard. It's going to be a long process. And quite frankly, it's going to be bigger than biting. This isn't something that one person or one president is going to be able to fix. Yeah, I want to get into that A little bit deeper is the kind of model that presidents like Biden represents is sort of this old school moderate who has a history of working across the aisle. Does that fit in this? Current era of extreme polarization. Well, it's certainly going to be tough. It worked enough for Biden in the election. As we saw he was able to draw from his more working class roots his time in northeast riding Amtrak everyday to D. C on drily, just speaking to a much with much more of a sense of empathy and trying to meet Americans where they are. And so I do think his. His tone is on message for this time, But it's exactly right that the risk that the country is dealing with right now this goes beyond just political polarization or indifference on issues. These are really social cultural divides that have And Stokes by different sectors and buy, you know different different sources across the country and again more than just the president. These trends started before Trump, so probably continue after Biden. But the I think the difference is that Biden won't be speed trying to address those rather than to stoke and exploit those as Marty Lusa under Trump. Only 30 seconds left here. What is job one for President Elect Biden. Well, first and foremost, he's going to be focusing on the crone of virus on this vaccine rollout. We've already seen him introduced this $1.9 Trillion Krone relief package. They probably won't They know they won't get that that they're going to try and get some kind of relief package through and really just trying to get the virus under control. Get the vaccination moving and try and jump start the economy. Thank you, as always, for being with us. Great to get your insights. Julie Norman Lecture and Politics and International relations at University College. London ahead of Inauguration Day. 12 PM tomorrow. Wall Street time President elect Biden will take the oath of office to become the 46th,.

President Elect Biden president Washington D C. Metropolitan police Nathan University College London Professor London U. S. Capitol 25,000 National Guard United States Julie Norman Secret Service Trump Stokes University College Marty Lusa
"university college london" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"university college london" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Be used for those who have contracted the virus. And find it's too late for a vaccine to be effective. Scientists with University College London hospitals are trialing the antibody treatment in this study dubs Storm chaser. So far, 10 people have been given the therapy with the hope that will be tested in hundreds more, including people with HIV and cancer. Sue Guzman, Fox News and one person is dead after gunfire erupted at a music video filming session Saturday in Lynn, Massachusetts, Boston suburb. Lynn Police say people started calling to report a shooting. I was standing on my porch. I'm gonna cigarette heard the gunfire. It was sound like automatic gunfire. Virgil Vanover was one of those people who called in saying he saw several people run after being struck by bullets. According to Lynn police. A total of six people were shot by one or more shooters. This The victims were in their twenties with the oldest being 30 years old. The group was reportedly making a music video at the time The gunfire broke out. Fox Boston's Kirsten graven I'm Mary Course Eddie on this is Fox News. This'd news radio K. L. B. J And now to ask you whether with your k O. B. J radar weather watch some clouds to start the day otherwise turning out mostly sunny. It will be breezy and warm this afternoon with a high of 76. Through to partly cloudy early tonight that increasing clad late though 51 tomorrow Mostly cloudy look for a share or two, especially in the afternoon high 70 to 74 from the Weather Center. I'm meteorologist Joe Lundberg. Haverty Furniture is here to help you get your home all set for the new year so you can set the stage with more style, set the bar more beautifully and set a more show stopping table. Let's set some.

Lynn Police Fox News Virgil Vanover Haverty Furniture Lynn Fox Boston HIV Joe Lundberg Sue Guzman Boston University College London Massachusetts Weather Center Eddie K. L. B. J
"university college london" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"university college london" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For specific purposes. All retail shops have closed apart from a central ones. You know Jim's hotels and the like. So it Zaveri close to a national Lockdown. But education would remain open on, of course, for things like weddings and funerals and stuff, but way believe the whole country should be in that right now given the severity off the situation, But there, you know there are good news stories around at the moment as well, in the sense that we do have safe vaccines. Andre are effective vaccines and they're being rolled out. We thank you for your time. Thank you so much for joining us on used a doctor and a lickle Stella there, professor of global Health and sustainable development at University College London. 25 minutes past the hour. Now, with organic material, your kitchen scraps and song you can stick him on the com possibility, will it It will eventually rot down thanks to the bacteria in compost. If only you may think we could do that. With things like plastic where it turns out, maybe we can to scientists from Hungary have produced a cocktail of bacteria, which they say can break down and help. Recycle plastic. The come the company they've set up now is called Polly Loop on one of those co founders is said this murderous list. First off What is the cocktail of bacteria? How do you go about making that? Good morning. Well, I can't give you any away any trade secrets about what I could tell you is that we spend about 1.5 to 2 years developing and refining this cocktail and right now, this cocktail exists solely in the property of Hollywood. Okay. Well, I wasn't asking for the recipe because I'm unlikely to be able to do it at home. Although I do have a compost bin. But what do you end up doing with the bacteria that you combine and you apply that to, for example, a plastic bottle? How long does it take to do what it does? And what is it that it does? Mm. I think that the analogy with compost was very, very good. Since basically we're following the same principles are bacteria used the carbon stored inside the plastics as the soil carbon source and what we can do right now, with the fossil base that single use plastics is aching to what you can do with a banana peel and the compost Beth and for now, depending on the type of plastic it takes about 4 to 8 weeks for our bacteria to break it down and metabolize it. And what are you left with at the end there? We're left with a sludge that can potentially be used as a soil conditioner. Oh, now that's kind of crucial because you said there that you can use this also on a single use plastic bottle, and of course, the whole tragedy of single use is that it can't be recycled. It doesn't become part of a circle. Are you saying that possibly you could actually do something with single use plastic Now, exactly. We've been focusing mainly on single use plastics since we started this company because we see that this problem is the most urgent one. Right. And how close to a solution to that, Are we? Therefore, I mean, does this mean that I could put the plastic from my domestic use into a bin with these bacteria on it would work like a compost heap? I mean, right now we're at the laboratories in principle. Could that be where you end up? Yes, yes. In principle, That's where we want to end up. And that, I suppose, is something that is easy to use. That's the crucial thing. People want solutions that are easy for them to adopt on this could be such a solution. Yes, of course. For now we're targeting mainly household plastic waste, which is which is quite abundant, and people should not notice the difference. They should not change their habits. It should just go in a bend. They will take it away and they will treat it at a facility on time. Maybe we can work towards having home composting bins as well. But the way we see it, that's more in the future. You're thinking that this group that you end up producing could actually go on soil and it will be Safe to do, so will it We did the initial analysis on it on day, According to the chemical analysis, it should be safe. We are about to roll out testing on actual plans come to anyone fascinating list. Many thanks indeed, co founder of Polly Loop, Liz murderous one of the Hungarian scientists who've come up with Annoy idea of trying to get a virtuous circle of recycling going..

co founder Polly Loop University College London. Andre Jim Hungary professor of global Health Hollywood Liz
UK Scientists Trial Instant Immunity Antibody Drug Treatment For Covid

First Presbyterian Church

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

UK Scientists Trial Instant Immunity Antibody Drug Treatment For Covid

"Therapies being tested in the United Kingdom that can not only provide instant immunity to those exposed to cove in 19, but offer hope for people who cannot take the vaccine because of a compromised immune system. Scientists with University College London hospitals are trialing the antibody treatment. treatment. Studied Studied Dub Dub Storm Storm chaser chaser boxes. boxes. SUIT SUIT

United Kingdom University College London
Erdogan calls on Turks to boycott French products

