11 Burst results for "United South Africa"

"united south africa" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

08:16 min | 3 months ago

"united south africa" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"If i butchered that pronunciation too terribly you have my full permission to absolutely destroyed me in the online forums. But no that i try. Okay give me my credit i tried. But nelson's father was a chief who provided guidance to the tribal leadership and his mother was a stay at home mom who helped to raise the children and maintain the household so nelson had a large family with more than ten siblings who all lived relatively close by. Nelson's father held a position of respect within the tribe which afforded their family wealth instability within the village unfortunately after a disagreement with a tribal official nelson's father was stripped of his position and the family suffered major financial losses. They were forced to flee to a village which allowed them anonymity and the opportunity to start over. The village was located in the rural grasslands. Much more remote in agriculturally focused nelson learned to adapt to living a country lifestyle spending most of his time outdoors playing with the other boys in his village. Another really cool. Tidbit is that nelson was the first of his family to receive formal schooling. Now i don't know if you guys noticed in my previous episodes. I always clarify by saying formal schooling to essentially differentiate between other methods of learning. I'm a firm believer that there are other avenues for gaining knowledge. Other than going to an institution so it's important to acknowledge those as well but it was at this early juncture in. Nelson's life that he would. I be exposed to the consequences of colonialism in his country. When the south african children would attend school they would often be given christian names to replace their birth names. This is where holy law i became nelson as the name was given to him by his teacher. In one thousand nine hundred thirty after his father passed away. Unexpectedly nelson was adopted by an old family. Friend this family friend was a chief and nelson was again. Returned to the more refined lifestyle. He'd become accustomed to as the son of a tribal counselor. Nelson was able to reap the benefits of having access and status continuing his schooling along with the chiefs. Other two children. The children learned about many subjects but nelson was naturally curious about african history. Nelson was also exposed to different cultures and tribes. While he was living with his adopted family. The tribesmen would educate nelson on their history. And how they were. Once they connected people before the perils of colonialism when nelson was in his teen years he participated in a traditional male rite of passage with other boys in his village during the ceremony. Nelson was disheartened by speech. Given by one of the chiefs native south africans had been suffering tremendously at the hands of colonialism and the chiefs spoke on just how bad the circumstances were for the men. It was at this event that nelson fully committed to the goal of uniting south africa while living with his adopted family nelson was trained in the same position as his father preparing to act as an advisor to the tribal leadership after coming of age nelson attended college at the university of fort. Hare a prestigious university that was known for accepting only the greatest of mines while not university nelson engaged in his first act of political resistance by aligning with a student body who demanded change while serving on the student council. He was ultimately kicked out of school due to his actions in sent back home. When the chief heard about nelson's actions in expulsion from school he moved quickly to demand nelson return to school and adhered to a plan for an upcoming arranged marriage. After hearing the chiefs plans for his future nelson ran away from home to the city of johannesburg in order to strike out on his own. While in johannesburg he enrolled in law school and became a lawyer beginning a lengthy career in criminal justice now before we discussed the latter part of. Nelson's life. I wanted to give a formal definition of apartheid and this was taken from wikipedia. Apartheid was a system of institutionalized racial segregation that existed in south africa in south west africa from nineteen forty eight until the early nineteen nineties. It was at this point in. Nelson's life that his goal of fighting for the freedom of his fellow south africans became a reality around. Nineteen forty two nelson would join. An anti-apartheid group called the african national congress and along with other young and like minded individuals formed the african national congress lee youth league these groups work to create a movement that would inspire south africans to fight for their independence using modern strategies and more direct action as opposed to the usual peace talks that had been in progress so far nelson dedicated more than twenty years of his life to working on fighting. The south african government with violent means starting his own law firm with a friend from law. School this was the first black law firm in south africa in specifically worked on counseling and representing the native south african people during this time nelson was organizing nonviolent campaigns to gain the attention of the south african government bringing awareness to the plight of his neighbors and working to dismantle. The racist discrimination in place nelson wasn't just in the office coordinating change. He was also boots on the ground on the front lines. Pushing the agenda of freedom for all in response the government would employ intimidation tactics such as false arrest and imprisonment for any activists that were caught. Luckily nelson was initially able to escape imprisonment until the fateful day in one thousand nine hundred sixty one although he was arrested more than once by this time over the years nelson was able to establish himself in the anti apartheid community as a leader in a such was able to mobilise. His own group called m. k. The south african people had become disillusioned and lost faith in the government to fairly remove. The apartheid with the government always pushing back any attempts to peacefully move forward in the early nineteen sixties nelson helped to coordinate a massive national worker strike across the country in order to highlight the mistreatment of native south africans around nineteen sixty three nelson was captured in arrested for his role in the strike resulting in him being brought to trial not just once but twice nelson had to endure an unfair trial and was sentenced to life in prison. This would have been a devastating verdict for any person but they did not know. Nelson nelson was severely abused in actually contracted to burke ulysses while he was incarcerated incredibly. The south african government still considered nelson a threat and made attempts.

