22 Burst results for "United Ireland"

A new Ireland in the works?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:23 min | 6 months ago

A new Ireland in the works?

"The people of Ireland have spoken. It may take a while yet to figure out what they said. Last Saturday's general election represents arguably the biggest recalibration of the Republic of politics in nearly a century since the modern state was founded in one thousand nine hundred ninety two power has mostly been traded between two parties fina foil and Finna Gale on Saturday a third party elbowed its way dramatically into prominence Shin Fain the party known in recent times principally as the semi respectable front organization of the IRA in Northern Ireland and widely regarded as a somewhat unsavory fringed. Presence in the republic shouldn't find one more votes than fina foil off in a gale and went with you whisker of becoming the biggest party in Ireland's parliament the doyle Shin Fain seem to have succeeded by addressing widespread anxieties about healthcare and housing rather than by prioritizing the animated cause of a reunited island. But that does not reduce the headache inflicted upon the establishment rivals. Who now face an uneasy choice between working with Shin Fain or around them? How and why did this happen? And what happens now and Shin Find Success Make United Ireland. More likely will possibly ironically less

Shin Fain Northern Ireland Finna Gale United Ireland
"united ireland" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

08:08 min | 6 months ago

"united ireland" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"Twelve dollars or twelve pounds. I up could United Ireland. Become a reality for most of the century since island gained independence from Britain. Control of the country has alternated between two parties on February eighth. That you up early was smashed apart when Shin Fain got the largest share of first preference votes in the Republic's general election the party with links to the Irish Republican Army or IRA which bombed and shot its way through the nineteen seventies nineteen eighties and nineteen ninety s one with a left-wing platform that included promises to spend more on health and housing yet. It did not hide. Its desire for something a lot. More ambitious our core political objective. Its manifesto read is to achieve Irish unity and the referendum on unity which is the means to secure this. Scottish independence has grabbed headlines since brexit. But it is time to recognize the chances of different secession from the United Kingdom Shin Fain Success at the election is just the latest reason to think that a united Ireland within a decade also is a real and growing possibility. That prospect means something far beyond the island of Ireland. The Irish diaspora includes more than twenty million Americans. Parties to ethnic conflicts across the world have long found common cause with Northern Ireland's Roman Catholics who contend that the separation from the south is an illegitimate vestige of five hundred years of incompetent and often callous domination from London island source of pubs poets playwrights and too many Eurovision songs for anyone's good has soft power to rival a country many times it size until today however unification has never been more than a republican fantasy even as the IRA waged a bloody campaign. In the twentieth century. The North's constitutional status was cemented by a solid Protestant majority and the financial and military backing of the British state. The Good Friday Agreement of Nineteen Ninety eight took the heat out of the struggle bringing an end to the troubles which had claimed over three thousand five hundred lives. Many Catholics were content to have representation in Northern Ireland's government thanks to that agreement and to see their culture flag and sports celebrated and subsidized. The Protestants have their terrorists. Two and a campaign for unification was thought to risk opening old wounds with bloody consequences. Brexit is one reason all this has changed. The North voted against but the biggest unionist party and England voted for nationalists. Were not the only ones to be angered by the current home secretary who suggested using the threat of food shortages to soften up the south in the negotiations heedless of the famine in the eighteen forties when all of Ireland was under British rule. Brexit also creates an economic border in the Irish Sea between Northern Ireland and Britain even as it keeps a Ireland for goods. Although services will become harder to trade with the south trading goods will be easier than with Britain in the North's six counties are affected more by what happens in Dublin the value of having a say in who governs there will grow the pressure for unification is about more than Brexit Northern Ireland census. In Two thousand twenty one is likely to confirm that Catholics Outnumber Protestants for the first time. The Republic has also become more welcoming. The influence of the Catholic Church has faded dramatically and society has become more liberal over the past three decades restrictions on contraception have been lifted. And gay marriage has been legalized. All this explains why support for unification in Northern Ireland appears to have risen in recent years in some polls respondents show roughly equal support for it and the status quo that leads to the last reason for thinking. The unification is more likely even though the Good Friday Agreement reconciled some Catholics to remaining in the United Kingdom it also set out how the North could peacefully rejoin the republic British Secretary of state. Who thinks it likely that a majority favors unification is bound to call a vote on the North's constitutional status to change the republic's constitution another referendum would be required in the south the EU has already said that Northern Ireland could rejoin the block and Ireland's membership after such a vote meaning that for Northern Irish voters a referendum on Irish unity is also a second referendum on brexit unlike an independent Scotland which would have to go it alone at least until the E. U. agreed to admit it Northern Ireland would immediately rejoin a larger richer club from which it could win big subsidies if not perhaps as big as the subsidy it gets from. Westminster today there are obstacles and uncertainties Shin Veins. Recent success may turn summoned the North Against Unification. Brexit may turn out to have less effect than expected. A British Secretary of State may use the wriggle-room in the Good Friday Agreement to hold off calling a referendum many British politicians. Worry that such a vote would be an administrative headache or worse provoke violence so to their Irish counterparts barring Shin Fain though they must always be seen to be fully behind unification yet sooner than most people expect the momentum for United Ireland could come to seem unstoppable if Scotland chooses independence many in Northern Ireland would lose their ancestral connection to Britain. If the government in Westminster persistently refused to recognize that there was a majority in favor of unification in Northern Ireland. That could be just as destabilising as cooling a referendum. The Island of Ireland needs a plan. The priority should be to work out how to make unionists feel that they have a place in a new Ireland. Work is needed on the nuts and bolts of unification including how to and indeed whether to merge to health systems one of which is free the armed forces and police services and what to do about the North's devolved assembly. It helps that the republic has a fine record for the sort of citizen lead constitutional consultations. That might help sort things out. Politicians from Britain and Ireland need to stop talking to the price of ending violence. Two decades ago was for Northern Ireland the Republic and Britian to jointly set out a political route to a united Ireland if the people of the North and the republic choose that path. The politicians must follow it.

united Ireland Northern Ireland United Ireland Brexit Northern Ireland Britain Brexit Island of Ireland Ireland Shin Fain United Kingdom Shin Fain Irish Republican Army IRA Westminster Scotland Irish Sea United Kingdom secretary
"united ireland" Discussed on AP News

AP News

10:48 min | 6 months ago

"united ireland" Discussed on AP News

"Ireland's political parties scrambling to adjust to a new reality off to a shock result that so the left wing nationalist parties shin Fane with the biggest share of the vote historically linked to the Irish Republican Army all I all right and it's violent struggle for a United Ireland the party received 24.5 percent of the first preference votes in Saturday's election that bested the 2 centrist parties the governor's island since it won independence from Britain a century ago shin fans left wing proposals for tackling Allen's housing crisis and creaking healthcare system proved a powerful tool for young voters I'm Charles de Ledesma

Ireland Irish Republican Army United Ireland Britain Allen Charles de Ledesma shin Fane 24.5 percent
Irish election produces an earthquake as Sinn Fein tops poll

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 6 months ago

Irish election produces an earthquake as Sinn Fein tops poll

"Ireland's political parties scrambling to adjust to a new reality off to a shock result that so the left wing nationalist parties shin Fane with the biggest share of the vote historically linked to the Irish Republican Army all I all right and it's violent struggle for a United Ireland the party received twenty four point five percent of the first preference votes in Saturday's election that bested the two centrist parties the governor's island since it won independence from Britain a century ago shin fans left wing proposals for tackling Allen's housing crisis and creaking healthcare system proved a powerful tool for young voters I'm Charles de Ledesma

Ireland Irish Republican Army United Ireland Britain Allen Charles De Ledesma Shin Fane
"united ireland" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:17 min | 6 months ago

