8 Episode results for "United Canada"

New Conservative leader Erin OToole on the coming throne speech and what he's offering Canadians

The Current

28:24 min | Last month

New Conservative leader Erin OToole on the coming throne speech and what he's offering Canadians

"I'm Jonathan Goldstein host of wiretap each week you're invited to listen in on my telephone conversations whether funny sad wistful or even slightly strange. You never know just what you might hear on wiretap I show I just didn't think that people actually listened to it. The breath of genius it's not just that you're funny but you can be cripplingly pointedly depressing. The Wiretap Archives available on CBC listen spotify, Apple PODCASTS and wherever you get your podcasts. Is a CBC podcast we continue to point out liberal failings and corruption. We must also show Canadians our vision for a stronger prosperous and more united Canada. Canada Ken. And, must do better. And Conservatives will work hard to earn the trust and confidence of Canadians in the next election. That's the new leader of the Conservative Party of Canada Erin O'Toole after Parliament resumes on the twenty third of September that election could come at any time Erin O'Toole says his party will be ready and he's on the line with me this morning Erin Oh tool good morning. Good Morning. Matt Congratulations. Thank you very much. We just heard a little bit of that acceptance speech that you gave and in it you called the Liberal Party corrupt. You said that Justin Trudeau has failed this country. There will be a confidence vote when parliament returns and throne speech as well. Should we assume that you will bring down this government? Well. You know what they say about making assumptions Matt I wouldn't assume that because Justin Trudeau is trying to force election to avoid accountability you know throughout the pandemic he's avoided accountability because of very spotty sitting of parliament, he used prorogation to stop that stop difficult questions about the way charity scandal at various committees, which were the only functions of parliament working in in the last few months and for. Him To have an election before he really presents a plan for Canada in the Economic Rebuild Post Serb post first-wave preparing for the second wave wouldn't be living up to my parliamentary responsibilities in a parliamentary democracy. So we will we will see we will propose alternative visions, but we will also continue to hold him to account. What do you want to see in the throne speech that would let you support it. I want to see a plan to get people working and to get people working in a way that respects the differences across our country. You know whether it's natural resources whether it's manufacturing whether it's agriculture whether it's startups Ottawa should not be picking winners and losers. They shouldn't be keeping whole regions of the country down dude ideology, which should be trying to respect the economic potential every part of this country. Get people working get the economy moving because the last six to eight months have been very difficult for families small businesses. There's a lot of concern out there and I think the best thing we can do is to show confidence in all parts of our economy, and yet you might be thrust into an election at any time sooner rather than later what makes you the right person to lead this country's Prime Minister? Well, I think I have a track record of serving the country long before I ever ran for politics that you know when I graduated high school from my small town. In the Toronto suburbs, I joined the military that gave me an amazing opportunity to live and serve and see all parts of this country I finished my service went into the private sector worked as a lawyer in the private sector and a large manufacturing Ontario understand the needs of job creators but I always gave back whether it was to military families or working with A variety of charities and nonprofits too much is given much is expected was our family. mantra and I've tried to bring that sort of small class ideals. Class Ideals to to my public life. I'm not a celebrity but I I've committed my life to this country but does it matter that you're not a celebrity? Well. I. Think That's how Mr Trudeau has really carved his prime ministership Matt you know if you look at the foreign policy at. was about the prime minister making splashy trips on behalf of our country and it was all about him whether it was India whether it was some of the other engagements including with the United States rather than taking a serious approach and trying to stand up for our national interests and the interests of Canadian workers and and our security partners. It always seemed to be about Mr Trudeau, his image or twitter I. think Canadians are a little tired of that we need someone. WHO's GONNA fight for fight for the wellbeing of Canadians at a very difficult time let's talk about what you would do. If you ended up in this job, you have promised that you'd balance the budget within a decade. We're in the midst of pandemic. We have no idea how long this is Clinton last deficit that is in the hundreds of billions of dollars will no doubt grow as the pandemic continues? We're GONNA promises that to budget to balance a budget in a decade not knowing. Really when the economic crisis that we're in is going to end. Well what I said was over a decade or so because there's going to be no rapid plan to get back to Balance Matt but we have to make sure that if we're basically indebting our children were doing it for strategic smart reasons. So if it's about getting people back to work, it's about helping the vulnerable reinforcing some long term care homes working with our provincial partners to prepare for a second wave. That's great. If it's hundreds of millions of dollars. Handed out to the charitable friends of Mr Moore. No and Mr Trudeau that is disgraceful in a pandemic it. It's it's crazy how much we've seen already about the liberals helping some of their friends and lobbyists to former MP who liberal MP just eight months ago seems to have gotten a sole source contract when parliament sitting and three hundred and forty three billion dollars were pushed out the door very quickly. So we're not proposing any anything serious in terms of. CUTS WE WANNA make sure the money is well spent, but the money's the money's already been spent. So if we have a deficit, that's three, hundred, fifty, billion dollars goes up above that and you're saying it might be a decade a decade or so you will have to cut won't you? Know if we grow the economy no but here's the reality under the last few years. Mr Trudeau seen about one hundred, fifty, billion dollars leave the country that's investments in expanding. Jobs that are already here or creating new ones just before the pandemic. We saw Warren Buffett pull his investment out of Canada because the legal rail blockades there is a sense that nothing can get built. Nothing can get done in Canada, and so even though we're were generally seen as one of the world's leading democracies, a safe place to invest that has changed in the last few years because of the ideological approach of Mr, Trudeau and I think we need to get people working and have a less of an auto on knows best attitude. One of the other things that people are focusing on, and perhaps this will come up in the throne speech would appear reports are suggesting that there will be a green focus on on rebuilding the economy in the last election year party promised to repeal the carbon tax is that still your plan? Yes it is. But one thing I will say mad, I don't think we had smart ineffective enough policies on Climate Change in environment I'm I'm a leader that's willing to say we have to better in some areas and Matt is one for every time we're seeing the carbon taxes is not smart because it's not competitive and it actually doesn't reduce greenhouse gases. Even the parliamentary budget officer says it would need to be tripled to have certain any of that impact we have to show not just what we're GONNA. Tear down what are we going to build? What are we going to do to reduce emissions to mitigate against some of the impacts on the environment of manufacturing resource production I? Think we have to show Canadians. We can do both not through tax, but through partnerships through technology working with the provinces to get emissions down my commitment a year ago though I mean most Canadians voted for parties that supported a carpenter. That's two thirds of voters doesn't that make you out of step with Canadian voters? No people vote. As you know, well, Matt because I I've listened to you interview people over the years people vote for variety of reasons, the economy and uncertainty about jobs and wellbeing of family. That sort of thing is probably the biggest driver. The environment is one body would not suggest that all of the parties on the centre-left received vote from. Canadians on. This one issue, but they all did support the idea of a carbon tax and most of them supported a carbon tax that was higher than with the Liberals had put in and and most have very little idea how the economy works. Here's an example. Matt in our area of Southern Ontario all of the manufacturers compete whether in auto parts or what have you. Michigan Against Ohio against Pennsylvania, where there is no input price on carbon. So we have to make sure if we do something that applies attacks or makes less competitive are we going to see jobs being swept away? We've seen that in interior already. So how when the parliamentary budget officers is already saying it's not having an emission reduction effect in the way the government. Promised, why don't we do something smarter? Why don't we get emissions down without chasing investment and jobs away that will be my commitment and just the last question on this is that I mean Nobel Prize winning economists are the Business Council of Canada the CEO's of of corporations like son core support the idea of a carbon tax. So what do you know that they don't? Well I've worked in the private sector and they they want certainty Matt, and I think we've also contacts tax they would rather have certainty. So in the case of Sun Core, for example, Alberta does have a large emitter price on carbon at as a provincial led approach. In fact when Mr Trudeau I said he was going to price carbon. He said he was gonNA, leave it to the provinces that is going to be my approach partnering because many provinces do things a different way but we have to be very careful. We are integrated with the United States in terms of their economy, and if we do something radically different to them and remember Mr Trudeau began this under the Obama presidency. They didn't follow his lead the brilliant Brian Rooney years ago on acid rain with an acid rain treaty with making sure that Canada and the US we're in lockstep so that our economy didn't suffer. So until until there's a global approach to this is the Nobel Prize economists talk about how can Canada do meaningful measures to reduce emissions without putting us dramatically at a step with countries we compete with for jobs and investment. Let me talk about one of those other countries and that is China you have promised a very different approach to the relationship, with China, what would be different under your leadership. Well, we have to deal with China in the reality of how they conduct themselves in world affairs and not by I think the sort of way that Mr Trudeau would like them to him. He was pursuing a free trade. Agreement. said it was a country admired and was trying to warm relations at a time that Beijing was actually. Doing less in terms of working with its neighbors in that part of the world less in terms of respecting human rights. With disrupting global trade patterns. So I think we have to deal on principle with China. There's an importance with trade, but the Almighty Buck is not everything and when we have our citizens being mistreated for six hundred and thirty days in prison as an act of sort of diplomatic prison take prisoner taking when we see this situation with the IRS. So China Sea Islands I think we have to stand with countries like Australia and show that We're we're going to call out bad actions and him and and try and work around on some of the trade issues and and other disruptions caused by the communist regime. Do you worry that taking a harder line could endanger those Canadians that are being held in those harsh conditions in China? Well, their wellbeing is very important to me and I think we can assess that after over six hundred days. Matt the status quo is not working. If you take a harder line, is that not going to put them at greater risk? No I don't think. So in fact, China respects strength more than than weakness and I think they see Mr Trudeau as uncertain and week when it comes to responding and look they also don't like when other countries highlight some of their bad actions and so Australia in recent months has taken the lead in calling. Out some of the actions of of Beijing and I think we should work with primarily are five is allies, UK Australia New Zealand the United States to try and provide some counterbalance to China the other just ignoring them has not worked in the last few years. So I think we can stand up for our citizens and our commitment to human rights and the rule of law we can do that together. Told me that I'm wrong too. Young. To. Use One small man and giant field. But I do wish to say official that I'm wrongfully imprisoned right now. Uncover season seven. Dead Wrong. Actually Killed Tipple if the Jeff Ninety nine. Available on CBC listen and wherever you get your podcasts. He smashed pretty much every billboard and streaming record that matters. It has already been stream more than A. Billion. Times. People still to this day point to this is the moment everything changed. But whether you agree with those claims are not this podcast isn't really about him either you're not an astute businessman or you're inherently racist when it comes to black music in his country. This is not a drake podcast available now on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcast. We're in the midst of a pandemic but we were also in the midst of a global reckoning if I can put it that way around racism anti? Black Racism. In particular we've seen in the United States we've seen it here in Canada do you believe that systemic racism exists in Canada? I think there is racism in Canada Matt and I think we we have to address it as a society that. Racism exists in Canada. I. Think there is racism in in all of the institutions. It's a matter of when you say systemic is it part of our training? Is it part of our recruitment? Many people tossed the word around but don't actually describe it. Some people say that systemic racism is based on. Outcomes for income or outcomes in the justice system so I've I've advocated on this for a few years now and tried to advocate on behalf of some of my constituents in the Toronto area that I think were discriminated against by the federal government and I didn't get a an appropriate response from the Trudeau government. So if there's anything we can do on a bipartisan basis. To produce better outcomes and help help groups that have lost faith whether law enforcement or in in departments of the federal government. To restore that face, you'll see a commitment from one of the examples of systemic racism that people have pointed out at length is within policing studies have shown black and indigenous people in this country are much more likely to be stopped by police and subjected to police violence and police leaders have admitted that systemic racism exists within their forces. Why do you think that is? Well I. Think this is this is a case where if you look at the outcomes in our justice system, there are over represented groups and we have to get get to the bottom why that is and there could be a whole range of reasons including some racism within within the system and so when within law enforced when people say that police forces given the fact that the some police leaders admit that systemic racism exists that police forces need to be funded that money needs to be taken from those forces and invested in, for example, social services and community services. What's your reaction to that? I don't think it's an either or Matt I think you can work on the outcomes issue and income inequality totally apart from the justice system I also thank you can promote responsibility and and and safe communities and and an approach to respecting law the law of the land and respecting you know neighbors property this sort of thing while addressing. The justice system including policing right now there was a study all parties agreed on to look at concerns about racism in the RCMP Justin Trudeau shut that study down when he prorogued parliament. So when I call when he called me to congratulate me I said all of the committees need to return immediately because. We're looking at the we very politicized scandals. The Public Safety Committee was looking at the RCMP issue. Specific do we need? Another study look at it on a bipartisan basis. Do we need another study on whether racism exists within the? Well I think we have to look at how to eliminate it. This is what's challenging in this day and age mad is a lot of people will we'll talk on twitter and suggests that here is here is a problem we have to address. But then will not start looking at solutions. I'm the type of person whether it's for indigenous Canadians whether it's four black Canadians whether it's Canadians that are losing faith or trust in their own government. I WANNA see some action and I WANNA see tangible measurable results and I'll tell you conservatives under my leadership will partner on initiative if we can start restoring some of trust in in our public institution. You're speaking on a public institution, which is the CBC, and you've promised to eliminate funding for the digital arm of CBC. Cut Funding for CBC TELEVISION AND CBC News. Network by fifty percent. Why would you do that? Well I think as the media landscape is changing I think it's wrong for the crown, the federal government to be competing with the Toronto Star and all these traditional media sources that are trying to monetize their digital arms matt. So the public broadcaster like as you know, I used to listen to you on Toronto Area Morning Show and now in the current. There were no commercials coming up next are there this isn't competing with the private sector who are struggling to to live in the new media environment with the tech giant's from Silicon Valley. So I think increasingly, we need to see it return to its public broadcaster routes. There's no need for CBC digital be to be taking away from newspapers who are failing Mr Trudeau was giving more for that through subsidy and then was proposing a six hundred million dollar media bailout for the private sector that was hurting. Let's look and see what she does very well, which is, which is radio, which is some public interest, which is minority language services both French and English and some indigenous. And a little less the. family feud a little less. Show it's been suggested that this is an issue around cultural sovereignty. Cuts for example, CBC television. Then you end up not having an arm or a venue for television programs that tell our stories. So who would tell our stories? Canadians. In fact, you can watch Kim's convenience and Murdoch mysteries and all these sorts of shows on on net flicks as created less CBC. Well, these would be producer the candidate production fund, and so people can tell the stories. We also have a regulatory rules on how much Canadian music whether written produced is is played on the radio. So there's a lot of cultural protections that are there CBC is a broadcaster and it does some good content particularly when it's doing public interest broadcasting not competing against the private sector I don't think it's fair as media companies are are dying and withering on the vine. I don't think it's fair to either tilt the table in favor of the silicon giants and I'm willing to look at that as well. I also don't think we should be continuing to subsidies forms of the. The CBC that actually disrupt the media landscape for the private sector, Erin? O'Toole I hope we have the chance to CIA talk again in the meantime, it's been great to have you on the program this morning. Thank you I. Always enjoy it Matt. Thank you. Erin O'Toole is the leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. This is the current on CBC Radio One I'm Matt Galloway. Our. National Fares Panel has been listening into our conversation with Erin O'Toole Healthy Araj Ottawa bureau chief for Huffington Post Canada Rob Russo the CBC Ottawa Bureau Chief. Good. Morning to you. Both can wearing I'll tell you what did you make Aaron O'Toole. Had to say what stood out to you the most. and He seems to be opening the door, I, opposing the government on the budget or the fiscal update. So the second confidence though that we will expect later in the perhaps in November. the words that he talked about in terms of strategic investments I feel like they're probably could be some common ground in the station ruined We know that the Conservatives as much rather have an election I later rather than sooner they feel it mister tool is not well known as a personality to the country. there was a lots of really interesting stuff in and did a good job of pressing him robbery. So for you what stood. Well I. If you can't see the peace tower these days because the air is so thick with political trial balloons floating around there and he he floated a few of them as well. if he he said if the government wants to do something on long-term Garrett, that's great. He might support it that was new. That was interesting if if the Liberals wanted to do something on on systemic racism, even though you, you couldn't quite get him to say that it is he said that he would be willing to look at it on a bipartisan basis he's willing to take on the Silicon Valley. Giants but that was interesting as well So you know if you go down the list of some of what restore tool is proposing, there are a lot of similarities between what he and Mr Trudeau are proposing and in some ways I'm sure that that's by design Mr. Tool seems quite intent on trying to increase his political fortunes by adding supporters rather than subtracting, which was something that his predecessor was accused of in the past. The prime minister has talked about rebuilding the economy in a new and better way, and that's extensively what will hear about in this throne speech healthy. What does that mean a new and better way? What he has talked about when he used those words as he talked about change it to long-term care changes to sick days expanding six days ago ability he's talked about this situation on around people who are on disability payments. He's talked about swimming called vulnerable workers. I'm not actually sure what he means by that and he's talked numerous times. The about supports revolted will worker is creating more equality in the country he's. Talked about Pharma Macaire expanding Karma Care he told us that he wants to economic growth by also making investments that are in line by can't with candidate's commitment to be net zero by two thousand fifty he's talked about more digital and more conducted being part of it. So expect more investments on expanding broadband He's talked about women and child care. He's talked about rationalize Canadians and indigenous people can finding additional. Oh plan with. degrees. He's talked about young people feeling with the burdens that they have When you look at, you know what? Joe Biden for example in suggesting in the United States there you have a two children climate change clan. You have a promise to forgive pass student debt you have it by. America. Procurement Policy seven, hundred, billion dollars and stuff. These are manufacturing in clean energy and artificial intelligence. So. It's possible that there is some some mimicking going on about what's happening in the United States that might be part of the throne speech here as well. So rob when you hear all of those ideas being floated and Erin O'Toole says that he's looking at balancing the budget within. A decade or so. Square that for me? well, everyone is handing out free money. It's going to be really hard for anybody to win the next election on any kind of platform austerity you've got hundreds of billions of dollars being spent Mr. O'Toole is GonNa is going to cut taxes to try and spur people to get back to work. Mr Mr Trudeau is proposing to in effect. Reinvent the the social safety net of Canada, use this as an opportunity to take care of people who who might've been dropped from that net as a result of the pandemic. So what are we going to have? We're going to have an election that's that Fahd around what those hundreds of billions of dollars is going to be spent on rather than how much is going to be spent everybody now agrees that austerity is completely out the window when you when you hear a conservative leaders say. Ten, ten years or so before we get back to balanced we we in a new world, we are in a new world and we're in a world of free money where nobody pays it seems nobody pays for the promises that are being made everybody. Go ahead out there. Yeah I was GonNa say I think it's also part of the lessons learned the two thousand and nineteen election campaign right Mr who is trying really hard not to be accused of wine to have an authority budget not even sure that we will see. I it big tax cuts and what the Conservatives should we have an election would propose for that very reason and rob's earlier point I think he's entirely right through to finding a lot of time trying to add to his electoral coalition with regards to. Climate Plan. For example that you touched a little bit upon and the the sort of what he will agree to that part of. Mr. Troodos throne speech I think we'll be an indication of that. You know the fact that he was willing to talk about strategic investments should we have an election as a key phrase and so in the last minute or so that we have everybody seems to be saying they don't WanNa fall election. Rubber, so is. Air Not going to have the time to introduce himself to Canadians. I think. So I think the liberals if they want to can survivor easily all they needed to support one party are they doing the political calculus and the math? Are they looking at Blaine Higgs New Brunswick who was in the middle of an election now to see if he pays a price? Yes every government across the country is looking at blaming. To See if he pays a price, the problem with Mr True is he doesn't know when the second wave of pandemic might hidden and whether or not. He'll pay the price for also whether or not an activist agenda, which is what he is proposing might be palatable to Canadians or thinking a lot about can they stay healthy and can they hang on to their jobs? Are they looking more for that kind of basic protection or are they looking to dream a little bit about what the twenty first century might look like? I'll say rush thirty seconds to you how likely is it? That will go to the polls in the fall. I think it's unlikely that being said I. Think you know we're still focused on the liberal conservatives that we've really forgotten about the MVP and the MVP cannot support each thrown that seems to be. Focused on expanding the welfare state. Then why would people continue voting for the EP? Also facing a crisis of its own relevance and so beyond a really bad poison pill in a speech from the throne or physical update I cannot see the MVP not supporting Albro. We'll do both to it. Of course, a great to speak with you this morning. Thank you. Ottawa bureau chief for Huffington Post Canada. Rob Rousseau is the CBS's auto bureau chief. For more CBC podcasts go. To. CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