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:40 min | 2 years ago

Erdogan calls on Turks to boycott French products

"Talks president recipe type Erdogan has called for a boycott on French goods as tensions between the two countries rise after President Emmanuel macron called for a French Islam. This follows the beheading of teacher in France after he showed his class caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad published by the Satirical magazine. Charlie. Ever. Let's cross to Istanbul to join the journalist I login Yuck. Leeann also on the line is Philip Malia professor of French and European politics at University College London. Island let's start with you. Why is Turkey so upset? Well the magazine this week published a cover that depicts a caricature of president are due on and suggesting that he's a bit hypocritical about his religious beliefs. He's drinking a can of beer and he's lifting. The skirt of an Islamic garb. So that is Let us set off a firestorm among our close circle They're accusing them accusing the magazine of insulting and have actually sued the magazine for libel. It is a crime in Turkey publishable a punishable by up to four years in prison to insult the president. So that has been the latest twist. In this in the spat, but they've also putting a ban on French goods. That's correct that stems from President Macron's a recent pledges to. Ensure. That Islam does not affect the French way of life and French values describe that as a relaunch of the Crusades an attempt to Spread like cancer the Islamic phobia that already exists in Europe according to Don So there, but the dispute doesn't just start there between Turkey and France on they are at odds over a number of issues including the war in Libya and including the search for hydrocarbons in the eastern Mediterranean as well as the conflict in Nagorno-karabakh. Absolutely, and we'll come back to those in a moment. I just want to bring Felipe here to talk about what my chronic said. I mean he's saying that he's been misquoted. Yes I think that that's what he says and to to be fair in this Ongoing Saga Domestic Saga in France that is around the shaggy bill cartoons the latest of course, the latest terrorist attacked a couple of weeks ago. This teacher who was beheaded in France by terrorists the the trial shall you do are all taking place as we speak, but there's a lot of things going on and to be fair my call has always been has has never been the hotline in this. In this debate about the cartoons is a bit more of a solo rather than. So in a sense, it's been unsound aim to be to be branded suddenly the most Islamophobic person in fraud I don't think used to be fair but the issues for sure it's been misquoted in a sense i. think he said, yes that they were issues with Islam. which probably was a rather undiplomatic way of putting things to wealth stage. I think he's presented essentially the new bill on socal separatism, which is quite controversial in France and probably. Is, yes implicitly targets in the Muslim population in France but it's true that if French I'll probably surprised how at ten suddenly the sued relationships and and how the sort of tension has related between the two countries of late. To. Be Fair that the two men have been at loggerheads for a long time so it seems on the train side. For advil hand, it's almost protects the those at the story of the call tunes because inside the being as your guests. Until you have just said, there's been real geopolitical issues and disputes between the two countries for one now. Yes. Well, I wonder how much of this also has to do with Turkey's domestic politics I mean we know that there's a huge economic crisis is this a diversionary tactic? It certainly helps distract people from the issues surrounding the economy and our one has been accused of using any number of foreign problems to distract his voters This in particular might resonate because the fact that it's religion and this is something that people hold. So close to their hearts on think that people are filing necessarily know every twist and turn. Of the issue. But when they hear of Charlie Hebdo, the satirical magazine, they might recall the images of the Prophet that the magazine published previously and that. Sir. Association. So when are two one talks about insulting Islam that's what comes to mind. Not The fact that published an image of political leader on the cover and so if bob he does have an impact. You know anything to get people's minds off of the fact that the jobless rate is soaring. The currency in Turkey has lost about forty percent of value this year against the dollar There's real economic pain here. So the certainly can help can help change the debate now.

Turkey France Satirical Magazine President Trump President Macron Leeann Felipe Charlie Hebdo Philip Malia Professor Of Fren Istanbul Muhammad Erdogan Europe Advil Fraud University College London Nagorno-Karabakh BOB Mediterranean
U.K. Moves Toward Ethically Controversial Coronavirus Vaccine Trial

PRI's The World

06:07 min | 2 years ago

U.K. Moves Toward Ethically Controversial Coronavirus Vaccine Trial

"Vaccine Trials are happening all over the globe today. The UK government announced funding for phase. One of something called a human challenge trial for a corona virus vaccine. The process will require young healthy volunteers to be infected with the virus in an effort to speed up vaccine testing a company called H Vivo and Imperial College London. Have the contract is set up the first part of that process. Here's more from the world's caroline dealer the idea itself sounds wild intentionally infect people with the very virus returning our lives upside down to avoid. People hear about these trials. Many people's immediate reaction is, how could it be ethical but Oxford bioethicist deb Yom row gic says, it's possible if certain conditions are met one of those conditions is that the expected benefits of the research outweigh the risks. In this case, how many infections could we prevent if we developed a vaccine sooner? For example, in a typical clinical trial thousands of people are injected with a test vaccine and sent out into the world to see if they still get infected naturally that's happening now with several corona virus vaccine candidates, but Andrew Catchpole. The, chief scientific officer at H., Vivo the company launching this human challenge trial says that takes time normal traditional trials involve many thousands of subjects take many many months to complete in human challenge trials, which HP VO has been running for decades. A small number of healthy volunteers would be intentionally infected with the coronavirus after getting jabbed with a trial vaccine to see if it works. What happens is because everybody is given the disease, you're able to determine efficacy in a matter of weeks. These types of tiles have been used for centuries and in the recent past have. Sped up the development of typhoid and cholera vaccines. The agreement announced by the UK government today is just for the first step of this contract to manufacture and test Raina the virus to use in trials it still has to be approved by regulators and an ethics panel. If it is between thirty and ninety volunteers could start being injected with just the test virus, not yet any vaccine as soon as the beginning of next year so far nearly three thousand people in the UK have signed up to volunteer for a challenge trial. One of them is allaster frazier ORCA. White indefinite convinced. The Human Josh all has essential to advising Ovalles, scenes, population way more quickly lift on them on opinion the risk is small enough to travel participants that we need to take that risk frazier ORCA put off going to university for a year to work with one day sooner, a nonprofit group advocating for human challenge trials and signing up volunteers. He says the Tom Channel some of the fear of living through a pandemic into something that feels productive grandma custos. My Dodd might catch his out his risk. So kind of on a personal level the. Volunteer volunteers will be paid somewhere around five thousand dollars insurance cover healthcare costs. For any complications they will quarantine in a special nineteen dead unit at the Royal Free, hospital in London for an expected two weeks after virus exposure. Again, Andrew Catch Paul from h Vivo. A first priority was doing these studies is the safety of the volunteers. So for that reason, we go very strict criteria about those who. Will be eligible to participate. Volunteers must be between eighteen and thirty healthy with no pre existing conditions. But there's a more controversial criteria that scientists are wrestling with right now whether to exclude volunteers of color because there is data suggest that there is a potential for increased risk. The UN says Kobe nineteen is disproportionately affecting racial and ethnic minorities around the globe including in Brazil the UK and the US. K. Government figures, black men in England and Wales are more than two and a half times more likely to die of cope in nineteen than white men. Some of that is explained by socioeconomic status in pre existing conditions. But Dhillon David Kumar, a physician and professor at University College London says it's more than that. They're also other underlying causes racism discrimination for example, being an underlying cause which are not easy to count foreign. Announces such as this Dave Qamar said, he's the health impacts of racism and xenophobia. He says, well, it's important to note that raises a social construct, not biological. The effects of racism in tells in ways that can be hard to identify. So you can't hold constant the discrimination someone's face throughout their life. You can't hold constant the environment someone grownup in the levels of air pollution kinds of housing that they've lifting throughout their life. So. There are differences in outcomes amongst racial groups. David Kamar isn't familiar with this specifics of this study proposal, but he says he can understand the reason for picking volunteers who are at the lowest possible risk for getting really sick. Charles cordray chief officer for the Caribbean and African Health Network sees it differently. It's really disappointing people of Color. In clinical trials that's partly due to legacy of racist medical experiments. By white doctors and kwok-wah dray says the idea of excluding people of color from this trial would add to the distrust mistrust and the lack of trust has come about as a result of decades of sometimes how we need to respond so quickly but what is meant is that there's a whole section of people. Fair much. whose voices are not being head HBO is still making a decision about whether and how to include people of Color in the first phase of this trial when they're testing out the safest way to infect people with the actual virus the company hasn't designed protocols yet for the actual vaccine-testing in hopes quickly follows the volunteer criteria for this stage of the study will be finalized and handed over to UK regulators and an ethics panel by

UK Andrew Catchpole Imperial College London Chief Scientific Officer London Kwok-Wah Dray David Kamar Frazier Orca Typhoid Royal Free Caribbean Hp Vo Dodd University College London Tom Channel UN Dave Qamar Dhillon David Kumar
Neanderthal DNA May Be COVID Risk

60-Second Science

02:05 min | 2 years ago

Neanderthal DNA May Be COVID Risk

"The risk factors for covid nineteen are many old age obesity, heart conditions. But early genetics studies have identified another trait that some people who developed severe cove nineteen seem to share a cluster of genetic variations on their third chromosome and that DNA sequence likely derives from neanderthals says Hugo, Siegburg of the Max Planck Institute it is quite striking that S-. This veterans has lingered until house years fifty thousand years ago is. The approximate time humans and neanderthals interbred, and over the Millennia, those neanderthal variants have become more common in some homo sapiens populations than others for example, about sixteen percent of people of European descent carry at least one copy of the neanderthal stretch half of South Asians do and nearly two thirds of Bangladesh's, and that's kind of fascinating is so high that points towards that it must must've been beneficial in the post. I mean it's much higher than we expect. Undone. It's totally expunged in east as shown in China. Some something has happened driving the frequency often certain placing removing a token, the other places they details are in the journal, nature. See Bergen is colleague right that perhaps the NEANDERTHAL DNA happens to boost the risk of developing severe covid nineteen and they point to the fact that in the UK people of Bangladeshi descent have twice the risk of dying of cove nineteen than the general population. But as Epidemiologists Neil of the University of Nottingham pointed out in an email people of African descent in the UK are also being hurt more by the virus. Despite, having hardly any neanderthal genes instead, it's social factors like crowded multi, generational households or working frontline jobs that are more likely to be driving the trend seen in the UK that's according to Andrew Heyward Director of the Institute of Epidemiology in Healthcare at University College London, and as both epidemiologist pointed out, it's worth remembering that you can only develop severe covid nineteen if you're exposed to the virus in the first place.