"united ireland" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Still to come on the show on Sunday Switzerland heads to the polls. They're voting on a law. That would make it illegal to discriminate based on sexual Oriented many Swiss people overrate. How modern our country is it might be rich but concerning LGBT rights? It's really not modern and yet that's still ahead right here on the world. I'm Marco Werman. This is the world. Say the words Xinfang Vein and you might think of the hardline. Irish Nationalist Party a party associated with the terror group the IRA in Northern Ireland but in vain is now a big player in the Republic of Ireland quick geography reminder that is the independent Ireland on the southern side of the Emerald Isle for decades to center right parties have dominated politics there but new opinion polls show Shin Fain in the lead on the eve of a general election tomorrow. I asked the world's Orla Barry London about this shakeup in Irish politics. It's it's a real shock marco traditionally as you said we have these two center right. Parties Phoenix Phoenix Sale. They're the ones who've been battling it out sharing power back back and forth for the last essentially hundred years since independence in the nineteen twenties from Britain and to see Shin Fain come ahead like this in the most recent recent poll last weekend really took everyone by surprise. These are the highest polling numbers at the party has ever received since entering the Irish parliament decades ago go it should by the way. Come with a caveat though because Xinfeng often do quite well in polls and then on election day vote often collapses. Is there a sense that maybe this selection will be different. I mean how has fain managed to kind of get to the top of the polls and who's it appealing to a lot of. The reason is thanks to the party leader to Mary. Lou McDonald because prior prior to this the IRA was always closely associated with champagne. But Mary Lou. McDonald is a very different character. She's a woman who was born in Dublin cheese WH- WHOA from a wealthy part of Dublin. Well educated and a woman first of all the traditional in fame voter has usually been northern. That you should be Mayo Eh. Quite nationalist quite working class Mary. Lou has come in and sort of positioned herself as much more middle class voter appealing to people on issues like housing issues like healthcare and also she's being positioning Shin Fain basically as the alternative to the mainstream parties as the alternative to fina fallen feeding gale. Have a listen to her. She was on the TV the other night in a TV debate. The team of this election that has emerged as a thirst for change. I'm very clear about the change means everywhere that I have gone. People have said to me that they they recognize that Fiona Fallen Finna gave essentially identical. Piracy's had it all their own way now for almost two century so if a party election fain gets into government in the republic violent I mean what would that mean for this dream stream for some people of a united Ireland bring together Northern Ireland and the Republic of yeah. It's interesting because champagne is very nationalist. Party they've always campaigned for United United Ireland and Mary Lou. Donald was asked about this on the campaign trail recently if there would be a referendum on United Ireland under her watch.

Irish Nationalist Party Shin Fain Mary Lou Lou McDonald Northern Ireland Ireland United United Ireland Marco Werman Fiona Fallen Finna Switzerland Xinfang Vein Phoenix Phoenix Sale Orla Barry London Dublin Britain Xinfeng Emerald Isle Donald
"united ireland" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:18 min | 6 months ago

"united ireland" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Brexit here's began began gathering in London's Parliament Square early this evening to celebrate the UK's official departure from the EU today for those opposed to the split though today is the day of mourning and also so a kind of weary resignation at long last. Brexit is actually happening for Martina. Anderson is something else entirely. Ms Anderson is an outgoing member of European. He in Parliament from Northern Ireland's Shin Fain Party and a one time member of the IRA she claims. Brexit has had another consequence. It has renewed the appetite for United Ireland Orland. We reached Martina Anderson in dairy. Then understand. Why do you think that Brexit may have advanced the cause of United Ireland? Brexit isn't unmitigated disaster. We worked very hard in the European Parliament to put the Irish Protocol Withdrawal Agreement which basically it is a forty a hardening of the border in Ireland affording custom post in Ireland. But that said we have a situation. By report of iron designee New York and the north of Ireland like halfway heights neither inroad and things like trade is being protected and rightly so but citizens rights are being eroded so people started to realize that being taken out of the eagerly against a democratically expressed swishes of the people of the North who folded remain in the that that accelerated an invigorated. The conversation on Irish unity. I A- An indication that Boris Johnson says. He doesn't want to bore. He's going to do whatever you can to make sure that there is still a free flow of goods across the the border between Northern Ireland. And the rest of the UK. So do you have no faith in that well. We warned the IAN negotiators not to trust Boris Johnson in terms of with the Dean because every deal that they've ever made the British establishment. They walk away from in agreement and then they start negotiate dine merch. And that was why we had to ensure that the Irish protocol was legally bind and because was if they wear to crash site by the end of next year because they haven't put the shoulder to the wheel to try to bring a bite at trade deal. The North is still protected. There will not be a harder border in Ireland but we will still face all the complications and difficulties that brexit will bring. But isn't it the case also that to have a staggered right. I mean are going to be this transition period. If it doesn't work that you can go back on this agreement that you have periods of two years four years eight years to determine whether it's working isn't isn't possible that the arrangement that has been put in place. We'll actually come to work. The arrangement that is put in place is an ugly compromise but the partition of Ireland is ugly at you talk by no changed. Hey completes until the end of this year because the transitional period and in the broad scheme of things such right but I come from the city called dairy a city with a history of Gerrymandering that knows the fan value of our foot because our parents had a fight for what was called Dan one-man-one-vote I am an. Mvp I was voted in by the people of the north of Ireland to be their air force and the people of the north of our did not consent to me being kicked. Don't now this isn't the maybe but it is by them having a voice because it hasn't been seen fray fury would have been talking about the Good Friday Agreement let alone it. Become one of the priorities. Just you being being a sin member from dairy of all places you can understand. How fragile the Good Friday Agreement is how fragile peace this is and what what threats exist in this agreement? Do you think for that fragile peace. The fradulent pace is something that needs to be worked dom this is about the political process to you in this. EU citizenship. An Irish citizenship. I'm an Irish citizen. That makes me in the US citizen and therefore I should be able to enjoy access an exercise my EU rights where they recite people even from the British tradition who find on us their European citizenship. They have joined the conversation about the form and the shape of a New Zealand so we wanted to date be set for a unit referendum. So can you give me a sense of why you think that would it in a referendum held today or in the future sure would result in majority of people in Northern Ireland supporting that I mean. I'm talking about not just just nationalist but also unionist well. There has is being nine opinion polls stunts and straps it and opinion poll after opinion poll after opinion poll showed that there is a majority in favour of Irish unity if it was going going to allow people to get back into the and on the twenty ninth of April twenty seventeen the EU Twenty seven member states agreed that if the Democratic Emma craddock grosses Ireland's reunified all Ireland stays in the right. So and what support do you think that exists for this idea in the Republic of Ireland while the the last opinion poll of stone after the elections there showed there were seventy seven percent. All people supported Irish unity. We heard Irish Prime Minister Red Car saying that he ultimately like to see unity. But there's no urgency to it so is it Do Differ on the view. Uh of how quickly it should or would happen well. Let's dereliction of Political Judy. Not Today with it because he I knows that there has been a nightmare of academic work done the former president of Ireland Mary McAleese has called for a unity referendum. So the growth of civic momentum for constitutional change is evident for for all to say so you Iraq wants to be in on the one hand hold the people of the north of Ireland that no Irish prime minister would ever again label behind. The Irish rights are European rights. They have not been as protected as washing machines. Tumble dryers and kyw's and cheap The the trade across the EU all that is being looked after and rightly so. There's no hardening of the border here in Ireland but it is a bite Irish citizens since our EU citizens and we are entitled to participate in the life of the European Union. That's a treaty obligation. But that is going to be. He wrote this Anderson. We're going to leave it there and I appreciate speaking with you. Thank you thank you thank you very much. Martina Anderson is an outgoing member of European Parliament for Northern Ireland. An incoming IMA- for the Faint Party in Belfast. We reached her today in dairy.