nelson Nelson chiefs university of fort south africa johannesburg african national congress lee south african government south west africa Hare african national congress wikipedia government Nelson nelson burke ulysses
"united south africa" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

08:07 min | 3 months ago

"united south africa" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Love. A unique name in this was a doozy. I so loved learning it. I just love people that have unique names. Nelson mandela was born. July eighteenth nineteen eighteen in a tiny village. In south africa. Nelson mandela's birth name was not nelson. It was holy la mandela. I thought this was pure perfection that holy claw roughly translates to someone who creates mischief or trouble. Like how cool is that. Your name literally means troublemaker. It's like hey trouble literally a holy law. I'm so jealous. Like i love that. I think that is so amazing. And if i butchered that pronunciation too terribly you have my full permission to absolutely destroyed me in the online forums. But no that i try. Okay give me my credit i tried. But nelson's father was a chief who provided guidance to the tribal leadership and his mother was a stay at home mom who helped to raise the children and maintain the household so nelson had a large family with more than ten siblings who all lived relatively close by. Nelson's father held a position of respect within the tribe which afforded their family wealth instability within the village unfortunately after a disagreement with a tribal official nelson's father was stripped of his position and the family suffered major financial losses. They were forced to flee to a village which allowed them anonymity and the opportunity to start over. The village was located in the rural grasslands. Much more remote in agriculturally focused nelson learned to adapt to living a country lifestyle spending most of his time outdoors playing with the other boys in his village. Another really cool. Tidbit is that nelson was the first of his family to receive formal schooling. Now i don't know if you guys noticed in my previous episodes. I always clarify by saying formal schooling to essentially differentiate between other methods of learning. I'm a firm believer that there are other avenues for gaining knowledge. Other than going to an institution so it's important to acknowledge those as well but it was at this early juncture in. Nelson's life that he would. I be exposed to the consequences of colonialism in his country. When the south african children would attend school they would often be given christian names to replace their birth names. This is where holy law i became nelson as the name was given to him by his teacher. In one thousand nine hundred thirty after his father passed away. Unexpectedly nelson was adopted by an old family. Friend this family friend was a chief and nelson was again. Returned to the more refined lifestyle. He'd become accustomed to as the son of a tribal counselor. Nelson was able to reap the benefits of having access and status continuing his schooling along with the chiefs. Other two children. The children learned about many subjects but nelson was naturally curious about african history. Nelson was also exposed to different cultures and tribes. While he was living with his adopted family. The tribesmen would educate nelson on their history. And how they were. Once they connected people before the perils of colonialism when nelson was in his teen years he participated in a traditional male rite of passage with other boys in his village during the ceremony. Nelson was disheartened by speech. Given by one of the chiefs native south africans had been suffering tremendously at the hands of colonialism and the chiefs spoke on just how bad the circumstances were for the men. It was at this event that nelson fully committed to the goal of uniting south africa while living with his adopted family nelson was trained in the same position as his father preparing to act as an advisor to the tribal leadership after coming of age nelson attended college at the university of fort. Hare a prestigious university that was known for accepting only the greatest of mines while not university nelson engaged in his first act of political resistance by aligning with a student body who demanded change while serving on the student council. He was ultimately kicked out of school due to his actions in sent back home. When the chief heard about nelson's actions in expulsion from school he moved quickly to demand nelson return to school and adhered to a plan for an upcoming arranged marriage. After hearing the chiefs plans for his future nelson ran away from home to the city of johannesburg in order to strike out on his own. While in johannesburg he enrolled in law school and became a lawyer beginning a lengthy career in criminal justice now before we discussed the latter part of. Nelson's life. I wanted to give a formal definition of apartheid and this was taken from wikipedia. Apartheid was a system of institutionalized racial segregation that existed in south africa in south west africa from nineteen forty eight until the early nineteen nineties. It was at this point in. Nelson's life that his goal of fighting for the freedom of his fellow south africans became a reality around. Nineteen forty two nelson would join. An anti-apartheid group called the african national congress and along with other young and like minded individuals formed the african national congress lee youth league these groups work to create a movement that would inspire south africans to fight for their independence using modern strategies and more direct action as opposed to the usual peace talks that had been in progress so far nelson dedicated more than twenty years of his life to working on fighting. The south african government with violent means starting his own law firm with a friend from law. School this was the first black law firm in south africa in specifically worked on counseling and representing the native south african people during this time nelson was organizing nonviolent campaigns to gain the attention of the south african government bringing awareness to the plight of his neighbors and working to dismantle. The racist discrimination in place nelson wasn't just in the office coordinating change. He was also boots on the ground on the front lines. Pushing the agenda of freedom for all in response the government would employ intimidation tactics such as false arrest and imprisonment for any activists that were caught. Luckily nelson was initially able to escape imprisonment until the fateful day in one thousand nine hundred sixty one although he was arrested more than once by this time over the years nelson was able to establish himself in the anti apartheid community as a leader in a such was able to mobilise. His own group called m. k. The south african people had become disillusioned and lost faith in the government to fairly remove. The apartheid with the government always pushing back any attempts to peacefully move forward.

