12 Burst results for "United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope"

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

04:00 min | 6 months ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"It's long time ago. But that the idea of the thin and this is as. I said it's been around for quite a long time. Neil read jerry gilmore of that people. I worked with an edinburgh still going strong. In the world. Astronomy the thick disk is thicker and it is roundabout something in the region of five to ten thousand lightyears. So you know it's probably about five thousand light years thick compared with a thousand for the old thin disk something like three hundred for the young thin discs so the thick this is very definitely a separate component. The work that i did with colleagues in the in the rave projects the radio the experiment that we did. Using the united kingdom schmidt telescope we collected the speeds and physical parameters of half a million stars and it was possible from the results of that to see the delineation between the thin disk and the thickness even though we actually tried to avoid the disk. Because it's too many stars in it. We were mostly looking at the halo of the galaxy with that expand. Anyway a great question and thank you for that moving also. We are just need to clarify when we talking. Thick disk. Indiscreet talking liars. Yes in a sense we are. I mean it's all done because you're talking about stars which are individual objects and not something like gas. You're really talking about statistical things but so the statistics are that there are a lot more stars in the thin disk than the thick disk and the imagine is allow between one and the other is probably not very flat layer because once again this probabilities involved but really remarkable that we can now recognize these two characteristics of the of the disc. No in fact we recognized too that the halo itself is not uniform. This the halo and outer halo. They've got quite different rotational caracteristics so as we find out more about our galaxy we realize it. Structure is more and more complicated. Yeah well that why. I'm not surprised. Now he also wants to know about how the solar system is aligned or tilted in comparison with the galaxy and is it the same for other solar systems desta to that is no the answer to the tilt of our own. Solar system is the plane of the planet is what we call. The ecliptic plane is tilted to the plane of the galaxy in other words to the thin disc. It's tilted at an angle of sixty degrees so sitting up at an unusual angle. Nowhere near the same plane and that is true of all solar systems. We find that they are very different angles. I think people have looked for a the kind of correlations that might sale. Sixty degrees is the most popular in the must. Be reason for that. That's not been found. So yes you have. You have quite a strong tilt of the solar system to the plane of the galaxy and that's normal yes and that's normal and it seems to be what you've got you remember how the solar system was formed. You start off with a cloud of gas and dust that collapses under its own gravity and it's the little random rotations within that cloud that eventually take on a preferred direction and a preferred plane of rotation so the whole thing starts rotating that could be in any direction. And that's why we get. This randomness is a great question. Very have andres question about it in day..

Neil sixty degrees jerry gilmore Sixty degrees half a million stars three hundred ten thousand lightyears five about five thousand light year two characteristics a thousand ecliptic plane united kingdom edinburgh many stars more
"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

05:44 min | 9 months ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

"Space nuts. Thanks again for joining us on the space nuts. Podcast andrew dunkley with frayed watson and thanks to everybody who send questions into us because we lock to get questions from the audience we feel it gives you a bit more to to enjoy. It's just us rabbiting on about what we like to talk We get to talk about the stuff that you want to know about as well and we've got Episode two hundred forty coming up very very soon and as we tend to do on the round numbers the opportunity to go all in. So if you've got a question buzzing around in that massive. Brian of yours that you would like fred to tackle plays plays plays senate into us. Just go to the space. And that's podcast website space nuts. Podcast dot com is what it is coincidentally and you can upload your question through our email interface. If you don't want to use your voice or you can click on the tab and record your voice as long as you got to deliver the microphone. It should work and just tell us who you Wave from ask you a question bam and away we go. So we'd like to do an old question episode for episode two hundred and forty which will be coming up in about five weeks time. Now fred we. We have got The need for spade in episode two hundred thirty five of the space. And that's us and we go from a fastest spinning earth too high velocity stars which of been observed by the china fan quite a few of them. Yeah that's right. This is actually a story quite close to my heart under a number of reasons partly. Because i've been involved with in measuring high-velocity stars myself the right project. Radio velocity experiment which we did with the united kingdom schmidt telescope during first decade or so of the new millennium the speeds of half a million stars and one of the first pieces of research that came out of that was the detection of high velocity stars. Nothing like as many as the chinese astronomers have now discovered but what does not just these stars leaving the galaxy and waving goodbye. She gives you a way of measuring the mass of the galaxy and we got a mass for the galaxy from those results of one point four trillion times. The massive sum. That's a result. The dutch really still holds up..

andrew dunkley four trillion times Brian one point frayed watson nuts half a million stars fred hundred thirty five first pieces space nuts one Space nuts chinese need for spade five weeks united kingdom episode first decade and forty
"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:04 min | 9 months ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"Space nuts. Thanks again for joining us on the space nuts. Podcast andrew dunkley with frayed watson and thanks to everybody who send questions into us because we lock to get questions from the audience we feel it gives you a bit more to to enjoy. It's just us rabbiting on about what we like to talk We get to talk about the stuff that you want to know about as well and we've got Episode two hundred forty coming up very very soon and as we tend to do on the round numbers. We offer the opportunity to go all in. So if you've got a question buzzing around in that massive. Brian of yours that you would like fred to tackle plays plays plays senate into us. Just go to the space. And that's podcast website space nuts. Podcast dot com is what it is coincidentally and you can upload your question through our email interface. If you don't want to use your voice or you can click on the tab and record your voice as long as you got to deliver the microphone. It should work and just tell us who you Wave from ask you a question bam and away we go. So we'd like to do an old question episode for episode two hundred and forty which will be coming up in about five weeks time. Now fred we. We have got The need for spade in episode two hundred thirty five of the space. And that's us and we go from a fastest spinning earth too high velocity stars which of been observed and fan quite a few of them. Yeah that's right. This is actually a story quite close to my heart under a number of reasons partly. Because i've been involved with in measuring high-velocity stars myself the right project. Radio velocity experiment which we did with the united kingdom schmidt telescope during first decade or so of the new millennium we surveyed the speeds of half a million stars and one of the first pieces of research that came out of that was the detection of high velocity stars. Nothing like as many as the chinese astronomers have now discovered but what does not just these stars leaving the galaxy and waving goodbye. She gives you a way of measuring the mass of the galaxy and we got a mass for the galaxy from those results of one point four trillion times. The massive sum. That's a result. The dutch really still holds up..