Northern Ireland Martina Anderson European Union United Ireland Orland Brexit European Parliament Republic of Ireland United Ireland Boris Johnson Parliament UK Ms Anderson Ireland Parliament Square Shin Fain Party London prime minister New Zealand
"united ireland" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:18 min | 6 months ago

"united ireland" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Brexit here's began began gathering in London's Parliament Square early this evening to celebrate the UK's official departure from the EU today for those opposed to the split though today is the day of mourning and also so a kind of weary resignation at long last. Brexit is actually happening for Martina. Anderson is something else entirely. Ms Anderson is an outgoing member of European. He in Parliament from Northern Ireland's Shin Fain Party and a one time member of the IRA she claims. Brexit has had another consequence. It has renewed the appetite for United Ireland Orland. We reached Martina Anderson in dairy. Then understand. Why do you think that Brexit may have advanced the cause of United Ireland? Brexit isn't unmitigated disaster. We worked very hard in the European Parliament to put the Irish Protocol Withdrawal Agreement which basically it is a forty a hardening of the border in Ireland affording custom post in Ireland. But that said we have a situation. By report of iron designee New York and the north of Ireland like halfway heights neither inroad and things like trade is being protected and rightly so but citizens rights are being eroded so people started to realize that being taken out of the eagerly against a democratically expressed swishes of the people of the North who folded remain in the that that accelerated an invigorated. The conversation on Irish unity. I A- An indication that Boris Johnson says. He doesn't want to bore. He's going to do whatever you can to make sure that there is still a free flow of goods across the the border between Northern Ireland. And the rest of the UK. So do you have no faith in that. Well we warned the. Hey you negotiators not to trust Boris Johnson in terms of with the Dean because every deal that they've ever made the British establishment. They walk away from in agreement and then they start negotiate dine merch. And that was why we had to ensure that the Irish protocol was legally bind and because was if they wear to crash site by the end of next year because they haven't put the shoulder to the wheel to try to bring a bite at trade deal. The North is still protected. There will not be a harder border in Ireland but we will still face all the complications and difficulties that brexit will bring. But isn't it the case also that to have a staggered right. I mean are going to be this transition period. If it doesn't work that you can go back on this agreement that you have periods of two years four years eight years to determine whether it's working isn't isn't possible that the arrangement that has been put in place. We'll actually come to work. The arrangement that is put in place is an ugly compromise but the partition of Ireland is ugly at you talk by no changed. Hey completes until the end of this year because the transitional period and in the broad scheme of things such right but I come from the city called dairy a city with a history of Gerrymandering that knows the fan value of our foot because our parents had a fight for what was called Dan one-man-one-vote I am an. Mvp I was voted in by the people of the north of Ireland to be their air force and the people of the north of our did not consent to me being kicked. Don't now this isn't the maybe but it is by them having a voice because it hasn't been seen fray fury would have been talking about the Good Friday Agreement let alone it. Become one of the priorities. Just you being being a sin member from dairy of all places you can understand. How fragile the Good Friday Agreement is how fragile peace this is and what what threats exist in this agreement? Do you think for that fragile peace. The fradulent pace is something that needs to be worked dom this is about the political process to you in this. EU citizenship. An Irish citizenship. I'm an Irish citizen. That makes me in the US citizen and therefore I should be able to enjoy access an exercise my EU rights where they recite people even from the British tradition who find on us their European citizenship. They have joined the conversation about the form and the shape of a New Zealand so we wanted to date be set for a unit referendum. So can you give me a sense of why you think that would it in a referendum held today or in the future sure would result in majority of people in Northern Ireland supporting that I mean. I'm talking about not just just nationalist but also unionist well. There has is being nine opinion polls stunts and straps it and opinion poll after opinion poll after opinion poll showed that there is a majority in favour of Irish unity if it was going going to allow people to get back into the and on the twenty ninth of April twenty seventeen the EU Twenty seven member states agreed that if the Democratic Emma craddock grosses Ireland's reunified all Ireland stays in the right. So and what support do you think that exists for this idea in the Republic of Ireland while the the last opinion poll of stone after the elections there showed there were seventy seven percent. All people supported Irish unity. We heard Irish Prime Minister Red Car saying that he ultimately like to see unity. But there's no urgency to it so is it Do Differ on the view. Uh of how quickly it should or would happen well. Let's dereliction of Political Judy. Not Today with it because he I knows that there has been a nightmare of academic work done the former president of Ireland Mary McAleese has called for a unity referendum. So the growth of civic momentum for constitutional change is evident for for all to say so you Iraq wants to be in on the one hand hold the people of the north of Ireland that no Irish prime minister would ever again label behind. The Irish rights are European rights. They have not been as protected as washing machines. Tumble dryers and kyw's and cheap The the trade across the EU all that is being looked after and rightly so. There's no hardening of the border here in Ireland but it is a bite Irish citizens since our EU citizens and we are entitled to participate in the life of the European Union. That's a treaty obligation. But that is going to be. He wrote this Anderson. We're going to leave it there and I appreciate speaking with you. Thank you thank you thank you very much. Martina Anderson is an outgoing member of European Parliament for Northern Ireland. An incoming IMA- for the Faint Party in Belfast. We reached her today in dairy.

Northern Ireland Martina Anderson European Union United Ireland Orland Brexit European Parliament Republic of Ireland United Ireland Boris Johnson Parliament UK Ms Anderson Ireland prime minister Parliament Square Shin Fain Party London New Zealand
"united ireland" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"united ireland" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"This is the other really interesting things need is why I've written pieces about this in the past and others mention it why the D._U._p.. The Democratic Unionist Unionist support full brexit actually might prove to be very difficult for the or maybe of regrets at late run the Irish Prime Minister The I._T.. Show clear for the end of last week who's actually stayed away from the kind of the unification question slutty up the ante which he suggested that a hard brexit could lead to an early referendum on the island of Ireland about a united Ireland. I think in many regards it could do because essentially judy if you look at the demographics of Northern Ireland it has relied essentially potus majority to retain its place inside the U._K.. That majority has essentially being whittled away through a high birth rate of Catholics and in these circumstances Protestants essentially no longer have a majority now that is not to say that unionists indus don't have a majority that's different thing. There are according to polls about a quarter of Catholics who'd be willing to vote to stay inside the U._k.. But one of the reasons that they are happy to stay inside the U._K.. Is Because essentially they've been allowed to be Irish citizens. They've allowed to be E._U.. Citizens and the border has not been a big part of politics. You can cross go across it. I'm back and forth as much as you want without any problems essentially Ashley what I'm trying to say is you can be Irish as you want or U._b.. As British as you want the problem with the Nodia Brexit is that will close off some of that Irishness business to that kind of the Catholic population who might be inclined to be unionists and the concern I think amongst eunice and indeed it must be said Theresa Theresa May who really felt the Northern Ireland's and essentially United Ireland was kind of a big problem in audio brexit is that you you get rid of that kind under unionist majority and while it not happen overnight that you bring forward a potential unification pole and so the concern for unions across the U. K.. Why is that ultimately in the Centeno deal brexit's you could see real strains on the union on the to continue constituent parts that voted to remain? I know that Ireland that it could become a united Ireland and Scotland of course that once again that could be an independence referendum. They're done. Thank thank you very much indeed. Let's turn McCaffrey now still to come on the program some flights between South career in Japan suspended adding to the worsening relationship between the two countries and we look at railings between California and Nevada Metro CEO. Phil Washington has announced that the city of Los Angeles Transit Authority is in talks to make a high speed rail link between Los Angeles and Las Vegas a reality in the next couple of years. This is the globalist stay tuned C._B._S...