UK Max Planck Institute Andrew Heyward University Of Nottingham Hugo Bergen China Institute Of Epidemiology University College London Director Bangladesh
"university college london" Discussed on AP News

AP News

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"university college london" Discussed on AP News

"In Michigan, six alleged militia members are arrested for an alleged plot to kidnap governor Gretchen Whitmer over her virus restrictions. Seven others are arrested for plotting an attack at the Capitol 13 members of two militia groups. We're preparing to kidnap and possibly kill me. I put my hand on the Bible and took the oath of office 22 months ago. I knew this job would be hard. I'll be honest and never could have imagined anything like this. Wittmer is criticizing President Trump for his refusal to denounce hate groups during last week's debate. President Trump recovering from Covert 19 is being cleared by a doctor to resume campaign activities Saturday. A letter from Dr Sean Conley says the president has responded to treatment and suffered no ill side effects. President Trump released a Twitter video telling seniors they too can get the drugs that he took to my favorite people in the world. The seniors. I'm a senior. I know you don't know that. Nobody knows that. Maybe you don't have to tell him but I'm a senior. We are making tremendous progress with this horrible disease that was sent over by China House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is questioning the president's fitness for duty. Hundreds of businesses and schools in New York City neighborhoods where Corona virus cases spiked were closed today by order of the governor. There have been protests and lawsuits. Louise Glueck, an American poet, has won the Nobel Prize in literature. This is AP News. There's a new study on Cove in 19 symptoms conducted in Britain. Researchers at University College London analyzed data from one officials survey, which had been testing thousands of households every week for godless of whether the subjects had covered symptoms. Researchers found that off those who tested positive 86% did not have key symptoms such as a cough a fever or loss of taste or smell. Lead researcher I re Petersen says the figures suggest many may be spreading the virus, while asymptomatic Charles Ledesma, London, a surge of Corona virus cases and with Skansen in the Dakotas. Is forcing the scramble for hospital beds. The area is emerging as one of the nation's most troubling hot spots. Three states now lead all others in new cases per capita I'm Jackie Quinn. AP News. Although Judge Amy Cockney Barrett didn't list people of praise among her affiliations on Senate judicial questionnaires last month, a records check shows that she lived with Kevin and Dorothy ran again in the mid 19 nineties, when she was a law student at the University of Notre Dame. The couple helped found people of praise in the early seventies, a group that opposes the legal right to an abortion and issue likely to come up during Barrett Senate confirmation hearing. Amy Barrett's father, Sir. For years as the head of the organization's nor leans branch and on its all male national Board of governors. Her mother was a handmade. It's a term used until recently to describe women entrusted to guide other female members. Jackie Quinn, Washington record show Supreme Court nominee Amy Kuney. Barrett previously lived in a house owned by the co founders of a secretive religious community, People of praise the teaches men are divinely ordained to be there. Head of family and faith. Although Judge Amy Cockney Barrett didn't list people of praise among her affiliations on Senate judicial questionnaires last month, a records check shows that she lived with Kevin and Dorothy ran again in the mid 19 nineties, when she was a law student at the University of Notre Dame. The couple helped found people of praise in the early seventies, a group that opposes the legal right to an abortion and issue likely to come up during Barrett Senate confirmation hearing. Amy Barrett's father, Sir. For years as the head of the organization's nor leans branch and on its all male national Board of governors. Her mother was a handmade. It's a term used until recently to describe women entrusted to guide other female members. Jackie Quinn, Washington We all have different tastes in music. Some of us like hip hop, some.

Judge Amy Cockney Barrett President Trump Jackie Quinn president Senate Gretchen Whitmer AP News University of Notre Dame Board of governors Amy Kuney University College London Louise Glueck Michigan Nobel Prize Dr Sean Conley Nancy Pelosi Twitter Dorothy New York City
Shatter-Proof: How Glass Took Over the Kitchenand Ended Child Labor

Gastropod

05:36 min | 2 years ago

Shatter-Proof: How Glass Took Over the Kitchenand Ended Child Labor

"I am a Coloratura Mr Beast not Annette's. Well, whatever you are on record sal show Debra sent you over here. He didn't. You told me was your age. I nine and in spite of what you think. There are some professions where practice does make perfect. Julie Andrews pretending to be a man pretending to be a woman and still managing to shatter a wine glass with her gorgeous and super powerful voice at least in the movie Victor Victoria. But you know you can't believe everything you see on the big screen like breaking a wine glass with just a perfect flat yeah. I always been a long held ambitions. Break wine glasses of the sound. Some of you longtime gastropod listeners might recognize that Voice Zoe. Laughlin. Is none other than the star of our very first episode who said that mango sorbet tastes sublime on gold spoons hers is the voice that is inspired the purchase of a thousand golden spoons or at least a half dozen that we know about though is not just spoon aficionado. She's a material scientist and director of the Institute of Making at University College London, and this episode we were excited to talk to her again not about gold spoons. But about glass I mean even though I should've understand it on paper. Everything about glasses still sort of extraordinary mysterious like just the fact that is transparent when pretty much everything else isn't transparent is extraordinarily we have a lot of questions this episode for one. How did something? So seemingly delicate and breakable get to be so ubiquitous in the kitchen and also how come you could never put a drinking glass in the oven, but you can cook in a glass dish. What does the? Invention of the bottling machine have to do with a beautiful stretch of protected sand dunes along the shores of Lake Michigan or with the rise of Ketchup and Coca Cola and the abolition of Child Labor for that matter and more importantly can you actually shatter glass using sound did zoe pull it off by the way Cynthia you might not have realized this but this episode is dedicated to your mother glassmaker extraordinaire. Of. Glasswork on display in my house as we speak and I have at least five pieces of fused and stained Tama Graber, glass mom, this one's for you. What is glass? All glass everywhere in the world is at least seventy percent made of sand that's been melted down and it's mixed together in a way that the atoms don't have any kind of order them, and that's what gives rise to it being transparent. You've already heard from Zoe now it's time to meet our other two intrepid glass enthusiasts who will be inducting us into the mysteries of this material. This episode been Speiser journalist and author of a very enjoyable book called the World Grain, the story of Sand and how it transformed civilization and an Isa Ramirez, material scientist and author of another totally delightful. Book. Called the Alchemy of US humans and matter transform one, another Zoe and Isa and bins are all about glass. You cannot overstate how ubiquitous glass is and how important it is to the modern world in which we all live I'm just looking around the kitchen where I'm standing there glass bottles holding olive oil. There's glass windows they're glass fixtures around the glass lightbulbs to everything from you know salt shakers and I glass lenses to things like twenty ton telescope lenses in the world's most powerful telescopes. It's in the fiber optic cables that connect to the Internet fiber optic cables made it literally of Spun. Glass. So really without glass we wouldn't have modern civilization. So we've established that this miraculous foundation of modern civilization is made of melted down sand with a few other ingredients thrown in but to go back another step, and this is a strange question but what is sand and is all sand the same thing? The Word San means just any small pieces Greens right of any hard substance so sand can be. Anything, you know it can be flint it can be courtside anything any kind of stone but the most common form of sand. Most of the sand in the world is courts, which is silicon dioxide and to make glass. That's what you need. You need court sand and you need a specially high security court sand. This seems very fortunate. You need court sand to make glass, and that turns out to be what most of the sand is primarily because courts is so hard that it just outlasts all the other rocks is they're all getting ground down together. You do still have to clean the courts end. Up a bit and get out the last remaining impurities and you have to add a few other ingredients to lower the melting temperature of quartz, and then you heat it up, you need a huge amount of heat. So while I like one, thousand, seven, hundred degrees Celsius which mostly in Fahrenheit I mean it's over three thousand degrees Fahrenheit based bloody hot. Eventually the sand melts and then it re congeals and a weird thing happens when it turns into a solid again, courts is a crystal but glass is not what a weird structure because it's not a crystal crystals are actually made up of atoms arranged like soldiers. In rows but glass is sort of like picture of kindergartners at resets, atoms are all over the place, and so that's what makes it unusual but it's that chaos in the arrangement of atoms that actually gives rise to it having the property of transparency.