andrew dunkley four trillion times Brian one point frayed watson half a million stars one first pieces hundred thirty five chinese earth fred space nuts first decade need for spade united kingdom Space nuts five weeks episode dutch
"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:59 min | 1 year ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"The surveys confirm that matter and invisible component of the universe mode of as yet. Unknown material dominates the massive how galaxy raise also discovered that the milky ways is asymmetric and it wobbles the interaction of. The, spiral arms with the informing of satellite galaxies rave also allowed for the identification of still a streams in the solar environment. These streams of stars are the ancient remains of satellite wolf galaxies torn apart and cannibalized by the Milky Way in the past the chemical element abundances of the observed stars also hold important clues about the chemical composition and the subsequent middle enrichment of the interstellar medium as traced by stars of different ages, and middle. Oil elements other than hydrogen and helium are considered metals by astronomers, and these medals were old produced by earlier generations of stars either during their lifetimes or in their death rose. So with rave astronomer searching for some of the very first as in the universe these are metal poor and give clues bet the earliest epochs of stellar evolution and formation, and therefore the chemical evolution of the Milky Way the find out more Andrew Dunkley speaking one of the pioneers of the Rave Project Professor Fred Watson Fred Your pretty close to this one indeed. Yeah. I wasn't. Actually the project scientist that was the role of one of my colleagues in the University of Louisiana. In Slovenian, his name is Thomas Vita my job was to be the project manager. A survey was actually quite a large consortium of something like sixty scientists from twenty patients internationally many of them located in Europe. In fact, it was led by Professor Doctor Matthias Steinmetz who is head of. Astrophysics at the live Knits, institute physics in POPs down in Germany. So Matisse till match on myself a the three, what you might call managers of this project but there was also an executive bowl which will members then the consultants itself as I said, sixty scientists. So what is it? It is project, which had since inception back in two, thousand, three, I remember meeting on A. Chilly. Morning in Cambridge U K, we discussed the possibility of using the United Kingdom Schmidt. Telescope at siding. Spring. Observatory here in Australia and was equipped than with a with a robotic fiber optics machine called Sixty F that stands for sixty degree field the field of view of the telescope which would allow you to gather information on the velocities of stars accurate velocities for stars and this. Proposal was actually on the back of a a spacecraft that was being planned. I think it might have been Feng the spacecraft that was being proposed by the German Space Agency. The idea was that the space craft would make measurements of the velocities of these styles across the line of sight, and we would then from the ground do the equivalent but along the line of sight. And if he could combine those, you get what's called the velocity of the staff. So the whole idea of this radio velocity experiment, radioplus t's just star on the line of sight was to build a database of stars using the Schmidt Telescope and indeed got kicked off. It went through all kinds of tribulations pilot observations in two, thousand, three in two, thousand, five rave projects. became the only project that the UK Schmidt Telescope was undertaking. So it was undertaking it stroke throughout the whole year rather than just on selected dates each month and the project grew. So it's actually grew in many ways. You know the initial idea was to gather velocities of stars an might just out vested interest in this not boasting about it from any personal point of view but. We did great things. There's no doubt when we started the total sum of Stellar Star Radio Velocities was about twenty thousand that had been gathered for the previous hundred and fifty years, and within the first year, we had think more than doubled that we've gone to forty or fifty, thousand Khan remember the number but it be quite obvious that this was a very effective way of improving. Knowledge of the velocities, the motions of Stars in the Suns, neighborhood? Galaxy and that's why the project then kind of took off and basically we observe for a roundabout ten years it was the final observations were made by somebody called Fred. WHAT'S THE ON I? Think it was a full of April two, thousand thirteen. It was in the wake of the Wimbledon fire that nearly took out the observatory I did some think fallen i. To absorb actions in the April of that year, just to prove that it wasn't the five that brought the project to an end. In fact, we essentially run out of funding. However, in that ten years we measured five, hundred, eighteen, thousand, three, hundred, Ninety, seven spectra that means the data points for four, hundred, fifty, one, thousand, seven, hundred, ninety, three stars that you go. Final number. So the observation stopped in two, thousand, thirteen seventy years. Later, what is happening is the final basically, the final catalogue of all these data has been released not was when we released, what was what's called? diaw sakes the sixth to release of the RIF catalog and it's the final product. This is the end product of what the survey has been all about and I'll shut up from it so you can ask a question but when A. Again, just give you some incident to what has been discovered from that. Well, that's that was my question because you've done all this work for such a long period of time and I'm sure that you've been able to crunch the daughter and and come up with with some revelations and I'm just looking at Some of the information has been released and. Talking about things like how fast style has to be moving to escape gravitational pull. but I'm quite intrigued by the results confirming the dark matter. dominates the massive galaxy. I mean it's it's something we know much bat but you've you've been able to confirm that it is a dominant force in in the universe. Yeah that's right and certainly not galaxy. So what what you're doing is you're using the spades of stars to essentially reveal something about the gravitational feeling which that moving that's that's basically how. is one of the ways that you can tell what sort the gravitational pull styles of failing. And the shore enough we get the same result that most of the massive our galaxy is in is in doubt matter. That other result you mentioned. It plays into the same idea in fact, because the idea of determining the minimum speed needed for style to escape the gravitational the Milky? Way Is actually one of the first papers that was produced from right back in about two thousand and four thirty early result what's called the escape velocity of the galaxy that gives you a a mass of the galaxy. But of course, that mass includes not just the styles can see but also the matter in more detail rave has shown the. Disc of our Milky Way is calling a slightly because of the satellite galaxies line with too much alantic clouds the way they are interacting with our galaxy. So the has wobbles in it and we've also found streams of stars which are probably the remnants of Dwarf galaxies the that have been pulled apart. The first one that was found is probably bucking about two thousand, six thereabouts with simply call the Aquarius Stream. It was the dawning of the Stream of query that was the title. Of the paper I, think. So That's dwarf galaxies that have been ripped apart the have merged with the milky. Way. But we still see their evidence in the movement of the stars. So it was pretty neat project to have to say, and let me say the I am very honored to have played a part in my role was essentially supervising only observations is a team of half a dozen of us who did the observing managing that group is stronger in charge of the observatory? But also as the right project manager spend a lot of time wearing about budgets when money was coming from spent a Lotta time worrying about the fact that the fire was in a fiber optic machine kept breaking and also stuff is why Andrew got note at virtually the rave put a big on my shoulders but honestly, it was worth every lost hair of it because well over one hundred top-class scientific articles of come from the right project and that that's just a brilliant output. So. It's kind of our Ip Ray, because this six data released really represents the end of the project and the fact that those days public, any of our listeners could go and access them. You've got to go find them at the..

Fred Watson Fred Your project manager Rave Project Andrew Dunkley project scientist Schmidt Telescope UK Schmidt Telescope Europe Professor Doctor Matthias Stei Cambridge German Space Agency University of Louisiana A. Chilly Professor Thomas Vita United Kingdom Schmidt executive Germany
"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:41 min | 1 year ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Sun, the solar system, and subsequently the emergence of life on Earth May all be a consequence of a cosmic collision between our Milky Way Galaxy, and a smaller satellite galaxy, known as the secretary as warf ever since it was first identified at nine hundred ninety astronomers of realized that the Secretaries Walk Galaxies orbit indicates that must've have collided with and smashed through the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy on multiple occasions. In fact, computer simulations suggest that it's impacted the disk of the Milky Way punching right through it, and at least three separate occasions over the past six. Six billion years and the immense gravitational tidal interactions generated during these colossal events have had a profound effect on how stars within the Milky Way Galaxy and may even be responsible for the Milky Way spiral arms. Now a new study based on data gathered by the European Space Agency's Guy. Galaxy mapping satellite suggests the secretaries towards influence in the Milky Way. Maybe even more substantial a report in the journal. Nature Astronomy points out that the ripples caused by these gigantic collisions would have triggered Mejia staff who nation episodes and according to this study, one of those episodes roughly coincides with the. Sun and solar system were formed some four point six billion years ago. The study's lead author Thomas Ru is Lara from the Astrophysics Institute. Canary Islands says existing models show secretaries to fill through the Milky Way on at least three occasions I, about five or six billion years ago, then again about two billion years ago, and the final one around a billion years ago, and the guy data shows three periods of increased star formation, which peaked at five point seven billion years. Years ago one point nine billion years ago and a billion years ago, roughly corresponding with time when secretaries is believed to have passed through the disk of the Milky Way. The authors looked at luminosity distances and colors of stars within his fear of about six thousand five hundred light years of the sun, and then compared the data it with existing stellar evolution models. They say the collisions would have disrupted the milky ways equilibrium, causing previously still guessing dust the slosh around like. Like ripples on water, and these ripples would have increased concentrations of molecular gas and dust clouds, causing some collapsed and trigger starburst, the spontaneous formation of millions of stars, and the authors speculate that Al Son consequently solar system formed after the first of these collisions between secretaries and the disk of the Milky. Way, each of these collisions has strip cemeteries of some of its guests and dust, leaving the galaxy smaller after its passage. The other say that their data suggests that secretaries. Secretaries may they've been passed through the milky ways again quite recently in the last few hundred, billion, or so, and even now observations show that it's awfully close. In fact, the author found a recent burst of staffer Mation, which they suggest is a possible new and ongoing way. There's still a burst from just such a collision. The find out more enter Dagley speaking with astronomer professor. Fred Watson this store galaxy, the Cape smashing into the Milky Way and I now believe perhaps. that. It's why we exist why our solar system is here. which does make for a compelling story I imagine he dated does is a great story, and it's actually very close to home. Is this Andrew because the dwarf galaxy that we're talking about smash through the plane of the Milky Way whilst discovered at the United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope, so it was, it was a discovery night. The research, Piper discovering actually was published in nineteen nine. T four I think I'm writing, saying that upset by been nineteen ninety-five. Which is the year? I took over as strongly Josh but I worked at before before it was a strong recharge I worked for ten years is just one of the likes taking photographic plates and that was how Dwarf Galaxy was discovered so all right? What's the story on? The IT really allows us now to make the absolutely exquisite observations. This story requires the facilities the Guy Spice craft, thus the new parts of the story guy is a European mission was launched five six seven years ago. Maybe it's essentially doing absolutely high precision measurements of the positions of stars in our galaxy, the Milky Way Galaxy and it's total I, think so far is about a billion and a half that they've. They've measured itself huge number. Many many more than we ever did with the telescopes like Schmidt back in the nineteen eighties, but they're also measure that velocity, so what the guy data shown us is the way they start a moving and so the Solitary Wolf Galaxy managing guesses principally the constellation of Sagittarius. We've known for a long time. That is that this is one of the Dwarf Galaxies that is in orbit around our Milky Way and more than that it actually being dismantled by the Milky Way. The two best examples love clouds that much much bigger than the Sagittarius Dwarf but day out to being torn apart over timescales of millions of years, hundreds of millions of years probably. Probably and eventually will wind up his positive. The Halo of our galaxy, not halo of stars that surround galaxy. The terrorist will as in the same boat. It's being told about by tidal forces, but much Mola, and he's actually near to the plane of Galaxy. The genetic clouds and what's now happened is because of the observations of the Guy a program, the guy spacecraft, being able to measure these stop position very accurately. What it means is that you've only got to wait two or three years. How she's probably about five years, but you measure them again. They've moved, and so you can. You cannot share workout. What the how fast they styles are traveling, and so they've done that. That for the Secretary Dwarf that then allows you to track back as to wear, come from, and how it has behaved haying interaction with the Milky Way Galaxy, and so the models allow you to do this show that the secretaries dwarf galaxy is basically for through the plane of the Milky Way three times a while I. One was about five billion years ago, then again about two billion years ago, and on the third time, only one billion years ago, and what they saying and I should say. This is research that's done by astronomers at place. I used to have a lot to do with it, too. So instituto the astrophysics edeka Nadia which is the Canary Islands astrophysical institute. Spanish telescopes in La. Palma and I used to work that quite a lot. Because there's a British facility that was, it's now much more collaborative than that. So what they looked into was first of all the model and the model shows that the secretaries wack through the Milky White three times, but he can come at this from a different angle. You can look at the star formation history. History in our galaxy and you can do that by looking at star colors luminosity distances, you can basically do this giant analysis, because there's such a huge amount of data coming from guy and he turns out the Milky Way as three periods of increased stuff omission, which peaked five point seven billion years ago, point nine billion years ago. A one believe years ago and they're exactly the Times that the secretaries. is believed to have kind of punched its way through the disk of the Milky. Way So what's happening here? Is that Gravitational Interactions As. The Dwarf Galaxy with all stars process through the Milky Way they trigger the formation of new styles, but because the plane of the Milky Way is rich in hydrogen knots, the raw material a star, so this disturbance is what kind of compression of gas, and that actually kicks off the star formation, and so what they are suggesting is that that period of enhanced stuff mention five point seven billion years ago is probably what you might call the same batch. Batch of stuff election, the same period of stuff in which some for the sun formed about four point six billion years ago. This is a little bit more recent than that, but some could be part of the the end way of the staff election that was caused by first transit of the Dwarf Galaxy through the disk of the Milky Way so very nice story have to say it brings together. The the many facilities that we've got to do is astronomical research these days, but in particular, the guy at project, which is really an excellent project, a remarkable look and they Sam Galactic..