Northern Ireland United Ireland Democratic Unionist Unionist Nodia Brexit Prime Minister Theresa Theresa Los Angeles Transit Authority Los Angeles Ashley McCaffrey California Phil Washington Centeno Irishness brexit Nevada Metro Las Vegas CEO eunice Japan
Lira Mckie, Northern Ireland And Sarah discussed on Inside Europe

Inside Europe

03:13 min | 1 year ago

Lira Mckie, Northern Ireland And Sarah discussed on Inside Europe

"Has been international condemnation this week after the murder of journalist in Northern Ireland lira mckie was reporting to riots in the city of Londonderry also known as dairy when she was shot. The group known as the new era says was responsible for the twenty nine year old's death. David hunter has this report Lear Mckee was tipped as one to watch a rising star in the world of journalism. However, her career was cut short. She became the latest innocent victim of a long and troubled history. Northern. For over forty years to communities here were involved in a conflict which claimed Thorson's of lives. Very sorry about fast in Northern Ireland. We don't wanna return to this really just like it's just so set young Garrick your life just doing ritual. People don't want to see a return to the violence of the past the unionist community largely over Protestant bunk. Roy and want to see Northern Ireland remain part of the United Kingdom, but the nationalist minority mostly of a Catholic community want to see the reunification of Northern Ireland with the Republic in nineteen ninety eight after decades of boming riots and murders a peace deal was signed known as the Good Friday agreement the agreement that has emerged from the Northern Ireland peace talks opens the way for the people there to build a society based on during peace, Justice and equality signed almost exactly twenty one years before liras murder and Deloitte, people to choose whether the. Wanted to be British Irish or both by law and also cleared the way for the main par military organizations here too late on their weapons and end decades of conflict lira once described her generation as the ceasefire babies, the so-called new array responsible for her Jeff as one of the groups that which refused to accept on arrangement and is still using an armed campaign to try and bring about a United Ireland. The Irish president Michael d Higgins has this message for them. Please unrepresentative. I hope you'll reflect on what you have done. See the appalling unsustainable on justify take Footrot. You'll have these dissident Republicans are fiercely opposed to the nineteen Ninety-Eight under Britain's involvement in governing. Northern Ireland Ryan's brew going on the streets. Were LeRoy was killed as police searches believing an attack against them was imminent, youths began throwing paddle bombs and bricks before a gunman. Opened fire of the armored police vehicles beside which lira had been taking shelter. She was struck by a stray bullet leaving her partner. Sarah devastated. This cannot stand. There is death. Most not being vain because her life was Shane late everyone else's life. There is friend lost the mat with a young writer earlier in the day that she was killed discussing her plans to build a new life in Derry where she moved from her native city of Belfast. She showed me pictures of the ring that she'd brought for Sarah and told me of the fabulous plan. She had for the proposed in New York. And may I was given strict instructions to where my kilt which she always wanted to borrow onto find a refined.

Lira Mckie Northern Ireland Sarah Murder Londonderry United Ireland Lira David Hunter ROY Thorson Lear Mckee Garrick Michael D Higgins Belfast United Kingdom Leroy New York President Trump Ryan Writer
Troubling: a death in Northern Ireland

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:29 min | 1 year ago

Troubling: a death in Northern Ireland

"South This economists podcast is sponsored by linked in jobs. Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economists radio. I'm your host Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. A minority of South African people have steadied formal jobs too many, including a large fraction of the country's youth do piecemeal work or are unemployed altogether. We look at the efforts to bring the young into the workforce. And there's a lot of talk about public figures particularly candidates in America's upcoming presidential race speaking, multiple languages, what's with these polyglot politicians. But I. A funeral will be held today for a young journalist from Northern Ireland who was shot dead last week all for the loss of lira. Our hopes and dreams all of her Mazen potential with snuff type a single Barrick. Lira Mckee had been reporting on violent unrest in the city of Londonderry. We believe this to be a terrorist act. We believe it's been carved violent Republicans yesterday. A group called the new IRA took responsibility for the killing it even apologized. The incident was shocking reminder of the fragility of peace since the end of the Northern Ireland conflict known as the troubles. This was an attack on everybody in northern. It. Doesn't matter if you're Catholic or Protestant. British are this is an attack on democracy? The troubles began in the nineteen sixties and painted mostly Catholic Irish nationalists against the British army Northern Ireland police and mostly Protestant loyalists. For three decades violence and terror was a part of everyday life, the turmoil claimed more than three thousand five hundred lives, but in nineteen ninety eight the Good Friday agreement largely brought an end to the conflict today is about the promise of a bright future. Dave, and behold, a line can be drawn bloody past some low level violence continued, but this latest killing has fear and outrage. The funeral today of Larry Mckee is going to feel in many ways. Like, we'll most states occasion. Tom Wainwright is the economists Britain editor where expecting to see the Irish T show that the prime minister will say the president of island the secretary of the UK as well as low two local politicians from Nova Nyland, of course. And so it's going to feel like a big deal, and it really is a big deal in Northern Ireland. This kind of killing of innocent civilian in what seems to have been a terrorist attack something that really has shocked people. It's by no means the gnome since the peace agreements of twenty one years ago. This kind of thing is much less common than it used to be in people here really really shocked by what happened last week, and Tom what can you tell me about the group responsible for misbehaves death, new IRA and its relation to the other groups with IRA in the name, it's it's a bit confusing. Picture it is it really isn't. I think to understand that you've got to go back to the Good Friday agreement of nineteen ninety eight and. What happened? There was that the IRA and most Republicans agreed to end any kind of struggle and take their fight for the United Ireland to the debating chamber of the streets. But at the time there was some Republicans who disagreed with that to this represented, a capitulation, and these guys who are now widely noted dissident Republicans have continued that struggle on a fairly low level. But nonetheless, they are security worry five the security agency raised the threat in Northern Ireland is severe they have continued trying to police officers, for instance. And so why do the new IRA kill Lear mckie? Well, she seems to have been killed by stray bullets. She was watching a riot taking place in the city of Londonderry Derry as it's known to Republicans, and she was watching from next to police come and she was shot in the head and later died, and this riot was kicked off really after police had been raiding homes in the area shortly beforehand seems that they were concerned on the. The Easter rising some local Republicans might be out to coast trouble. And seems that some cycle dissident Republicans is this as a excuse to get that people on the streets and co some trouble and the new IRA said it was an accident and apologized there's some significance to that. Right. There. Is yet seems that they really feel as if that on the back photo of this that agreed which has said, the it's propensity is violence to said that the Republican coups, but they seem to be well aware that locally these kinds of acts of violence in which older NRI innocent civilians killed or injured go down extremely badly and really risk setting that goes back, and we've seen evidence of this already in dairy, the headquarters of a local political party, which is supported by the IRA people being smearing red painted handprints on their offices a form of protest and lately various Republican murals have been graffiti as well by people saying things like not in my name. Name. And so they think realize that this could set them back in a big way. Police also reporting that moving one hundred people have sent them with information about the killing and in a city like Derry, that's really unusual. This is not a place where people have historically been happy to talk to the police about Republican activists. So we could be seeing Quanta change. So do you get the sense from all that then that there is just simply less tolerance for the kind of violence that was so common during the troubles. I think that's right. I think since the Good Friday agreement which was almost exactly twenty one years ago. Many people in Northern Ireland of come to see the peace that's being achieved is enormously valuable, and the idea of going back to that is something that really worries a lot of people. And I think most observers thing that the chances of returns to scale violence, very slim, but any sign that violences on the rise is obviously a worry, especially at the moment with Brexit going on which is causing all kinds of problems for Northern Ireland. We've also got the problem of the Northern Ireland assembly having been suspended now for more than two years. So there's a feeling Northern Ireland is inevitable position so events like this do concern a lot of people that people worry that things are being destabilized that, but you mentioned Briggs in in passing there. Do you think that all the negotiations and the degree to which Northern Ireland has been such a lynchpin of the negotiations has sort of reignited tensions? It's certainly reignited tensions. Yeah. We haven't yet seen a big kicking off of large scale violence or anything like that. But tensions absolutely have been heightened. And it's not surprising because the peace deal made back in nineteen ninety eight really hinged in many ways on the UK an island shed membership of the European Union that help to enable these countries to have a border, which is not just open. But invisible, I mean, if you go there and drive between Northern Ireland and their public of island, you can do so without even realizing that you've crossed the Boda, and of course, membership of the EU means the two countries of members of the single. Markets, and so no customs checks needed and since nineteen ninety eight people know of Nyland being able to choose whether they take Irish or UK possibles in many ways, they've been allowed to feel as if they are either Irish Oprah show oath if they want and so the UK now leaving the European Union really will subject that to strain. And it's clearly pulling the UK an island upon a way that nobody on typically to twenty one years ago and many people particularly in the Republican community. Most of them voted to remain, by the way, think that Britain is in some way reneging on agreements that were made or hinted that twenty years ago, so it is a time of heightened tension. Yes. Tom. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you.