ZOE Scientist Debra Julie Andrews Mr Beast Coca Cola Tama Graber Isa Ramirez United States Lake Michigan Laughlin Annette Victor Victoria Institute Of Making University College London Child Labor Cynthia Director
Are You Putting on Enough Sunscreen?

BrainStuff

05:19 min | 2 years ago

Are You Putting on Enough Sunscreen?

"As I record this, it is August which here in the northern hemisphere means hours of outdoor time under the blazing summer Sun. But even though many of us do wear sunscreen to help prevent sunburn skin cancer and the kind of skin damage that the beauty industry calls premature aging recent researches found that we're not applying that sunscreen is thickly as we should hang its effectiveness by about forty percent. Sunscreen is rated for Sun Protection factor or SPF WITH SPF thirty able to block ninety, seven percent of ultraviolet rays, the higher, the SPF, the greater the protection although even SPF one hundred doesn't block one hundred percent of UV light. The problem according to this recent research out of University College. London is that few of US US enough sunscreen to enjoy those high levels of protection. Lead author entity young explained to US via email that to calculate ratings in the lab. Sunscreen is applied thickness of two milligrams of product per each square centimeter of skin. He said, an average woman has about one point, seven square meters or eighteen point three square feet of skin for a whole body sunscreen she will need about thirty three grams or one point. One fluid ounces with three whole body applications a day that's about one hundred grams or three point four fluid ounces. For reference, a fluid ounces roughly equivalent to a shot glass of sunscreen and a large tube of sunscreen holds eight fluid ounces of product. So a person spending a full day in the Sun should use about half a tube by themself. Are you using that much sunscreen probably not young and his colleagues estimate that our real life application of Sunscreen is closer to about point seven five milligrams per square centimeter at less than forty percent of the recommended thickness as a result or not getting anything close to the ninety seven percent protection promised on a bottle of SPF. Thirty. The good news from young study is that you can get away with using less product with SPF of fifty or higher. They found that even the real world application rate of point seven, five milligrams of sunscreen per square centimeter if using SPF, fifty provided considerable DNA protection compared to untreated skin. So does that mean that you should run out and buy the most expensive SPF one hundred or spread your regular SPF thirty as thick as cream cheese on a BAGEL. We also spoke with Ivy Lee a board certified dermatologist based in Pasadena California who explained that you could. But that the best daily Sun Protection Strategy is to keep it realistic. Lee, said I tell my patients to go for the highest SPF possible. That feels good on the skin for daily use. How do you know you're really applying two milligrams per square centimeter? No one knows we don't want to induce anxiety over this we want to build healthy habits. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States and exposure to ultra-violet or UV. Light is a risk factor for all types of cancer including melanoma more than nine thousand, three, hundred Americans die for melanoma every year. UNPROTECTED EXPOSURE TO UV light damages the DNA and skin cells leaving them more susceptible to skin cancer DNA damage can result from either a few severe sunburns or a lifetime of cumulative sun exposure. Incredibly the American, Academy of Dermatology reports that getting just five or more blistering sunburns between the ages of fifteen and twenty will increase your overall melanoma risk by percents. and. Lee says that although skin cancer is less prevalent in people of color exposure to UV, light can also cause premature aging they sunscreen use will slow the appearance of wrinkles and age spots for all skin tones. Healthy sun-protection habits include avoiding sun exposure during the peak between ten am to two PM wearing a wide brimmed hat and sunglasses went outside and full sun, and of course, applying sunscreen on all exposed skin even in overcast conditions. For full coverage, Lee recommends starting the day with a cream or lotion type sunscreen preferably fifteen to thirty minutes before you step outside. Instead of measuring out of full shot glass of product, Lee tells her clients to think of applying sunscreen like a massage or can fully into the skin without missing a spot since body sizes vary and product spread. Differently there's no preset amount that works for everyone. Lease suggests reserving spray or powder type sunscreen for fast reapplication on the go the ideal is to reapply every two hours but lease as a more realistic plan is to reapply around lunchtime if you're going to be out all day. If you're heading out on water sanders snow more frequent applications are required because UV rays reflect off of those surfaces. According to Lee it's a myth that you can't burn the palms of your hands or the soles of your feet. Also, tablets and other hand held devices reflect UV light too. So pick a shady spot if you're going to spend some time in the sun scrolling.

Skin Cancer Ivy Lee United States Premature Aging Sunburn University College London Dna Damage California Pasadena Academy Of Dermatology
How Do Researchers Preserve Smells?

BrainStuff

03:35 min | 2 years ago

How Do Researchers Preserve Smells?

"Pardon me fragrances your book wearing researchers at university. College London suggests that the knows knows get it in an extensive study of smells heritage and Historic Paper published in the Journal Heritage Science. The authors argue the importance of documenting and preserving smells, but why the researchers realized that visitors at Saint Paul's Cathedral Dean and Chapter Library in London frequently comment on the aroma of the space, saying they feel like they can smell history now. Thanks to our LIMBIC system odors can make us pretty emotional especially when they evoked memories, sense affect how we experience different cultures and places and help us gain more insight into. Into and engage more deeply with the past since smells are a part of our cultural heritage, the researchers posit they have historical value and deserve to be identified analyzed and archived using chemical analysis and sensory descriptions. The study authors said about figuring out a way for scientists and historians to do so. In one experiment, the researchers asked visitors at the historic library to characterize the odors. They smelled more than seventy percent of respondents considered the library smell as pleasant. All visitors thought it smelled woody. While eighty six percent noticed a smoky aroma, earthy was seventy one percent and vanilla. At forty one percent were also descriptors. Visitors chose often. Responses ranged from musty, pungent and floral to rancid In another experiment, the study authors analyzed the responses of seventy-nine visitors to the Birmingham. Museum and Art Gallery in the United Kingdom to the smell of a historic broke from a second hand bookstore to capture the book smell. A piece of sterile GAAS was soaked in five milliliters or point one seven ounces of an. An extract of the book odor and placed in an unlabeled metal canister, screwed shut to prevent visitors from peaking the top three responses when the visitors were prompted to describe the smell, chocolate, coffee and old, the team even analyzed the volatile organic compounds also known as VOC's in the book and in the library. Most odors are composed of VOC's or chemicals that evaporated. Evaporated low temperatures. VOC's are often associated with certain smell types like acetic acid with sour, for instance, using the data from the chemical analysis and visitors smell descriptions. The researchers created the historic book odor. We'll to document and archive the historic library smell main categories such as sweet or spicy fill the inner circle of the wheel descriptors such as caramel or biscuits fill the. The middle and the chemical compounds likely to be the SMELLY source like Firfer all fill the outer circle. The researchers want the book odor wheel to be an interdisciplinary tool that untrained noses can use to identify smells and the compounds causing them, which could address conservatives concerns about material, composition and degradation inform artifact, paper, conservation decisions and benefit all the factory museum experiences.

VOC London Historic Paper Journal Heritage Science Chapter Library Saint Paul's Cathedral Museum And Art Gallery Birmingham United Kingdom Firfer
How Much of Our Food Do Moths Pollinate?

BrainStuff

04:53 min | 2 years ago

How Much of Our Food Do Moths Pollinate?