Dwarf Galaxy Times European Space Agency secretary Mejia Canary Islands Fred Watson Mation Dagley Schmidt Astrophysics Institute Piper United Kingdom Schmidt Telesco Thomas Ru Josh Canary Islands astrophysical i Cape smashing Andrew
"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

"But you're more than welcome to sign up through either of those platforms, super cast, patriotic dot com slash spice nets now as I've said many times, it is not mandatory. But if you feel compelled to put a few dollars kitty so that we can do extra things like purchased new recording equipment that that Kinda jazz. You're more than welcome to do so through either of those platforms patriarch or super cast. Now Fred let's move onto the next topic. And that is an interesting discovery about a galactic crash. I think they're describing it. the Dwarf Galaxy. The keeps smashing into the Milky Way and they now believe perhaps that it's why we exist why our solar system is here which does make for a compelling story I imagine. Does It's a great story and it's actually very close to home. Is this Andrew because? The, Dwarf Galaxy that we're talking about smashed through the plane of the Milky Way. Whilst discovered. The United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope. I think it was discovered when I was. Astronomer in charge there. Truly, wasn't it was just was yes, it was earlier on that so it was. It was discovery night. The the research banker discovering it actually was published in nineteen. Four I think I'm writing saying. That That's the year on moved. He not been here for twenty six years now. Anyway, but it was, it was discovered. At the UK Schmidt. Telescope upset by being nineteen ninety, five. The year I took over as strongly jobs, but I worked at before before it was a stone recharge I worked for ten years just one of the lakes, taking photographic plates, and that was how. This galaxy was discovered today you are. Not so maybe. Like Dwarf Galaxy that was discovered by the United Kingdom Trick Telescope. Is the reason why we exist. Which is a nice. We should make something of that. We. You know look what. Trophy Trophy Am. MANTELPIECE YEP so all right? What's the story and it really what what allows us now to make the absolutely exquisite observations that they story requires The the facilities, the guy spacecraft dots the new parts of the story guy is a European mission was launched these five six seven years ago maybe. It's. Essentially doing. Absolutely high precision measurements of the positions of stars. In our galaxy, the milky, way galaxy..

United Kingdom Schmidt Telesco United Kingdom Trick Telescope Fred let UK Andrew
"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"We'll have to wait and say. Now looks like perhaps not. You're listening to space nuts with Andrew Dunkley and Fred Watson. Ago! Once again a special thanks to patrons, the people who put a little bit of money every month into the space, and that's podcast, and there are a couple of options these days. If you have one preference over another, you can do it through space. Nuts, super cast website, which is space, nuts dot, super cast, dot tech, and there are different options. They can buy bundles. For five six seven dollars a month or thereabouts, or you can go to Patriot we have a big followings repatriation, and mainly because we've been doing it through Patrie on long. you're more than welcome to sign up through. Either of those platforms Super Casto Patriotic Dot com slash spice nets now many times it is not mandatory, but if you feel compelled to put a few dollars in our kitty said, we can do extra things like purchase new recording equipment that that of as you're more than welcome to do so through either of those platforms on or super cast. Now, Fred, let's move onto the next topic. And that is an interesting discovery about a galactic crash I. Think the describing it the store galaxy that keeps smashing into the Milky Way, and they now believe perhaps that it's why we exist why our solar system is. He which does make for a compelling story I imagine. A does it's. A great story and it's actually very close to whom this Andrew because. The DWARF GALAXY that we're talking about smash through the plane of the Milky Way whilst discovered. The United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope. I don't think it was discovered when I was. Astronomer in charge there. Wasn't it was just before was yes, it was earlier on that so it was. It was a discovery the research paper discovering it actually was published in Nineteen Ninety Four I. Think I'm writing saying. that. That's the year on move. He not been heave twenty six as now Anyway, but it was, it was discovered. At the UK Schmidt Telescope by Nineteen Ninety..

Fred Watson Andrew Dunkley Nineteen Ninety United Kingdom Schmidt Telesco UK Schmidt Telescope
"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