Northern Ireland IRA Tom Wainwright British Army Northern Ireland Londonderry Larry Mckee Jason Palmer Nova Nyland Britain UK United Ireland America European Union Londonderry Derry Mazen Lear Mckie
Lyra McKee: 'New IRA' admits killing of journalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Lyra McKee: 'New IRA' admits killing of journalist

"Last thursday. Twenty nine year old journalist Lyra Mckee was shot dead in Londonderry twenty one years after the Good Friday agreement was signed to bring peace to Northern Ireland yesterday. A group called the new IRA released a statement taking responsibility for the killing and offering it sincere apologies to liars family who holding her funeral today to find out more about the situation on the protests that followed liars murder, I'm joined by Rebecca black who's a journalist with the Press Association based in Belfast, Rebecca who are the new IRA and holiday different from other branches of the group. Morning there and the IRA they're a dissident Republican dissident Irish Republican terrorist group, but they Kim together to eleven grew together. A lot of these smaller groups that were sort of sloughs ING steam and the come together though, they're small numbers. They have being described as the threats by the police service of Northern Ireland's some of their members were involved with real array, which listeners will probably remember, and they responsible for the ball in nineteen ninety which which killed a lot of people. What has the public's response being to the group's admission of guilt? Well, just order discuss. I think the statement yesterday came quite a few days after it was very much enough to fold on an even though it shouldn't apology still seeking to justify what it has done. So buro- responses being. It's not enough. If you're issue any sort of statement, it should be that you're going to spy on the late stage. What would what possible justification can there be? What do they say? Well in their Russian they're blaming the police service and on the on the night. It's all on the night. That killed 'em was a police operation going on. There were searching Heis and based on intelligence and Abida terrorist suspects. The police have combined actually since then and said the review intelligence before the search and they're perfectly happy. It was the jet on should have gone ahead. But these dissident Republicans they say the by the peace coming into an area such as Creggan, and it some way provocative that they're suppressing them. They're perfectly entitled to riots Super Four lire Schultz and was ride in helping that was that was quite a number of petrol bombs thrown up police, and then in the battle this Amana merged, but yet in their Russia there, they think it's acceptable to close riots on to ultimately their Jackson to any sort of any sort of doctors objecting to out of being part of the United Kingdom and there. Of the mindset that learned Heil do Coyote violence until Northern Ireland's part of the United Ireland and their their philosophy. And is there any sense that this sympathy for that point of view, and that people aren't supporting extremists on either side? Well, very very little sympathy far. I mean, it was very different buck in the nineteen seventies. When the provisional IRA were going because they did have somewhat support. This group has very little support. I think after the carrying of killing of narrow in particular, a young female journalist who was competing political opinion chill. All she was doing was just watching that night. That's close to even more discussed. A main there seems to be even a split within the discipline grip themselves because ever since Thursday there have been a number of incidents where Petra ball miss that side, a dissident members Heiss the shots fired another person's heist in Lurgan county, my yesterday, do they seem to be disagreement even within themselves as you said, we know that Staunton the power-sharing agreement broke down of two years ago. I wonder how far the up since of a working assembly stoking, more extreme fringe groups.

Northern Ireland Rebecca Black Lyra Mckee Londonderry KIM Belfast Murder Press Association Creggan Lurgan County United Ireland Petra Heil United Kingdom Staunton Amana Schultz Russia Jackson Twenty Nine Year
"united ireland" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"united ireland" Discussed on KCBS All News

"One zero six nine AM, seven forty KCBS. KCBS news time is ten twenty one. A man who says he drove cross country to confront Google officials has been arrested in Mountain View with three baseball, bats. In his car's trunk now. In view police were warned by two other agencies that Kyle long was on his way and arrested him Sunday on suspicious of making criminal threats by say, the Thirty-three-year-old main man was upset because his YouTube channel had been shut down. He allegedly told his hometown police that he'd get violent confrontation didn't go. Well, Google owns YouTube last, April a video maker with a grudge over YouTube policies now seem Ogden shot and wounded three people at the YouTube campus in San Bruno before shooting himself, the seemingly innocuous awarding of a certificate by the mayor. Of San Francisco has sparked an international incident. KCBS reporter duck sovereign says now mayor London breed is apologizing for not being more sensitive. The late IRA leader Martin McGuinness was chosen by the United Irish societies of San Francisco as an honorary grand marshal for the Saint Patrick's Day parade. So mayor London breed awarded a posthumous certificate of honour to mcginnis which celebrates his courageous military service. Oops, says Sky News correspondent into Brady. Mcguinness's military service was spent helping to lead with the English and Irish Protestants consider a terrorist. Army? It is quite incredible. Was happened this week in all honesty that San Francisco's decided to honor him unto pay tribute to his military service. You know, this is getting a lot of airtime over here. Mcginnis did go onto renounce violence and help lead the peace process in Northern Ireland. But that's not the emphasis of the mayor Alana he was a divisive figure he really really was people who want the United Ireland saw him as a hero people who wanted Northern Ireland. Remain British saw him as the probably not to stretch to describing as the devil incarnate. Now, the mayor is apologizing for the pain caused by this saying in a statement that the language on the certificate should've taken more care to reflect on his later life as a peacemaker, Doug, sovereign KCBS. San Francisco electric bike store is preparing for this year's IPO's after companies like Uber and Lyft announced I'll be going public KCBS is Carrie Hodousek spoke to the owner about how they plan to keep up with demand. Fred Thurber who owns the new. We all electric bike store in San Francisco says sales are on the rise in part because of companies like Buber lift Pinterest and Airbnb who've all said.

San Francisco KCBS YouTube Martin McGuinness Google Northern Ireland mcginnis San Bruno London Mountain View baseball Fred Thurber Kyle long United Irish societies reporter United Ireland Carrie Hodousek Doug Sky News
"united ireland" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:47 min | 1 year ago