"Bees are not doing well. Since the mid two thousand colony collapse disorder has been taking out the world's most famous plant pollinator all over the world, these pont, one third of the plant's we eat from oranges, almonds a service worth some one hundred sixty eight billion dollars a year by the way, and their rapid disappearance is worrying farmers worldwide. But what if there a secret army of pollinators? Sneaking around the plants we rely on most it could be good news for food security, or it could be a neutral factor if these insects are susceptible to the same or similar pressures as BS. A study published in May of Twenty Twenty and the journal Biology letters has found moths playing much bigger part in pollinating plants than anybody imagined possibly visiting a bigger variety of plant species than bees, and doing it under the cover of darkness. Scientists didn't just realize overnight that moths pollinate plants. The problem was much of the research was limited to a few specific types of moths the. Spend a lot of time rooting around in flowers like hawk. Moths which have extraordinarily long tongues like fourteen inches thirty six centimeters long used for getting it hard to reach nectar reserves within a flower. However over the last decade investigations into how moths as a group contribute to the process of pollination found that your average moth tongue can be a effective tool for moving pollen from plant to plant. This knowledge led the study's authors to turn an eye to the rarely studied settling moths, which sit low and close to flowers and hide out in sheltered spots during the day. We spoke by email with these studies lead author Richard Walton of the University College London Department of Geography. He said our research has for the first time compared moth pollination networks with those of day flying pollinators such as bees hover flies to help us understand illustrate the wide ranging plant preferences. We discovered moths to have in an agricultural setting. We also found that malls were carrying most pollen from the flowers they visited on their furry bodies, which means the means of pollen transport from flower to flower by moths is very similar to bees, hover flies, which also transport most of the pollen on their bodies. Many social bees like bumblebees and honeybees visit lots of different types of flowers, but they also tend to target certain favourite plants that they know will provide plenty of their favorite kinds of pollen and nectar. As a result, some plant species get less attention than others. Walton said solitary bees often be more specialized visiting one type of plant while hover flies often visit flowers with a certain shape. We found that moths visit many different species of plant with a few different types of flower shape. If daytime pollinators do not visit a particular plant species often, but motte species do, and this results in pollination. This increases the chance that this plant would survive for another generation. So because malls are a bit less picky than daytime pollinators, but still get the pollination job done. Plants not preferred by bees persist, maintaining a diverse population of plants is essential to maintaining A. Resilient ecosystem that can weather threats like climate change organization. Conversely with plenty of plants to feed on moths, themselves can continue being an important food source for birds, bats and other insects. The research team observed and collected daytime pollinators as well as nocturnal moths around farm ponds the United. Kingdom and found moth food webs were often comparable to those of daytime pollinators in complexity, and in some instances had greater complexity. Walton said moths are likely providing a kind of resilience or backup to the food webs of daytime pollinators, if a certain species or number of species of bee or butterfly disappears from the landscape, moths potentially fill in that pollination gap. Taking this step further, it's also significant because moth populations are facing severe declines across the globe, as we realize that they're important contributors to the pollination process becomes even more important to protect moth populations because we might be placed ourselves at risk. The researchers found mauled were visiting plants belonging to families that are important to humans as a source of foods like apples, strawberries, pears, peaches, beans, and peas. Walton said this has exciting implications for mall. Being involved in crop pollination, it would help us to move past seeing moths as merely pests, but as important contributors to our own livelihoods.

Richard Walton Twenty Twenty Biology Letters University College London Depa
Scientists warn of potential wave of COVID-linked brain damage

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Scientists warn of potential wave of COVID-linked brain damage

"Of of a a potential potential wave wave of of Corona Corona virus virus late late related related brain brain damage damage as as new new evidence evidence suggested suggested Cove Cove in in 19 19 can can lead lead to to severe severe neurological neurological complications, complications, including including inflammation, inflammation, psychosis psychosis and delirium. Researchers at University College, London described 43 cases of patients with Koven, 19 who suffered either temporary brain dysfunction, strokes, nerve damage or other serious brain effects. Covert 19 is largely a respiratory illness, but neuroscientists and brain specialists say emerging evidence of its impact on the brains. Eyes very concerning. After

Inflammation Cove Cove University College Koven London
"university college london" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"university college london" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"To make for collision repair backed by our best price guaranteed better get make up turn to NJ one one five dot com for more on jerseys coronavirus crisis how soon to a spike in humidity chief meteorologist Dan Serra's complete forecasts coming up your Jersey fast traffic in one minute here is the radio thank you for being the voice of reason New Jersey won a one point five there are times when our need to connect really matters Comcast business is prepared for these times powered by the nation's largest expedient work tools to do business from anywhere an expert here twenty four seven when every connection counts you can count on us learn more at Comcast business dot com forward slash response the pandemic you're probably washing your hands more but if you need reminders Samsung has a new head watch app for phones and watches research from University College London suggests washing your hands six to ten times a day floss after going to the bathroom and before eating you could set alarm to regular intervals and when you're at the sink we'll give you a twenty second timer all in love with Delaware crossing in low pack on New Jersey this well maintained community is perfect for active adults fifty five and older who are looking for an affordable home with a maintenance free lifestyle killer crossing offers renovated homes with first floor master suites and upstairs guest quarters two car garage on site pool gym and more just minutes from shopping and major highways call sue living stone for reader realty at nine seven three seven two two three oh three eight that's nine seven three eight seven two two three oh.

Dan Serra New Jersey Samsung University College London Delaware chief meteorologist Comcast
Computer Aided Biology Platform Helps Companies Meet the Challenges of 21st Century Biomanufacturing

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Computer Aided Biology Platform Helps Companies Meet the Challenges of 21st Century Biomanufacturing

"Marcus co-founded synthase after working as a research associate in synthetic biology at University College London where he developed novel Bio Synthesis Methods using pathway engineering prior to ucla, he was a bio transformation scientists working as part of an industrial biotechnology group that conducted more than ninety contract research projects for over twenty clients. Marcus has a PhD in plant biochemistry from Durham. I'd like to start by asking if you could tell us a bit about the concept of bioprocessing four point zero, and what it means to the industry. By purchasing full. Has Come from a cut derived from the attempts of industry full point. And will that's referring to. Is the Barracks Industrial Revolution which happen which is made human production Gamal as sophisticated, inefficient through the ages first industrial revolution, we just quoting a Siamese what steams to be used as a power source, replacing manual effort, the chemical energy. Dramatic increases the productivity as possible. Within Industry and then moving onto electrification, innovation production lines any more efficient ways of producing products an visit us. Industrialization around Automation Electronic Control that. So they find the content industry full point. As is often referred to in thinking. Okay. How can we connect all of the different devices of pieces of information that we might have particular setting? Connect those in to to the digital. Computing where you can have data storage across crossing and data analysis, so then debates this. Use of automated production is that one level higher allows the three sophisticated knowledge in control of what's going on, we take. This is particularly important for area such as processing. Biological Because of the complexity of what we daily with, so we really need to be able to get to grips with the complexity of the processes. Running on wore the day to this coming out with those and get into Rica era format such we can use asked me as we progress. That's really interesting. You explain. The Solutions synthase provides in this area. said they didn't start out as companies as we all now, so these days we provide software ted help people do their science recently made this offering the first late is because we processing. Those looking for ways of doing more sophisticated automated experiments in order to address the next is the will to do so the cool capability software. Anthony is the older generation. ultimated instructions abolish Christ calls. While is means is the scientists can rapidly specify They want to run. The works out all the details down to the every step of run protocal it can convert those detailed actions. The scripts that needed particular. These Commission and Toronto away from the intent. The scientist is given the software old way through old details that needed to actually run at intended experiment. Includes will to calculating the volumes concentrations, the reagents in the samples that needed shows the US to set those regions on on your. So then using that. Hey, go on the road. Will that wrong this? Project Hope with instructions. To generate. Amidst. Substantially more usable impactful at the moment there's a real issue It's highly flexible due to the complexities of programming and so out, there allows much more flexible, useful information. Law Context for more complex experimentation. So. Now's where we started. To do some really cool experiments that we re proud, generated number case studies which show the power of using automation in all science. But. It also has a really big beneficial effect when it comes to digital integration. If we think about all the different devices we have within the lab. Is the automation is? Also Dr and actually we have about electrical devices in particular, which is an associated with those. Two nations which actually produced the data, which is the whole point running experience in the first place. What we need is a way of structuring dates from all of these diverse diversities equipment.