nelson Nelson Nelson mandela la mandela chiefs south africa university of fort johannesburg african national congress lee Hare south west africa south african government african national congress wikipedia government
"united south africa" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:51 min | 4 months ago

"united south africa" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain. I'm shankar vadim. When nelson mandela became south africa's first black president in nineteen ninety four. He had big dreams for his bitterly divided country we enter into covenant that was billed society rain bonus at this and the world. He spent a lifetime fighting the racist apartheid regime including more than a quarter century in prison. He was a heroic figure already. By that time. But many white south africans. They saw him as a criminal terrorist. This is psychologist van. Able as president of the united south africa nelson mandela or madiba as he was known to his supporters needed to find a way for the people in his rainbow nation to see themselves as south africans. I other petitions might have turned to speeches and policies madiba turned to sports offside by he used the rugby world cup which was being hosted in south africa and dreamed apartheid-era south africa had been banned from competition and the south african team was known as the springboks and they were beloved by the white south africans and despised by the black population. But what mandela did was. He went out onto the podium. Not just as the president but as a fan he had the green springboks passengers and he used it as a way to make a statement that we're one team were one country. Now and he took a symbol of oppression and use it as a symbol of togetherness presidents to the captain. The springboks team captain francois. Tr remembers the moment. Madiba walked into the team's locker room before the finals against new zealand. He said Good luck boys and they turned off and my number was on his back in the day was i couldn't sing the anthem because i knew would cry. I was just so proud to be south africa. That the match was a nailbiter. It went into overtime. South africa ended up winning fifteen to twenty across the country. Black and white south africans cheer together in triumph paid off nelson. Intel is cheering. The whole of the stadium ceo flags nelson mandela. Knew that getting enemies to cheer for the same sports team was only a start much work. Remain to heal the wounds of apartheid but his intervention reveal how psychologically astute leader can find ways to create connections among people even bitter enemies this week hidden brain how group identities bring us together tariffs apart.

madiba south africa nelson mandela shankar vadim united south africa Madiba rugby mandela francois new zealand nelson Intel
"united south africa" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

02:45 min | 7 months ago

"united south africa" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"A situation where hardly population is unemployed and they are no real and the options about how to sustain people and to keep a socially healthy and productive society be. Finally we just have a minute. You've pointed out that. In fact one of the grievances driving grievances of these protests. The fact that life for most black south africans has remained more or less unchanged since the days of apartheid and that this has been compounded by policies of the anc government. Could you just talk about that briefly. United south africa's famed peaceful transition. I think did was was successful in some degree on the political front and in the immediate conflict that came with about it but it really did nothing to change the underlying economic structure. And the reality. Is that the economy from nine hundred and forty eight and actually from before then was structured to exclude black people. It was an economy that was structured. So that black south africans would be kind of permanent underclass servicing the economy and the needs of white south africans who would own assets including land. It's what has happened since nineteen ninety. Four is while few black south africans. I mean myself included have been able to get education and and break into the middle and upper classes. The boss majority of blacks africans remain inclu excluded and from the economy and an able to improve their conditions and until we change the fundamental structure of our economy. I think we will continue to face the risk of this kind of unrest in the future. We wanna thank you so much for being with us. And i just want to add looking at south africa where it's been leading the challenge To get vaccines throughout the poorest areas of the world in less than three percent of the population has been fully vaccinated. Compare that to almost seventy percent of people in the united states simulate bit day. I wanna thank you so much for being with a senior lecturer in political sciences at the university of pretoria in johannesburg next up as we talk about hunger in south africa. We're going to go global and look at how the pandemic has fueled a massive increase in the number of people.

anc government United south africa south africa university of pretoria united states johannesburg
"united south africa" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

02:45 min | 7 months ago

"united south africa" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"A situation where hardly population is unemployed and they are no real the options about how to sustain people and to keep a socially healthy and productive society invalid. Finally we just have a minute. You've pointed out that. In fact one of the grievances driving grievances of these protests. The fact that life for most black south africans has remained more or less unchanged since the days of apartheid and that this has been compounded by policies of the anc government. Could you just talk about that briefly. United south africa's famed peaceful transition. I think did was was successful in some degree on the political front and in the immediate conflict that came with about it but it really did nothing to change the underlying economic structure. And the reality. Is that the economy from nine hundred and forty eight and actually from before then was structured to exclude black people. It was an economy that was structured. So that black south africans would be kind of permanent underclass servicing the economy and the needs of white south africans who would own assets including land. It's what has happened since nineteen ninety. Four is while few black south africans. I mean myself included have been able to get education and and break into the middle and upper classes. The boss majority of blacks africans remain excluded from the economy and an able to improve their conditions. And until we change the fundamental structure of our economy. I think we will continue to face the risk of this kind of unrest in the future. We wanna thank you so much for being with us. And i just want to add looking at south africa where it's been leading the challenge To get vaccines Throughout the poorest areas of the world in less than three percent of the population has been fully vaccinated. Compare that to almost seventy percent of people. In the united states simulate betty ona thank you so much for being with a senior lecturer in political sciences at the university of pretoria in johannesburg. Next up as we talk about hunger in south africa we're going to go global and look at how the pandemic has fueled a massive increase in the number of people.