11:34 min | 1 year ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Rocks known as tears which have orbits that full within the the earth the tiny body was discovered by Celtics Vicky transient facility at the Mount Palomar Observatory. It's the third tier discovered by Vicky which is especially adept at finding these asteroids rapidly. Scans THE ENTIRE. Sky Tried to cat side of them at terrorism especially hot the spot because they close orbits to the sun making them visible only at dusk and dawn astronomers announced trying to get follow up observations of the asteroid to bid a pin down at size and unusual orbit best estimates suggest. Twenty twenty two is between one and three kilometers wide and has a one hundred and fifty one day orbit always interior Venus and with its closest approach to the sun bring it close to the orbit of Mercury Journalists think the asteroid probably migrated to its current orbit from further out in the solar system. And unless it's flying out of its current orbit through some gravitationally academy with Venezuela Mercury. It'll probably end up crashing into one of these two planets to find out more and you're dangling is speaking with John Dr Frit Watson. Let's talk about this This asteroid that Spain found closer to the sun. Venus which sounds I mean. That sounds normal for some of the time but this is all of the time from what I'm understanding. That's absolutely right. It is a bit surprising when I was allowed hundred. Eighty seven years ago. The asteroids allstate terribly well behaved. They'll stay between the always of Mars and Jupiter we knew of really very few that strayed outside that range but of course as time has gone on we've discovered more and more and more asteroids and there is now a class of asteroids which cold tears and I think the named after the prototype of the class which is probably cold thira und- Asteroids that orbit whose orbits a wholly within the orbit of the Earth. So it's not a very common place to be. We know of many asteroids whose orbits across the always averse earth but tears have all been so entirely inside the obesity so they always a near to the sun in the earth is but there's only twenty one of them and not numerous objects and so. It's perhaps surprising that we found an even more extreme example of these and it was found this year fact the observations were made home the fourth of January at a place that in its own strange ways close to my heart. Because it's the what used to be called the Pelham Schmidt Telescope. It's now basically now cooled the ZANDT T. F. Which is the Vicki transient factory and for Americans? It's Z. T. F. I'm sorry. I'm so sorry for that universal language. Hey for it. We have indeed yes. That's right so few subtleties about this. Well the telescope itself. The reason why I'm very fond of it is that is the twin effectively of the United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope which is at Siding Spring Observatory. And which is actually what brought me to live in Australia. In the first place hundred years ago the Caltech machine though The is E. T. F. named after Fritz Vicky of course the great astronomer in the nineteen twenties and thirties virtually discover of that matter. But that's another story. The telescope is a one point. Two maitre forty eight INCH SCHMIDT TELESCOPE. Hyundai was the basis of that Palo Alto sometimes called the Ocean Schmidt now because it was renamed a few years ago. And he's now there's Vicky Facility Telescope was essentially muddled on that one also one point to me to diamond to correct so they sell this wide angle telescopes. They were built for photography. I'll tell us go now. Does something quite different will soon? When the commissioning work is finished on our new starbucks instrument uses fiber optics to look at many objects at a time whereas the contact one of my Paloma actually has a wide angle. Electronic camera adopt. His really white can be used for looking for objects that change in space by changing brighter. Dimmer me move. Of course this thing moves. That's how you find asteroid you look at one minute. Look at them few minutes or a few hours later and they've moved in space. And that tells you that it's a relatively nearby object now discovery though though is unusual because if you think about the orbit of an object that lies within actually within the Earth's orbit you're only going to see it soon after sunset or shortly before sunrise because they object toll was going to be close to the sun in the sky. Dies even more extreme in this case because the object. Which I'll tell you it's twenty twenty eight hundred to eight. Actually as as you said. At the beginning he keeps its orbit until I within the opposite Venus not just inside the sob it but inside the over to Venus and of course because it's inside the SOB. It means EXOTICA. Asteroid is mentioned. The ones whose obits are always within the ask people are now calling this VAT era because it's within the over Venus and it is the first one that has been discovered how how day we just assume that everything associated with earth. I mean exactly. Museums must be getting pretty steamed. Yeah they must be actually are actually getting quite steamed this meal time. That's right so sulfuric acid drizzle and all the rest of it makes you wonder though whether we'll find ones inside the orbit of Mercury which might be Cold Matt Era Asteroids. Anyway Twenty twenty two the first Venus are internal to Venus asteroid is only no more than three kilometers across a. Toby is quite elongated. And in fact when it said is closest to the sub. It's not far from the mercury. Seeing bet your life will find asteroids eventually which our the of Mercury so how did he get that and while one of the professors of Physics California Institute of Technology who asked Co investigator? On the Vicki transient factory. He says an encounter with a planet probably flung astroid into Venus's orbit. It's the opposite of what happens when a space mission swings by a planet for gravity boost instead of gaining energy from a planet it loses it and there is another comment as get stuck. It was on its way somewhere and got distracted bar. That's right yeah go. And that was that more likely the gravitational pull of maybe MAS MAY BE. Juca depends on where it started. Its journey big day sell. Yeah the only pretty girl in the inner solar system is Venus which is the only female planet. So what I said. Yeah that's right so it could have been Venus as well. Not Another of the colleagues of Tom. Prince at Caltech George. Hello Helu I think he's how you pronounce H. E. L. O. You know could be hell. No hello a said getting past the Venus must have been challenging. The only way we'll ever get out of its orbit is if it gets flung out via gravitational encounter with mercury Venus a more likely may well end up crushing on one of those two planets. That's a really interesting prognosis for this. Little world ten until the beginning of this year. We didn't know about like I suppose. We shouldn't be surprised because there are things coming and going all the time and there are a lot of various forces acting upon against each other from time to time. It stands to reason that you're not going to just find asteroids in the reaches here we are with twenty one of the murder just sort of fleeing themselves around insider Soba going. This is nice. I could stay. He will whatever they want to do. Really with All subject to the forces of gravity. Exactly what I think. He's really interesting. Aspect of this is that people will of course encouraged by this discovery looked for more because we don't know whether they're all all of these internal Venus Ovitz Asteroids over the twenty two thousand nine hundred. Eighty two is unique but notwithstanding this Vicki transient pack trade the Z. T. F. There is a new facility. Which will come of line. I think he actually is later this year. It's been in construction for a good while maybe ten years or so. I saw last year on top of the mountain in northern Chile hates until very recently was called the L. S. T. which is the large synoptic survey telescope. This is a Beta class telescope. Which will survey the anti southern sky every week effectively every six nights. Well that's right. That will be turning up objects small objects in the solar system. Like you've never heard before what was because the large synoptic survey telescope has been renamed details a full name which I'm absolutely delighted with because commemorates one of the greatest women in astronomy. Very Ruben. So it will be called Vera Rubin Observatory when it comes online and that's a great night it is of course. Also the person who put back in the nineteen seventies. That's Fisa Fred Watson and astronomer with the Department of Science speaking with Andrew Dunkley on assist program space nuts and this is space time. I'm Stewart Gary Astronauts aboard the International Space Station successfully completed a fourth spacewalk designed to refurbish the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. The spectrometer was the last major science instrument brought up to the orbiting outpost by the space shuttle before its retirement flying up on endeavour honest one thirty four. It's attached to the poor trust on the outside of the Space Station where it's designed that attacked high energy. Cosmic rays an ice high-speed particles mostly protons electrons and helium nuclei these agenda at a tiny little speeds by things like Supernova in black holes the data coming from the spectrometer has provided a wealth of information for scientists searching fundamental questions about the nature of antimatter and mysterious dark matter however the unit was only ever designed to operate for around five years and it was never designed to be serviced in space. The problem is the data that it's been providing is so valuable scientists decided. It's worth at least trying to design a way to refurbish it and keep it operational and eventually after a lot of head scratching. They came up with a plan. It involved. Four extra vehicular activities. Or as that's NASA speak for spacewalks the first these as sore astronaut set up equipment handrails until specially designed for the job they then remove the spectrometers protective debris shielding and a vertical support beam and Calloway the Mardi layer insulation calves that encase the killing systems pipes the second. Va so the removal of a cable. Bundle inside the spectrometer capping the remaining wise and then attaching to new power cables spacewalkers. Then began venting depressurizing the cooling system before cutting away more multilayer insulation and then cutting through eight stainless steel coolant pipes. The thirty the ace of the cutting and splicing of the coolant pipes to allow.

T. F. Twenty twenty Fritz Vicky Sky Vicky Facility Telescope Pelham Schmidt Telescope Mount Palomar Observatory United Kingdom Schmidt Telesco Spain John Dr Frit Watson Venezuela Celtics allstate Space Station starbucks Australia Hyundai Ocean Schmidt Va
"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