Justin Trudeau CBC Canada Matt United States Erin O'Toole Mr Trudeau Parliament China Toronto CBC Conservative Party of Canada federal government united Canada twitter Prime Minister Liberal Party Beijing Matt Congratulations Aaron O'Toole
Shingles

The Current

18:05 min | 11 months ago

Shingles

"How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell him that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark net the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police ace who hunt down online predators. The environment. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made it hunting. MOORHEAD subscribe wherever you get at your podcasts. This is a CBC DC podcast. Hi I'm Laura Lynch. This is a podcast from the December fifth edition of the current. They were large. welts up my right leg. Basically in a pattern a ladder. I wanted to scratch my leg off and I thought I'm going to get an infection from scratching. I was surprised because the first time I had shingles I was under fifty and I thought well I'm too young for this was Mimi Maxwell describing her first experience with shingles as you heard it can be an itchy blistering rash and for many. The pain can last for months even years shingles is typically associated with people over sixty but doctors say it seems to be on the rise in people of all ages like Mimi. Elizabeth Elizabeth decent was in her forties when she got shingles she describes it as one of the worst experiences of her life. I started having very severe pain in my neck up by a hairline. It was so bad that I literally would wake myself up screaming in the middle of the night. That's how bad it hurt and so I went to the doctor. The doctor said you know what before we do anything I'm GONNA treat you for shingles it was horrible. Cs me what. My pain level was on a scale of one to ten and I told her it was fifteen. It was located at the top of my neck neck near my hair line and it also went down my arm and along my side and it was itchy. Initially looked like hives and then they started popping not exactly like chicken pox but more like actual blisters then they popped and they sorta scabbed over the nerve pain stuck around and it would. It would come go Sunday's were okay. And some days were just miserable. I thought I was dying was terrible. It was those teenage ever been in in my whole entire life. Now there are two to vaccines that can help. Prevent Shingles and Canada. But they're not affordable for everyone. Andre because is a columnist for the Globe and Mail hello hi what is shingles singles so shingles is a terrible illness that you can get a rash and pain etc it's exceptionally simply the older adult version. There's and chicken pox so only people who had chicken pox and get shingles and the virus lies dormant for often for decades and then it springs up again. How painful can it be? Oh it can be debilitating one of the people I talked to said it was like the being wrapped in barbed wire to give you an example You can become. I'm blind you can become deaf but the worst thing is the nerve pain so a small number of people get this really debilitating nerve pain Araujo and that can last for for a long time. Kenneth can last forever. There's not media cure to it. There's treatment but It it's unpredictable. Who can get it? But it's one of the most difficult conditions additions to treat in medicine now. So many of us of a certain age got chicken pox when we were kids so how many people get shingles in Canada. They eat here well about one hundred and thirty thousand people get shingles but Since she about ninety percent of people before born before nineteen ninety-five will we'll have had chicken. Pox is very common childhood illness until we had a vaccine available in that wasn't Dole nine hundred ninety five so it's a large number of people but it's a small percentage of the population so two hundred and thirty thousand people get shingles or about five point eight million seniors and those one hundred and thirty thousand who is most likely to get it. Two thirds of people are over the age of fifty. So it's something that recurs when your immune system starts defeat of it but if you look at the math the other way about one third of people are under the age of fifty so going to happen in your twenties your thirties your forties etc.. And they are there treatments for it. Well the we treat symptoms right so you can treat pain. You couldn't treat you get these awful skin rashes that are very very itchy. So you can put cream on on those but there's not really a treatment has just go away and I've heard though that antivirals can help There's some people who are treated with antiviral cities viral all disease but those sort of minimized the symptoms rather than cure. And how contagious is it. It's not contagious at all. Unless if you cross someone who's never had chickenpox it's not The dangerous spreading to someone else is not that big unless you're interacting with people who are have immune conditions people with AIDS or people with cancer. Then it's very very cheap in life threatening to them and there's there's been some discussion that you you have to actually touch someone else's rash to get it There's all kinds of mythology but it's not all that to say it's not that difficult. It's not it's very very difficult story to spread it to someone else. That's not to be concerned and so there are vaccines what are they so there are two vaccines on the Canadian market. One is called zoster vaccine. The other cult shingles zoster vaccine been around for a long time since two thousand eight. It's moderately moderately effective. And then the newer vaccine that just arrived in twenty eighteen sheen. Greeks has very good results in trials so very very effective and especially for older people. That's why it's attracted acted so much attention what what makes so much more effective. Well it has a A way that they boost they boost the immune response bounce using a particular products chemicals in the in the backseat. So it just makes it Trying to explain it in not scientific Hypica- term specifically makes it more powerful. If I could put it that way. which is we don't know exactly? But that's that's the theory but it's especially important for those who are older with compromised immune systems that make sense. How how much did the vaccines cost as she says in two doses? Roughly three hundred dollars was it. Depends 'cause they're dispensing fees. You can be charged to Get the axiom. Because it's not covered publicly so more or less three hundred dollars zoster vaccine. It'd be a little less than how much of a barrier is. Cost them to getting the vaccine. Well three hundred dollars is a lot of money especially for seniors so it is definitely barrier. the people who are getting back to nate at tend to be people who are a little wealthier and that's not necessarily who needs to most protect there is The in Canada's only one publicly refunded program Ontario Funds Zoff toback secure between the age of sixty five and seventy and leaving on -Tario you can get shingles vaccine but it's not the most effective actively but is that is that the only coverage across the country I mean. The Canadian Association of Retired Persons is calling on all provinces to to fund the vaccines. Yeah so far only alien -Tario has done it and many would argue. They're probably not funding the right tax even though they have a contract that they have to fulfill so that that will probably change but the provinces have been very slow to on the uptake for this because it is very expensive. Well what what. What are you hearing from health professionals of anything about about what the human cost pastas of this not being covered by the province's well the National Advisory Committee on Immunization which looks vaccines and decides? If they're worthy it has said that everyone over fifty should get this vaccine and under under our ethical rules in Canada when Nasty says that a vaccine should be given. Every doctor has a responsibility to tell their patients that even whether it's covered or not so the we should be having a much bigger discussion of this to start off with what you hear from the public. What you hear from physicians -sition is it's really horrible to have shingles and three horrible to treat people with shingles? So they would love some help out there. They'd love some prevention in the form format vaccine but it has to be affordable though so there would have to be some If centralized buying some serious negotiations to make it more affordable and then there are are those there are critics who say. It's not worth the price so you can have these scientific debates we judge the value of vaccines based on a measure measure called the MVP so number needed to treat to figure out how effective vaccine is so for shingles you have to vaccinate thirty five people to prevent one in case so when you put that against the cost you have to say what else can we do for that money to prevent other illnesses etc so this is always the the big calculation in public public health sitting back to nation. How do we get the most bang for the buck for our vaccines? What's interesting now is that there are more cases of people in their thirties getting shingles AH? There's no vaccine for people under the age of fifty right so anyone can get the vaccine but it's only recommended for under the age of fifty. The main reason is we just. I don't have research. It's a difficult to do. These huge vaccine studies and the numbers of percentage of people get in their thirties. It's very very low so it's almost impossible impossible to do a a a study of that age group but is there any information about why shingles seems to be on the rise. Well it's just. Do you know the the chicken pox coming home to roost affect it that way so all. These people over time had chicken pox and now they are getting a little title older at. Why did this happen younger people? Well it's because we have more people living today with the immune compromise because we can treat people for all these illnesses illnesses that they used to die forty young age. So there's a lot of people who are more at risk is the short answer for that. Well it's it's interesting to see all of this happen and I thank thank you for giving us a primer on all of it but thank you under because a health columnist for the Globe and Mail for Dr Vivian Brown. It's quite common to see patients but shingles. She's a family doctor in Toronto aboard member of Immunized Canada and author and author of the book a Woman's Guide to healthy aging teaching and she joins me in our Toronto Studio. Good Morning. Laura what are you seeing when it comes to shingles cases in your clinic shingles is a very common disease and as a family doctor. After I probably see a case maybe a week or case every two weeks People will come in with a rash Sometimes they recognize that this is shingles themselves and sometimes they'll come in with a very localized pain and no rash. They often can come in before. The rash even erupts and so you have to be on the lookout coat for shingles because that localized pain is very suspicious. Okay so so how. What are some of the more severe cases that you have seen over the years unfortunately having having been in practice for awhile I have seen some severe cases Not Too long ago. One of my patients ended up with shingles meningitis which means the shingles virus that virus or chicken pox virus got into the fluid around her. Spinal Cord I have another case of what happened to her. She was extremely ill with high fever headache. She was admitted to a hospital. Owned was in the ICU for a couple of days. on antivirals in order to WHO in order to suppress the virus I also have seen someone with shingles encephalitis that means inflammation of the brain and and that actually has left that particular patient With some impairment some permanent impairment so not just pain not just light sensitivity entity or photo phobia but actually cognitive impairment. So this can be a real significant disease. Aside from the antivirals treatment options. What are they well? The antivirals are really important. A we use them as soon as possible. Which is why if I even suspect shingles even before the rash comes out all all? Put someone on antivirals it. It prevents the virus from multiplying and so it makes the course of the rash shorter what it doesn't do unfortunately is a dozen decrease your risk for nerve involvement so that poster pedic Neuralgia is not related to whether or not you're on an antiviral so the antivirals viral will make the skin better and shorten or hasten the recovery of the rush. The other treatments are really treatments to decrease nerve sensitivity so there's no good treatment to just radically the virus or get rid of the virus. We're really treating the symptoms of nerve sensitivity and there's various narcotics and non narcotic medications that we can use for that. Are you frustrated by the lack of options for. I would say that this is a very difficult disease to treat when someone has nerve involvement. If it's just the rash a little bit of discomfort little itchiness goes away. In ten to fourteen days we can survive that but when someone has chronic debilitating pain That is very difficult and we do have pain guidelines in Canada as to how to treat it because it is very complicated complicated and the side effects from the pain medications make a huge difference so people are impaired not only from the rash not only from the nerve pain but from from the side effects of the drugs now shingles may not be very contagious. But you can still impact someone. That's right you can infect someone who is at risk for chicken pox so any baby be under. The age of one has not been immunized for chicken pox yet. Anybody whose immuno-compromised can get chicken pox when you have shingles but you're not going to give shingles to to your partner because shingles really is your own. Immune system not suppressing that chicken pox virus and presumably. Your partner is in your own age group and probably had had chicken pox when that partner was younger as well so are they going to get shingles. No they won't get anything if their own. Immune system is robust but if they're stressed or immune immune compromised they can get shingles as well. They're always going to ask you about stress. I mean we hear about the different ideas under talked a bit about this. What Causes Causes Shingles Angles is stress a big reason to so the main reason for shingles the number one cause of shingles if you if you look at it in those terms is aging and what we know is our immune in system gets weaker with age? That's called Immuno Senescence. Our immune system is just getting a little bit older and if you add on top of that an older immune system and stress stress. We know that stress affects the immune system and Dr Elizabeth Blackburn in two thousand and eight two thousand nine got the Nobel Prize for her work on stress and and telomeres and the aging immune system so yes stress does have an impact if so then what we are seeing more younger people getting getting shingles. Now what would explain that. And how often do you younger be coming up. I do see younger. People coming in with shingles but the nice thing about being younger is your immune system is still robust last. So it's less likely when you get shingles as a younger person to have any nerve involvement. Most people get better relatively quickly. And that's why we generally are not immunizing before age fifty because the main goal of immunization is not only to prevent the rash but also to prevent the nerve damage from the rash. So let's talk about the immunization. What kind of uptake are you? Seeing patients opting for that newer more effects of effective vaccine shingles so shing. REX has been out now for a two years. It has incredibly Great data in terms of how how efficacious is how well it works and so in the population that I'm seeing people are anxious to be immunized. This vaccine is recommended. Are Canadian body recommends it currently it is unfunded and we have lots of things that are recommended but unfunded think of car seats for infants recommended. It's the law but unfunded bicycle helmets for kids recommended mended. It's the law but unfunded well now we have this fabulous vaccine that's very efficacious offered to a population that understands this disease because everybody knows somebody who's had shingles it's not it's not a A disease that is hidden so The uptake is fantastic. People are very interested in being immunized because because people are afraid of this disease and rightly so but it also is expensive. Some people can't afford it it. Should it be covered. I think it should be covered because we do have an aging population. The goal is to keep people independent. The goal is to keep people living in their own community not in a nursing home. Not In a facility if you get a bad case of shingles if you get chronic nerve pain multiple medications very quickly an older. Maybe more frail person can no longer live independently and as we're successful with all of these chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease and COPD and asthma and people are surviving cancers their surviving and they're independent but they do have underlying chronic disease and when you get a disease like shingles it. T- stabilizes your chronic disease so it's not just the shingles that you're wearing about not just the nerve pain but the effect on the individual for all their other diseases which they were managing well and now maybe not so. Well Dr Brown. Thank you for coming in. Thank you Laura. Dr Vivian Brown is a family doctor. She's a board member of the United Canada and she was in our Toronto Studio for more C._B._C.. 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Canada Laura Lynch Pox Dr Vivian Brown partner Toronto Studio Mimi Maxwell MOORHEAD Canadian Association of Retire AIDS Elizabeth Elizabeth United Canada Andre Araujo Neuralgia Kenneth Toronto COPD
Tom vs. Time