Scientist Marcus Automation Electronic Control Barracks Industrial Revolution Durham Ucla United States Research Associate University College London Gamal Toronto Commission Anthony
"university college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"university college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Matt McGraw has more details long seen as fluttering pests that make holes in your clothes scientists now say we have badly misjudged the humble moth while bees are widely recognized for their role as pollinators we have overlooked the same job being done by moths during the hours of darkness the study published in the journal biology letters from the pollen often sticks to the mosques hairy body and is then transported to a wide range of plants and flowers during their night time travels not only are their distribution networks larger and more complex than daytime pollinators the most help pollinate species rarely visited by bees and butterflies the researchers from University College London are concerned because most numbers are still in serious decline due to pesticides and changes in land use the mosque's real problem is perception they say and the key to preserving their vital role isn't regulation but recognition rob now they're already back in South Korea Germany is on the way this weekend and England could be returning soon I'm talking about football leagues of course but not all are trying to defy the coronavirus and finish their seasons Cameroon has become the latest country to bring their domestic league to a premature conclusion crowning new champions in the process well let's speak not to the newsroom's Jonathan savage you tell us more about the decision that's been made in camera well Valerie football at all levels has been brought to a conclusion and Cameron for this season the decision was there will be winners but no losers in after another way champions but no relegation to the men's champions of P. W. D. the mater who at the time of the season was suspended we're a point clear at the top with a game in hand that's what made us first title under the first club from the angle formed part of Cameron to win the league for eleven years now with no relegation to sites will be promoted to the top tier for next season expanding that into twenty teams and in the women's league lose mean profits have been declared the champions there the decision to end the season is one that has been reached in many parts of Africa Angola Burkina fossil Congo DRC Kenya Mauritius needs year they've all abandoned their campaigns also cross continental competitions have been postponed the confederation of African football's champions league and confederation Cup are all indefinitely suspended what does that mean going forward doing how has this outbreak affected clubs and indeed individuals across African football well there's a huge financial black hole to be filled most leagues are not rich the players aren't rich I'm with the income from gate receipts and sponsors football just can't function for example the average monthly salary in the Kenyan premier league is two hundred dollars that will get top top with win bonuses appearance fees and money which really with that matches just isn't going to be there so players across the continent seen their livelihoods evaporate there is some help on offer FIFA has announced an emergency relief fund for associations which many African countries have taken advantage of some prize money being released early and go back to Cameroon the body there fica food last month announced plans to financially support clubs in more than a thousand players and coaches but that's just eighty eight thousand dollars to be spent across the men and women's game and while Africa has it had the same level of I agree to some other parts of the world sport on the continent is crippled by the court of virus and it's not coming back soon just yesterday in the words of the football football for governing body in Africa and that guy said football must wait Jonathan savage that and Tom has some of the stories from our newsdesk Chile has requested a twenty three point eight billion dollar loan from the International Monetary Fund to help its deal with the impact of the corona virus anti government protests and a drop in commodity prices the IMF managing director Christine as you as you have said the request was likely to be approved and just a few hours New Zealand will loosen its lockdown meshes the changes will see retail cafe restaurants cinemas and gyms re open while headdresses and Babers will also unlock that tools at midnight local time cathedral junction bothers in Christ Church will open for people wanting a pre dawn heck I would at Conrad fitz Gerald has told radio New Zealand he's already received at least fifty calls from clients will be AutoCAD logs in a lot of the the table just aids or they want to get back in the side of the road but I got back to work on Thursday I don't know a lot of the first people starting with a year on Thursday I want to look good on Thursday celebrity to come in and if not I don't know what it is we're going to go back to what was your initial Michael Sargent com Michael Carroll or people just because I actually believed about longer I've gotten used to it and new research has found his dogs his struggle with their emotions during puberty in a similar way to humans British scientists say that's dogs go through emotional highs and lows as about eight months old during that adolescents and this could interfere with a dog's training and ability to bond with that sign up the researchers warn against punishing a dog for its teenage out fast as this could make the problem worse now New York is the place worst hit by the pandemic in the United States not just by the disease itself but also by the effect it's had on the busy lifestyle in the Big Apple cultural institutions like museums have close ties have favorite restaurants theaters and businesses some will never reopen Tom Brooke has been taking a tour to survey the damage times square the so called crossroads of the world pretty much deserted except for a street musician not too far away I clinic city structures like the Empire State Building still stand out on the streets there's uncertainty the drivers of the city's world famous yellow cabs and desperate most often and it has been driving a New York cafe eight years my best as I can tell you know it's a killer and then one other thing that I can tell you I know a lot of people the space yeah one of the person that I used to rent a taxi before I on this one that right now he had two hundred taxi and the garage nobody's working nobody's making any money the secular.

Matt McGraw
Understanding Neural Networks

Data Skeptic

06:54 min | 2 years ago

Understanding Neural Networks

"My name's Tim Willie Crap. I have affiliations with deep mind which is a part of Google and as well. Ucla University College London. Could you tell us a little bit about your career and how you got into machine learning and AI and topics? Like that. So I can around? When I was in undergraduate I took cognitive science course which I think was really the turning point for me. It got me interested in philosophy of the mind and figuring out how we think sometimes and I was in university Toronto when I was in Undergrad and was fortunate enough to take some neural networks courses from Jeff. Engine Bruce Sarah's a professor teaching undergraduate courses and that got me hooked on thinking about neural networks deep neural networks and from there I kind of went off and did neuroscience during my PhD post doc but of kind of slowly come back into. She learned philosophy of the mind doesn't show up on a lot of sort of traditional computer science curricula. How is it the to able to integrate that in also understand the more mathematical sides of these topics? Most of the everyday computer science we do is working with data structures trying to transform numbers and so on but on the other hand I would say that even fairly early on was some connection to this reflexively of mind. Kind of ideas. Touring famously proposed entering test very early on in their development of computer science theory and I think there has been sort of a bridging interest the whole time in part because so why is that I guess because we have this question all the time about what it means to think and in a certain sense computer science has sort of understood that is what does it mean to compute. And there's been a bridge built. I guess at each step along the way as we've gone into that all depending on how lazy I want to get as an interviewer the paper that I invited you on to talk about poses a series of questions. So I'll just do it once. Start with title. What does it mean to understand the neural network? Yes yeah that's right. The title is a bit funny. I mean there's actually probably a bunch of ways to interpret that title and I should say really commutes looks at the paper was aimed. Maybe most at risk kids audience. So it's really trying to speak to neuroscientists who are in the process of trying to understand the brains understand biological brains in particular and how they work and how they compute. It is a paper. Midi written from the perspective of where we find ourselves right now in machine learning deep network theory but then trying to take some of the recent results and ideas and reflecting back into neuroscience in terms of these two fields. I'm wondering if you can describe the relationship. I mean I do bump into people that kind of share both worlds but the ven diagram does not overlap as much as you'd think between machine learning and neuroscience what are some of maybe the successes are inhibitors that can help or hinder the ways in which these two fields can share information depending on who you talk to been massive amounts of transfer and. It's sort of an easy thing that happens all the time or almost no cross talk and I don't know if you like get too bothered about that. I think it's just a case by case basis where there might be transferred interesting ideas flowing one or the other. I think sitting in between them certainly where I've spent a good deal might time and thought but there's very successful practitioners who are just totally. Ignore the other thing that's going on. I guess maybe to connect this question back to the paper though. There's this huge. Recent set of successes in machine learning employing deep. Neural networks to solve all kinds of problems that we couldn't solve before and I do think that there's at least one particular story that's coming out of that progress which we to try and take seriously over on the neuroscience solid. That's what this paper is kind of about of the areas that the paper delves into notion of intermediate languages. Can you talk a little bit about what those are and why they're necessary and helping to understand neural network commitments from perspective of neuroscientists? I for a long time. People doing neuroscience have wanted to in some sense understand how the brain is computed and sometimes the functions of the brains computing are incredibly complex their complex enough that we really do not understand how computing they compute. And so. There's a sense in which you'd like to be able to describe that and how scientific language that we could talk to each other with debt. Let's say this is how this brain tissue is computing complex function. Made it a ground. All of discussion going forward. I'll pick a very particular one. One I think has almost become common currency which is categorizing on object in an image. So this is sort of the canonical example machine learning and you can imagine lots of animals to their answers this kind of computation and certainly humans do tons of this kind of computational time it's very sensible to ask people for ages you know how our brains performing that kind of a problem in could we have a language that would let us get a hold on that describe. What's going on as these computations vote that I think is really the thing that people have had in mind. The aim people have had in mind and I think that the recent results that have come out of the deep learning machine learning community cast a bit of light on this funny light on this. Which is that. Maybe that is not the best question to ask. Certainly. Maybe it's not the best kind of question to start asking right now. What is the best question to be asking right now? If we look at all the progress it's happened in deep learning. We have this picture where we can now build say large networks. That computer function like that quite easily. So in fact weaken specify learning algorithms and the network architectures in a couple of hundred lines of computer code. That will train network to perform that kind of a task quite easily. And we as human computer science practitioners to look at that code and pretty much have a good understanding of of each line of it. How a good idea how they string together in fold together and produce the outputs at the end produce a functional piece of in Silica Brain tissue and even though we can do all that we have almost I would say no true understanding of the computations that have been put into those networks after train. Now I want to distinguish from moment. What do I mean by understanding? I think understanding is this a very loaded philosophical word that gets his into all sorts of trouble just wanted to distinguish for a moment. I mean I think for these networks that we train these deep neural networks. Between our computer we have in some sense. Complete understand what those in that we can look parameters the weights in the network. We can look at how it sort of performs computations on inputs how it transformed the images from hidden layer to in there and then finally to the Oakland so we understand all of mathematical computations. That happened in between sort of totally white box way. But when we step back from that if someone asks you how does that network that this image is a draft or this particular images of an elephant we have? I think no good intermediate language we can sort of talk to other scientists about let us feel like we really tangibly understand the computations that have been put into that network.