14:16 min | 1 year ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

"Episode and to you too it's a milestone for reasons i could not possibly glean well well it's probably the some of our ages something like that i was just going to say it's one more episode we added up last week maybe so that's the significance of it but i tell you what we have got a couple of stories today that will make eyebrows piece halons if you can reach that far aw say not withstanding my current partner in crime he we've gotta look at an asteroid that's fair that's been found inside the orbit of venus this has happened that she is in the last couple of weeks there that's been my toe it's pretty astounding you don't think about asteroids asteroids being sort of within that orbit range but there is also another thing that sort of goes a lot further than we thought and that's earth atmosphere in fact it seems the moon passes through the earth's atmosphere what we can walk the we'll investigate that and surprisingly frayed people will go questions about black holes well what a coincidence and what what surprises me so we're going to knock off a couple of those because to be honest if we stopped answering questions black about black holes as we probably wouldn't have any questions to answer but we're going to look at to completely something similar questions very different angles also i suppose you could say someone's got an interesting thought on black hole collisions and we'll we'll get to that in a little while but first of all fred let's talk about this this asteroid that spain found closer to the sun and venus which sounds i mean that sounds normal for some of the time but this is all of the time from what i'm understanding absolutely right and it's it is surprising when i when i was a lad hundred and eighty seven years ago the asteroids allstate there were terribly well behaved they'll stay between the always mars and jupiter we knew of really very few that strayed outside that that range but of course as time has gone on we've discover more and more and more asteroids and there is now a class of asteroids which had called IT ras and i think the named after the i said a prototype of the class which is probably called IT era band IT are asteroids that orbit whose orbits a wholly holy within the orbit of the earth so it's not very commonplace to be an asteroid this we know of many asteroids orbits cross the earth but attila's have orbits air entirely inside the obeserver so they always a near to the sun than the earth but there's only twenty one of them not you know they're not numerous objects and so it's perhaps surprising the we found any an even more extreme example of these and it was found as you said this year in fact the observations were made on the fourth of january twenty twenty hat to a place that in its own strange ways close to my heart because it's the what used to be called the pelham schmidt telescope it's now it's it's basically now called the azad t t f which is vicky transient factory from the americans it's the z. t.f i'm sorry i'm so sorry for that universal a universal language hatred we have indeed yes that's right so few subtleties about this well the telescope itself the reason why i'm very fond of it is that he is the twin effectively of the united kingdom schmidt telescope which is at siding spring observatory and which is actually what brought me to live in australia in the first place hundred years ago the caltech machine the z. t. f. named named after fritz vicky of course the great astronomer in the nineteen twenties and thirties actually the discovery of matter but that's another story the the telescope is a one point two maitre fourteen schmidt telescope and it was the basis of of that element or sometimes called the ocean schmidt now because because it was renamed a few years ago and he's now there's vicky transient facility it it actually telescope was essentially actually modeled on that one also with one point two two diamond to correct so these telescopes are wide angle telescopes they were built for photography i'll tell us go now does something quite different tastes while it will soon when the commissioning work is finished on our new starbucks instrument uses fiber optics to look at many objects at a time whereas the eh contact one of my plumber actually has a wide angle electric camera and adopt his really white can be used for an looking for objects that change in space by changing get brighter dimmer well they move and of course i think moves that's how you find asteroid you look at them at one minute and look at them a few minutes or a few hours later and they've moved in space and that tells you it's a relatively nearby object now that discovery though is unusual because if you think about the orbit off of an object that lies within actually within the earth orbit you're only going to see it soon after sunset or shortly before sunrise because they object toll was going to be close to the sun in the sky and is even more extreme in this case because the object which i'll tell it's nine twenty twenty eight hundred to eight actually as you as you send rice at the beginning it keeps tolbert and tally within the opposite venus not just inside the SOB but inside the over tavini's and of course because it's inside the earth orbit it means it's an arterial asteroid there's a mentioned the ones whose obits are always within the earth's but people are now calling this a vat era because it's within the over to venus and it is the first one that has been discovered how dare we just assume that everything associated with earth i mean exactly negotiations must be getting pretty steamed named yeah they must be an actually are actually getting caught steamed stimulatory that's right so the sulfuric acid drizzle in the rest of it it makes you wonder though whether we'll find ones inside the mercury which might be called matt era asteroids anyway twenty twenty five eighty two the first venus or internal venus asteroid is only no more than three kilometers across across told me quite elongated and in fact when it said these closest to the sun it's not far from the mercury seeing bet your life will will will find a asteroids eventually which are within the office of of of mercury so how did he get there and a while one of the professors offer physics california institute of technology who's actually one of the co discoverers of this object are sorry he's a he's a co investigator later on the vicki transient factory he says in his press release an encounter with a planet probably flung the asteroid into venus's orbit orbit it's the opposite of what happens when space mission swings by a planet for gravity boost instead of gaining energy from a planet it loses it and there is another comment lament as i get stuck it was on its way somewhere and got distracted by google and that was that more komo likely the gravitational pull of maybe mas may be jupiter depends on where started his journey day sell yeah a ah pretty girl in the solar system is venus which is the only female planet so what i said yep that's right so it could have been venus as well another of the colleagues of of tom prince at caltech george hello helu i think he's how you pronounce on c. h. e. l. o. you could be held hello he said getting past the obits of venus must have been challenging the only only way we'll ever get out of its orbit is if it gets flung out via gravitational encounter with mercury venus but more likely it will end up crushing on one of those two planets that's a really interesting prognosis for this little world that yet until the beginning of this year we didn't know about i i suppose oppose we shouldn't be too surprised because there are things coming and going all the time and there are a lot of various forces acting upon and against each other from from time to time it stands to reason that you're not gonna just find asteroids in the outer reaches here we are with twenty one of the murder just just sort of fleeing themselves around in saada sobek going this is nice i can say whatever they want to do really it's all subject check to the the forces of gravity exactly what i think he's the really interesting aspect of this is that people will of course at an encouraged by this discovery look for more because we don't know whether there will these internal salinas orbit asteroids or with a twenty twenty eighty two is unique but notwithstanding this vicki transient factory the z. t. f. the there is a new facility which will come online i think he actually is later this year it's i've been in construction for a good while maybe ten years or so i saw last year on top of the mountain in northern chile it's a until very recently it was called l. s. t. which is the large synoptic survey telescope mehta class telescope which will survey the entire southern sky every week effectively every six nights well that's right and that will be turning up objects wchs small objects in the solar system like you've never heard before so chances are you're gonna love this trade chances are we're gonna find a moamoa i do like that yes maybe even talking of naming weird names i'm glad you mentioned because it lets me segue to something to say a coating last week on the what was being cold large synoptic survey telescope has been renamed it has a full name which i'm absolutely delighted with because it commemorates one of the one of the greatest women in astronomy vera rubin so it will be called vera rubin observatory when it comes online and that's a great night zero of of course also the person who put that my thrown them out back in the nineteen seventies indeed and it's a good thing that changing the names of telescopes the scopes doesn't bring the same bad luck is changing the names of ships so all is well it's bad luck to rename a boat or ship are don't know y but i'm tired that's the case whether or not anything happens i don't know the bach and deva which is one of the great ships in history they used to be called something completely different it was a coal scuttle or something yeah well let me so the an interesting footnote to that is that the certainly the two telescopes which i've been responsible here in australia the anglo-australian telescope on the united kingdom schmidt telescope even though the the institutions that run them have gone through several changes the names of been sacrosanct today were built is those things and that's how they're state so it's nothing to do with look just you know moldes convenient cape eight the same names because otherwise you get mixed up with things like the ocean schmidt in those mickey transit factory one of the greatest challenges was anglo has stri conservatory to australian astronomical observatory because they didn't have to change the logo is better than that because the sydney end of that institution itution these now australia national takes they've still got the same logo we putting together in nineteen ninety one that is just beautiful yeah offense we know how to save money andrew yes indeed looking around designing new law goes if you stick with the name of the place changes changes it's it's brilliant all right so now we know that they were going to go look for more of these these these asteroids orbiting living within earth's orbit and famous for that matter and probably mercury's as well but this twenty one so far there may be more you're listening to new space nuts andrew dunkley here with of course fred what's systems space.

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"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