PTI

24:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Tom vs. Time

"When deciding how and when to safely return to the workplace you need to be informed. That's why IBM Watson helps you prioritize employee safety with Watson works a set of a infused capabilities. Let's put smart to work visit IBM DOT COM Slash Watson works to learn more. Pardon the interruption but I'm Mike Wilpon recited the Paul Net belittle the bears yesterday. How about one celebrates their win last night. I'm Tony Kornheiser Roses Red Footballs and brown bears would lost if Brady remembered fourth-down. Yeah Willie did. And he also zoomed why'd outside several times leading up to that? So he wouldn't to with golden boy last night was. No going into the game thought the bears were going to go down. Go Down Ha I did glad they. Brady went down art and he's going down again when I get finished with. GOING TO PTI, boys and girls. Today's episode. The Astros are answering their critics, the Yankees and raised go to game five while the heat hoped for a game six. But we begin today and this will make wilpon happy with an embarrassing moment for Tom Brady with the bucks down by one point to the bears last night and less than one minute to play. Brady threw an incomplete pass twenty yards downfield was fourth and six at the time. But from Brady's reaction after the play, it seemed apparent. He thought it was third down. On, what is your reaction to Brady seemingly getting the downs? Wrong. Tony. Watching us we're going to think my reaction is extreme. So let me brace them right now. Tom, Brady, from my money if not, the greatest football player of all time certainly is like many people think the greatest quarterback of all time and when I say the golden boy I, see it with a wink but he's the golden ways been that and so for him to berate scream at belittle his teammates on the verge perhaps of humiliating some of them during the game and then to lose track of the down the play itself, Tony is relatively unimportant. Tom Brady doesn't need to win the game. He doesn't come back I mean his reputation and his legacy if you will professional football legacy is in concrete forever but Tony. To scream at teammates and then not own your own egregious like that. In the aftermath Tony it might not have been dishonorable but it was less than honorable and so it was a teaching moment for me 'cause I grabbed my son right then we watched the whole thing as early out here in the west and I said, Hey, don't you ever do this as a young quarterback in the point guard don't you ever do this? You own your mistakes and I think people like CAL ripken and Bill Russell and Roger Federer who I don't know like the other two and I just can't imagine them doing that Tom Brady should stand for something he's not unassailable which he seems to think he is. Yeah so my feeling is that these are fairly common mistakes that can happen to any quarterback. Yes. Yes. But you've got to say I screwed up you've got to say yeah that my mistake and I thought last night what I saw of it Bruce Arians tried to cover for him but he was trying to cover for very weakly me you'll he felt and he said so today. He felt that everybody knew was fourth down and Tom Lewis four down to go back to the larger point here you're right. It's all set in concrete. He's got nine Super Bowl appearances. He's got six super bowl championships. I don't think anybody's ever going to get to that and I'm not saying this is like Willie mays stumbling home plate, but it has a sense of shadowing Mike I. I see Brady, this year is a lot like last year. He has some really good throws in some bad throws. He had a great half last week. He has some very ordinary halves I'm not sure I'm right when I said earlier that the transition to winning at tamp is going be as smooth as I thought, it would be the Antonio. I of I agree with every word you just said, but I don't even care about the football. It can make mistakes Tom if Tom Brady Goes Oh for his next twenty. So what? But. To just not stand for something to not be accountable I, mean I hope it. Maybe I shouldn't expect but I, hope the great champions can stan for more than performance and it's just it really consumed me last night I should have been happy that my bears one and found the Golda previously thought of by me golden boy but instead I'm I'm Sabal with thinking about this and sort of being an anguish about it an angry about it the Tom Brady would just dismissively act like saying hey fellas I blew. Admired him because everybody blows it at some point or at least almost everybody I blew it. I lost track of the down, but he couldn't do it just. Disappointing. The Yankees are either going on or going home tonight Jordan Montgomery pitch better than Tony. Thought. He would as New York, even series with Tampa to setup tonight's deciding and dramatic game five the Yanks Will Pitch Garrett Cole on three days rest while the raise counter with tyler glass now on two days. Rest Yankees First Baseman Luke voice as well. We're going to win it close quote. Tony. You with them. So I will tell the people what happened earlier today at about eleven o'clock eastern time and eight o'clock in the morning your time I called you and we talked about this very game and I said, and I'm quoting myself I think accurately you don't WanNa get no one game series with the Yankees. They can hit it out too often they got sixteen home runs in six playoff games which nobody has ever done. Now I want to see Garrett Cole pitch because the guy he hated so much at Ucla Trevor Bauer Trevor can go on three days rest and he win on three days rest Garrett Cole has never done. You don't see what he can do, but he is three zero with the Astros and the Yankees in playoff games against Tampa. He is three and all the other guy going on two days rest we'll I can say it's to winning or three inning deal because Kevin Cash said before I got a stable full of guys who can go ninety eight. Only, three pick it up from there because interests me about this. So two or three inning stint supposed coming on just two days risk, you can't get two or three innings. It in the first inning, you get rocked it seems to try Kevin Cash noses personnel I get that, but it seems to me telling you plan with fire in the against the lineup that you're talking about and the reason I know that call happened this morning because you're thinking my God, this guy can throw six pitches three of them can go out and that game over a deciding game five and Tampa I don't know what the BP I says but this is a fifty fifty affair at least you think of that going in but two days rest Tony. It just seems to me it's unnecessarily risky. Yeah. So I mean, I think about this I think how wildly series because? It's five games in five days. There's no days off you know. So it really tests your pitching staff and I thought well, maybe the Yankees are built because of where they play for a bigger stage but it's not a bigger stage all the goes exactly the same. There are no fans is though there's nothing to indicate that the Yankees and built for this. If I took towards the Yankees at all, it's just because I think in a one game deal it's just I don't know that you can pitch to them get away with everything even though I've told you many times Tampa is up ten four in the season series and I think that's meaningful I do let's stay with. We one quick question do you think that call can get more than? Four innings think he can get into the six say providing the Yankees but yet another. I think Cole I. Think Coal Can get into the six and the Yankees Bullpen seventy-nine is going to be fine if that happens, let's stay with baseball. In fact, let's stay with American, League Baseball or guess who will the winner of Yankees race? It's the disgraced Houston Astros who cheated their way to the world championship a few years back they got eleven runs yesterday to eliminate Oakland which had finished seven games ahead of Houston in the regular season, we'll have the astros proven they're good regardless of the cheating. I, Tony. That's like the age old question is. Worth about twenty years of examination thirty years of examination like how great would certain players have been berry bonds whether or not? There was something performance enhancing so the astronaut had a certain amount of greatness. Yes. Yes. Yes. They had that already I thought coming in. But Tony Right up through last year when you're you're nationals took them out I think this year though is a separate question. I don't think that just winning to this point proves anything I think if you get to the League Championship series and how you perform in that that I, think you can look at that specifically as evidence to say Aha they're not cheating. Now we don't think there's any way for them to cheat. They've proven themselves in in the context of this year after the measures put in place but I, think you've got to play this one out I. So I'm GonNa make two points here. The first one I'm going to pretend to be the astros. If I'm the Astros I want the Yankees and then I want the dodgers because these were the two yappiest teams about the way we cheated I wanNA, beat them, and I wanna to tell him to shove it. That's point number one point number two is this the Astros got so lucky this year that there are no fans because they'd have been booed everywhere they went every game they played and that Boeing would never have left their ears and they would have been haunted by that. So they caught an enormous break they're playing in silence stadiums and it's just their baseball now. told. I agree with you but was interesting is they weren't any good anyway in the regular season they finished two games. So they weren't any good anyway now you wonder if with that booing and not just doing but I mean I mean catcalls and profanity and all the things you hear in a professional stadium when People WanNa get on you. You wonder if they'd have just cratered I mean we'll never know which is to your point. But yeah, you know they want those two teams i. tell you else don't. You think those two teams want the Astros because I do. I think they do I, I will say this these are not the same astros because they don't have leander and they don't have cold who with the two best experts in the American league last year but the spine of that lineup correa and Bregman and Al Tuba in springer is those hitters them to two world series in three years, and they're still here the managers go on GM going they're still there let's take a break but coming up can the heat stay alive and the NBA Finals Lebron when the title tonight with a third team. And the dodgers are rolling. Can the graves give them a series? I would say this I bet the dodgers want Houston. I bet they want him I'm GonNa meet on. The wheat marks six annual KPMG. Women's PGA, championship at a Ronnie Golf Club. October eighth through, eleventh in Newtown Square Pennsylvania as the first ever partnership between the LPGA tour the PGA, of America and KPMG. The Kpmg Women's Pga Championship brings together the best LPGA players from around the world to compete for one of the most coveted major championships in golf competing on championship caliber courses. The Kpmg Women's Pga Championship has elevated the women's game to new heights and Puts the LPGA players in the national spotlight and the KPMG. Women's Leadership Summit L. The week of the championship invest in rising women's leaders aspiring to reach the C. Suite by providing thoughtful content tools and networking opportunities together, they serve as catalysts to empower women both on and off the golf course. KPMG continuing its commitment to the next generation of women, leaders and proud sponsor of the Kpmg Women's PGA Championship to learn more visit Kpmg Dot com slash women's leadership. GEICO presents, Monster Counseling Dracula tell me how you're feeling no one understands how lonely these no one will even let me into their house I knock knock but they ignore me. What else? I. Look in the Mirror. Don't even see myself anymore if you don't see yourself clearly, can you really expect others to I'm having a breakthrough it's not easy to be a vampire, but with gyco it super easy to switch and save hundreds on your car insurance. The audit gives me a higher vantage point from which to see the future I sense the first call. Hey of Mike. Staying alive tonight. It. This is very cloudy for me and I'm going to tell you why you know that I always pick Lebron I always ride with Lebron three times in the bronze career. He's had the opportunity to win an NBA Championship one game Ford three times he has won it I. Think they're better than the heat at least the top two guys are better than the heat and draw still out what gives me pause Mike is that in game four, Lebron texted, all teammates must win I don't think he can say that again in game five that's why I think Miami has a pretty good chance I will pick the Lakers but without my usual confidence. We'll Tony interesting thing I. I. Think Lebron will find a way to sort of motivate to prod those teammates I. Think you'll find that. Ever it is but let me just say this I think Miami is GonNa Win Tonight I. Think There's going to be a game on Sunday. They're going to extend the series and it's not just about Jimmy Butler have an other worldly game because you can't do that. People will do that twice in. A lifetime. So do I ask him to do it twice in the series Butler crowder hero Robinson Bam everybody they all have to play Tony this is not an all time Lakers team. All right. This is not magic and Kareem and worthy iron. Scott. Who Does Not Shack Kobe and Fox and all right D. Fish is not one of those teams. So so I just think I think the Lakers will win this series but not tonight. Next Call Nets Call Hey Mike and Tony thanks for taking my call. Any chance you guys see the braves giving the dodgers series. Look. The dodgers are the best team in baseball, but the braves are very very good. They hadn't won a series and moved on since two thousand one, they lost nine straight series. They give a lot of confidence. They played the minimum five games. They've given up a total of five runs. That's all five runs their T. B. R. A is. Nine two and the rundown rental is nineteen I am not saying they're going to win but I'm saying that Osuna and a Kuni junior and Freeman. There give the dodgers series. Tony they do. But look you know me. I'm always pushing away crazy numbers. and. The stats don't mean Jack use the his were does mean something at least to me all right Oh nine to right that we keep talking about every day people are hitting them out the Yankees have these these these weeks where they just swab him out when you are pitching to your staff is old nine to you're going to be a series with anybody including the twenty-seven. Yankees. If you believe in that staff, I believe in that staff to give the dodgers series I'm not picking Atlanta because the dodgers can pitch to but I think this will be a series. The dodgers handled. The padres confidently dispatched you but the braves are good. The phone lines are closed really. But in our future, I see US discussing. Latest changes to the NFL schedule. And is Rocklin doll a lock for his thirteenth French Open title. Thirteen lock. On Against Commitment Lock. Lock. I'm saying a lot. Yeah. Rilo lock. And he's not GonNa Forget. What said it is GEICO presents. Monster Counseling Dracula. Tell me how you're feeling no one understands how lonely these no one will even let me into their house I knock knock but they ignore me. What else I look in the Mirror It don't even see myself anymore if you don't see yourself clearly, can you really expect others to I'm having a breakthrough it's not easy to be an empire, but with GEICO, it's super easy to switch and save hundreds on your car insurance. NAPA. Napa, you can buy a five court jug of mobile one full synthetic motor oil for just twenty, seven, ninety nine, and as a bonus, you'll score a ten dollar gift card by mail-in rebate. That's like a cherry on top of the Cherry on top of your oil change. So get ten bucks backed by mail when you buy Jug of mobile one quality parts helpful people that's NAPA know how know how generous dates pressing sales price it's not include applicable taxes every second offer instant thirty, one to one. Happy Time people have twenty, seven, th birthday George Kittle, the forty niners tight end came back from injuries last Sunday night and court fifteen passes for one hundred, three yards and a touchdown against Philadelphia. It's Kessler Travis Kelsey for the best tight end in the league. Apparently, the forty niners agree is they just signed to a five year seventy, five, million dollar contract the richest extension ever for tight end kill was a fifth round pick out of Iowa two thousand seventeen somebody on the forty niners staff clearly knew something because kiddle set. The record for most receiving yards for tied in one, thousand, three, hundred, seventy, seven in two, thousand, eighteen the first of his two pro bowl years he was first team all pro last season when he led the forty niners in catches with eighty five and in receiving yards with a thousand, fifty three despite missing two games kill is also regarded as a top block tied in on the side note kills off season workout partner is Robert Tania's Green. Bay's tight end with the man bond who already has five touchdowns for the packers. Will kills present is he's GonNa get his preferred remake Jimmy Garoppolo Jimmy G. IS GONNA be back out there and after missing two games and that can only help the forty niners in a major way. Happy. Anniversary Andrew Lock on this day ten years ago, USC defensive back cherise right was scooping up and attempting to return a recovered Stanford fumble. When luck lay them out with possibly the hardest tackle ever seen from a quarterback the violence of locks collision caused right to fumble at six, four and two forty. Luck was a deceptively athletic tank who made a habit of extending plays by absorbing hits in the pocket. Luck was the number one overall pick in the draft and lead Indianapolis to an eleven five record in each of his three I seasons. Making the pro bowl each time in two thousand, fourteen, he threw for four, thousand, seven, hundred, sixty, one yards and a league-high forty touchdowns taking the colts to the AFC championship game. But in the injuries began to mount up, it was a lacerated kidney and then a concussion and then shoulder surgery luck was named Comeback Player of the year in two thousand eighteen after throwing for four, thousand, five, hundred, ninety, three yards and thirty nine touchdowns ironically after winning that Comeback Ward love chose to never come back and retired at the age of twenty. Nine Tony you get the feeling. It'd look if he wasn't playing quarterback could've played several positions on a football field including linebacker there plenty of hall of fame linebackers who weren't as tall six four and not as heavy as to forty. London's just a great athlete going back to the day when even though he's still young when Kids Played Multiple Sports and excelled at all when I'm sure luck was one on. A melancholy trails to Whitey Ford Edward Charles Ford crafty little left-hander. The greatest pitcher in Yankee history died today at ninety one he was the oldest living former player in the hall of fame. Whitey Ford, a native New Yorker played on eleven pennant winners and six world champions. One, two, hundred, thirty, six games. The most of any Yankee and his winning percentage of six ninety is the best in the twentieth century and beyond among pitchers who won two hundred or more games in nineteen sixty one when he was twenty, five and four, he won the CY young his lifetime array was two, seven five he was inducted into the hall of fame in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, four. Was Best Friend and teammate Mickey. Mantle. was about their particular chemistry mantle said quote we both liked Scotch like Dimaggio Mantle Rizzuto Ford spent his entire career with the Yankees who retired is number sixteen in retirement. He acknowledged that he sometimes doctor pitches with Saliva Baby Oil Turpentine and Rosin he used the ring to cut the bowl and make his pitches break dramatically Ford was great pitcher and clearly a master craftsman, his world series records of thirty three and two thirds consecutive scoreless innings, ten victories, and ninety four strikeouts still stand at Whitey Ford Day in Yankee. Stadium in two thousand. He said and I quote I've been a Yankee for fifty three years and I'll be a Yankee forever. Tony closer to home was still in the industry baseball also lost an executive Jimmy, Lee Solomon who was at the root of so many important initiatives in baseball like the program RBI, which really helped bring baseball back to big city kids. He was only sixty four. He was a very good friend and he championed people who shouldn't have needed it and I just wish someone had championed him because if you talk to people around baseball so many of them will tell you he had the stuff that talent the the guile everything necessary to be perhaps the Commissioner of baseball I guess he had to be born maybe twenty years later at least. Well, the former commissioner baseball was his dear friend right buds. Yes there were. People in the industry love and respected him Tony and this comes as comes as a little bit of shock was Washingtonian. For a lot of his life live not too far from you and I got to know him and just just respected him and if there were big baseball issues, he was the person I wanted to run things past to see if my thinking was on the track, it should be. Let's go to the big finish. The NFL move the broncos patriots to Monday in the bills titans to Tuesdays at a right with you. Tony is jarring. The CV thinks based vocal has a certain rhythm Sunday. Maybe Monday. Yes. But in in this case now it is all right. It's more than that roffe on the dollar Novak Djokovic going to square off in the French final who you got. I got Nidal because it's on clay but I wouldn't that a lot of money on this one the capital signed former Rangers Goalie Henrik Lindquist to a one year deal. Do you like that? Tony Thirty eight coming off a career worst save percentage. I don't know former capitals goalie. Britain. Hoping by the wayside with the conducts Alabama number two at all Miss Tomorrow Saving Kiffin. Are you intrigued? Yeah. I'm very intrigued saving always beaches former assistance last one, number fourteen Tennessee a number three Georgia tomorrow. Better mentality and spirit about college football and try to get into it for the first time. Tomorrow including that game? Audits on trying to better the next time. I'm Tony Kornheiser and I'm Mike will have a great weekend knuckleheads. You can get the PTR podcasts on the APP or apple podcasts. United. Canada. Now, you've got Olympics.