anc government United south africa betty ona south africa university of pretoria united states johannesburg
"united south africa" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

02:45 min | 7 months ago

"united south africa" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"A situation where hardly population is unemployed and they are no real the options about how to sustain people and to keep a socially healthy and productive society invalid. Finally we just have a minute. You've pointed out that. In fact one of the grievances driving grievances of these protests. The fact that life for most black south africans has remained more or less unchanged since the days of apartheid and that this has been compounded by policies of the anc government. Could you just talk about that briefly. United south africa's famed peaceful transition. I think did was was successful in some degree on the political front and in the immediate conflict that came with about it but it really did nothing to change the underlying economic structure. And the reality. Is that the economy from nine hundred and forty eight and actually from before then was structured to exclude black people. It was an economy that was structured. So that black south africans would be kind of permanent underclass servicing the economy and the needs of white south africans who would own assets including land. It's what has happened since nineteen ninety. Four is while few black south africans. I mean myself included have been able to get education and and break into the middle and upper classes. The boss majority of blacks africans remain excluded from the economy and an able to improve their conditions. And until we change the fundamental structure of our economy. I think we will continue to face the risk of this kind of unrest in the future. We wanna thank you so much for being with us. And i just want to add looking at south africa where it's been leading the challenge To get vaccines Throughout the poorest areas of the world in less than three percent of the population has been fully vaccinated. Compare that to almost seventy percent of people. In the united states simulate bit i wanna thank you so much for being with a senior lecturer in political sciences at the university of pretoria in johannesburg. Next up as we talk about hunger in south africa we're going to go global and look at how the pandemic has fueled a massive increase in the number of people.

anc government United south africa south africa university of pretoria united states johannesburg
"united south africa" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

02:45 min | 7 months ago

"united south africa" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"A situation where hardly population is unemployed and they are no real the options about how to sustain people and to keep a socially healthy and productive society invalid. Finally we just have a minute. You've pointed out that. In fact one of the grievances driving grievances of these protests. The fact that life for most black south africans has remained more or less unchanged since the days of apartheid and that this has been compounded by policies of the anc government. Could you just talk about that briefly. United south africa's famed peaceful transition. I think did was was successful in some degree on the political front and in the immediate conflict that came with about it but it really did nothing to change the underlying economic structure. And the reality. Is that the economy from nine hundred and forty eight and actually from before then was structured to exclude black people. It was an economy that was structured. So that black south africans would be kind of permanent underclass servicing the economy and the needs of white south africans who would own assets including land. It's what has happened since nineteen ninety. Four is while few black south africans. I mean myself included have been able to get education and and break into the middle and upper classes. The boss majority of blacks africans remain inclu excluded from the economy and an able to improve their conditions and until we change the fundamental structure of our economy. I think we will continue to face the risk of this kind of unrest in the future. We wanna thank you so much for being with us. And i just want to add looking at south africa where it's been leading the challenge To get vaccines throughout the poorest areas of the world in less than three percent of the population has been fully vaccinated. Compare that to almost seventy percent of people. In the united states simulate bit i wanna thank you so much for being with a senior lecturer in political sciences at the university of pretoria in johannesburg next up as we talk about hunger in south africa. We're going to go global and look at how the pandemic has fueled a massive increase in the number of people.

anc government United south africa south africa university of pretoria united states johannesburg
"united south africa" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