14:19 min | 1 year ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

"There are protections which are more or less effective depending on you the local circumstances just like to go back a little bit to talk about spectroscopy again and specifically ask you about your role well in developing multi object spectroscopy. I had never. I know what that is. Please explain an executive order it. Does this marvelous marvelous technique invented by William Huggins effectively the idea of using a spectroscopy for a spectrum graph which records the spectrum originally it was photographic now hold on electrically to workout. What's going on in the heavens? That became very much stock in trade astronomers during the first seventy years of the twentieth century. Words up until the nineteen eighties. It still is but the a big change happened in the early nineteen eighties. Because in the early days you had to meet your observations one star at the time. It was the only way a telescope under spectograph combination could work then in the late one thousand nine hundred seventy s a man with us absolutely delightful name Roger Angell who looked to the heavens German Brit. He works at the University of Arizona Eh. He's retired now. Still one of American astronomer astronomy very favorite strenuous Roger. Angell thought well outside outside the box in terms of how you could use technology to to you know improve astronomy and he got mixed up with fiber optics now fiber optics were until nineteen seventy. Were essentially an entertaining diversion. What what they are is stones of glass very fine strands of what we now use for fines and yes? That's right exactly. It's actually not quite a few silica which is classy. Material material drawn into these fines strands seldom more than a tenth of a millimeter diameter with the hair. It's it's yes that's about twice the width of very very fine. And they have the property that like put light in at one end and it will come out of the the other now they were known back in the nineteen fifties lava lamp lava lamp different ones. And the Yes. That's right all right. Yeah go sorry for my aside. There they were known back in the nineteen fifties these fiber optics but it was only in nineteen seventy that the corning glass works in the United States manage to draw fibers. Because that's how you make them start off with a block of glass and then you melt it and pull it out into these strengths. And they manage to draw fibers with extremely low losses by that. It means that if you put light in at one end most of it comes out the other disruption eruption. Well it's it's attenuation is. The technical is a reduction in the amount of light absorbed by the fiber before that you put light in at one into not tiny dribble came out of the but from nine hundred seventy with these what were called low loss optical fibers that's when they became a potential chill for the communications industry and so Calling it it allows sound and light to pass through it does allow any other it allows. There's light to pass through it. You Can put light in at one end and it will come out the other if you want to transmit sound through it. You've got to turn that sound signal into light clever modulating citing a light source you imprint. A sound wave on through and and that transmit through the fiber comes out the other end. You need decode and you get the sound route. So that's how communications work but astronomers and Roger Angell in particular. He thought well. These things are brilliant because astronomers are always jealously regarding the amount of light that they receive because it is so faint usually we're talking about single photons. Individual particles light so can can we use these newfangled optical fibers and in fact he's first idea was to have many many telescopes smallish telescopes all coupled together with optical fibers. So Oh you gather the light from all these telescopes and bring it back to a single place and you cannot do all the light together on one single object or one single object. That's right but then he turned the idea on its head and realized that with one big telescope which is looking at an area of sky instead of just taking one star or Galaxy Alexey from within that field of view you can actually use these optical fibers to line per fiber on many many objects simultaneously. So let me get this right. We have a field of sky. We have maybe a planet or is that too close. We don't bother with planets looking at enough galaxies and fire off stars and we could have fifteen or twenty items in sky and we could be looking at all of them and getting this barcode information from the stars Civil Tony's because you you can put a fiber on each one and in fact the first one I built actually had thirty nine optical fibers which by the standards of the day were quite quite large means thirty thirty nine objects simultaneously. So what what Roger Angell duty you got a PhD student. By the name of John Hill to work on this build something called Medusa which Medusa head thank you and that had think twenty-five fibers and they tried it out on a telescope in Arizona at the Steward Observatory and it worked. It was a technique that worked really well L. But then astronomers Australia got hold of the idea and in particular an engineer at the Angle Shirley Telescope by the name of Peter Gray. He worked out that you could engineer this thing. In a far more effective way the Medusa I worked with Peter. He was working with the anglo-australian telescope. I worked with a small telescope telescope called the United Kingdom Schmidt telescope which has a very wide field of view and together we produced a kind of workable optical tickle fiber systems for these two telescopes which kind of took the lead in the world on this science. Could you tell us the names of these. Well Peter Peterbilt you built the. What was it called fiber optic coupler psychot- remember the name but it turned into fo cap that was the acronym I built? Something called the fiber linked array imagery for matter which was flare then flare worse built in the early nineteen eighties. It was the first multi-fibre telescope spectroscopy system that coupled telescope to a spectrum graph which was actually stationary in the dome. Now that sounds weird an esoteric but what it meant was the spectrum of which is a very delicate piece of equipment was not riding around on the back of the telescope. It was fixed on the floor and was incredibly stable. And that's so we were the first to do that. So flair was the pioneer. Then I built a second version. Because flair had certain inadequacies the second one was the panoramic area coverage with higher efficiency. which was panache panache? A Well what clearly came next finesse. Until one of my colleagues said Venus stands for fails to interest nearly everyone saves spectrograph engineers engineers well. She called it flat to then evolved to a robotic system with more boring name of sixty F- with one one hundred fifty fibers that was commissioned in two thousand one and now a building an amazing machine called Taipan which uses things called starbucks so each optical fiber sixty had robot a single robot move the fibers around but with Taipan h fiber dopey. Three hundred in the end has its own micro robot round meanwhile anglo-australian telescope back in one thousand nine hundred ninety six built something called to death to the F. stands for two degree field. That's the amount of sky the thing sees in two F. Four hundred fibers but after tell you the aero which now stands for Australian astronomical optics used to be the Australian Astronomical Observatory. Hey always building. A system with more than four hundred fibers for telescope in Europe a European European telescope straight cuts way up doesn't it. It really does punch above its weight with regards to -nology develops right. That's why Australian astronomers Jonas have had such an given where small country because we have this equipment that we build it probably more effectively than anywhere else Somebody said we should call ourselves. Fibers are us. Because that's what we do. We do optical fibers the tech. The technique technique is in use around the world but many of the ones that are used elsewhere ones that have been built started struggling anticipate so just keeping bring on technology. Same here I heard Margaret Atwood before papal. She's the person that wrote. The Maidens Tail Modem Handmaiden handmaidens and. She comment was that old. Technologies have got good use a bad use and stupid. I use that we never considered and just thinking about lights and particularly with astronomy. What would you think the good the bad and the stupid well look for optical astronomy that's visible light astronomy not now talking about radio astronomers rexroad strong because these these are all different disciplines? Although we're all looking at the same things in a different way and often those results all piece together optical astronomers and and they're talking trades light so they are obsessed with light a more especially obsessed with with actually getting the very the best information from lies so the good is what we learn from from the from from the sky by Sifting light through the spectrum and other types of interest yep yep the baddies light pollution. So that's when light. which is it's been used for completely innocent purpose but gets out of hand in particularly in the light plumes of cities and and really goes back to the early twentieth century when councils putting lights with really no regard to what that was doing tonight sky because we simply simply never thought about it was becoming a problem by the time of the Second World War? It's really interesting. Is that in Los Angeles which is very next very very near the Mount Wilson Observatory in fact exceed Los Angeles from Mount Wilson. Where at the time? The biggest telescope in the world was during the second world. War centuries had had blackouts in order to to mitigate the possibility of invasion and during that time huge astronomical discoveries as were made because the the night sky koby seeing properly from moments again So it was inadvertent. So that's the bad side just on that I. I've attended some conferences in the U. K.. And one of the issues that they have when they talk about. Trying to mitigate light pollution the K.. Is that if you start talking to pay pooped in that sort of generation of about turning of streetlights and they feel like it's taking them back to that so I just like the blackout out to do that in blackout. Yes or no. I remember people saying that's true but it's not a blackout. I mean what we're talking about now is good lighting eh because this been huge progress in the last twenty years with understanding the ills of light pollution and not just for astronomers where the where the least least important in many ways of of the consequences of Bob Lighting. I again when I talk to groups about pollution. I often or haven't often and but I have been asked by people worldwide. Do we have to keep the lights down for the astronomers. When you've got a whole heaven stars you know? Why can't they study the start of the left or the brightest star or whatever and I think in some ways we lost that argument where we talked thirty years ago when when the International Dark Sky Association started and it was astronomers saying are we losing our night sky that that story was lost on the general public? I didn't understand the information that you're getting about heaven. That's probably true thing I'm most people think an astronomer is middle age bald man with a white coat. Who's got a long spindly telescope? And just spend his nights looking through uh-huh nothing could be further from the truth. It's all about you know. Well directed a scientific problems. We're trying to understand the universe because that understanding my actually actually turn out to be really useful to us one day and it's it's conducted in a very very progressive ways. Not just looking mistake. The sake of looking were studying and of course. The great thing is that it's no longer and more pulled middle aged man we we are. How far more diverse? So that's the good in a bed. Yeah stupid stupid. Use of technology that maybes. He's come through astronomy through light and and I know of things you talked about. Doppler effect isn't so I actually almost Lump the fiber optics work that I was talking about into their it certainly quirky. Because in you know I in one thousand nine hundred seventy. Nobody had thaw in this direction. It was Roger Angell towards the end of the nineteen seventies. We're thinking outside the box or this to what you could use these technologies for and I do remember number when I started working on this in one thousand..

Roger Angell United Kingdom Schmidt telesco Angle Shirley Telescope University of Arizona Eh William Huggins International Dark Sky Associa executive United States starbucks engineer Europe Margaret Atwood Steward Observatory Australian Astronomical Observ Los Angeles Galaxy Alexey Peter Peterbilt Australia Peter
"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