"united ireland" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David Ramnik for nearly forty years. The city of Belfast was synonymous with bombings murders and guerrilla warfare. Police reported fifty-six hijackings seventeen bombings Twenty-three shooting incidents and nearly two hundred attacks on the conflict in Northern Ireland between the British government and the IRA the Irish Republican Army ended in nineteen ninety eight officially that is but the troubles continue to bubble up in unexpected places in two thousand thirteen Patrick Radin kief stumbled across an obituary of a woman named Deloris price. She was the first woman to serve as a real frontline soldier in the IRA. She was part of that civil rights movement in Northern Ireland in the late nineteen sixties, and she got radicalized and she ends up leading a bombing mission to England getting arrested and going to jail going on up the Old Bailey. She'll blow up the Old Bailey. She led the. Mission. And this is when she scarcely out of her teens. She goes toe to toe with Margaret Thatcher, eventually Thatcher. Let's out of prison and later in her life after the peace process. She was very disaffected. After the troubles Deloris price took part in a secret oral history project. Members of the IRA were interviewed on tape about the acts of warfare and violence that they commit the tapes were sent to Boston College here in the US and each record was supposed to remain sealed until the interviewee had died and in two thousand thirteen when Delors price died. It had come out that she had been involved in. What was one of the most notorious incidents in the troubles, which is in nineteen seventy two. There was a woman named gene McConnell who was a mother of ten and a widow who was taken away by the IRA and disappeared. She was killed. But her body was buried in an unmarked grave or kids. Never knew what happened to her. Why would she have been killed by the IRA? The children didn't know at the time. What we learned later is that the IRA maintains to this day that she was an informant for the British army. She's a mother of ten what could you possibly known that? It would have been a tremendous value to the IRA. And this is what her children who are now. Adults say is that they really vehemently contest any suggestion that you have been informed. They said what would she? No. She was trying to take care of us. Is there an answer to that question? There's not a definitive answer in the book. I lay out the evidence on both sides. And there are people who today will swear up and down that she was and that she wasn't. So I I don't know what do you say they disappeared this woman. What exactly did they do to her? And when was discovered will again, we didn't know the children didn't know one night hin, December nineteen seventy-two she's at home whether kids and a group of people comes and knocks on the door in a housing project in west Belfast, they barge in they have guns there masked, and they. Pull gee, McConnell out. And her quite young. The youngest were two twins were six years old at the time there claimed to her legs they're screaming these intruders say we'll bring her back. We just wanna talk to her and they never saw her again. It was only in two thousand and three that her body was found two thousand and three thirty odd years later thirty one years later, her bodies found by a beachcomber and the Republic of Ireland walking along a beach one day, finding bones they found bones, and there had been some storms, and so some Rosen and not coastal area, and these bones were kind of churned up from the ground. And it was only more than a decade after that that people like the lowest price started talking and some of these secrets began to come out about the circumstances of this death. Why would they talk? Because they experienced great trauma. So part of what I was trying to do in. This book is take one violent incident and approach it as you would a novel. And you've got a handful of compelling interesting characters real people, and you look at the way it affected them the victims and the perpetrators alike, and how that played out over the decades and for some of them people like Dolores price. There was a huge amount of trauma associated with the violent acts that she had committed in the name of the United Ireland. So she looks back as a mother herself as somebody reaching middle age and begins to reevaluate some of the things she's done, and what access did you have to the papers at Boston College. It was pretty limited. So they are not all debt. Well, there's that. But then the other thing is that there was a huge political fight part of the reason I thought there might be a story here initially magazine article. Was that on the one hand? It's a story about a terrible murder that happened in nineteen seventy two on the other hand. It's a story about how that history far from being remote or a closed case or a cold case that nobody's paying any attention to was incredibly politically explosive. So more than one person had talked in this archive at Boston College about the circumstances of Jane McConnell's death, and it emerged that people were pointing a finger a Gerry Adams, so Gerry Adams, we should explain to somebody who was always thought to be a leader of the provisional IRA involved in violent acts. He's always denied it. He was also a member of parliament in Britain and the leader of the Irish political party shin Fain, and he became a pivotal figure in the reconciliation in the nineties. So why would this be such a big deal? All these years later for a variety of reasons. One is that. Adams who I feel pretty comfortable saying was in fact commander in the IRA for many years had, you know, because I've interviewed a whole bunch of people who run the IRA with them. And because really it's Adams who meant hence today that he was never in the IRA, and there's nobody else. So you're you're saying that he ordered the killing of gene Macondo. Yes. Yes. And more than one person who was involved has has said this. He denies it. But he denies he was ever in the IRA. Look, it's funny. I I did want to talk to Adams. But I was also mindful of it just because you get the interview doesn't mean he's going to tell you anything I had this hilarious encounter. When I was doing our reporting. Right talk to a former IRA guy who's known ons for a long time. And he was saying look, even if he talks to he's not gonna tell you anything. And I sorta said, hey, don't underestimate me. I've got my ways and the guy kind of chuckled and he said. He said, you know, Jerry's hot what they call counter interrogation training. This means you could be torturing the man, and he wouldn't tell you anything, and he looked at me, and these, but if you want to go in with your we notebook to talk to you. Listeners please note that was Patrick kief during the imitation, David Ramnik. I'm now now Adams you're saying ordered this murder and ordered the lowest price to do it. What was their relationship? Like, did it stay the same. It didn't. And that's part of the dramatic arc of the book. Is that there were a handful of people were characters in the book who were very very close when they were young members of the IRA and the early nineteen seventies. And it wasn't just doors. Prices. Are sister Marian price? It was a gun in Brendon Hughes who is involved many of these operations, and they did some awful things they set bombs in public places they killed people, and they did so in the name of the United Ireland, and then in the one thousand nine hundred atoms whose political instincts had always been a little bit more evolved, perhaps than some of his content. Pariahs in the IRA starts to realize we're not gonna fight the British into the sea. And so he starts taking part in this peace process. And what that means for the lowest price and Brendon Hughes, and some of these other people who took orders from atoms they feel betrayed is that they feel betrayed is that they say I did these things telling myself that the ends would justify the means. And what you've done is you've United Ireland United Ireland. And there might be a great deal of bloodshed in order to get there. But we would get there. And you've changed the game. And then in addition to doing that Adams would rather blithely say, well, I personally it was never in the IRA. I didn't order any of these things. I don't have any of that blood on my hands myself and that drove some of these people mad. I mean, I think some of it was PTSD and trauma. But there was also a sense of a very acute sense of betrayal. Clearly, you do not find Gerry Adams that attract to figure in. Many many ways on the other hand this is a question of an incredible historical significance in the region. And it was resolved. And it was resolved with Gerry Adams at the center of it. So in the end, how do you think history will treat Gerry Adams? This is one of the great ironies of atoms as a figure, I find him emotionally, very unsympathetic, downright sociopathic in his clinical tendency to just cast aside anybody who's not useful to him anymore. But politically Adams was the one who realized that you need to end this fight. And so I do think that there's an enduring irony in the idea that this is a man who was guilty of ordering perhaps the most notorious war crime of the conflict that he then helped to end see nothing is in my mind to books at once versus the best book about the troubles I've ever read, and that's on one side on the other. It's a murder mystery. And you solve it your book discusses the lowest price. She was a possibility in your mind. Signed an IRA member named Patrick McClure. Who was a possibility for reasons that you get into and there's a third person. And in a sense, this this book is a who done it. I don't wanna make light of it. But there's a there's a mystery that solved here in third person is named what is it like to accuse somebody of murder in a book and have you heard from this person? It was. It was certainly the most intense decision. I've ever made in my career as a reporter and writer. I'll tell you that. There was a lot of lawyering as you imagine. This person's still alive and had never been associated with this murder. And he or she been associated with any other murder. Yes. So it was a former IRA member. But I. I'll put it this way. Leaving aside the legal issue morally, I would never have. Named the name and pointed the finger at someone and accused them of carrying out, you know, one of the most heinous war crimes of the troubles of a terrible conflict. Have you gotten a response from the accused? So I initially reached out to this person's lawyer in may. And got nothing and got in touch again got nothing and said, I'm going to publish this book accusing your client nothing the book came out in not even a response a negative response to cease and desist anything nothing and the book came out in in November in the UK and Ireland in part because it had this news in it, which they wanted to get out because it was it was a fairly newsworthy thing over there. And it was excerpted in the Sunday Times. They got in touch with a lawyer a few days before publishing the excerpt got a no comment a few days after the book came out this person released a statement saying it wasn't true. But that they wouldn't be saying anything more about it. And I've heard nothing sense. Now one thing we've forgotten here is ten kids lost their mother, and became orphans instantly. What became of those ten children the McConnell children? Well, things didn't get any easier for them. They it was heartbreaking. They initially tried to stay in the family apartment because they bought their mother might be coming back, but eventually the state stepped in. And they said, look if you're gonna put us into a home, can you at least have us all be together and the state split them up and put them in different orphanages, and those orphanages were every bit as bad as you might imagine that Irish orphanages would have been in this period of time. And so the kids were re victimized in a whole series of awful ways when you made this name public. How did the kids who are now obviously will grown? How did they react? It was an intense experience. I I wrote a letter to gee, mccown villes children prior to the book coming out telling them what I'd learned. And that always had a different idea of what might have happened. They were extremely surprised about the identity of the person who I pointed to, but what I heard from a lot of people who have watched this case closely and know, some of the parties involved is again, this idea that they were both shocked to learn the identity of this person. But when you thought about it it made perfect sense, Patrick in many ways, the troubles feel like a long time ago, you found that sources were still sometimes reluctant to talk to even now for fear of the IRA at and as recently as last month a car bomb was discovered in north. Than island, which is not good news. Do you feel as though the troubles are somehow bubbling up again in some form or another? Well, I think that and why is there an IRA? Well, that's that's a big question. The there's a line that Gerry Adams used famously. He was giving a speech in somebody in the audience yells, bring back the IRA and Adams leaning back and said, they haven't gone away, you know, and this is a big question in Northern Ireland is this this idea of is the IRA still there, and there definitely is some form of it that continues to exist. And tensions are high..