Google AI Tim Willie Crap Ucla University College London Jeff Bruce Sarah Oakland Professor
"university college london" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"university college london" Discussed on 710 WOR

"We'll keep on north here's another study on crow as from researchers up in Ontario Canada should the journal of the American college of nutrition when I gave people cruel oil within the first week it was already reducing inflammation of the heart by the end of one month Kroll had lowered inflammation in the heart by a third within one month krill lowered inflammation of the heart by a third that makes cruel winter that makes real winner yeah krill does other things for the heart here is a review of seven Uman clinical trials from University College London medical school on university of Bologna I do university of Palermo in Italy I'm a one issue scroll wheel this call really do something it's a new journal nutrition reviews which is a journal I look at every month nutrition reviews is a great journal because things in there are either yes or no because they only have meta analysis in the nutrition reviews so in this report they looked at seven eligible trials now I told you a meta analysis group together a bunch of similar studies she would tell you if something either works or it doesn't work so here they took seven studies that we're looking at the same things would krill oil a significant reduction in LDL cholesterol lowered LDL bad cholesterol sixteen point at lower triglycerides fourteen points it raised HDL by seven points I mean that's unbelievable that's huge amount of benefit for reducing your risk of a stroke or heart attack now they didn't look at inflammation in this report but other studies look at inflammation so real is lowering and improving many dangerous things that cause strokes and heart attacks krill is lowering many things that lead to strokes and heart attacks if you have high cholesterol that can lead to a heart attack if you have inflammation on heart that can lead to a heart attack if you have elevated triglycerides that can lead to a heart attack if you have low HDL that can lead to heart attack because HDL is like a vacuum cleaner that sucks cholesterol the walls of the arteries and your heart crucifixes all of those hello just every if you could just every one of those a bit that strongly reduces your future risk of a stroke or heart attack or developing coronary heart disease the biggest killer on the planet.

Ontario Canada Kroll krill Italy journal of the American colleg University College London university of Bologna university of Palermo
"university college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:43 min | 2 years ago

"university college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Modified and improved an existing design in less than a week fester Rebecca Shipley is head of the team at University College London which spearheaded the project that has some some advantages for patients here aren't quite as extremely sick as needing an invasive ventilation islands in in it it's in the data and are telling colleagues that we be speaking Tate have indications that around fifty to sixty percent of patients that received the C. devices don't progress to mechanical ventilation we already have a hundred Mercedes which we're currently testing in office patient trial Sadie's can make a thousand a day within a week and it's a Tesco while they can be in the NHS by the end of this week these are devices that are already used extensively in the US and in Europe and Asia and in the U. K. so that you know they're not they're not a new way of treating patients with them spiritually fila what we're trying to do is purity skate up the provision of them Rebecca Shipley you're listening to the news from here on the BBC world service and finding has the headlines the sock in Spain one of the country's worst affected by the corona virus pandemic new restrictions have come into force Japan has reported a surge in confirmed cases with concerns about the lack of tests so far and president trump has pushed back his estimates of when the United States is likely to begin easing its coronavirus locked on as the corona virus sweeps across the world China the country with the disease in marriage in December is moving back to normality firms that are being urged to resume activity as the pandemic gradually abates large sums of money are also being promised to revive the economy is even worse the city which first experience deaths from coronavirus tries to get back on its feet let's go to our correspondent in Beijing Stephen McDonell so is life really getting back to normal there than Steve still a long way from normal but every day there are little bits of more normality returning if I could put it to that way I mean I'll give an example just the sort of corner shop near the B. B. C. bureau here at at did have that the car park cordoned off with these restaurants where you can get in there well that that is come down now you can into that area the shop itself so the work is from there sort of scraping off these warning signs the head on the glass outside so it's saying that's not as important as it was to have that it doesn't mean that you know you can't wolf still for example if you go into any cafe in the shopping center what have you you still have to have your temperature checked you still have to put your name down put your phone number down showing that you haven't been outside of Beijing for the last two weeks otherwise just festering quarantine things like that so it's just a a slow return to normal if you like but we're not there yet but they are concentrating on the on reducing the economy which to countryman does hit yeah we can slowly but surely things are booting up again I mean you just have to look around the CBD you can see that the towers they add don't have all the lights turned on in those offices partly that's because they're not allowed to have more than half the stuff in there so you know on the one hand the government is saying come on we want to get joining moving again and on the other there are these restrictions on help moving you can be and often this varies from sort of building to building as well you know you still have to sit in an office a couple of mates is from another staff member as I say there are strict insulin number stop you can have in there that would be the same in in factories and even moving around the country that you can't come into Beijing without doing the two weeks quarantine so you know there there are a lot of things still to what how can I put it things have to be clicked back in for business to be anything like a normal box you know you like I say every day a few more shops are open we can see that there there is sort of more people on the streets it's it's a long process but they don't want to rush I guess and you can understand why because TV is that could be another explosion infections here Steve McDonald in Beijing in China well president Muhammadu Buhari of Nigeria has addressed the country for the first time since the outbreak of a covert nineteen there Nigeria has more than a hundred confirmed cases of the disease president Buhari or outlined a raft of measures including the locked under the country's capital Abuja and its financial hub lake also and of open state a correspondent in West Africa is changing this is a matter of life and death that's what president Muhammadu Buhari said in his televised address to the nation legal's Abuja Ogun states have the most cases of covert nineteen the twins stop that spread the president announced they will undergo a TV clocked down starting from Monday at eleven PM you little citizens to stay at home and businesses to close he said officials would use the time to trace those who come into contact with positive cases Buhari added that the government will clamping down on into city and interstate travel he says his government remains committed to do whatever it takes to fight the virus but there's been growing criticism in Nigeria the president's failure to make a public address on coronavirus today's speech is a response to speculation about his health after his chief of staff tested positive the president himself tested negative G. G. isn't it so far France has confirmed more than two thousand deaths from the corona virus but the official figures don't include the number of deaths in care homes even though local authorities say a third of retirement homes in the Paris region have been affected the country is not launching an app to come cases inside care homes which could make the official numbers spiral as a result our correspondent Lucy Williamson visited some of the homes affected in Paris deliveries like this one point two hidden crisis in France wooden coffins still wrapped in the factory plastic wheeled quickly up to the sealed gates of the Rothschilds Calhoun Paris the deaths that have happened here during the corona virus epidemic officially invisible but you can count the coffins that arrive the most child care homes lost sixteen residents of the virus another eighty or infected the delivery men here told one waiting journalists it was nonstop Alexander Sunday works as a G. P. for another care home involution the east of France where at least twenty people have died recycle them because there was a cluster of about fifty people with fever for five days followed by symptoms of severe pneumonia so we had to use oxygen at the height of the epidemic he there must have been twenty five or thirty patients on oxygen at the beginning of March president macron visited the care home to talk about protection he was filmed sitting at a table surrounded by elderly residents who face mosque then no social distancing a few days later visits to France's retirement homes with bands and last week the government said all residents should be individually isolated in their rooms at that on the night that you would concede that the easy and now the biggest risk to residents we talked to one nurse who wanted to be known just as Carol she said that some homes were keeping mosques in reserve for a corona virus outbreak a note giving them to stuff and with many workers offset growing isolation themselves she says the spread of this virus is very hard to control in normal protocol one of yours as soon as the current value centers a care home it's all over there is nothing we can do since we don't have enough staff to be dramatic once a very centers there would be a huge number of that idea of art is not minimum basin units in the Paris region is now critically low and there are shortages of some drugs the health minister has said France will begin mass testing of its population and is ordered a.

Rebecca Shipley University College London
Why Do Books Smell So Good?

BrainStuff

03:16 min | 2 years ago

Why Do Books Smell So Good?

"The brain stuff a production of iheartradio brain stuff. Lauren bomb here. If you're like me you love the smell of all fashioned analog paper books old books new books and researchers at University College. London suggested that these scents aren't just nice. They're an important part of the human experience. In an extensive study of smells heritage and Historic Paper published in the Journal Heritage Science. The authors argue the importance of documenting and preserving smells but why three researchers realized that visitors. Saint Paul's Cathedral Dean and Chapter Library in London frequently comment on the aroma of the space. Saying they feel like they can smell history thanks to our limbic system odors can make us pretty emotional especially when they evoke memories sense how we experience different cultures and places and help us gain more insight into end engage more deeply with the past the researchers posit that smells are part of our cultural heritage and have historical value and deserve to be identified analyzed and archived using chemical analysis and sensory descriptions the study authors set about figuring out a way for scientists and historians to do so in one experiment the researchers asked visitors at the historic library to characterize the odors spelled. More than seventy percent of respondents considered the library smell as pleasant all visitors. Thought it smelled woody. While eighty six percent noticed a smoky Roma seventy one percent reported an earthy scent and forty-one percent said they smelled vanilla other less frequent responses ranged from musty too pungent and floral to rancid in another experiment. The study authors analyzed the responses of seventy-nine visitors to the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery. Uk to these smell of a historic book from a second hand bookstore to capture the book. Smell a piece of sterile. Ause was soaked in five milliliters of an extract of the book odor and placed in an unlabeled metal canister screwed shut to prevent visitors from peaking the top three response when the visitors were prompted to describe the smell chocolate coffee and old. The team then analyzed the volatile organic compounds in the book and the Library. Most odors are composed of these. Voc's which are chemicals that evaporate at low temperatures VOC's are often associated with certain smell types for example acidic acid smell sour ISO Acetate smells like bananas. Using the data from the chemical analysis and visitors smell descriptions. The researchers created the historic book odor wheel to document and archive the historic library smell. Main categories such as sweet or spicy. Fill the inner circle of the wheel descriptors such as Caramel or biscuits fill the middle and chemical compounds likely to be these smelly source like ferral. Fill the outer circle. The researchers want the book odor wheel to be an interdisciplinary tool that untrained. Noses can use to identify smells and the compounds causing them which could address conservatives concerns about material composition and degradation informed artifact paper conservation decisions and benefit Olfactory Museum experiences.