14:32 min | 1 year ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

"Space nuts and numbers of building rather nicely on our youtube channel which is very very good all era besides lights are on Youtube we pushing on relentlessly to the magic one thousand followers? We've only got one thousand ago now. That's not true. Three hundred twenty three hundred three hundred and twelve should do it now the three hundred twelve. Gm Max's terrible should be an astronomer Toronto three hundred and twelve mall and we'll hit the magic one thousand followers on Youtube Channel. So if your Youtube love as I am I am just Subscribed to us and then just lookin' bit gets the numbers up never said that Atlanta. Now let's get into some questions Fred and this one comes from a repeat offender named Malls Bradley Hyphen Andrew. Sending another question. You'll way this one is for my GRANDPA. AH The determine age of the universe seems to be related to the distance of the farthest known discovered object. Right wouldn't it have taken us much longer longer to become that far apart. Is the question from GRANDPA Bradley. Bradley could be two allows for sending your GRANDPA's question. Fred will answer in twenty words. Do you want them in the row. So the most I guess. The the simplest way and of determining the age of the universe is not really about the distance. The fathers object. It is certain evolves looking at distant objects. But what you do. Is You find a way of measuring that distance and there are a number of ways to do that. usually evolving particular type of variable stock. The CEPHEID variable. You find find that distance and you you also look at how fast. They're moving away from us because they expansion of the universe. And then you can plot what's called the Hubble Diagram and the reason it's called that was Edwin Hubble. Was the first person to do it. While you plot the distance of galaxy against its velocity of recession as he's called the movement movement away from us and that essentially gives you Y- basically turned upside down and look at. Okay say so. Everything's moving away from us. That means that some time in the distant past we were all in one place and you can essentially turn the question upside down and he can measure the time back to win two zero when everything was in the same place. Invite you if you do that. You get an answer this slightly wrong about fifteen billion years And that's partly because we now know that a lot out of other things have happened in between the subtleties to this. But that's just the basic method so it's so it just going through to the to the end of a Bradley's grump soy miles. Broadly crump US US question. Wouldn't it have taken as much longer to become that far apart So yes he can look distant objects and say that a long way they off but they fit that relationship that I've just a explained it's more when you when you look right back to the beginning when we see what's called the cosmic microwave background radiation. which is the flash of the Big Bang itself that tells us that the was a time in the various area history of the universe when expanded very rapidly indeed the first gazillions of a second that went from you know the size of a pay to the size of a galaxy galaxy a tiny tiny space of time since it is but but it but but the reason why believe that happened is there's no other way of accounting counting for the uniform? Microwave background is across the whole sky. A and so we know that there was a time when the universe expanded they very very rapidly but the objects themselves within it all a you know they all fit the bill then they are part of the more sedate expansion. That has taken place since that time. No not really not answering this very well but it turns out that there is actually a problem with the distances of the things that we measure they within the age of the universe. Let me put it that way. So wouldn't have taken as much longer to become that far apart. No so you could have done so I took no twenty one thousand two hundred but hopefully that that clears it up malls GRANDPA and thank you for the question malls really appreciate it. Good to hear from you again. Let's move on. Hello Fred and Dave are this is GonNa be Brock. GotTa be cheese from Canada. My question is related to an article which he sent us a copy off in this article it talks about a star that went supernova twice and looking at the pictures the Supernova is a tiny dot in a distant galaxy hat. Can we be sure that it was the exact same star that exploded they possibly thousands slash millions of stars that could be in the vicinity of this dot in a very far far away galaxy or a galaxy far far away even brock that it could be thank you as always from your fan brock wrong. Thank you Barack. Well Dave that was a really good question I saw I saw plus he advocate. That's right look broke. His absolutely on. The money is a great question so I followed followed. The story and I know you did as well and in fact read the original plaintiff. This is all about it comes. It comes from some work that was done in published in twenty twenty seventeen almost exactly two years ago. And it's about a star in a distant galaxy the went Supernova it became very very bright. Sort of outshining the rest of the galaxy a Supernova. Do and the things about take the suggested that it was a fairly standard I think type one a Supernova which is one of the standard ones a car in the data checkup up on that But but actually it subsequent observations revealed that it was far from normal Because yes yes. He got bright and then it faded but then he got bright again. The name faded. Let me go bright again then faded then again then again five times sir over a period of something like five hundred days to you know getting them for two years so this is completely different from the behavior of a noble noble a noble Supernova. It clearly doing something else. It brightens and fades over this this period typically of the order of one hundred days. Something like that. So that was a from an event that that was observed in two thousand. Fourteen faded got brighter. Did it five times actually. Over in total it was it was served. Three years still really not fully understood but what what the scientists did there was so uh-huh you know this. This thing have been discovered that she by a telescope very similar to our United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope In Mountain near San Diego That's one of the classic telescopes of all time. But they now operate in cold Was He called the Supernova factory. Something that so. It's not unusual an unusual name. It's it's the Palomar transient factory. That's that's what the telescope is now cold and it looks for things that varying brightness so that was how established they sing was walloping up and down in brightness from two thousand fourteen for the next three years or so but what they did was look through our data look back through two older photographs graphs of the same part of the sky and sure enough in nineteen fifty nine they found a brightening dot is sorry it was big about nine hundred fifty four and not nineteen fifty nine the same area of the Sky Fred celebrated his fortieth birthday exactly. That's that's right. Don't you forget it. whippersnapper assert so brooks question in his on the money because you know the nineteen fifty four nine. I have a photograph of it. Right in front of me is a faint smudge of a galaxy where the Blob in the blob probably encompasses as brock says millions of stars that could be within that Blob of light but the the Aja that it is the same object and the reason for that is that this behavior is so unusual and as I said it's not yet fully understood it is so unusual that The overwhelming likelihood is that that object is the same thing that was shining in nineteen fifty four now just to cover the authors of this work in that paper which was published in nature can twenty seventeen lean and it has a list of about I would guess looking at that is about sixty says. It's a clearly a huge team They describe the The the event in their first sentence is a great one every supernova so far observed as being considered to be the terminal explosion of a star. They won't clearly isn't over three years. It bounced up and down as we've said but then later on in the abstract they say another a possible eruption was recorded at the same position in nineteen fifty four. And so what they're saying is it's only a possibility but it is the overwhelming likelihood that this was the same object now not using that data from nine hundred fifty four in any way to muddle. What's going on with these object for that? They've views The brightness measurements that they've made and by the way they've continued using observatory fairly close to our heart at siding spring. The last congress abreast observatory because one of the big two meter. Telescopes is that there's another one on On the island of Maui so place that has Associations with Australia so that that using the those telescopes to monitor the brightness of this object as it goes down and essentially drawing the conclusion that it's probably the same thing that was bright in nine hundred fifty four and there's a really good chance at that was the case thoughts. What's another question though for What what they're saying is This is star. That's gone supernova more than once so the question pops India Brian is. How is that possible? So yes so. This is the exact mechanism of what the star is. And some people have speculated. Is something called a pulse ation pair instability Supernova. I'm one of the call of the paper comments on that. He this is according to this. Theory is possible that this was the result of a star so massive and hopped that it generated antimatter in its core. Aw that would cause the star to go. Violently unstable and undergo repeated bright eruptions over periods of years. And Dan is a calculation to say before the first explosion. Whenever that was it might have been before nine hundred fifty four stars at least fifty times as massive as the the song and probably larger another of the call is coming so these explosions were only expected to be seen in the universe and she'll be extinct today day and suggests that this curious object is like finding a dinosaur still alive today then he says if you found one you would question whether it truly was a dinosaur is a really interesting piece of work that we don't really understand what is caused but it selling very unusual and we could popoff again they could drop again? Yeah what is doing certainly until when the paper was actually after say that towards the end of the period that is covered by the paper it was definitely fading To you know below the level of well to almost level of a normal Supernova is it it security subject and the great news is that they less Cumbria's observatory that Global Telescope Network which is what they've got He's able to keep an eye on this part of the sky almost indefinitely And so the this global telescope network. He's probably probably going to show us whether there's another eruption what that might look like so they are. It's an ongoing story which I think is very interesting so uh probably most likely almost definitely the same star rather than Yup Yup separate stars or more. Okay thanks Brooke appreciate appreciate the question and it's thought provoking as always now. Let's move on to a question from Andrew Brewed. How Broadhurst? Now you're GONNA have have to do some explaining he. Lucy Hi Andrew and Fred. I've purchased seventy electronic astronomic time for switching on a do control system in my observatory way too much speed on the unit.

Fred GRANDPA Bradley brock Youtube Global Telescope Network Edwin Hubble Toronto US United Kingdom Schmidt Telesco Dave Atlanta Canada Andrew Brewed Cumbria Broadhurst Dan Brooke Lucy Hi Andrew
"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