10:43 min | 1 year ago

"united south africa" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Richard along with Jerry Evans and we continue with our guests the great Gary player with this today Gary player of course his career in golf legendary but he is kept relevant as he is now eighty four years old golf course design one of the things that he has been doing a lot of charity work philanthropy with the Gary player foundation and we are so happy to have him with us on T. degree J. Gary before before we get on to some of the other things we wanted to talk about you you mentioned that you're you're starting golf at a young age I heard a story once that you played your first round of golf at the age of fourteen and you started out in your very first round of golf at the age of fourteen by pouring like your first four holes you ever played is that true United South Africa we have the sport cricket which is a very big sport in the world today and I was getting full honors for cricket so I was quite similar to the golf swing and when I went out and played with my father the first time ever they were very very short or very short par three just a wage and then exploded over the next the next you know you can almost drive and I managed to get three pars Americal denied my nines in my sevens and other such high schools like that but by then I got the bug and thank goodness I did because what a game golf is it's the most difficult sport of all and I didn't able you to travel around the world which I always wanted to do because I seek education I read Winston Churchill's box and that your knight education is the light and your athletes are renowned as quite close because and it's imperative that the manages unfortunately they don't consist of Panay cards leading to speak well and I think they have a commodity English language and to have a knowledge and I had a very different ambition to other golfers I wanted to have the best world record I wanted to go to Australia and I want the most to straight open seven sixteen south African Americans one in Brazil and Japan and all over that bridge and all over the world that I wanted to get off the plane play against guys or at home I had a time change on a long trip I'm not sure what the challenge to be able to beat everybody in their home countries and develop a record and I managed to do that and that was a great thrill I had my great challenge that faced me and we must have a valid license it's imperative is not absolutely and and one of the things that we were kind of wondering about is once you've played that first round of golf were you hooked at that moment or did you have to kind of still blend into it not I was hooked it's something about golf golf is a disease once you apply it and you know the great thing about golf which you cannot say about other sports you can be blind I played well I was very friendly with a magical Charlie Boswell he was blind and I was playing at a gas that was merely walks out on the fairway and not even the president is allowed to walk out on the fairway at Augusta and he walks down the fairway he's Gary how are your kids are you know you know that out yet he said I'll just be a second he says look we gotta have this great match you're not been talking about I want to play for five grand that's a jolly either gamble that much I should but on the stroke you want these are there weren't any strokes I see well that's not a play against a blind man what are the conditions he said will play at my home course at midnight there you go some blind people can play I played with the man with no legs said Douglas beta from mainland as zero handicap I played with people with one arm one leg it's quite unbelievable maybe that Dennis Walters in America yeah he was inducted into the hall of fame and he plays in a wheelchair he came to South Africa and he got you suck **** everybody came back home he was injured in a car and he was quadriplegic I think and he's already done three thousand shows around the world with his courage his real check quite probable yeah we've had two it's been awhile but we did have Dennis on the show a few years back and amazing that if you wouldn't have had a career at playing golf it what would you what would you what would you have liked to have done I'd like to be in a farm now what I have been a farm and most of my life and that sure I've got my great my batteries recharged and I don't know what I like best as farming because I did farming Aidid crops Jim back and also raise sources which is an amazing similarity between that and golf and so I would like yeah I did do that but not eighty four I don't do that anymore black did a lot of things I'd like to have done I'd like to be a school teacher and to be able to talk to children on fitness and health because you know here in the greatest country in the world they probably going to be a hundred million Americans with diabetes S. in fifty years says time and because of the way they eat in that way the parental guidance is is United no knowledge on how to eat properly and how to exercise at night taking exercise out of the schools instead of increasing at my schools in South Africa we have the greatest high schools in the world in South Africa the best facilities at school the best dress code and managed and they make you let that make you but you automatically have to do a physical fitness three times a week I mean it's terribly important for young people in America is the greatest country but I'll give you a great saying the greatest thing I ever heard in my life and it comes from Winston Churchill and young people come to me all the time young boys and young girls to play golf and say whatever I'm going to do to become a champion I ship nobody can tell you what to do to become a champion it's a little thing called it and not many people have that thing called it I said but listen very carefully Winston Churchill said when they are asking after me was as successful he said the height the great men reached and kept not detained by sudden flight but what is the president's was meeting he was joining up with him that night and that's what I did I hit more balls in any golfer that ever lived I do my if I went out to dinner and I had to do my exercise number back at twelve o'clock I went to the gym I went to the hotel manager and he was reluctant to give me the key but I should admit I put everything back and I still today at eighty four I mean I'm still pushing three hundred pounds of my legs I'm doing my push ups my bench presses I still run on the treadmill at Max now you see when I was a young man I thought of eighty four should man I live you're lucky to be alive which I suppose you are because all my boxing friends did but really I mean I'm playing golf like I was a young man and I still let him travel around the world sure I mean honestly we've got the wrong idea in life we we not eating and we not exercising and we not we don't have the right strategy for longevity I'm definitely going to do a book on my opinion which helps people to have longevity so that's three came up I guess you know we talked about it a little bit was being a pioneer in the diet health and fitness and and certainly in golf sold all these recommendations you're making are to help people improve their life but also to be able to play golf better play whatever sport they're interested in that to be able to play that better correct exactly give me that's not any just the Gulf it's being a better husband it's it's being a bit a wife it's being a bit of father it's it's just an overall it's an herbal remedy for life and you know that if you use so many people that they're suffering from depression so many and it's just unnecessary for people to do that if I start off an aged rated correctly around the correct lines the cheetah positioning that I let into my life which is it was a godsend my mother is said to be said that in one way it is a godsend my mother died when I was nine which was a tragedy in my life my brother went to war at seventeen from South Africa to fight with the Americans and my brother and all winters well he never came back and I lay in my father was working in a gold mine eight thousand feet on the ground of my sisters at boarding school and I went to this grade school but it took an hour and a half to get back home and I get back home nine years of age I had to cook my own food not very good why should I on my clothes wake up myself in the morning to get up at five thirty and go to school and I lay in bed every night crying wishing I was dead on the other hand adversity is the greatest gift that one can ever have in your life and every single person in this world has to have that visit the it's part of god's plan it's part of the plan I know a lot of people don't believe in god and that's a great choice my life is surrounded by my faith in the lord and the thing is this it doesn't matter what you believed in but you gotta realize you've got to have adversity in life you confiscate who's dead peach that said you know I'd love to have the money about Bill Gates to build the perfect school in America when I love to do that that could be just something fantastic because the end with judge Joe said the youth of the nation we're coming up on a break here so we'll continue on the other side with our guest Gary player today on T. degree and now today's Ben Hogan golf tip when hit your long irons crisper and longer it's important to take the club back easy on your backswing a longer iron requires more about sweeping fluid motion another.