Yankees Tony Astros Tom Brady Mike Wilpon baseball dodgers Tony Kornheiser KPMG Willie mays GEICO Kpmg Women Tampa Lebron Garrett Cole football Tony Right Houston Lakers
November 8: How the west could be won

As It Happens from CBC Radio

57:06 min | 1 year ago

November 8: How the west could be won

"This is a CBC podcast. Hello I'm Carol. Hello I'm Karen Gordon. This is as it happens. The podcast edition. Tonight's how the West could be one after a visit with the prime minister in Ottawa. Manitoba Premier Brian. Pallister tells us what it will take for Justin Trudeau to quit feuding with the Premier L. Berta and Cisco on some disassembly required thirty years after the Berlin Wall came down. We'll speak with guests. Who was our man on the scene all those years ago physician and former pro democracy? Activists Yen's Ri- malice aforethought decades after surviving surviving. The Holocaust an eighty nine year. Old Senator in Italy is assigned police protection after she received anti Semitic messages and threats so many losses for words new information brings a new dimension of horror and grief to the death of thirty nine Vietnamese nationals in a truck in the UK. Ten of the victims were just teenagers left without our own devices. You might call it putting down your phone and watching the birds for a bit but in Silicon Valley. The latest wellness trend has a more high tech name dopamine fast and all without the same boat Alberta's annual annual flying canoe festival. Needs a real jay stroke of luck after thieves takeoff with a bunch of the canoes. That were meant to take off as it happens. The Friday edition radio that would hate to be the bearer of bad canoes. Brian Pallister says he came in peace. The Manitoba Premier was in Ottawa. Today for a post-election sit down with Prime Minister Trudeau the election. Exposed Mr Trudeau's weaknesses in the West and Premier Pallister's prairie colleagues in Scotch Win at Alberta appear to be spoiling for a classic Canadian Federal Provincial. Fight but this morning Mr Palestine insisted that he just wanted offer Canada's prime minister a little friendly advice. We reached Manitoba Premier in your Brian Pallister in Ottawa female Palestinian. What was your advice to Mr Trudeau? Today well reach out Look to bind us together Make sure that we can make some Serious economic and social progress by Utilizing our resources and our mutual skills don't continue to divide against premiers That that a political leader can do but a prime minister should not Really Congenial Manitoba Advice. Friendly Lia's MANITOBANS are Working offering to work to build bridges in this country to make us a stronger country. Do you think that Ottawa that Mr Trudeau has been dividing screeners. Well I would say certainly. That's a tactic that many political people use Carol and I would say it was pretty obvious so I'll let those who watch the federal election. Draw their own conclusions inclusions on that but I think going forward. It's pretty clear that the ground has shifted When the Prime Minister I came in we had I think eight to end EP or liberal? Premiers I don't know seven conservative premier's now it is a different time and it calls for I think some openness and I think that the Prime Minister Minister is demonstrating in words. Certainly that he's open to that openness and I think people need to see that indeed I think there have been a number of comments about alburto blaming on blaming this to Trudeau for what's going on with the economy of the province. Do you have any advice. Mister Kenny. Well certainly I think. Mr Kennedy has been very vocal in advocating for the people who are very obviously very frustrated. You saw that in the electoral outcome. But it's more than that I too you're seeing You're seeing job loss there. That's you know. BERTA has been a wonderfully blast over many years with a strong strong economy and all count has has benefited from that. But the fact remains that. Now we've we've seen significant increases in for example Suicide rates among young men. There who want to work and and I think that the effort needs to be obviously to get the Trans Mountain project not just bought but to get it functioning so that we can create more opportunities for that region of the country country that being said I'm also concerned as the mayor of Calgary about delays other delays in terms of things like flood protection projects. We're trying to get done carol and so there is a need to get these things built. We need a structure. That isn't just used for delay but is used for progress to be achieved as well in a balanced way understand what you're saying about the situation in Alberta and just how dire it's been in that people are actually possibly taking their own lives because of that situation. You blaming that on Ottawa. No No. I'm not placing acing blame. I wouldn't have come down here to place blame Carol. I'M A bridge builder. And I'm trying to do my very best to make sure that UH as Manitoba's the keystone province. I suppose does we're. We're very strong Canadians first. And we want what's best for the country. Not just what's best for Manitoba so we're certainly advocates for seeing action that that can That can bind us together better because I think we have been somewhat divided over the last while. There is a minority government in Ottawa. Now is you know but Sixty five percent of voters chose parties that support the carbon tax whether it's the liberal carbon tax or something even tougher so where does that put those provinces who are against instance where does that put Alberta. Where does that put Scott Mo- in the political calculation? Well let's not equate concern about climate change to uh automatically opposition to building the Trans Mountain pipeline. I think that you know that there's significant support for energy corridors. In this country including not just pipelines pipeline's but I would say also hydroelectric energy significant support for development and that side and I think that's really the approach. Primo and premier. Kenny have both taken So I I wouldn't equate the two things I think Carbon tax action is P- as part of a climate change. Plan is something that I think I think we can accept And certainly it's something that Many Canadians demonstrated they would support parties. Who support that? But that's not the only way to fight climate change now Toba got a green record yet. Pre Election are green record was dismissed by the federal government because quite clearly they wanted to run an election campaign against Some of the provinces that needs to heal now we need to show respect for each other's initiatives. We need to understand. We're all in this together. We're not going to benefit by further such strategies prodigies of division. We need strategies of unification. Now she says that running a campaign based on the idea that there should be a carbon tax was in fact a campaign against provinces who oppose the carbon tax. I would say was designed to be more of a defensive strategy than a unifying one and I would say that any environmentalist. I would suggest that there are many other ways in which we can in addition to the possibility of a carbon tax that we can deal with climate change. We we developed what minister McKenna. Perhaps soon to be former minister McKenna that would be up to. The Prime Minister set described as the best green plan in Canada. Carol Sixty seven pages of actions we're undertaking. That's are made Manitoba Green Plan. One page was carbon tax. Sixty six pages of other initiatives that were pursuing so again I would suggest. Mutual respect act is A better strategy than Federal usurping or dominating provincial initiatives. It's not a long term way to find success short-term at worked to get a minority liberal the government elected long-term it doesn't work to build a stronger more united Canada. We interviewed New Brunswick's premium Blaine Higgs who said that after the election he flipped over over and said Yeah. I'm going to have a carbon tax. I'm still GONNA fight. Ottawa's imposition of certain parts of it. But I'm GonNa do it because you said the writings on the wall. The people have spoken. This is what they want and and I'm going to shift over to represent that. So what do you make of Female Higgs position. I make this of the line of questioning. Carol I would say see that the very fact that we're spending most of our conversation talking about a carbon tax shows that we're talking about something that's easy to divide people with when we should be talking about working on climate change adaptation. We should be talking about flood protection. We should be talking about climate mitigation projects. This is what Manitoba wants to engage. Jenin is and so I would suggest that Constructive Conversation would be about how to deal with the big problem not how to divide with the little one. Did you hear anything today. That made you think independent minister is willing to do what you've suggested the prime minister in our meetings has been very open I've appreciated his willingness to listen. Listen and I think now what Canadians want to see Not Exclusively in western Canada elsewhere is that he's willing to act on the words that he has spoken beaming Palestine. I appreciate speaking with you. Thank you it's a real pleasure. Carol thank you Brian. Pallister is the premier of Manitoba about we reached him in Ottawa. ooh Liliana Eliana. Say Gray was barely a teenager when she was taken to the Auschwitz concentration camp in nineteen forty four her father died but ms grey survived the Holocaust and today. She's a senator for life in Italy. Since being appointed to that position last year Mrs Mugabe has been the subject of Anti Semitic messages. Her Son told The New York Times that some have wished for her death and now officials have assigned Miss Segue police protection for her safety in public spaces. Emma Bonino is an elected senator in Italy. Really we reached her in Roam. Senator Bonino what has Liliana Segue told you about how she feels now that she has a security detail tale guarding her. What she she simply said formerly by the way that she at number number imagine to put under in head own country so she did the same time surprised reassured so but also in a very fighting mood so I'm sure shooting up give up but definitely what is that both in the clan not then then in social excetera etc of course I've a factor that her Very much even. If she's you stood firmly yesterday showing his number number a arms saying pay this number of the Auschwitz Birkenau Cam and with Ota these are is on people omeday Chapman. Why do you think that now they've authorities have had to take the next step which is to actually protect her? I think the bill to the fact that he went when Pavlos promoting this special commissioner in on racism and accent that said the debate In understand that was really a shame and I think that she was known to were small group of US But she has become a public figure More recently and so the hate speech and then so and so on and so forth every Chris exponentially in the last months. That's why the Minister of Interior after meeting decided that starting today from Milan Milan provincial forces. We provide an armed excellent to Indiana Saguenay. That must mean that. It's not just that they're horrible. Things is being said to her but she actually. There's there are credible physical threats to her safety. Is that what we're understand. Yeah that is what what it does mean to boot under NASCAR. I was under escort Years ago and it lasted a few few years season. Not Go to. Can you tell us about this. Commission that Liliana Segura is spearheading. I hope she wouldn't be elected the chairperson. Oh this committee. The committee has a mission of hiddinks collecting proof and at the end but it it doesn't have any legislative power and what the Commission can do as the Commission of Human Rights Where I'm Five six hundred eighty can provide reports on suggestion. How to change? What the change What are the measures to make? Kids are better coexistence easily and so being on the sued Mazen food My right is saying and either not blowed that pass of the commission but I think It was a political go gesture much more that the gesture regarding the real power of the commission and you mentioned that there were right wing parties ladies who abstained. Wouldn't support this commission but these aren't fringe parties are they. This is the party of seal this Kony. This is the party of Salvini. There are others as well but this is an and they abstained because why what was the reason for not voting to support this commission. I think that was. It was a process of intention so they claim that the commission could be Let's say distorted mission Russian Etcetera Etcetera. But I also think the now they do apologize and they've heard today that some leader so the right collision or a set. Today we live. Vote As chancellor some of this commission of course she's ninety so I think that she would need the L. Pomono us with the part of the commission go forward but I think that they I realize that they done go. Far One of the key comments by Mr Salvini is that he believed that this commission that would would stop attempt to stop hate speech would actually curtail freedom of speech. And the right to say Italian's first. What's your response to that? Ah That's adjusted curious. I I it's enough to read the motion that we approved And those this can can meet really. It's fake news that I know people speak Without reading what is exactly the text text of the motion And my no way it's important in any case such culture commission because the the elements and incidents over lashes and are very spread. Initially there is a cultural Komo which is not only on this amazing on the Jews but But blankly Rascist so that's why It's such an important to have such a community and that whole that Donna would be as courageous and valorous the stand firm but I know how difficult it is to to live under escort particularly for her. She told me me exactly. I never never thought that I would put under escort in my own country. And here she is a survivor of Auschwitz. It's getting to be protected for MS Bonino. Appreciate speaking with you. Thank you thank you very much. That was Italian. Senator Emma Bonino in Rome for more on this story visit our website. CBC DOT CA SLASH AI h In Edmonton when winter hits residents have a choice curse it or embrace it and devoted fans of the flying canoe festival prefer the ladder for them embracing. Winter involves a makeshift lose truck a canoe and a bundle of for but now they're desperately short of one of the key ingredients after a thief made off with some of the canoes breath. Danielle Corn Way is one of the festival's organizers we've reached him in Edmonton Daniel was happened to your canoes. They were taking they were stolen stolen. meccano subtly flying. Canoes flew away somehow. But we have a very good idea how that happened your idea well. It's quite simple. It's a tragic tale. Somebody proceeded to drive into our lower-paid cut blocks and drive away with three or four plank canoes but there were two hits John Year canoes right two separate robberies. We've had eight canoes taken over the course of the summer in on October. Twenty second was the final three walnut. The final three. We do have one left. But it's lonely dear. If you were having a flying canoe festival you need more than one. I would imagine you need multitudes of canoes everywhere everywhere you should look. You should see a canoe. The Flying Canoe Vullo Winter Festival. All right let's ask. I WanNa ask you about how you use these canoes on a luge track. What exactly exactly do you do? We've created a Canadian triathlon of sorts. It's in the voyagers spirit. Can't forget that Emerton was founded with two forks for the prairies which was the North West Company Company and the Fort Emerton with the Hudson's Bay company with that spirit in mind. We thought those for as yours in winter are obviously looking for things to do. So what better way to to grab your for Bundle and your trading flag sprint. Fifty meters to canoe. Go down run on a Ski Hill. Come to the bottom. Get Out of your canoe. Run to the trading post trey pastor puts up his hand in your other two teammates earn a buck saw. They cut their fourteen inch diameter log with the buck saw when the peace hits the ground their time stops and then they go for next to us to better their time people realize that after signing for a good five to ten minutes You don't have a lot of upper body strength left. Throw that ass so we we came up with this idea to just embrace winter make winter fund so what better way to enjoy winter than getting out there and braving the elements okay. I wanted to wind this back Quebec. not this braving the elements braving a lose track in a canoe. I how dangerous is that. It has its risks of their need to be signed. Basically basically we take the seats out of the News Pat the with gym mats and whatnot to make them as Kushner as possible. You are in this vessel and you're pitched forward down I WANNA eat This is basically a couple of snow banks that are keeping you in line. You're getting a fair amount of speed. You could be going. Probably easy to fifty the seventy kilometers an hour down the hill so it is a thrill does get the blood flowing just a real true Edmonton winter thing to do okay. Have you done this. Have you tried yes. Well you know being the producer of the event took on crash test dummy to act go down and do it. I did it with sandbags representing presenting peoples weights at eventually myself in by production team. We jumped into canoe and we proceeded to adventure out where no man has has gone before so we knew it was possible. And we've taken this to the next step you know you're doing this design a waiver. There's there's many waivers that need to be signed yes. Nobody wants to really accept responsibility but we do try to keep. It is safe as possible. I will admit I might get in trouble for this but months before I took my daughter who is eighteen nineteen at the time and after fresh snowfall. We actually went to the hill that we just took a canoe and went down at. That was actually the first take time I tried it. I think it's a way to break up winter putting ideas and all kinds of people's heads. Well that's good because you know. Winter is meant to be embraced and we shouldn't it be running and hiding from it so I think anyway in Edmonton winter can be long. Days are dark. Okay now why don't you call in the VOYAGEUR spirit. What's this has got to do with with with voyagers? The Flying Canoe. The story itself is actually based on a piece of French Canadian literature. That was ten by on Able GOB way. Back Doc in eighteen ninety six to ninety four. Give or take any published in the Montreal Gazette in the New York New Yorker magazine at the time. And Anyway it's the story of these cool Dubois or waivers that are missing their loved ones on New Year's Eve and who knocks at the door but the devil the devil mix deal deal with them at to fly them home to see their loved ones on New Year's Eve to get to the party's not the problem it's on the way back. There were three rules to follow. The mustn't drink. They mustn't use the Lord's it's name in vain and they mustn't run into any church steeples. So on the way home is when old things went awry and unfortunately these are condemned to fly the skies forever except we say that Menton and our boyer spirit that every first week in February they make a cameo appearance down in the Mill Creek Ravine of the French quarter of Edmonton. It's it's really celebration of indigenous Mateen French culture with all of them into the flank to races are a big piece of what all that fun is all about now. If you can't can't catch your canoes back. What does that do to your flying canoe festival? Well it puts things in peril. I mean it's hard to have a flying canoe festival without canoes news simply we would like the person who took them just to quietly breaking back though. I think that's a stretch but we're looking for any ways. People would like to contribute but without canoes. It's pretty fair festival and it would be really important to help those back. Okay my theory. Is that the mothers and the spouses of these voyagers have stolen. Those can do to prevent you guys from doing this But maybe that is what maybe people protect you from yourselves. The applet you know. Why would you do that? What's wrong with knocking? Your head every now and then you know maybe knock some sense into us. So can you give us our canoes back and behave accordingly protecting you from yourselves. What mothers and fathers? I'm sure some of them to maybe got involved. There's anyways my theory probably not true. I hope you get your canoes back. Danielle and thank you both. Thanks so much for getting the word out. We just hope sincerely to get her loss. voyagers home all all right. Take care. bye-bye Danielle Corn Way is the executive director of lassie. Francophone the organizers of the Flying Canoe Festival we reached Tim in Edmonton Ooh For centuries religions of emphasize the importance of taking a break from society of getting away from the shallow distractions like like envying your neighbors mortar and Pestle or arguing with your horse a timely timeout. Helped you get perspective and return home feeling clear about your place in the universe and feeling more forgiving of your stupid inconsiderate horse. This practice has been known as a spiritual retreat. But you already know that your your wondering aloud to yourself is was it a total productivity hack. Religious literature doesn't explicitly say so. Maybe the latest fancy and Silicon Valley is better than a spiritual retreat according to the CO founder of the company sleep well it is a total productivity hack and has that's what you want try dopamine fast. What is a dopamine fast? Well put your phone down and listen one secret is put your phone down and listen to music that's out you don't watch TV or play video games or exercise. You don't talk text drink. Coffee make eye contact or have sex. The problem according to disciples of the dopamine fast is that we're addicted to the constant mental stimulation so by eliminating as much of it as we can we reset reset our brains to their baseline. Whatever that might be it's a powerful idea or it's a powerful new