IRA Gerry Adams murder Belfast Northern Ireland Boston College David Ramnik United Ireland Deloris United Ireland United Ireland Republic of Ireland Margaret Thatcher US Dolores price gene McConnell Patrick Radin Irish Republican Army British army PTSD
"united ireland" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"united ireland" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"It was very violent atmosphere and overlay, and that creates a distorting sense to the whole situation that really is in replicated elsewhere. Interestingly you have the same not the same, but a comparable situation in the Middle East where there continues to be violence a lot of people killed and even that has not been enough to bring the parties to the table for the kind of negotiation that can bring. It to an end. So while it does serve as a motive of people getting together. And I do want to say because it should be said that the real heroes of Northern Ireland with the political leaders of Northern Ireland. They at great risk to themselves personally to the families to their careers at a moment of crisis rose to the occasion and took a very dangerous step by entering into this agreement. And it's something that our leadership ought to look at and say, we can do that. We're not we aren't threatened with death when not being killed or shot at her bombed, but the future of our country is at stake in a different sense suppose. That's why the things that each of the parties in Northern Ireland were willing to give up to reach an agreement is what's so remarkable to me right because the IRA gave up its dream of having a United fully United Ireland the British government agreed to release from prison. People who had been convicted of terrorism for bombing and murdering people in both the UK N in Northern Ireland. It it self. So there were sort of core values that ultimately the parties were willing to give up to reach an agreement. It just may go ahead of just going to say makes me wonder how like if there are core values at play here in Washington right now should people be willing to give those up to reach agreement. But when we drafted the agreement it was drafted in a way that everyone would come out of it and not stress the points that you stressed but stress what they gain by the agreement. Everybody gained something from the agreement. I myself had been a politician, I was dealing with politicians everyone in the talks had been elected to get there. And I met I understood that I had present them with something which they could go out and not say I gave up on prisoners not say I gave up. On this of that. But say here's what we gained. And each side had a substantial list of things that they could claim they hit achieved proclaim victory and go forward together. And that's really what's needed. Here. You have to figure out a way that you can come up with comprehensive legislation. Look the president says he's doing this for border security what everybody is appointed security. The question is can you come up with a series of proposals that everyone can come out and say we've gotten an improved border security? I that that should not be beyond the capacity of everyone involved to take just a few examples. The president says that ninety percent of the heroin coming in from southern border is have come through the southern border and has an adverse effect on Americans. Yes, that's true. But the fact is almost all of that heroin comes through the. Legal border. Crossings would have no affect whatsoever on. Well, why couldn't we say that part of border security would be using the most modern technology in whatever increase in personnel. That will help us to detect and interdict those drugs coming in through the legal points of entry, and that's just as much border security as building a wall out in some desert area to prevent someone from sneaking into the country..

Northern Ireland heroin president Middle East United Ireland UK Washington British government ninety percent
"united ireland" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

The Fundamentalists

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"united ireland" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

"Compromise between Darien Londonderry if you call it dairy, you likely won't a United Ireland. If you call it Londonderry, you come from a community that that wants to keep Northern Ireland part of the United Kingdom. So there's only one city in reality. But in language there is a cuts. There is a distortion. Dot is what the Locke's the lock is not something that exists in reality. But exists within subjectivity within our language within symbols. I like this podcast the podcast. We do the fundamentalists. I think we could stuff. It's this is a fun episode stuff a lot. I think what's cool about it is there's a through line from maybe three line. But at least a similarity between this episode and the last of like if you just follow logic. Or if you just follow reason you can arrive at two different conclusions. And so therefore reason itself and logic. And all these things have lack, you know. And there's there's something isn't adding up all this stuff. And I love that Nicole. Yeah. Good good way of thinking about it as well. As a PM thing if you what if you look at PNT in that Ha's perspective trees in the four grind. And you have a mind and the back grind. There is new distance in the peons. The painting is a flat surface, but you perceive distance within and the distance allies you to actually make sense of the painting. So the distance is real. But it's real in a sense of exists within your subjectivity not within. The painting self, but it is it is real as it. It is what fundamentally helps you interpret and understand the painting isn't that the whole idea of like the the painting. That's like this is not a pipe or whatever it is. Yeah. Yeah. This is not a. Yeah. Is that what it is? This is not a pipe when something or other. But it's the same. It's it's this is a depiction of. And therefore, you're assume you are saying to pipe, but really it's a two dimensional. Yes. I think different. And I think it's different is I think there's some very clever going on with this is not a, but I'm just a PM with Ryan back grind. So it's. I'm sorry about vision. Yeah. Man. That's that's very I like all that. So the fantasy of the non castrated other the lack so we're talking about are you still going with just one just to cloud dots? What is meant by the lock is. It's like it's like a distortion within our social reality and necessary distortion that that means that we can never feel complete so. Yep. So once we go I just wanted to clarify because people talk about it as like a almost like a thing or is nothing. So it either exists or doesn't exist. But this means that doesn't exist or not existed insists the consisting is very it sounds. It's like kind of a. Yeah. I mean, it's it I would to be a critic or a cynical person. I would say that to exist in insists are not opposite words. Like, it sounds really catchy. But I the the message that it sends is perfectly good. This isn't a philosophy pogo. So we can't get into the detective side. Nova. They're different in a sense of to exist. Means it is like is like the PNT in the distance doesn't exist. Yes. It doesn't exist. It insists that his insists as in it at mix. It's it in mixing impression on the Brian. So I think it's like philosophies is an important difference between existence and insistent. Oh, totally virtual re-. Those are two totally different things. Yeah. Yeah. Said something can weirdly think society doesn't exist. It says if you took all people out of the world, you wouldn't have thing call society, but society does insist you can't talk a bite society. Green rate analogy, there's something. Yes. There's there's a there's a nation of luck. Yeah. I like all that. That's real fun stuff. So you. You know, what's interesting. I got a message from a guy who spoken with. He's a listener his name's Damien. I don't remember his last name, you may know who he is. But he bit basically in response to the the live episode that we did he mentioned that you and me seem like people seem to be seemed to have an element of the non castrated other..

PNT Darien Londonderry Damien United Ireland Dot United Kingdom Northern Ireland Locke Nicole Ryan Ha
"united ireland" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"united ireland" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"We're gonna choose vice president of the European Union at the minute are Representative. An EMMY p. and she says, when we brought this issue up here, she was like, we should never mix the two conversations, the whole United Ireland? Yeah, yard and who unification aspect of like that could be outed from Brexit shooting me broaden the because of the different issues, different modern office, its own history, but we have run in the polls. I'm when y'all end up at the pool is when Poland, north non, very because everyone's very political. So you have to be a bigger sample. Is geopolitical balance and get people from different political with and stuff like that. And the findings were that if breaks goes ahead, nevermind a hard Brexit ourselves Brexit if breaks it goes ahead. Fifty, two percent majority would before United Ireland and thirty nine percent, right a pros. So all of us should be. Yeah, we call it buy. It was very difference between younger people and older voters on like the rest of north non wasn't very it, like it was slightly with regards edge, more likely vote for leaf, but it was more on the two green and orange issue. So more aligned to unionise loyalists relief nostrils to just finally, you've been meeting a lot of an pays. Here's impress Jay, who's he gets it. Oh. Everyone's been very receptive. I'll say, I'll tell you the one who find least gets it because they're over. To. I was a very informal, impromptu beaten on we, the Hillary band. So Jaren the selectmen for leaving the u. on briefly spoke to him about people's vote and the people's vote, but very much to to the party line comes lever. So talking, all of this, we say in the economic area, we're going general action where I says be on democratic style election, and then it'd be like, just increase that democracy further people's vote. No. What is thinking. Yeah, I think he probably feels imprisoned by all your own Hillary band was Tulsi is very speaking. Like he knows it's like no one else, but with regards us chomping articles for people's vote, he's just like the perceptionist what's going to get people. So people perceive, she's like, oh, you slowest. She wants to know the go off the issues. Lets no pillory Ben. Listen to the voice of youth. Pay us. Thanks for coming. Okay..