Richard Jerry Evans Gary
"united south africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:59 min | 2 years ago

"united south africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Kelly see the first black south Africans captain his country's national rugby team this spring books of course and of course to lead them to that threatening success against England in the Rugby World Cup final last November that was a wind which always in the build up to it and off to which was talked about in terms of how it might help to unite South Africa and Kelly she is now doing his best to make sure it has an impact on the whole country's been talking to the B. B. C.'s Neste McGregor about the continuing impact of that time was there on the server does it all the time I see a home or to the couple of days ago it's it's a great memory one loss for a very long time we we need to do a lot because of the view that we in as a country and we needed it more than anyone else and it was big thing full full for Africa as well the whole of our free echo one one because within only present softly goal was in the whole continent in general tell us a bit more about some of that work that you are doing and to make sure grassroots rugby in South Africa gets the funding you just mentioned build in some rugby pitches I know what it feels like to not have properly feels you know and facilities so my goal is to make sure that one day everybody gets has failed virginity and an old school get to play against other let kids phone privileges FOR D. cannot compete against a guy this play in the suburbs do you feel chosen to feel special G. thought this was your your part in life or do I have to do more than just play and I have the platform to to that I think that's why I was given the plus on this I was blessed to have this opportunity and it's just it's natural confidential and it's it's in me if something would have been some do and some just give financially and that's the point for me if it means a lot to me because we have come from was cheap me to the person that I am today it's worth saying on a done if units will cut you obviously in an interracial relationship something that your grandparents or parents you know it was illegal to do I'm how how much is it warm your heart knowing that your your children what have to face discriminations that generations before them that perhaps I think that's the far from god I dream of every day and that's the stuff we go in our lives each and every single day and it is tough you know some people are born in and a time and a column of our country and get there maybe that's all that they know but hopefully one day that's what markets it's they can love whatever they want okay let's move on to and some of it's about you know you are signed to jay-z's these management label to resolve a rogue nation that's ridiculous and because we're losing an old timers that we everybody knows it's cheesy and everybody spectrum and it's crazy enough now I'm in his company and and and I'm in a told you know when I joined like they're going to want to do whatever you do whatever the endorsement of business it means they must be stuff that gets given back to the front of the work and they pick on that already saw values and and system with with together the people in hopes of because of over three the the follando of the business has been come from from from the project and it will give his way through any pending so strongly on giving vent to from so in everything that I do I want to make sure this the topic is is not part of the conversation you obviously a massive Liverpool fine as well how much of that rogue nation money would you bet they win the league all of it yeah hundreds and confident it's it's it's a done deal yeah well it's not a done deal I'm a spokesman on all these things work but I have full faith in the team and the codes you have to say if they manage to throw away a fourteen point lead it's going to be some story for the rest of the season C. R. Kelly she talking football and a lot more with the baby sis Nestor McGregor many thanks indeed Matthew canyon with the sport it's nine minutes to the hour now mosques to the ready cause weight crossing to the Philippines the main airport is partially reopened with told but in the background of course is the thousands of people who having to evacuate the area around the volcano the tunnel of full Queneau which last erupted in nineteen seventy seven it's doing this thing it's a sort of a volcano saying what it's throwing up into the air is often seem to be a sort of a bit of a a full warning of an eruption now we were told by the on news allocations people at the B. B. C.'s Howard Johnson is getting as close as he can not too close I hope at the slight delay on the line but how it joins us now how it please tell us where you are and what the situation is yeah hi lots of outside a cafe in tech it's I know with this is that buzzing Taurus hot spot we can overlook taal volcano Norman so luscious verdant seen here but now it looks like a lunar landscape ash on all of the trees on the roof here we can see some gentleman scraping the ash off at the moment somewhere between two to sixty centimeters worth of ash dumped on this area at the moment well ensuring I magmatic eruption face from for attic a Russian phase yes it was all about the steam and the cash now it's about the law but that has started to break out from this volcano and the fear is that this is now at the level four out of a maximum five level of alert and what that means is they fear that that has a disruption could take place within hours or days we have to also remember that may on another the the the most active volcano in the Philippines did a rock in twenty eighteen also hit level full but we didn't see houses are options so the same could happen with this volcano lots of people all of us see rightly concerned either way thousands of people have left and it's been quite an operation for them to leave but how many people would be affected by the eruption all they still presumably thousands.