London VOC Historic Paper Journal Heritage Science Birmingham Museum And Art Gall Lauren Chapter Library University College Saint Paul Olfactory Museum UK Ause
"university college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"university college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"University college London and an author of the new study published in the lancet psychiatry he says scientists track the kids steely physical activity using wearable devices called accelerometer as these a little tiny devices worn on the body and they record bodily movements is the same device that you might find in your mobile phone or if it bit and the track how much time someone spends being physically active each day condolences colleagues analyze this data from when the children were twelve fourteen and sixteen years old and they found that has these kids went through adolescence they spent more time sitting there daily amount of time that was spent said entry increase from around the seven hours ten minutes to about eight hours and forty minutes this extra hour and a half of sitting around condolence says was linked to a higher risk of having symptoms of depression later in life the every hour increase in seven three time day was associated with the round and eight to eleven percent increase in depression school at age eighteen but the good news here he says is that increasing the amount of time spent doing physical activity even an hour each day cuts the risk of depression by ten percent to our increase cut the risk by twenty percent now this doesn't have to involve going to the gym or playing sports just moving around more doing everyday things like walking at school or at home running errands or even standing and talking to someone can make a difference psychologist Carmel Choi is a research fellow at Harvard University this is encouraging because light activity is low hanging fruit it's doable it takes less effort it's that easy alternatives and so it's more likely that young people can follow through on it Choi who wasn't involved in the new study says since kids spend most of their days at school schools can help ensure that teenagers move around more by doing simple things like have stretching breaks hold standing classes or even being intentional about how classes are scheduled say at different ends of the hallways and there are things parents can do to getting teens engaged in house chores like washing the dishes are putting away the laundry maybe setting up a standing desk for the computer for doing homework symptoms of depression often appear faster ng adolescence so choice as preventing depression in this critical period could have a lasting impact on people's mental.

University college London Carmel Choi research fellow Harvard University
"university college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"university college london" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"University college London and an author of the new study published in the lancet psychiatry he says scientists track the kids steely physical activity using wearable devices called accelerometer as these a little tiny devices worn on the body and they record bodily movements is the same device that you might find in your mobile phone or if it bit and they track how much time someone spends being physically active each day condolences colleagues analyze this data from when the children with twelve fourteen and sixteen years old and they found that has these kids went through adolescence they spent more time sitting that daily amount of time that was spent said entry increase from around the seven hours ten minutes to about eight hours and forty minutes this extra hour and a half of sitting around condolence as was linked to a higher risk of having symptoms of depression later in life the every hour increase instead entry time day was associated with the round and eight to eleven percent increase in depression school at age eighteen but the good news here he says is that increasing the amount of time spent doing physical activity even an hour each day cuts the risk of depression by ten percent to our increase cut the risk by twenty percent now this doesn't have to involve going to the gym or playing sports just moving around more doing everyday things like walking at school or at home running errands or even standing and talking to someone can make a difference psychologist Carmel Choi is a research fellow at Harvard University this is encouraging because light activity is low hanging fruit it's doable it takes less effort it's an easy alternative and so it's more likely that young people can follow through on it Choi who wasn't involved in the new study says since kids spend most of their days at school schools can help ensure that teenagers move around more by doing simple things like have stretching breaks hold standing glasses or even being intentional about how classes are scheduled say at different ends of the hallways and there are things parents can do to getting teens engaged in house chores like washing the dishes are putting away the laundry maybe setting up a standing desk for the computer for doing homework symptoms of depression often appear faster in adolescence so choice as preventing depression in this critical period could have a lasting impact on people's mental.

University college London Carmel Choi research fellow Harvard University
Lungs 'magically' heal damage from smoking

BBC World Service

01:34 min | 2 years ago

Lungs 'magically' heal damage from smoking

"The thousands of chemicals in tobacco smoke corrupt and you take the DNA in your lungs they transform them from healthy to cancerous and was long for the best genetic damage was permanent but now study by University College London and the science institute choose the lungs can recover they performed a detailed genetic analysis of lung tissue from people who did not have cancer in smokers the overwhelming majority of cells have been mutated by tobacco smoke those cells have been altered up to ten thousand times but a small proportion of cells seem to exist in what the research is described as a nuclear bunker and escape the genetic devastation caused by smoking when you quit it's the cells that spread and he will belongs in people who quits up to forty percent of cells look just like those from people who never smoked Dr Peter Campbell from the song institute said it was a massive surprise we were totally unprepared for the findings that perhaps there are cells that can regeneration replenishing the normally aways one of the remarkable things about this study was that we found patients who have quit smoking even after forty years of cigarette smoking had regeneration of cells that with totally unscathed by the exposure to tobacco this doesn't mean quitting eliminates all the risk of lung cancer but cancer research UK said it was a double win for patients the lungs repair past damage I'm by no longer smoking they avoid further mutations health and science correspondent James

University College London Dr Peter Campbell Song Institute UK
"university college london" Discussed on AP News

AP News

10:03 min | 2 years ago

"university college london" Discussed on AP News

"Rose status sets you apart it gives you a special social role in our society Bob Morris at University College London says being a member of the royal family is very different from your celebrity it's very difficult for you to put the hat on and take it off no you cannot be harmful and Harry and Meghan stated desire to not be reliant on public funds it's a tricky one given their inescapable oil connection so far the understanding his be that they cannot be use for a commercial activities questions about taxes who pays for security and other details of their new roles remain unresolved I'm Ben Thomas

Bob Morris University College London Harry Meghan Ben Thomas
"university college london" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"university college london" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Cut the risk by thirty one percent the results of this long study over a twelve year period of time seven thousand adults University College London the research adds to the evidence that engaging in art whether playing you know of any instrument or admiring paintings can benefit your health who would have ever thought there was a connection between visiting a museum or an art gallery or watching a a a a play in the theater would increase your longevity decrease your risk of death over the next twelve months I mean this is a pretty remarkable thing and I think it really gets down to just enjoying life in reducing stress and having something to look forward to in learning and socializing how you think about how simple impassive this year's yeah you should do all the other good things we know to do that we talk about on this radio show on a regular basis get that exercise sleep well eat well think well take those nutritional supplements but also how about a little culture how about some theater visiting the the museum how about a play once in awhile get out and enjoy life that's what this is really speaking to it all about instead of being a hermit and we'll just sitting in front of boob tube all.

adults University College Lond
"university college london" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"university college london" Discussed on WJR 760

"In that capacity for twenty five years there's something to learn when you hear a child hiccup hiccups may help babies regulate their breathing and a study led by university College London researchers monitored thirteen newborns they found pick up being triggered a large wave of brain signals which could aid in the child's development a senior researcher on the study suggested that brain activity might help babies learn how to monitor breathing muscles leading to an ability to control breathing voluntarily pick of being is seen as early as nine weeks into pregnancy and babies born at least three weeks premature hick up for about fifteen minutes each day newborns involved in the study had electrodes placed on their scalps and sensors on their torsos to monitor for hick ups researchers found contractions in the baby's diaphragms produced three brain waves they believe the third brainwave allow baby laying down the hook up the physical contraction they feel for today's health minute I made the Gaither W. J. R. news time seven oh five let's head out to the road I two seventy five north bound at an Arbor road an accident on the right shoulder and fourteen east founded I two seventy five an accident blocking the right shoulder Garfield road closed at both directions north of fifteen mile road vehicle hit a utility pole emergency crews on the scene avoid the area I'm Peggy hides W. J. R. traffic and weather first southwest winds and warmer air coming up from the Pacific into our Thursday forecast your Detroit was some rain showers.

senior researcher Pacific Detroit university College London W. J. R. W. J. twenty five years fifteen minutes three weeks nine weeks