14:36 min | 2 years ago

"united kingdom schmidt telescope" Discussed on Space Nuts

"Reported feels. Oh good hello again. Thank you for joining us on the space knots podcast and we are celebrating episode one hundred and eighty eighty which is extraordinary. Because I can't count that high as a general rule and joining me as always is professor. Fred what's an astronomer at large. Hello Fred Hi Andrew. How you doing well? One hundred eighty episodes. It makes me think you and I should get a life. You know. Yes yes. You're probably right. Although I enjoy this much I really get a kick out of it. And I'm so thrilled when we get emails and messages from people to say how much they love it too. so that's that's fantastic and we had dedicating these whole episode two questions from the audience. Most of these fairly recent questions. And I've certainly got the Brian Working at ninety two dozen Detroit come up with some some thoughts and hopefully come up with some answers will you. I'm just going to sit here and look like an idiot but yeah we'll get into those shortly. I've got to tell you Fred astronomically. Speaking yesterday in town we had a massive smoke haze because we had an easterly breeze and that brought in all the smoke from the coastal fires that we've been having these last few weeks in New South Wales and I thought in win the sunsets. There could be some really good photos to be taken so I took my camera down to the end of the road. Because there's a hill behind us and the sun sits behind it this time of year with a grove of trees on top and I thought get some snaps. Boy Oh boy did I I. They are amazing. I particularly particularly like the one way or the sun was behind a grove of trees and I took a A close up at forty times optical zoom and it looks like the Tracer Razer on fire. It is showed them to you. Tell me how good they offer it. Very good the spectacular. And of course what you're seeing there is effect of scattering was the Sun sinks down into a smoke laden atmosphere this phenomenon phenomenon of Rayleigh scattering kicks in. It only works if the particles are small. So you could probably tell by the amount of red light that you're seeing around the sun just have smaller particles as well as fantastic stuff really good stuff if one of my favorites is took from the backyard. I've sort of over the neighbor's yard and the appropriately won't royalties nab because because one of his plants had Leif turned up in sort of a cup shape and I actually the sun sitting in it. Which looks really really nice? So I'm very happy with them. They are on my facebook page. If you want to track Dan and my instagram pages. Well put some there and on twitter. Ah on Tumbler and on pinterest everywhere dear listeners. You probably get the impression that under his quite proud of these. The agenda is beautifully anyway. We'd better get down you. I've been doing this weekend. Well Yeah you better. You better Philippine not photography but We were very honored this week. to have a visit from Linda Tom Spilka and you probably will recognize recognize that night. Melinda is the Cassini project scientist so she came over at the invitation of the Department of Industry Innovation. Chance chance to do some Monday we were at Macquarie University doing a public lecture. The hat on Tuesday at questioning camera doing public lecture there and she also gave colloquium to the Planetary Science Planetary Sciences Department. mcquarry so Linda is a fantastic person. She is not only the you know the mastermind the mind behind what I think is one of the best ever Planetary Robotic planetary exploration missions. But she's a really nice person as well and Was So generous with our time we had some very very long and really interesting chats about not just Cassini many other aspects expires flights as well Tom. Linda's husband is a planetary scientist to and a space engineer and his passion as he's for spacecraft which have artificial gravity and he's currently very deep in the design of a spacecraft which would would be Remember actually so the order of a couple of hundred meters in diameter very much along the lines of the space of the space station in two thousand and one but it has lunar gravity so it rotates at just the right right to give you luna gravity. That's to allow all kinds of commissioning to be done for instruments and equipment at not to mention astronauts who will eventually go to the moon. It's brilliant stuff. It was an exciting couple of days. We have had a couple of questions in recent times asking about the development of artificial gravity. So there it is it is actually something something that's been seriously considered. That's exciting news. Let's move to our first question. This one comes from Andrew. Hugh pokka okay. That's three people by the way so another sixty styling. Satellites are in orbit and a bunch of fresh articles smashing spacex over how they our threat to astronomy itself. I'm curious to hear what people are actually signing in the astronaut Michael Community. How much do these articles reflect the thoughts off off the astronomy community? I would expect that spicy six have done their research into this. I would also hope that if it indeed posed a threat to astronomy. They wouldn't wouldn't go ahead with their plans in saying that though they aren't the only company company Dreaming Up plans for Constellation. Shortly at least one of these companies would have taken astronomy. Astronomy into consideration especially SPACEX and blue origin by chasing space exploration with astronomy being critical to their mission. Fred what's going on asks. Andrew Hugh Parker thanks Andrew Andrew. The kind of touched a nerve that because that's absolutely right there is. There is a lot on the webb. It's come to. This is of course been brought to the attention of the world. By the fact that SPACEX launch two batches of sixty satellites one in May one in November and these relatively bright objects air in low earth orbit. But but they're just the precursor from a much larger constellation of satellites in fact that the styling program that space x as undertaking taking eventually. We'll have well. The number is eleven thousand. Nine hundred. Forty three voted in orbit. And that's just one of a number of projects to launch constellations of satellites which number in the thousands these specifically for Internet Internet Internet access to give the world the same sort of access to the Internet that you get from the Central European city for example something like that Really high speed broadband. It is an issue. There is no question about that and the has. It's been quite a lot of work done within the professional community to really try and quantify the risk. What's happening in terms of what? What would? How will it impact on imagery? That's being carried out by a large telescopes and the bottom line. Is that the the telescopes that will be the most affected by this are imaging telescopes. That's to say ones that. Take Him ages rather than taking spectrum. The you know the the rainbow and and Diagnostic that we use such a lot in astronomy imaging telescopes but particularly wide field. Telescopes those without a broad field of you you and we kind of know about this one. I used to be connected with the United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope. which is I thirty years took took seventy images of the sky these photographic plates of course rather than CCD detectors But we noticed the number of play steadily really increasing over the history of that telescope with satellite trails on them. A satellites actually increased now. That of course was in mini. Her when you could probably count the number of opera operational satellites well not in the fingers in one hand but not much more than that and now we're talking about a completely new era so wide field imaging telescopes will be most affected. Perhaps the one most critically affected will be the st the large synoptic survey telescope which is being built not far from US arena in northern Chile That has a wide angle of view on his job is to rapidly. Image the sky okay so it covers the whole sky every week just about every six nights and that perhaps has all the professional telescopes. That's the one that might be most significantly affected. Of course the the the other large area where wide-angle imaging telescopes he uses in the community. They see how much time and too many have asked spice nuts community. That's probably realized as well so there will be an effect there so yes you know I've done have been made to these companies Elon Musk says he is engaging with astronaut community he's talked about coating the spacecraft with low reflective material to try and minimize the the optical reflection but there is no doubt that he's aware of it the community selfies. The there's a there's a whole spectrum of responses from absolute outraged to Well we just gotTa get on with it that one of the issues with spicy. I think I'm right in saying that. Some of the space craft in mean pretty low office I think five hundred and fifty kilometres is the lowest over that they will use expected to the K.. Fairly rapidly okay. So so it's A. It's a more fluid population of satellites nevertheless. It's a lot and especially if we got many other companies doing the same sort of thing we might see a doubling of that number we might be talking about twenty thousand spacecraft so very interesting stuff a very interesting time for astronomy. I don't believe it's forecast. The end of optical astronomy and some people said I think there's much more to it than that that but we will survive. But yes it's it's an interesting Issue and the big you know the the the the the the best outcome or perhaps that the way to to deal with this and I think this is really. What's happening is dialogue between these operators and the International Astronomical union particularly telescope concerns like the launch an uptick survey telescope so radio telescopes? Because I would imagine Jim because there's so many of these and they're all using radio signals that have to block out some of the spectrum well so the radio spectrum already divided up into so you know in two bands that are available for communications and bans. The town on Barak election. Did look at this one back in May. When that first trans-youth a satellites was launched by styling and I think we're pretty clear of a critical way bands that used in radio strongly? But that you you know that that bandwidth is always under pressure. The communications industry always wants to try and extend the range of frequencies that they can use coast the radius. Join me for eternity. Basically pushes back on that because these frequencies that if you cloud them out by satellites to lights and you know when you think about the square kilometer range in Western Australia it's radio quiet part of the world if you've got satellites going overhead that a broadcasting getting on frequencies that used by the telescope. Then you've got bad news. But my recollection from what Luta earlier is that. That's not the case they want Andrew. Hopefully Fred has told you what's going on in. Thanks for your question. Let's move on. I love this one for this is this is a beautiful a mile from Franchesca iskoe in Cincinnati. Hi guys go the Bengals Andrew dismal season so fi last. I looked Francesco. Nine that is not. There's there's not good season anyway. She goes on to say. I'm a junior astro physics student at the University of Cincinnati Cincinnati currently working with a professor of mine on Cosmic Microwave background radiation and finding gravitational waves using bio weapon kick in the South Pole. I've been listening to you guys. Let's roll musty. I even played your show through a speaker at an observing event at Cincinnati Observatory where I volunteer. We have the oldest continually operated telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. Your show never fails to make me small. That's lovely I was listening to episode one seven five. I think we're Andrews said that. In his opinion you know. Young girl won the telescope picture contest on facebook. That was me. I was freaking out that I was albeit indirectly mentioned in my favorite show. I have a quick question. I was hoping for it could clarify gravitational lenzing for me. I understand that in some Hubble images there is a foreground on galaxy which distorts the image behind it almost acting like a magnifying glass. But I just can't get my head around how it works. Thank you so much you guys seriously. The the best lots of love from the US. Francesca Pierce Fred. Give Mandawa kiss for me. He's eight Saly the cutest cat. I follow on twitter. That's lovely love of that. Well next time I see him. I'm in Melbourne..

Fred Hi Andrew Linda Tom Spilka facebook twitter Andrew Andrew US Constellation SPACEX Planetary Science Planetary Sc Rayleigh Detroit Macquarie University Francesca Pierce Fred Elon Musk instagram Hugh pokka New South Wales Cincinnati Observatory