Kelly England rugby
"united south africa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:57 min | 2 years ago

"united south africa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Black south Africans captain his country's national rugby team this spring books of course and of course who led them to threatening success against England in the Rugby World Cup final last November that was a way in which always in the build up to it and off to which was talked about in terms of how it might help to unite South Africa and Kelly she is now doing his best to make sure it has an impact on the whole country's been talking to the B. B. C.'s Neste McGregor about the continuing impact of that time was there ninety seven percent all the time I see a home or to the couple of days ago it's it's a great memory one a loss for a very long time we we need to do a lot because of the few that we in as a country and we needed more than anyone else and it was big thing full full for Africa as well the whole of our free echo one one because within only present South Dakota was in the whole continent intentional tell us a bit more about some of that was that you are doing and spatial grassroots rugby in South Africa gets the funding you just mentioned build in some rugby pitches I know what it feels like to not have properly feels you know and facilities so my goal is to make sure that one day everybody gets has failed which an anti and an old school get to play against other let kids phones permanent sponte cannot compete against a guy that's playing the suburbs do you feel chosen to feel special G. thought this was your your path in life or do I have to do more than just play and I have the platform to to that I think that's why I was given the platform that's always place to have this opportunity and it's just it's natural confidential and it's it's in me is something would have been some do and some just give financially and that's the point for me if it means a lot to me because we have come from was cheap me to the person that I am today it's worth saying on a done if units will cut you obviously in an interracial relationship something that your grandparents or parents you know it was illegal to do how how much does it warm your heart knowing that your your children what have to face discriminations that generations before them that perhaps I think both this offer gar I dream of every day and that's the stuff we go in our lives each and every single day and it is tough you know some people are born and a time and a column of our country and get there maybe that's all that they know but hopefully one day the imam markets it's they can love what they want okay let's move on to and some other bits about you know you are signed to JZ ease management label to resolve a rogue nation that's ridiculous because really soon to sit with everybody knows and cheesy and everybody spectrum and it's crazy no for now I'm in his company and and then I'm NO told you know when I joined like they're going to want to do whatever you do whatever the endorsement of business it means they must be stuff that gets given back to the front of the work and the people on that already so values and and system would work together the people in hopes of because of all this week the the follando of the business has been comes from from from the project and it will cause his way through any printing so strongly on given by two from so in everything that I do I wanna make sure this that fica is is not part of the conversation you obviously a massive Liverpool fine as well how much of that rogue nation money would you bet they win the league all of it yeah hundreds and confident it's it's it's a done deal yeah hello this is not a done deal I'm a spokesman on all these things work but I have full faith in the team and the coach you have to say if they manage to throw away a fourteen point lead it's going to be some story for the rest of the season C. R. Kelly she talking football and a lot more with the B. B. C.'s Nestor McGregor many thanks indeed Matthew canyon with the sport it's nine minutes to the hour now mosques to the ready cause weight crossing to the Philippines the main airport has partially reopened with told but in the background of course is the thousands of people who having to evacuate the area around the volcano that tall of full Queneau which last erupted in nineteen seventy seven it's doing this thing it's a sort of a volcano saying what it's throwing up into the air is often seem to be a sort of a bit of a a full warning of an eruption now we were told by the on news allocations people at the B. B. C.'s Howard Johnson is getting as close as he can not too close I hope the slight delay on the line but how it joins us now how it please tell us where you are and what the situation is yeah hi lots of outside a cafe in tech it's I know with this is that buzzing Taurus hot spot we can overlook taal volcano normally so luscious verdant seen here but now it looks like a lunar landscape ash on all of the trees on the roof here we can see some gentleman scraping the ash off at the moment somewhere between two to sixty centimeters worth of ash dumped on this area at the moment well ensuring I magmatic eruption face from for attic a Russian phase yes it was all about the steam and the cash now it's about the law but that has started to break out from this volcano and the fear is is that this is now at a level four out of a maximum five level of alert and what that means is they fear that a hazardous abruption could take place within hours or days we have to also remember that may on another the the the most active volcano in the Philippines did a wrought in twenty eighteen also hit level full but we didn't see houses are options so the same could happen with this volcano lots of people all of us see rightly concerned either way thousands of people have left and it's been quite an operation for them to leave but how many people would be affected by the eruption all they still presumably.