name for an old idea as a neuroscientist told journalists? Mike like write quote. If I were being cynical I'd say it's just a way of taking conventional and accepted wisdom and rebranding it so that it looks like a new idea that's more more palatable to silicon valley types unquote. Well maybe so I guess either. You should take a rest or they should give it a rest you have. It was thirty years ago. November nineteen eighty-nine pressure had been building on the East German communist government for months Hungary had opened up its border and refugees from east. Germany had been making their way there to escape to the West inside east. Germany pro democracy activists had been holding regular other meetings and protests in October of that year. Former as it happens host Michael Enright spoke with Yen's right one of the founders of the new form movement on necessarily of changes to blow in our country movements and changes unnecessarily elections. I really the really something to choice. I'm a press that makes interesting interesting reading chronic media but you babe hopton political issues and so on that was eastern East German pro-democracy activist Yen's speaking with as it happens in October of Nineteen eighty-nine little. Did he know at the time. How quickly change would come to his country by November? The protests had grown including the largest one ever on November fourth. Nineteen thousand nine at the Alexanderplatz in East Berlin and then on the night of November ninth the announcement that shook the country. The law was changing east. Germans would be allowed to travel freely across the wall and the border that had divided Germans. Germans for the past twenty nine years was about to disappear over the next few days. People streamed across the border walking driving their communist issue cars. Their in parties broke out all over all day long at the Berlin Wall a carnival atmosphere the trump and champagne toast to the end of an era. Today see for me. In my life history was unfolding during those pivotal years of nine hundred eighty nine and nineteen ninety as it happens spoke with East German activist physician and molecular ocular. Biologist Yen's Reich four times this weekend along with millions of others across Germany Mr Reich who will be marking the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the wall. We reached yen's rise again at his home in Berlin. Yen's first of all welcome back to as it happens after almost thirty years. Well we just heard Dan rather getting very excited about the events Just after November the ninth after the the end of the wall in Berlin. But for you I know for many it began much earlier and less well known are are the events of November the fourth just days earlier where there was a demonstration. That was very key to this. You were one of the speakers. Do you recall the events events of that of that demonstration. Of course I reminded those days these days in particular but of course it's it's one of the well. Mel reminded days of my life. You were one of the speakers that event. How risky was it for you? Because at that point you did not know what was coming. How risky was it for? You wouldn't know that it was no longer risky to speak up. A the governor Bandoro calling for reforms. We now know it that the powers that be did not Muster Austin the strength to do something serious against this uprising but at the time of course we are aware of this outcome it could could have occurred very easily occur that the whole movement could have been stopped for instance if Gorbachev in Moscow would have been sacked if he would have been removed from his post and instead stay Katy B in the army would have taken over after all we have nearly as many military the forces in East Germany. They could have stopped the whole Party very easily and yet yeah. There were a million people who are out in the streets and some people who are actually politicians people who are in the government speaking. You were one of the speakers Ah You spoke about the need for this kinds of change. How how surprised were you to see how quickly things changed over the next days? That was a complete surprise. Of course it was not a surprise that we did not expect. Things would happen into reforms the old name of the country and free opinion and all these things would come slowly slowly. Slowly Buck Doc. Nobody had any idea that five days later the whole country in effect would look collapse. That was the course and major surprise. I wonder distant. I ask you more about that surprise but let's just go. Oh to that night itself because there's a very famous a moment. When a man named Guenter Schabowski actually made the announcement that he's a member of the German polit bureau and You know this piece of tape. That people should be reminded of it here. Is that audio of of going through Shebab Ski Mirvish. Ma You've worked Kerensky bug on home also is so all right so in that clip you know what he's saying but he's announcing the end of border restrictions the end of the wall and there's an Italian journalist asking him. When is this going to happen? Any says immediately so of course. There's much controversy about whether or not that's really what he was told to say. Yeah it's not quite clear what he intended to say. I think ninety percent probability. It's a slip of tongues of. He's said something that he had not the mandate to do but it may also be there discussion among historians that. This was a planned thing. Gene the plan to let this team off from the Popular Movement by opening it for one evening or one day. Okay or one weekend and then closing it again and well and then every esteem of of of the they do each and all hell broke loose and people started turning up saying we're GonNa Cross and he's overwhelmed border guards I mean they could. We've had orders to shoot to kill. They could've had orders to stop. They could have done anything but they didn't know what to do. Did they know orders and there was a Francey exchange of telephone calls as I understood later on the bit. Win The bigwigs in in the polit bureau. Some nobody dactyl given order forced sedation. They all expected it from from the summit coming from above from Hanta by Monica was ill. It's time to. Therefore there was nobody triggered the pre repaired or less what is to be done when there will be what they call counterrevolutionary movement something this is this a reason that this Border Guy Called Hal. Yeager who know him all now he was a simple border guard and he he did not know what to do and the people they gathered and they were very very modest. Let let us go. We don't wish to go forever. We will come back. We will inspect West Berlin open and please we will come back even the shouted as cores and and finally said well. Now we have to flop as dumb as the opening of that was at ten forty five on on the evening of November ninth opened the gates and or that gate and then East berliners flooding into the West being met with champagne and flowers on the other decide. What a moment wasn't it was a great moment? Of course I think it great moment of history and and quite unexpected no not planned then of course. In in throughout the country people rushed to the vest on border. We we have not only the border the wall around investment in in but also the border between East and West Germany and everywhere the demanded to look into obviously the mood of the population was. There's a party going over there. It's all right. Let's let's talk about where you were at this party because because this is something you had wanted for years to seal the end of this where were you on the night of November the ninth myself. I wasn't known my my wife. Yvonne was in the hospital. She had denied servisair doctor. I wasn't alone with the children with the daughters veal already. Well I'm going to patent. Nothing happened to me. You went to bed. I'm going to bet you didn't know about this party. They was going on. I didn't watch television. Switch off and on the next stay by my life call me and she had been called deepen the night in the hospital and said to me that that our son who was twenty at the time Tony Serie called on her. And that's IT Mama. I'm sitting on the wall and the answer that my wife recovers was that she had said that is impossible also do client on the wall. She didn't realize what the course and of course she would probably be thinking of all the people people who had attempted to get across that wall over the years people who had been killed people who've been shot for that and there was getting message about your son but of course everybody was on on the water and was standing on the wall. And by that point but you couldn't imagine and we must see over the years or at least we wear they are very much a friend that our son or our daughter would serve together with others. Try such thing as climbing over the ball will do. Loose seems that We had seen a lot of successful and unsuccessful at times. You're listening to as it happens. I'm speaking with Jens Reich a physician and molecular biologist who is also one of the founders of the pro democracy movement in East Germany so soon after the end of the wall is of course the end of the German Democratic Republic the end of East Germany and you ran in the first elections during the the first the post-communist elections you ran march. Nineteen ninety. Michael Enright spoke with you again at that moment and And you were talking about it what you what you like about. It was just whether it was the very western Western politicians and slogans and I WANNA play a bit of you from March. Nineteen ninety. Dion is very hilarious Feeling we have had such a success overthrown the whole always system that has games Forty cates well on the other. The other thing is a bit sort of Disappointment that it We hadn't had time to to structure our own. You know the process of becoming getting into reporter So that was you being disappointed so much was imported chance to build your own. Did did that disappointment. Stay with you. Well no I'm I'm no longer disappointed. I see only that there is a large number of people who really got disappointed because they did not the garage into the Western system as they supposed at the time. Being after the collapse of the whole economy occurred art in East Germany and ecological problems grew grew and there are many people who got unemployed afterwards for years to come elderly people who never gotten a new new drop after having having been led off so there is a widespread feeling of that since could have been done more cautiously Better prepared in order to avoid that the opening of the mall with hindsight with become well will become a day of disappointment for many people. This doesn't include Mice Elf on our family. We we're we're not struck by this fake but we have enough people around. Who are having disappointed? You yourself south. I mean we talked about you efforts to become in political life but at the same time you have accomplished so much in science and research work con genomes is well regarded. You just received the highest honor in Germany the Order of Merit for your contributions. How much check your success do you credit with with the the experience of the fall of the Berlin what we did? Which side helped you more spending so much of your your life in East Germany or was it finally being able to have both sides of the country to to your advantage already no longer a young Men when the wall came down to the formative years of my life of course where before this this and we had to adapt to the eastern system and to to the live under the communist rule. I I have worked professionally for many years in Soviet Russia very creative signs to place after all the the family and our children king imprinted into that Russian live. We have many friends in Russia and Poland and so so we have made something out of the cage in which we were living life was not so bad but we wear depressive over many years spending our whole use only the tiny country in being able to travel to myself go to conferences and have interaction with other scientists Abedin though peace was communists time of my life the same time the the wall and the barrier between East and West Germany The point of it was they said to be around part against against fascism. It was anti fascist. Now that you're part of the larger part of Europe Germany is is united. What do you make of the the the rise of extreme right political parties of of a fascistic parties? I'm worried limb AC- of all roll some of the conflicts that I lied about in the newspapers and TV remind me of the years twenty s in Germany when the same sort of harsh clashes occurred occurred in Berlin and it burns me and I hope the spirit of democracy we. You will in Germany. After all these years it's good to hear you on the show again thank you. Let's let's meet again for sure. No T I hope you have many more anniversaries of this kind. Thank you bye bye bye. Thank you for. The talk is a molecular biologist physician and former pro. Oh democracy activists from East Germany on October second of this year. He was awarded the Federal Republic of Germany's Order of merit the highest honor given to individuals for services to the country. We reached him at home in Berlin for more on this story. Good or website. CBC DOT CA SLASH AI h In its author's words dual citizens is about sisterhood. Motherhood the desire they're to be an artist and what it means to be free. The novel by Alex Only N- is one of six books shortlisted for this year's one hundred thousand dollar Scotiabank Giller Prize Prize. The winner will be announced later this month before that we're featuring readings from all six finalists on our show I stop. Here's Alex owning with an expert from her book whose Narrator Lark is often eclipsed by her brilliant sister Robin. It goes like this a sunny day in June June the leafy heat of summer at odds with my frozen Terroris- I stood fixed to the ground. The air thick and still as a wall Paul against Robbins ragged breath and the wolf. My sister had named Kathryn inspecting us both with her yellow is robin was thirty. Eight weeks pregnant at the time and she just irritably informed me that pregnancy lasted ten months. Not Nine she was angry about. This is if there had been a conspiracy to keep her misinformed. She was angry in general because she was hot and uncomfortable and couldn't sleep. We were walking down a trail behind her house. That led to a canopy of pine trees hoping the air would be cooler. They're walking was all robin wanted. Wanted to do other. She complained about this to her. Hips hurt her knees hurt. Her ribs hurt. Complaining wasn't typical of my sister. Who was stoically clearly even savagely independent and it worried me? We stopped every few steps. She could catch her breath and when we did. I watched tur- stroke her belly. She wasn't in other ways tender toward the baby inside her or herself she frowned. What are you doing you nothing? You're touching yourself. She said I hadn't realized until then that I was imitating her making myself off a mirror. My Palm was flat against my own stomach. Though there was nothing to stroke. I flushed with embarrassment and my sister gave her harsh spark of a laugh. It's okay she said I get it but how could she get it. She didn't live in my body any more than I could live in hers. Yes we stood body to body sister. Two sister across an impossible divide then her eyes moved to to appoint behind my head. Look she said we saw the wolf trot out of the forest like a lost dog looking for. Its Home Tom from her strange gate. One leg hobbled we knew it was Katherine. Her Grey Brown for looked nodded and flat. Her body audie narrow hipped and sinewy was possible. We thought later that she was searching for her. Pack to me it hardly matters. Her motives aren't my concern. What I remember is her graceless stagger? And how quickly she moved despite it. How when she bore down on us so so close that I could see her eyes? I couldn't tell whether she recognized us whether the Bond Robin had nurtured with her with sturdy or significant can't slightest fit present in her mind. Scotiabank Giller Prize finalist Alex owning reading from her novel dual citizens is that a recent between the pages event at Toronto's Kerner Hall the winner of this year's one hundred thousand dollar prize will be announced at a gala on November eighteenth hosted by Janardan. There were thirty nine people each and terribly desperate desperate situations and today police in the UK. Several of the victims who died last month inside a refrigerator. Truck were teenagers some as young as fifteen fifteen years old they were all Vietnamese nationals making the long perilous journey to the UK in search of a better life just over two weeks ago. They boarded the truck. DOC in which they would die their bodies were found in Essex in southeast England and the Northern Irish man has been charged with manslaughter. Police are seeking three other men in connection to the deaths. Reverend Simon Newin has been a go-between for the families of the victims. And the Essex Police. We reached the Vietnamese Catholic priest in London. Reverend Simon. We know that of the thirty nine victims who are inside that truck. Ten of them were teenagers. Some as young as fifteen years old. How difficult is that for you to process all further heart? You know when I knew one you know the family of this feat in use owned I visited the maturity of this body with you. Know the Pelicans so it will rather distressful distressful. Do not see the body of this young man I harvest ratified the difficult to come to term. Great subject casualty. Just maybe you can tell us how these teenagers became involved in this because we know that a lot of adults are leaving Vietnam. I'm trying to get work. Because his mother and father they only here and did a great you know maybe you know she deform Lee. You know the heaven. Evan couldn't get to know the paper or anything I don't know but because you know his father and his mother they live here. They are leaving London and so they were expecting expecting their their son to arrive in this. Okay what have they learned as to how their son ended up dead in this in this truck because because you know usually you know the boy where you know wherever he went he always you know code his father and his mother but since the incident happened it's tough cooling so they suspected he was one of the victims. Did the family know that this was risky that this is going to be a dangerous journey for their son. Many many of them they knew so well you know and I also told them anytime. Addition various I advised them. Could you please pass on the message to the people in Vietnam to try to do this way because vetted angeles. Can you know. The incident could happen at any time. You know sooner or later Kind so you have spoken with this family. That's in the United Kingdom and and but other families still in Vietnam you have spoken into them about their loved ones who have died in this truck is that right yes. I spoke to them to email. You know the messages so I try to speak with these families. You have talked to families who are afraid to talk to the police. Why are they scared? Maybe be because they could be you know the from the people who You know organizing the trip or you know because of you know the obligation to to be settled in the UK on mandate behind. You said that you've been talked to the family of this one young man. WHO's the the the family? The parents live here but so many of the others who died their families are back in Vietnam. How are they going to get the the bodies back for burial? What what are what are you hearing from them about that process? You know I visited you know. Devoted some of the bodies have been cloud and the family you know they improved because of you know the encouragement from volition some of them you know. Listen to the investment. I accompanied beneath them to do the blessing and also to pray for repulsive or so of these people and now the police. When I asked the police office to the next step? They said To country the to government the government in the UK and the government in Vietnam. They've worked together and they are going to do do they. Don't know that he didn't know anything they tell me. You just follow the official announcement from the Office of the police station. We we know from other interviews that it's very important for Vietnam people to have the body back to Berry in their home and close to their relatives and so so how how frustrating. How painful is this for the families who have not just lost their their kids or their loved ones but can't get the bodies back? It's unbelievable it is too much for them because you know for them who she you know even you know the body that is a great relief the folded and that is why you know they insisted on having the body back to Vietnam because dating even you know the children there they left. They couldn't make the trip but now you know they can be united. KNOCK ACID leaving. But I should that person the unity of the debt and the Levy and because of the day it sits on having the body back to now. Do you think those families are ever going to know the whole story of what happened to their the kids and their relatives win in that truck. I doubt it because this is a very complicated because it is organized grind learned. So I don't know whether you know information will be revealed to them. I don't know but this quite complicated because so you know the many people involved in addition awful crime but details the more they know the mall pimple. They have you know you're planning planning some kind of a service on Sunday. What does that for? Did they fall to remember and to pray for that. They pose a source of these people number number one number two. Because you know we have asked the the police about you know a federal a goodbye ceremony for these bodies bodies but not in the Jewish diction of the police. So in the meantime the official number has been appl- annouced so we can do this. You know it's like a way that we can so despite to the people and own so the way that we can say now we can say goodbye to you and have a good journey by to be at Phnom where you can you know. Sleep apiece forever Reverend Simon sympathies sympathies. Go out to those families who are dealing with this and I appreciate you speaking with us