United Ireland Brexit Tulsi vice president European Union Jay Poland Hillary Representative unionise thirty nine percent two percent
"united ireland" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"united ireland" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And these symbols of course mattress that's why that's why i stepped out of my vernacular into the vernacular of our unionist neighbors and it was very obviously a gesture on my part of recognition but also common courtesy to the person who had hosted us that's my job leaders lead sometimes that mice obsession a fringe or a number of people within a particular movement on it's interesting your vision of what leadership of didn't feigns day means and you've made some really interesting speeches when one of which you you talked about how your vision of united ireland is a place where arlene foster you said of course is the leader of the democratic unionists in northern ireland you said i want a place where arlene foster feels comfortable feel secure feels at home in my ireland how can arlene foster feel secure uncomfortable as long as and this is the words of the police chief of northern ireland george hamilton just the other a day as long as the ira structure and he means the sort of leadership administrative structure remains intact he said no for terrorist purposes but nonetheless this ira structure still exists and he pointed out that it's still wields influence in the republican movement and presumably one can only as mean shouldn't fain and that it still maintains discipline in the republican movement arlene foster is never gonna feel comfortable with that the ireland envisages a myron and and it's our aren't and an arlene foster has as legitimate acclaim and a stake in that ireland does i do secondly whatever george hamilton's view is on that matter i want to tell you that i am the leader of that i am part of a collective leadership the leadership call the shots in our partial happen people that george hamilton says still out there still wielding influence what's your relationship.

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"united ireland" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"united ireland" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A sense that perhaps wants the whole brexit conundrum has been resolved that maybe there will be a desire for self governance again here in northern ireland and i guess that leads me onto a second points which is brexit i think much of how northern ireland goes now depends on brexit if there's a brac sets which make sure that britain and ireland continue to have very good relations at that isn't a border that there isn't a friction between trade i think that would have a very positive knockon effect here in northern ireland in terms of getting the assembly going again and getting local politics going again but i guess you it's always remember source was remembering unions to step back the nature of the challenge here norval honored i mean essentially have half the population that wants united ireland another half of the population wants to stay in the uk i think managing that division is always going to be a real challenge rob many thanks for that that person vs rob watson speaking from belfast in northern ireland distribution of the bbc newshour in the us supported by babbel a language applications real life conversations in a new language like spanish french and german babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons in the app store or it be a bb e l dot com and t rowe price offering a strategic investing approach where their clients investment and retirement goals institutions advisers employers and individuals choose t rowe price for over eighty years t rowe price invest with confidence we said to reporters to a hotel near the white house so outside the trump hotel in downtown dc would they stumbled on let them to one of the biggest money laundering investigations the us has ever seen they use the money.

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"united ireland" Discussed on The Anthill

The Anthill

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"united ireland" Discussed on The Anthill

"There needs to be another stage that they were moving into another stage they would still have considered this heart dot lung more strategy but in order to get into the final united ireland that i want to achieve they needed to enter into a political stage the number one thing that they always said is that there couldn't be decommissioning as a precondition that was a huge bumpy road and the way it was negotiation in the end is that they said okay decommissioning isn't a precondition bush the green at was a move towards decommissioning and intend to eventually decommission was a pretty condition and actually when you look at the interviews with adams mcguinness and others they give kudos to the british government for this they said it was very clever political negotiations dot it was an important stage and it was a neat solution to what was tense problem there say come now to the nitty gritty negotiations the job at getting people around the table to hammer out agreement and it was the americans who help that to happen his leeann kennedy director of the clinton institute for american studies at university college dublin to explain the role of president bill clinton in the good friday agreement why does president to be william jefferson clinton have an interest in northern and ask president a degree of interest that will bring him to crip political shock waves in washington and in london and dublin as he intervene.

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"united ireland" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"united ireland" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"He's causing such dilemma in northern ireland is a result of that well the basic thing is that most protestants and unionists are pro brexit that they liked the idea of leaving europe on most national so must all nationalists and catholics do not like that idea because they tend to think in terms of a future with in the united ireland and they're also very pro european so this is a whole fresh new area of disagreement which is complicated things very much the re complicated enough before but now you have this thing where there's a whole a whole all different thing to get worked up about a whole different thing to disagree on and the mathematics of the parliament in westminster of course involves the democratic unionist party that's the main unionist party in northern ireland supporting the current conservative minority administration which which further confuses matters very much so the as as we've been saying several runs of talks of failed so far they have the perhaps the nearly worked the last time but this is a whole new thing where everybody knows that the the democratic unionist politicians are informal agreement with the conservatives and not mix it looked nationalist izzo the chances of a fair day gone done and what then happens and this is the key point isn't it david what then happens to that border between what will eventually be a non eu country northern ireland part of the uk and the republic of our land we absolutely don't know is the author.

ireland europe united ireland parliament uk david eu
"united ireland" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"united ireland" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The scene and lower manhattan larry your works on a building overlooking the sea than everybody united ireland plunked down that i try to run away the path ataman letter and i asked her if this reminded her of the truck attack on halloween nothing at eleven edward who makes you think or at the intersection of liberty street and broadway comp say a wicked concert at the rear ended a fourday suv which then hit a bicyclist the driver of the lincoln kept going down liberty hitting another koren coming to a stop on the sidewalk many who work nearby say aggressive drivers are an issue with leg on in the janika make they tang one of the injured said now to be in serious condition wbz news time six twenty one forty two degrees in boston a partly cloudy skies tonight at low temperatures in the 20s and 30s singer r kelly is the victim of a massive robbery police say thieves hit the singer's to atlanta area mansions and then sold everything off neighbors tell police they saw trucks at the homes for about a week missing items include televisions couches and even the singer's diamond encrusted hoodie r kelly was on tour during the robbery's songs that have rarely been heard since the rolling stones performed them on the bbc in the 1960s have now been released on a new album growing sons guitarist keith richards caused the tracks on the new on air album incredible pieces of history the collection features thirty two songs that aired between 1963 and nineteen 65 i'm bbc shows such as saturday club top gear and the joe loss pop show richards admits he barely remember some of them and everything was so frantic in those days he says he was nineteen and it's all a bit of a blur but a very pleasant one on air is out now i'm rt sarlat are you listening i'm josh baseliner wbz here's where we want to with the lake yet the new his just into the wbz accuweather forecast traffic and weather together i said what news the news watch never stops wbz newsradio 1030 wbz news time the six twenty three of of traffic and weather together right now it's nicole davis and the subaru retailers of new england allwheeldrive traffic.

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"united ireland" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"united ireland" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Lives on this joint rubio eight four four or five hundred forty two forty two did you see that the representative al green of packs us he's the one who introduced the the articles of impeachment against president trump earlier this week and he made some great great soul seoul single back in the second thing is fine it turns out he had a harvey weinstein problem back in two thousand seven did you see that woman name loose and the daniels he ah they they she sued him and the they were assault charges against them when they reach the settlement he admitted that he had a romantic encounter with her back in two thousand seven so hotel first assaulting someone uh you that's yes that's harvey that's what harvey weinstein means when he says he had a romantic he calls it could assault physical the consensual encounter in in harvey weinstein speak but dislodged past that on the you can feel free to a google representative al green and liu said the daniels and you can get the uh this the guru week details hero woah what's not greens biggest on shanna means i love you i thank as an i thank never heard of that one irate united ireland is right whatever the laws of any state are broken julie authorized organizations goings election.

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