England rugby
"united south africa" Discussed on Lace Out AFL Podcast

Lace Out AFL Podcast

11:06 min | 2 years ago

"united south africa" Discussed on Lace Out AFL Podcast

"Looked it looked volant? It looked menacing. Does that make sense like he was trying to make a statement statement to a group of people and awful here we go. It's the sheets GONNA start again at indeed doing kept going pitcher now now. He was just a gone that was standing up for rice and being a proud of his rice. At the time. Our memory personally loved it was great. I know issue with it. Because I mentioned the documentary. It's no different to the Oh Baxter in the Hawk our l. any other MM traditional dance but when you're watching the commentary exits over eighty McGuire and Gary Line jared does it was fifty fifty wasn't you had some people go in. This is going blow up. This is going to blow up. Gary was GONNA blow up they blow and she said that she loved it. Eddie said that he wanted this should have been told you're going to do it so they can give it some context the child appearing as it was indigenous round and indigenous God did it warning d._N._A.. Did agree with that but once again again on locked up this group of people doing the hacker and so I can see that and it was just hot it was just it was it was genuinely eye-opening like it was it was it was up spell of emotion toward the end so all right so let's just go into some of the things do the I thou- tight too long to react yes this. Do you think that we will ever say something like this ever again in a foul to the level of dot thinks because we're going to have another a person like Adam goods because he wasn't just a gun footballer there were times I think is there was also some footage towards the back end of it. Where there was a couple of times you've got knocked oxen sort of fight to the ground etc and he could tell though now any retail apply for free kicks thank you everyone says you can tell and I reckon when you combined who he was with that Oregon the brewing to would agree started with some of the actions on the field? Yeah that's Oregon Oregon. That's what started it but what it started as an what ended up as which completely different messages yeah that's the sort of how already into it started from you. Stop fake in etc but then it just just go bigger and bigger out in the initial start for what it was does turn into something completely different different. I think some people was still in the Mon- frame of knives been it'll say I thought I think yeah you said before there will be no one like Adam. Goods tried to use his position in I._F._O.. For to change of good and I suppose it's not as not the same sense but it kind of is the same if you look at Nelson Mandela trod to unite South Africa Through Sport and three rugby any so the sport was the great healer and the great thing that people together and I thought were people just thinking that goods updated trying to push agenda of indigenous culture and we didn't cut that here in Australia Yada Yada Yada united that that that casually rises again racism undertones. We have here do you think. Let's go people's backs up the think there was somebody who was throwing it. Danielle throats national sport of that was the thing that that was the thing that people didn't unlock that we shouldn't maybe Chrysler devoid of having both I think it's sad because I think we've got one of the one on one of the greatest games he and it should be vehicle used for good and all things good bringing together teaching people healing people decide that probably August swept up in in Adam goods goods whirlwind and I think we we've got a lot better at it with digits rams the country round Anzac Day round etc in Troy and incorporate as many different races religions sexual preference talk whatever it is what would we are really inclusive. Guys is too shy that when you think you're on the right path something like these occurs and can see Seko's and it just pushes over all the top Lia- fluffy nece ally in shows animated there is a really big divide Yup and I do agree with you. I think that we will never say now that Adam goods again and I hope I hope we don't see now that Adam goods again from football perspective Yes for my pride in he's is culture yes before the treatment that he received because he was trying to show who he was. Are we never ever see people turn on one person like that pathetic behavior at Emory everybody we can we should as as paper now who've watched it who lived through it and I would be surprised that is showing so many times over the next ten years that particular documentary there'll be an encore presentation of it we will we will never wish we should never let s house get to that point again now. Think what what it's done. It's made people have a look within themselves in made major sink main figure for could I have done it more reasons behind uh-huh toss time could have had himself a little bit better certainly now on deserves that regardless and you can't change possibly can plenty will learn from it. Oh yeah luckily we say at work when we were coaching. It's not a mistake. If you learn from it. We can learn from it. What will be interesting is to see the what flows on from these not not now not in the next week or the next month? Let's see how things rollover in a year's time have will things have changed binding has the message through because the government apparently early wants to put this documentary all schools throughout the country which is not a bad thing because it's not a bad thing whatsoever the I'm looking forward to first gay pile to say what we will do now off the back of this. She's GonNa be other episode and a Half Gail still will acceptance of that all the strength of someone to come out. Yes I think the acceptance will funding of actually think acceptance by day but the carriage come out and site. We'll be completely that'll be that'll be a a monumental day for sport across the nation because his code because we've had a gay cricket male Great Male K. CRICKET COMING UP Soccer Playa Basketball Bola. I felt fulla an hour l.. Plying Playa any of them and I remember Neil Roberts emails yeah that was after he'd finished. I believe he's lost. It could be wrong but something they hate hidayat coming out and maybe that was the catalyst full someone's ago how you know what if that's the worst it's GonNa get here. It's GONNA get pretty bad but maybe I can make a stain and make make it a change for for not just me but for plies all around the country yeah you're right. That's GonNa be what's GonNa be giving huge that day. We'll be doing another spatial on that one. Don't worry about that so yeah I I just hope that we all learned from Adam goods and I I've ever since the consort of Grop and say that we're all just you know and all of us often because I'm probably probably got pushed left and rod a few Tom's hearing in the injury bolts of the world and listening to other people who've Moran or experienced probably push left and right all the time on this myself yet that we can also be safe through the bullshit and what it is actually call it what it actually is which is which was racism this thing. That's the thing that I'll take him probably the biggest data these at yeah. Let's just take a step back and go it wasn't great pretty embarrassing and we've all had we've all had a directory direct and let's just not get down. Let's let's we'd never have to watch another documentary. Let that again. I'm sorry yeah it's a little bit of science. Sorry brutal brutal for the now. I thank you very much. Thanks and we'd love to get back on how the conversation going on on facebook yeah exactly right and it just gives you thought because you know what it's FA- once it wasn't hello locked football this show and it also we're..

Adam Gary Line jared Oregon football facebook Eddie Nelson Mandela Emory Seko McGuire rugby Australia Danielle Neil Roberts South Africa Chrysler Troy Grop Moran Tom