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November 13: Both sides are buckling down  and buckling up

As It Happens from CBC Radio

56:31 min | 1 year ago

November 13: Both sides are buckling down and buckling up

"This is a CBC podcast. Hello I'm Helen Man. Hello I'm Karen Gordon. This is as it happens. The podcast asked addition. Tonight's both sides are buckling down and buckling up public impeachment. Hearings begin in Washington and while the Republicans accuse the Democrats of distortion. Our guests accuses President Trump of extortion. The risk of repeating himself eighteen months ago. Our guest suffered brain damage after being beaten by Turkish security agents since but today Moraleja was back in. DC to protest the Turkish president again total smelt down in northern New Brunswick a smelting operation operation announces. It is closing forever leaving four hundred people out of work including our guest. WHO's worked there for thirty eight years? Curtain call relates. It's playwright John. Morale played a major role in the growth of Canadian theatre and a protege says her mentor. Lived the true and perfect image of life indeed power trips Bolivia's president flees to Mexico and a Bible wielding former opponent. Says she'll rule in his place and our guest says both developments. Make her feel unsafe in our own country and wake up Maggie. I think I got some cool new trains for you. When a BBC suggests Rod Stewart didn't build an elaborate elaborate model railway all by himself over twenty three years Mr Stewart himself goals and to get him back on track as it happens the Wednesday edition Shen Radio that figures? That's the longest relationship he's ever had with any model if you turned on a TV news channel today. There's a good chance you saw a bunch of grumpy looking people glaring at each other in in a conference room in Washington it was the first public hearing in the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump House. Democrats are investigating whether the US president withheld old military aid from Ukraine for personal political gain side by side in that hearing room today with George Kent a senior State Department official and Bill Taylor. You're the US's top diplomat in Ukraine both had already testified behind closed doors. Here's some of what Mr Taylor revealed earlier today. Last Friday a member of my staff told me of events that occurred on July twenty six while Besser Vulcan Volcker and I visited the Front member of my staff accompanied ambassador. sunlen investor Sunland met with Mr Yearbook following that meeting in the presence of my staff at a restaurant. Besser solid called president trump and told him of his meetings and gave the member of my staff could hear president trump on the phone asking ambassador. Silence about the investigations now. Sahlin Toll President Trump Ukrainians were ready to move forward following the call with President trump. It's a member of my staff asked investors on what president trump thought about Ukraine. That's the song and responded that President Trump cares more about the investigations of Biden which Giuliani was pressing for later in the day. Mr Taylor and Mr. Ken were questioned by Democrats and Republicans on the Intelligence Committee. Here's a question and from Republican. John Ratcliffe in this impeachment hearing today where we impeach presidents for treason or bribery or other high crimes whereas the impeachable offense. It's in that call are either of you here today. To assert there was an impeachable offense in that call shouted up anyone Mr Ratcliffe respond. Let me just reiterate that I'm out here. I don't know I've got thirty. Allow you asked excellent question the witness's question. Let me take you let me answer. This suspend spend the time master Taylor. Would you like to answer the question distractive. I would just like to say that I'm not here to do anything having to do with Come to decide about impeachment. There's not what either of us are here. Do this is this is your job. Karen Bass is a democratic congresswoman from California we reached her in Washington. Congresswoman bast today one. Republican said. He found it hard to stay awake during the hearing. I understand you sat in on part of it. Did you have a similar problem. Oh absolutely not I think that Yeah pretty shameful. Considering how serious today is to me. A statement like that names that they weren't taking it seriously in what's seen is a pretty key moment today today. We heard ambassador Bill Taylor explaining a phone call that one of his staff members overheard between E U Ambassador Gordon Sunland and president trump. Tell me why that phone call is genus significant. Well my Republican colleagues. Want to say that. There's no first hand information that there I know first. Hand communication with the president so the information that was revealed today was a person overheard ambassador sunlen talking indirectly to the president. Now what's important about that also. Is that some land will be coming to do testimony in the next few days and so he can be asked directly but the fact that you would have a president of the United States who would use military aid for a country that is under attack and a whole that eight back so that he could extort them essentially to speak on behalf south of his campaign because investigating by me and looking for dirt where there is none that is about intervening in the upcoming election and that is beyond inappropriate in the opening statement. We urge the top Republican on the Intelligence Committee. Devon Eunice congratulating Mr Kent Mister Taylor on passing what he called the Democrats Star Chamber auditions. What do you say to that? I work in foreign affairs and deal with diplomats all the time and since this minister administration has been in power. The people that work for the State Department overseas have felt completely disrespected and marginalized in maligned by the president. These men have records that are impeccable. In terms of their service to our country. There were some questions frame today from the Republicans Publican's about remarks that were made by the Ukrainian President Vladimir Dolinsky an which he said there was not any pressure that everything in the coal was above hoard awards to say there was somebody holding a gun. Be Your head. You're not going to sit there and criticize them. That president forty one years old completely inexperienced an experienced politics. What was he supposed to say yes? That's right he forced to me number one that would make him look extremely weak in front of his own people both it would also make him look weak in front of the Russians and then he would anger the president and he needed to get the resources and the money so saying there was no pressure. Sure I think is not even relevant. Of course he would say that we also heard a lot of comments that the whistle blower himself or herself should be required. Hired to testify on Jim Jordan. Saying that you know basically the person who started this all is not going to speak. What do you say to that? And you know. I think that is coming directly from the White House else. That's what the president has been saying over and over. I think it's very disingenuous. Because if that's what you WanNa do that we need to throw out the whole concept of whistleblower protection. It shouldn't even exist that because if you're talking about a whistle blower to come forward the whole point of those laws is to protect people's. Do you think that these public hearings are going to do anything to help you gain support and I don't just mean from the general public like but you you need to get Republicans particularly in the Senate. Is this going to make a difference. I think that their support is contingent on public luke opinion and whether or not they feel that their careers are threatened right now. They are primarily concerned about negative tweets from the president. If the general public public begins to see what is taking what is going on then I think that they might be willing to step up. I believe that what we are seeing right now now is that the president is really a danger right now it would be easy to say. Let's just wait until the election. The problem is we don't know what he's GonNa do over the next twelve months. I'm not sure our country can't afford to wait now on the other hand because we've moved in the public space the president has the opportunity and the Republicans I can have the opportunity to to disprove. What is being said? And so far. They don't seem to have an ability to do that. They're not really challenging. The the witnesses On the facts. They're more challenging on the process and then when they're really in a corner then they reduced their complaints to saying well. Yes maybe he did that. But it's not a big deal. They did hear from the president though the president in like that the president wants to be descended and and so it'll be interesting. I think their testimony there statements and all of that is based on whatever the president tells them at a particular moment after the intelligence committee finishes up. It's going to write a report. It'll be Senate Judiciary Committee of which you are a member and what happens then when we expect your committee you too possibly recommend articles of impeachment. Well I am just guessing that I would say before the year is out but one of the other things that's happening. I want this to go quickly. But what are the other things is happening is more and more people are coming forward and as more and more people come forward then you know we have to decide. Do we keep getting testimony or do we move forward so We you know we will say about my best guess would be for the year so we have as you point out more testimony to here but just this this being the start of it. How do you think history is going to look back at this day? I think history is GonNa look back at this day and say that today was the beginning in which the the American public could hear that our democracy had has some serious weaknesses that we never before realized because we never had a a person that occupied the White House who had absolutely no respect for the rule of law. And I think that it's going to be compared to other impeachment and I think it's going to make the prior at least to impeach and if that happened during my lifetime look very very petty compared to what has gone on with this administration Asian Congresswoman Bass. Thank you for taking time to talk to us. Thanks for having me on that was democratic congresswoman Karen Bass in Washington. She's a member of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs and the House. Judiciary Committee after witnesses wrapped up their testimony today. US President Donald Trump was asked about the hearing. I know that you didn't spend a Lotta time glued to the TV. Today there was one month. Where embassador Bill Taylor recounted a conversation that An aide of his little heard. It was the day after the phone call on July. The twenty sixth in which the aide says that he ever heard you say his son when How are things going with the proceeding with the investigations? Solomon repeat it back to you. According to this aid that Ukraine was prepared to do you. Everything you wanted to do was is that correct. Can you fill in some more. I know nothing about that. First Time I've heard the one thing I've seen that Sandelin said it was that He did speak to me for a brief moment. And I said no quid pro quo under any circumstances and that's true the other right. I've never heard this in any of it. It's more second hand information but I've never heard that was donald trump speaking today during a press conference with the president of Turkey It's the end of the line for Brunswick smelter today. Glencore Canada announced that it was permanently closing the plant located in Bel Dune in northern New Brunswick putting four hundred and twenty people out of Work Union workers who make up more than half of the smelters employees have been off the job Since April in a contract dispute according to the company the plant has been losing money for years and business wasn't expected to turn around anytime soon. Silvani todd has worked at Brunswick smelter for thirty eight years. We reached him at home in Bathurst. New Brunswick Guitar how did you find out that the plant where you've we've worked your whole life pretty much is closing Actually was at Site today and people were saying that they seen something on the on the Internet saying that the cyclist I was frozen fell through or wasn't expecting. It was a bit of a shock beginning to sink in. Now it's starting to thinking now all in a little bit of frustration and little bit of Banda's a bit because you know we've been out on strike since April twenty third and if they nudity reclosing wire air we out you know we could have stayed and worked this time instead of being locked out there. How tough has it been the last seven months you guys have been off the job It hasn't has been easy like you know it's been harder for more than others like Some nine only has a single income coming in while they're having a greater time but No way it hasn't been that Eddie in Glencore Canada which owns the smelter is saying that the decision to close is not related to this labor dispute. There's a business decision. You seem to be suggesting nobody. It may have already thought way back when this this job action began that this might happen just wondering because usually when they decide to close the place. It's not forgotten the day or two days. It's six months a year down the road. They know that they're going to close so. I'm just wondering when we went into negotiations. If they're holding something back and wanted us. The road said he would be as for six. That's what I'm wondering. Glencore says that the last three years the plant lost on average thirty million dollars a year. Eared does that make sense to you. It's hard to say because we were there to every time they were making silver like it's a lead smelter and silver plant and we see on their sites at all. We're broke another silver record this month so for most of us we thought were were doing all right but they always said that they're losing money so it seems that they were going to. Actually you know improve the plant and updated it they were gonNA spend about sixty four million dollars on an acid plant and then the first phase I it was already done. That was like twenty million dollars spent. Yeah Yeah and they said the next sparked was going to be an August. But then we're we're out on a On wrote right so they said that they were GonNa put that on hold or cancelled it and so we were all right but there was a shock. Is there anything in the industry that you know of that. Add has changed significantly over the course of the last six or seven months to to sort of push that decision. No actually no because it seemed like People were going in and we were hearing that they're getting paid extra money to cross the picket line and all this and some retirees were being called and asked him to come. Vincent received spending. Lots of money. Didn't seem like it was an issue so it was quite a shock. When we found notable do you think that there is any way the smelter could have been saved I don't know actually no. It seemed we know that they was in bad. Need of some repairs and we needed some upgrades and like the plan was one. We knew if that wasn't done that it was going to go down but Lee taught that since they started the fees to receive liquor. Put money in we talked. We're going to be okay but but but I guess not. What is this closure mean for you and your family? Well it's been working there for eight years so now. I know a motive the job so I have to go out and looked looked so might be a little harder. Because I'm in my fifties in you know now they're going to be slipping for more younger people. So that's GonNa be an issue. How close to retiring a year and a half away? So what does this mean for your pension now. We don't know we're going to have to sit down and have meetings and see how that goes so we've got lots of questions about that right now. I'm not quite sure how that's GonNa work out. So the company seems to be indicating and is going to offer severance than it will so follow through pensions but You sound like you're not sure. No I'm not quite sure like you know until you sit down and you hear exactly what they have to say the little skeptical because right now. We don't know laying on your source so many unknowns. What about your colleagues? And you didn't have to be younger than you with this going. I mean how hard is it going to hit. It's going to hit hard like I mean in this area especially there's not a whole lot like you know as far as industry there's a power plant that took that's maybe got a little one hundred people were in there and then here was proud of Vegas one in the area so now that's closed and there's a lot of jobs on Spin Austin. There's a lot of places that Saigon feel not only at the alter The company has been in operation there for Fifty Years in your dad worked. There's here's what I understand. Yes my dad worked there. He's he worked on construction and then he got hired on after the plant was built and then I had four my brothers working there. Also Dave all retired now but I was the last one to retire. Is it hard work working in smelter. It's it has his moments depending on the jobs and things that's going on there sometimes that is physical and it's it's more Health wise and a lot of it because of the gases asses and you're dealing with it is lead arsenic cadmium soldiers a lot of stuff that you've got to take into place. The mayor of Belgian says this this is devastating. And as you say it's going to affect other businesses. I guess as well that count on the money that comes from the people who work there looking at the broader region at Bell Dune bathurst Thursday communities nearby. Our people going to cope with all of this. I don't know I mean it's GonNa Affect like Resent here just to grocery stores were losing. Almost fifty has details dollars a month since we've been on strike because a lot of families and before to go by the big week's groceries Just go and get what you need. That's going to be a big change. It's terrible news. I really appreciate you talking to us. I know it's a difficult day for you. Thank you very much very welcome. All right you take care bye. Bye See Evangi. Tar is one of four hundred twenty employees out of work after the newly announced closure of Brunswick Smelter we reach Mr Guitar in Bathurst New Brunswick Swick when Eric Marciano saw a car barreling towards pedestrians in downtown Montreal. Yesterday he didn't hesitate. He put himself in harm's way to protect the people on the crosswalk. The driver of that car was later arrested. and Mr Marciano is being hailed a hero. We we reached Eric Marciano in Montreal. Mr Marciano win. Did you first realize that something unusual was going on while you were driving. I I was on a street called Berry So facing the main artery Montreal called Lunatic and the light the guy. The suspect basically tried to run a red light that you realize there was a cop next so he backed up backed up and so they opened windows and they started talking and they just took off. If you're in your car you see. This guy goes through a light and the police are in pursuit. Yes exactly and how close you at this point Just the other lean across like a t he's sped along. I was on my green light because since he burnt his red eyes on my green so I turned left and Kinda followed them. We're not following them going the same direction so I am at the next intersection which is called. Send any very busy intersection. They were already a third intersection. Which is soggy me now at that point his car? Ah hit the SNOWBANK. The police got out of their cars. Were they're pulling their guns. Basically and he was able to escape at that point he backed out made a u-turn so he was coming towards me that was on the other lane. And that's that's really busy intersection Montreal. So he's coming towards you. And what are you thinking. I thought that he he was gonNA interest how he was going really really fast. There was a lot of construction and pedestrians at lunchtime. So I just Basically ran ran my I liked and Talked make sure everyone was out of the way blocked his way so you decided to put your car between him and the Pedestrians yes native act. It's a very very big. It's actually the biggest streets wide streets in Montreal. And there's a media in a concrete median there and So I figured that he wasn't he had a little Honda. There's there's no way he was going over the medium median. We say English learning meeting. So I I completely blocked away for him and the only way he could has basically stopped her go through move which he tried to do so he hits your vehicle. Yes yes and how quickly going when that happened. Probably eighty kilometers an hour. Roughly what did that feel like Well I actually lack just like basically a second. My car jumped out of my car so he impacted acted the passenger side. And you're jumping out the other side. Exactly what honey impact was there. It was pretty hard. I've really big. Suv He get a little Honda. Pretty pretty hard impact. What kind of calculations were you making obviously pretty instantly? When you decided to do this for me? It was a no-brainer. This you know. People were endanger. The car was coming fast. I've a big truck. He has a small car You Know I. I did quick calculations nations and it was worth the risk. Wow so tell me. They reaction As as he hits your vehicle. There's all these people around. What are they saying? What are they doing? Well it's because I had honked so much people were knew something was up So there was that point. People were more on the left of my car. He was on the right so they were kind of like a out of harm's way. There were a lot of construction workers once it hit. They're all very happy that it ended in a nice way. What did they all say to you? There were congratulating and thanking me for helping them with their safety. Tell me what kind of shape the Carson seems to be total total loss. Wow so what is your insurance company. Say while they were at first they were they were telling me that they're gonNa try to do their best. And so on so on. And then they pass the someone higher up and they said The worry we'll take care of it and you won't have to pay deductible and non responsibility and they were also thinking they were aware of after a lot of people might hesitate to to what you did when you want to say to them Dog just do it feels right I mean about that. I sacrificed my life but sometimes I saving many people one person you know part of the calculation you know that's what That's what the good citizens I think are supposed to do. But you could have been injured all could've but then so you know then happened so all good well are you out car shopping shopping No actually it was really kind of attached to my car for ten years but Yeah I guess not not yet I have A. I borrowed my son's car today today so I'll just take it easy and see what happened just a car. It's just a well. It's a great attitude you know. I'm surprised in a way that police didn't scold you a a little bit for for doing what you did. Sometimes they don't like it when when people are expecting it but I think they waited that all the individuals policeman the younger ones. They're all congratulating is leading me so I guess you know good ending story. Look congratulations on. I guess doing the right thing and thriving it and good luck finding another their vehicle. You like so much. Thank you so much. It won't be hard. Thank you have a nice day. You to Fi- Eric Marciano stopped a car from driving into pedestrians industrial's yesterday in Montreal. And that's where we reached him this afternoon. The nineteen year old