2 Burst results for "University College Ibadan"

"university college ibadan" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

08:00 min | 4 months ago

"university college ibadan" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"See I really enjoyed. Crazy story there's. Stuff. I. I don't know I feel like I would enjoy in Judaism like I find the New Testament to be very like you get the stories of Jesus Great. And then the rest of the news of is just people explaining what happened in the story of Jesus to other people. On the very boring. whereas. The oldest event. Happens and it's like a whole history of people. There's like. Kings and Queens and like people are murdered and overthrown, and like battles and finding old scrolls rebel. There's some really wild stuff that happens when in my favorites and believe it's he hud, but he's I in the. Maybe like judges or something like that? It's raining Abou-, but he. and. He's left handed and the little left-hander. Growing up going to church. Yes. Greasier. crazier than me. I was able to. Assassinate, some evil king because he loves. Because, he was so fat that what happened. In the story. Had goes to how he's invited. Keep with the king whatever. I don't understand what reasoning. But he. Stabbed him so deep that the knife the handle of the nights lives lost in his fat and he's leaving. He's I don't remember. He said something or the. Guards whenever. He's. Taken. He. He needs some time by himself. Checks on him I'm dead. All their Sony details the. Why do we need these personal lactated? Cool? That makes me happy. For? Generations and generations of people transcribing the Old Testament. Yes E had the left-handed. What is that? Anyway. Welcome to the club would Yulia and Victoria we're to friends and remains. Who read a book and talk about it each episode this week. We are talking about things. Fall apart by Tsinghua. Achieve in this episode. We're going to talk about the whole book including spoilers. What happens in the ending so Y-? That really irks you Hilas. Go read the book. Come back. We'll be here in. Can we talk about with you? So for those you've already read or are ready to be spoiled by the ending. Welcome to the party. Welcome disclaimer, never really studied much African literature. Yes, so when Julia. That she was reading. Things. Fall apart is like Oh this is like a classic book and I was like Oh. Interesting I haven't heard of it, but I also haven't heard of a lot of books and reading the intro and the talking about how it's sold like millions of copies I found two different numbers online that a very different ones had more than ten million more than twenty million. We're can say. A lot of copies were sold multiple millions in like forty five plus languages and I'm like. Okay now. Yes, this is a personal fault that I have not learned about this book before and also. Kind of an indictment on my entire education. Yeah, but it made it three would bachelor's degree in English was never required to read. I don't think any novels by African. Authors, which has entire continent of authors, many of whom right in English, so yeah, we had. One. We are a couple of classes that are specifically on African Literature and we also the head of our. Comparative. Literature Department was a very famous African author and playwright, so it was a little more INC like I had the option, but it didn't fit into my schedule like the class. I. If I hadn't have studied abroad, Lunden I, probably would've taken at my junior year, but it wasn't available my senior year, so I took like an agent American literature class instead. So he was there. Buddy like wasn't a requirement in high school or College. which I feel is very surprising. I should say probably were classes that my school. Yeah, but the fact that Amar fired is yeah. I find matic in that I took classes like modern contemporary literature written all the books on the syllabus. British American authors We dislike excluded the rest of the world. In, that one yeah, which is pretty wild, considering how global the modern world is yeah. So. We thought we would did you? Favor. By. That being said if you studied this book in depth or other Nigerian literature and things about the culture there, we would love to hear your thoughts so like send us common stems. We have a former website. That's always open for your thoughts not. Book Yet star. You know we had once emission. Oh, they're asking us to read the book, but you know. It was nice that they found our form. There with us. We're learning. Inch this this long way to go yeah! Yeah so a little bit more about to. He was born in Nineteen thirty in Olga de in a bow village in the land. That is now Nigeria. His father became a Christian in works for a missionary teacher for some time, and his family lived in various villages in Niger Nigeria. He excelled in school, and he won a scholarship as kind of like the first cohort of students to Attend University College Ibadan. which at the time was one of many colleges associated with University of London. Now. It's after his time attending there later. It was its own independent university by the time it was. Run by universally meaning that his English loader program was primarily taught by were exclusively caught by European professors, so he was studying. Shakespeare Milton and Wordsworth, and like all these classics. And this is kind of like a turning point in this education. He wrote about this and other essays interviews about how when he was reading this. You're growing up. He identified with the White Protagonists It wasn't until these moments in college that he was really like. Wait a second. English writers are. Like Taking hold of the narrative of my country and my people and This is what spurred him to go and write. Literature is often. He was part of a movement of emerging generation of West African writers in the nineteen fifties that we're looking to reclaim African narrative from Western literature. So after college. He went worked for the Nigerian broadcast. Service not gave him opportunities to visit. London says for him out of the country of the continent. For Training there and that also leads down the line to some connections for his first. I books republished. which was things fall apart. Things apart was his first novel. He published it in nineteen. Fifty eight at the twenty eight again another like amazing young author. said it's now required reading for many students on world, selling millions of copies multiple languages.