driver appeared in court and pleaded not guilty to seven charges. His mother thanked Mr Marciano for his quick thinking and said her son has struggled with mental health issues his entire life. It's an ongoing strike at the university. Prompts Poems from prof it seemed fitting to introduce this next story by summarizing it in the form of a high coup but my attempt. There really doesn't do justice to what Sarah Deleu has been producing on a daily basis for nearly a week now. Ms Lou is a professor in the Northern Medical Michael Program at the University of Northern British Columbia. She's also a poet and ever since you. NBC's faculty went on strike six days ago. She's committed herself to composing composing a Haiku every day for as long as it lasts this morning. She shared her latest composition with the CBS's Laura Sharp letty. Today's was inspired by all of the Wilderness and all of the wildlife that U. N. B. C. is so often surrounded by and it's titled Very Simply Daily Strike Haiku. Six dear catch their breath when cornered exhaling lean slowly. Quiet hoping in calm threats pass. I sort of took it upon myself in an effort to really try to encourage all players at all levels and all the various sides to put on our best in creative thinking cats in order to do the best for our students and for the future of northern British Columbia and I really couldn't think of any better and more respectful offering short offering of poetry every day that the Faculty Association was picketing. Sarah Deleu is a poet heddon professor in UNBC's northern medical program. She's composing Haiku every day at the faculty as the university remains on strike Turkey's president is back on American soil today and for more at Ya so that brings back some horrible memories. Eighteen months ago. The Kurdish American American man was badly beaten in Washington DC. He was protesting president. Ray Jeb tub air to visit to the White House. When security agents men who worked for President Air John began viciously beating Kurdish protesters? There are disturbing video recordings of the beatings the agents were charged by US sororities but eleven of those charges were later dropped. We're at USA. Suffered brain damage from the attack. But today he's back in Washington protesting president resident aired ones. visit all over again. In fact Mr Yassa is the one who organized the protest we reached him in Washington. DC Mr Yassir like for you to be back in the same place where you were so badly beaten. Eighteen months ago it is hot. I'm in my my memory. GOES BACK TO TWO TWO YEARS AGO may sixteen it is heart. I mean emotionally Detroit to kill me. I'm very emotional. Of course I mean and terrified but I'm here but this time I'm going to prepare myself so I said this time I'm going to have like a construction heart health. And then today I came to Frontal White House and with With my heart had the feeling instead of the the most terrible thing is OUR PRESIDENT MR trump invited him to White House. I don't think anyone anyone in Congress except Mr Trump and you're there now with this hard hat on to protect yourself. What about the other people in the crowd? What what is the mood like have have? They prepared themselves the same way David not because they didn't leave the things I I mean. Last time we were like fifteen when when he And then the police number is was not enough to protect us. There's very excited now. To the UC the slowdowns about a lot of our Turkey about invading about killing. The you know some people in there in Syria and on the other courts here. There's Armenian Indian Creek. There is how many people do you think are there are five hundred and what's the security presence like as you said last time there were not enough police and other security forces on the US side to protect you while this time they. They did their homework too. I mean there are these C- Police Department apartment from safety. Pacman from secure two senators so they are all over this time. Why is it so important written to you to be there to have helped organize protests today especially given all that you have been through a human? I'm good but I'm human and and my pupils dying right. Now there's shelling bombing so there's I mean the innocent people over the civilian you're talking. Take the children. How could I not come here to protest Guam killing you know some people well? As a matter of fact the situation has changed into politically not region since the previous protests because of the Turkish military campaign against the Kurdish forces. Is that invigorated you further. Of Of course this is worse than the two years ago season in the field. Dick Coats are the only the only one thing I says they lost. I eleven thousand men women there Rozsa movement is there lumine movement. They're the age of that movement that freedom not only for the there are many and took many are up the Assyrian all those Ethnicity like mosaic. Let me take you back to two twenty twenty seventeen because there is this terribly disturbing footage in which we can see you and other. Kurdish protesters being viciously beaten by the Turkish security team. That was traveling with President. Air To one. What do you remember about the attack and the moments remember? Yeah I was on the floor. They were kicking me all over my head and they're trying to kill. It is not just like a a protect so far. They say they tried. Hi to protect the president but there was no trick to hear the President I was on the concrete floor and they were teaching me one after another one after another after another. They're not try to cover my head with my arms. I sit on dying I said then all of a sudden my children came with my Is My daughter was going to go college and my son was admitted. Screw so then. I said I'm not going to see them. I'm not going to see. My father is going to marriage she is going to have children granddaughter. Granddaughter Grand Kids I mean is it is. You don't know what to do. What was the long term impact attack? How's it affected you and the life? You've been leaving ten while I am still. I have health issues I have a neurologist still. I'm taking medicine. I cannot sleep taking medicine and then nightmare it is life in prison. As long comes to my dream is given an order attack to is Security Guard and there are starting to heat me catch me and maintain I have a brain the memory memory. Those comes from that. They're trying to fix is it. I have some I have bows of medicine. I'm taking the men who attacked you. Eighteen months ago were initially charged. But most Mr those charges have since been dropped. Will you be looking to see if those are some of the Turkish security forces that are there today Adler brings them with him or a lumbering some others but even though if let's say he comes with that on which the charges trumped like like you say and the police is going to do a recipe and because trump is this from our president. He loves that dog and I don't think he's going to do anything. Do you believe that those men will ever see justice. I DON'T WANNA lose my hope but as fungus. Mr President trump is in the White House. I don't think so if you could sit down with president trump. What would be your message to him? While I'll tell him. Your slogan was make America. Great taking you call the president and then he came to attack your your. You're so is this. Is this the way you're going to make America. Great thinking is this. Have them respect to your citizen. You're wrong that's what I say Mr Yasser Thank you very much stay safe today. Thank you so much okay. Bye Bye Yassa is a Kurdish American who organized a protest today outside the White House speaking out against a visit by Turkish president. Ray Tayeb air to one. Mr Yasser was brutally a beaten by members of president aired on security detail in May two thousand seventeen for more on this story go to our website. CBC DOT CA SLASH AI h Western Canada may be mulling over its commitment to Canada. But if they're looking to separate they shouldn't ask their neighbors to the east for advice. That was the message today. Hey From Bloc Quebecois leader eve launched. Mr Blase was in Ottawa. Today meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau when reporter asked him to weigh in on the idea idea of western independence. Here's that exchange for the record independence in the West as a province that has gone through it already. Wizard life likes to people in our burdens is scheduled where Meyer is giving that Cabanas. Already been through this discussion and then thing to create the green state in Western combat. I might be tempted. Twelve if they are trying to create an oil stinks turned into that big can expect him. He'll France. I still do believe that will do better when it becomes a country so I'm not the one that will fight to a nice United Canada but I will not out some parts of were throwing that good dream of some kind of maybe don't do as far as defendants and maybe they are. The building strong was issued for themselves. But I'm not in that position to government warned up to do and true national or international channels. Charles we will keep fighting decided to obsessively want to extract oil from the ground and may default wall from today. That's bloc Quebecois leader e-filed swab lingerie speaking to reporters in Ottawa. I'm John Morell did it. All the Calgary playwright made a name for himself with the Second World War drama waiting waiting for the parade which brought to life his interviews with women who had worked on the home front while their husbands were fighting overseas his productions since were wide ranging dipping into opera translation adaptation and more. He died this week. After a long battle with leukemia he was seventy four years old in two thousand sixteen John Morell spoke okay with the. CBC About one of his final plays a reimagining of the last hour in the life of recurring Shakespeare character. Sir John Falstaff. I felt the need to To to give falstaff his last hour to show what happens. We hear it reported in in Shakespeare's Henry. The fifth we hear other people talk about how he met his untimely end or maybe timely and but it does feel like false falstaff last hour for Shakespeare is a bit of a footnote or an afterthought and I just thought well we old guys. I mean I'm I'm in my seventies now and if falstaff was in his fifties which is likely He was the equivalent of a seventy year old so So I sort of wanted to give him and maybe give myself kind of good exit saying you know Canadian playwright John Morell speaking with. CBC Calgary's David Gray about his play. Fat Jack Falstaff last hour in two thousand sixteen. Mr Morell L. died of leukemia this week. Anita Mitchum Dir is an actor and playwright who was in. John Morales who was John. Morales prochet through the governor. General's Performing Arts Award mentorship enter ship program. We reached her in Toronto. Ms Majumder my condolences to you. Thank you go through your mind. As you hear hear that clip of John Morello reflecting on his play fat Jack Falstaff last hour. The thing about John was that in his self deprecation of Sort of referring to himself as an old man and referring to his immense Manson long legacy in Canadian theatre history. He was actually really young at heart ahead. A real curiosity for the work that you normally family finding in artists who are just beginning their careers and I think his approach so work was always with his mindset that there's still room to expand the sort of underlying definition of what it is to make theater what it is To Be Theater you I met Mr Morell at the Kennedy Council Fiftieth Anniversary in two thousand seven. Can you tell us what you remember about that evening. I remember being A one of the few people who didn't know Most people in that room and John and I had been seated at the same dinner table and John didn't make me feel like I was sitting next to the Great John Morale. He sat next to me and we talked for the entire evening. And in my memory of of that dinner I also think it was just him and me sitting at this very large table in this in fact not true true There were very many people at that table. It's that we were the last people sitting about table because we were there till midnight just talking to one another you later. became his T- through the Governor General's Performing Arts Awards Mentor Ship Program. What did you learn from him during all of that There's a lot of things that I learned from John. One of those things was most definitely having really clear boundaries between professional and personality. It's not that he was a slave to the work and Sacrificed his own family. He loved his family of his extremely clear. Every time we we met and spoke and work together but he also had a separate space for his work That when he was was in the throes of being a writer and and how selfish second sometimes feel that he cleared separate space which was away from his family so that when he was with his Lupton once he was really with them. You know in an interview with the Globe and Mail about your partnership. He said that he hoped to learn. Just as much from you as you would learn from him Do you think that happened. Can you tell me a little bit about the professional development. You experience working together. He what he said in the Golden Male. He'd said to me on numerous occasions that for him this mentorship was a was fluid would in its direction that he was equally eager to learn what what I could offer and and to see play writing and making plays through through my lens which was very different from his. At the time I had been writing a show about shade Azeem in shade them. Is You know the the experience. For instance warning lighter fairer skin color and that was an experience a John hadn't had and it was one that I was very well versed in. It was a very immediate for me and things like that burgeoned into talking about our experiences of also also being Canadian playwrights But that that came from you know deep within us from places generosity and and deep kindness or at least a desire to be kind and desire to be honest. I think that's what we shared but our lenses are what we're different. I imagined today a lot. The people across the country who know and Love Theater are thinking about his impact on the Canadian. Theatres seen But but more specifically he was very committed. Did to Calgary in Calgary theaters seen. What do you think accounted for his particular affection for for the theater life of that city? I think it's a where he started. I think it's where his family was. It was his first point of migration when he he left the United States. I think it also speaks to the actual theater community. In Calgary it's it's hard to leave There is a remember. He hit once told me that he had a job offer to write for days of our lives. In your but New York wasn't home and it wasn't the right fit but that he entertained it and you know entertain the idea of moving his family there But ultimately you know to the end of his days it was always cow grave always out BERTA. Yeah so you've shared a lot of wonderful memories with US already but as you're thinking back on your time together and your friendship. Is there something that stands out for you that you'd like to share with us I remember when Away staying at the Banff Centre Center and I told John I'm I'm I'm not sleeping very well And because he had been the director of the theater program is he's really familiar with the territory and he had said you know when I first took up the job I was told that there's a lot of spirit activity in this area that you know we are on a land that many indigenous people don't actually live there because of this kind of spirit activity and Justice Justice. He told me that we saw coyote cross across our path Because we were driving in the car and he said it's a very special place ace and maybe it might be in your in your interest to just have a moment to understand that there. There's as an energy in a in a life force that is that is a greater beyond you and it's It's what I'm really holding onto today. Thank you so much for sharing that with us. I appreciate it. Thank you you too. Anita Madame door is an actor and playwright in Toronto. Her Mentor. John Morell died this week week. He was seventy four years old A.. Rod Stewart loves nothing more than listening to some hot tracks and then watching the little train. Come around the corner on those tracks for the past twenty three years. The British singer has been working on a sprawling extremely detailed model railway railway city it's modeled after New York and Chicago in nineteen forty five and it features dozens of buildings bridges and of course trains. He granted the magazine Railway. Modular exclusive interview on his creation which he completed over the span of thirteen studio albums and nineteen tours which led UH BBC to radio to host Jeremy Vine to speculate on air that. Perhaps the singer didn't actually build himself so Mr Stewart phoned into the BBC ABC hosts Radio Show today to clear things up. My friends My wife called and she said they're talking about your motor route lowered and insinuates insinuate saying that You didn't oil yourself well. That's the reason I I was worried about that. The reason I insinuated that is because it's so enormous I didn't believe you could have built it. Single handedly yeah. It's I would say ninety percent of a built myself. The only thing I was very good at and still I'm not is electrical. It was so that I had someone else do that. So so just tell us what it contains what it features rods. Well I would say it It's not not built on any prototypical city but it's a cross between Chicago and New York and that's it the engines The engines might funny. Sounds you could hear people talking into carriages. It's the visuals a one thing if you heard it. It's amazing so when you get into the room it's in Rhodesia press start and the trains go and you watch it or what. Yeah Yeah you have to line up all the computers Any more or less press co two run about eight trains. The time it's so big. They never bump into each other but he's really noisy. It is quite incredible. I'm so proud and I'm so proud of the coverage it got I. I look at it pig a silly hobby but it's a wonderful job. That was Rod Stewart speaking with BBC radio to host Jeremy Vine about his model railway city in Bolivia appears to have a president tonight. A senator named Janine Unas announce announced that she's stepping into the vacuum left by able Morales when he fled the country earlier this week but opinions about the new government's legitimacy depend on where you stand from his asylum in Mexico. Mr Morales has denounced his ouster. As a coup cloudy Opinion Claros is a former minister enable Morales government we reached return Lopez. Ms Penny Claros Ever Morales calling his removal from power. Aku what would you call it. I would call it the same way. Because Evermore List has been chosen in two thousand sixteen with sixty percent and all the votes to president of for the until January two thousand twenty as you know the organization Asian of American the states which recently acted as an observer in the elections in your country declared that most recent election as being highly concerning turning. They they do not feel it with a legitimate victory. There are pointing to a potential election fraud by Mr Morales and his supporters. How how is it correct? Then that he continue on an office A then we say some here that there has the topic. We have known certain deals that back when we talk about that we are not thinking about the recent elections. Sean we are not talking about wrote. We are talking that in twenty-fifty there has been an election and they will modalities has won that election Nixon. I understand I understand. Though that that you're saying that he should stay on until the end of his his term in January but there were So many heated protests in the street growing anger in Bolivia and you know a lot of people were very concerned that that was going to escalate the she then had sake on Sunday that he accept that the election of October would be nothing. Nothing and that I knew Nixon would come back on US getting this power and in this moment right now. The police don't let their legislators. We'll get into the khanate the president of this nape deep down not go into this innate work so you are concerned that the police and the military are preventing the the existing in government from continuing. Its work. Yes yes do you accept though that there were serious irregularities in the election yes yes I I accept that there had been irregularities in the month. The Typical Party has accepted the rolling. Can you religious necessary Janina Anez has stepped into the president's T.. Do you accept her as president at this point no no because before that they recently statement later off the president of the semait advanced gear for that has to be accepted in this name. Why these let their if not accepted sheets fees breath event of the snake? I think so. In this moment we have a president of the Senate and her name is Teddy. Allison but here but the police don't let her go into this ornate accomplish he's functions. You mentioned that Mister Morales said he accepts that new elections actions must be held. President onions is promising to hold those elections as soon as possible. Do you think that that will be a legitimate election. I really don't know because there has been last month. A Danish people not the minds against the the leaders of the mice not only against the president or the vice president or the minister that has been hung name that has been by your name against the leaders of the political party and right now we are having harassment and violence against the the legislators of the political party mass so in this scenario. I don't think that we can talk about. Oh normal elections because there are political. Don't get are being harassed. Will what about you yourself. I mean Mr Morales remains in in Mexico. He's safe there. You are back in Bolivia. Are you concerned about your own safety concerned about the range inch that you can see the streets day. They're against the people of the party. I leave in a nail yet of middle class and and I feel a little bit then to go into the streets because I don't think that somebody will kill me because perhaps they they showed up need or they insulted me so I wouldn't want that situation to happen. How divided is your country right now? It's very divided. His hand in it is very sad. Because in modalities west East Coast Source Indian Express then and the government has made a lot of work. Do get over the UH discrimination to get over the racist culture that we have here. There is a culture of racism hearing believed media and the government had made a lot of effort to get over that and what I see now east got. May we discuss the issues that we lost of racist things going on out that discussions and and there are signs. That people like Jellinek mantra face. I am not the right racy we equalize but what they said the quarter of races and that has some vite these years of able more not less government and and that is that these divides Hispania clarice. I thank you very much for taking time to speak with us. We appreciate it thank you. I thank thank you okay goodbye. Cloudy Opinion Claros served as oblivion minister under Evo Morales. We reached her in Lopez. Mr Morales US gave up power and fled the country earlier this week. You've been listening to the as it happens. podcast our show can be heard Monday to Friday on. CBC Radio One and on Sirius XM following world. Six you can also listen to the whole show on the Web ebb. Just go to. CBC DOT CA slash. Ah and follow the links to our online archive. Thanks for listening. I'm Helen Man and I'm Karen Gordon and yeah for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS Goto C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts.