Nigeria African Literature Literature Department Queens Sony Yulia Hilas Julia Lunden Attend University College Ibad London Amar Niger University of London Shakespeare Milton Wordsworth
"university college ibadan" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"university college ibadan" Discussed on What It Takes

"Of absolute equality especially children my parents says I used to say to collect waifs and strays so we had a lodge from it I mean some of them were relations for than we were the before they the parents would come and virtually donate the China Sea look Help me get this child you know all this child has given me talk trouble he was shown the goes some discipline here or maybe their parents were going away somewhere maybe the worked with the railway because because who were in the civil service certain departments of the Civil Service you will let it be transferred anywhere anytime you're teaching also in some with missionary school should be transferred those sort of physical geographical mobility among many employees in it at the time when traders also people working for private commercial companies could get Santa For instance Waco call at guard he worked for cocoa-exporting from could be sent to the interior for some time and some of these parents who bring their children to us so the the population or by a household was constantly shifting and they came from different strata of society and so we were taught the not so much directly but through the attitude that allow parents to all children that's there was no privilege everybody was a child and if you misbehave got this much punishment as the other children so if anything uh we were treated more harshly than the other children because we were supposed to better into show an example in essence he says his one claim to status this the son of the headmaster worked to his detriment but there was one big advantage his home had books and when he was just a toddler he started to figure out how to pick out the words and I had a sister who was only two to a year and two months here in three months three months older than I was when she began school she it made my life miserable because she put on her school uniform home and sort of looked at me with a kind of condescension so I'm I'm going to school you have to stay behind eat was infuriated and so on Day and then of course we live in a parsonage and a which meant that there were some schools missionary schools decision who's playgrounds abutted the long in front of our house so I would watch these cookies also coming out in their during their break to play and then I could see also through the school run through the school run windows or performers these pupils bent over their books their papers I mean it was it was like a conspiracy so one day I'd had enough and I followed my sister to school picked up books from my products desk for me it was the most natural thing going to school you have to have books so I picked up my father's which I couldn't read and the next thing I knew was I was behind her screamed at me what are you doing here what go back now so schoolteacher came out to see what the forecast was all about and he looked old enough to come to school I said Oh I'm ready. And just indulge decided to indulge me filter would get fed up with it after the first day but no so I actually began school a two and a half years later when his aunt I ant and his mother began to organize women to resist onerous taxes on the goods they were trading show Yinka was recruited to teach the women how to read and write but it was when he entered the University College Ibadan that he really got his feet wet challenging the establishment in a theatrical way he and a circle of six friends formed an organization at university this was in nineteen fifty two that they called the the pirates confraternity to ridicule the privilege and posturing of their fellow students many of them were children rich people you know what we call the children of colonial aristocrats and they brought that mentality of colonial aristocracy in to collect certain uh totally divorced consider themselves divorced from the rest of the community a sense of responsibility with which I grew up it was just not there and so they have these clubs and other clubs Social Club for instance all mimicking British considered British culture always dressed up in ties jackets and so on the college atmosphere was uh-huh model than Cambridge and so on you went to dinner hi Dina high t to wear robes to go to dinner I hit it all that stuff. I didn't mind the occasional ceremonial ceremonial but to mimic British managers and so on to some ridiculous and so we started is was a rebellion against this stayed British formalism we started the pirates confraternity and one of its a the motto was against Moribund Conventional and and we used to dress his we don't rough-and-ready pirates we have to seal concord on top of a flat surface of the bookshop our climb up bookshop and within knock up the a Lotta unseal into the horizon is all typical student fund the pirates confraternity grew and eventually spread to other campuses but Wola showy Inca didn't stay the group's leader for long because partway through his studies at University College Ibadan it dawned on him exactly what he wanted on a to study and that required him to move to England I hated my fanatics had no time for physics chemistry will manage to struggle through through it was a struggle in school once that was done I threw my books you're all my mathematics books to the window concentrated on literature feature wanted to write he was able to carry his scholarship with him to the University of Leeds where he completed his degree with a major in English literature then he started a doctoral degree but the real world of literature won out over the academic to play to their theater in London Josh and I it was not immediately accepted for performance but sufficient interest was generated for the Director Arctic director to invite me over and so I spent most of my time or to rehearsals reading plays in London instead of doom line thesis in in elites so I consider myself a doctoral dropout and why place article theater the most socialized socialized form of literary expression simply because it involves different all the time there's a dynamic which exists into theater which you do not find reading or reading a different different sensibilities completely reading a novel is almost send individual exercise poetry even more personal mall intimate theatre two is where the community expresses itself most directly home of Shankar's first place that he wrote in London when he was still villainous early twenties were the swamp dwellers and the lion and the jaw both were set in Nigeria both incorporated music and dancing thing in the kind of folklore he grew up on and both touched on themes that have been part of his work ever since power and hypocrisy oh so I was trying to recapture certain sense of community which had known in Syria and the transition between traditional national society the concept of western quote unquote civilization and trying to see the weaknesses in things not quite as was not nestle progression on this just expressions uh-huh all of my own observations of society the line and the Joe was performed in Nigeria in nineteen fifty nine the play has two main characters characters one is a pompous young schoolteacher within affinity for Western ideas the other is chief who believes only in tribal wisdom system the play is extensively about a fight over the village beauty but written on the cusp of Nigeria's independence it questions what progress Chris should look like exactly in Africa during his early years is a playwright in London will lay show Inca told the academy of achievement delegations Gatien's of Nigerian nationalists would come over to discuss the terms of independence with the British Home Office the process of decolonization patient formerly began in nineteen sixty but the process show Yankus says had serious flaws and in the end before the British left they a managed to install Nigerians that they knew would best protect their intrests because Galanga has never really want to leave anywhere leave only because they find find the other compelled to buy war embarrassed militant action or because the they're they're clever enough to realize the camel maintain continuing neocolonial linkage with their possessions by granting independence but they keep the contact and they do that living there surrogate behind that's what the British did pick on the list progressive part of the country falsified sensors falsified elections to make sure that when he left the Hanadova Pau to them we'll is she says he knew things would quickly go south in the new Nigeria just from watching from his perch in London the delegations nations that arrived for the negotiations and I couldn't help observing that Be Yes they were committed nationalist but at the same time see I always had probably because of my background elitism and privilege subjects which twitter respond confrontationally immediately because I and I I really ingrained in me this egalitarian principle and the sense of service and I saw the first commas as been very almost.