president Mr President trump United States John Washington DC Mister Morales Bolivia Montreal White House CBC Mexico Bill Taylor Karen Bass Helen Man State Department Ukraine Fi- Eric Marciano Mr Ratcliffe Senate Rod Stewart
September 13: A poor-judgment call

As It Happens from CBC Radio

58:06 min | 1 year ago

September 13: A poor-judgment call

"This is a CBC podcast hello i'm carol off and i'm ali hassan this is as it happens the podcast edition tonight have a poor judgment call newfoundland cabinet minister perry trumpet resigns after accidentally leaving an unsavory voicemail on an enu constituents it's found tonight he'll tell us about calling that constituent to apologize running for everyone's lives feature interview with green party leader elizabeth may who doesn't just want to save social programs or taxpayer dollars she wants to save the world every day they behold where they might be held workers in india india are constructing a camp to house people accused of being illegal immigrants some of them fear they may end up behind the walls they've built an even been more difficult talk about the birds and the bees we already know certain insecticides threatened bees and other pollinators new research suggests there also sickening migratory tori birds they've got junk mail and mail junk study of french postman's testicles is among this year's winners of the the most prestigious prize for egregious research and ignoble prize and blowing this poop cycle stand extremely thorough research research by our guest has exposed the shocking truth it is not in fact possible to fashion a knife out of frozen excrement that is sharp enough to cut up the meat it as it happens the friday edition radio that doesn't need to study of frozen poop knife to know that it is not going to cut it perry tripper has resigned and his cabinet minister newfoundland and labrador less than twenty four hours after his unsavory voicemail message made the news mr trump left that message this week on the cell l. phone of an executive member of the new nation mr trump thought he had hung up he had not and what followed was his candid conversation with another person about how the enu people people were using quote the race card last night we spoke with the recipient of that voicemail dominic rich who said he was shocked by the politicians comments tonight we've reached that politician perry tripper he's in happy valley goose bay mr trump era when we spoke with dominic rich last night on this program he he told us he didn't just feel disturbed by your words what he heard in that phone message he said he felt betrayed to understand why well mister rich and i've known each other for many years and worked well together as far as i can recall we've never had anything come behind us or between us i'm sorry until this incident he said that the you had been with him in moments of grief in moments of of personal moments you had you you had been with him and his people all to all kinds of ups and downs and always thought that you were you were sympathetic but this is such a disappointment to him yes that's correct and that is the person i am i guess two point zero one one is that there are words in in recording that i absolutely regret and i cringe when i hear them however a lot of the commentary this conversation that got recorded i wasn't aware of a lot of context and it would take some time to explain but it really doesn't matter the end of the day i'm sorry and i expressed that to mr rich last night long messages you know you see you're saying you're talking to somebody else you don't know your if message is still being recorded in you're telling somebody else this new guy on the phone accusing us of having bias translators and a say they think it's their god given right to have these services with whom are you speaking it was on the street and i've not revealing the person's name name 'cause i i don't see it as being relevant really the issue here is that a cabinet minister was speaking very inappropriately and i really realized that that's also also why i've resigned from cabinet today i felt that the the attention was was was drifting to the premier into my cabinet colleagues and this was my mistake i ask about who with whom you're speaking is because we spoke again with dominic rich today about about all this and he he's he wants to know if this woman with whom you're speaking is actually someone who works for the government because he says this for you to leave and to have somebody else who's perhaps wrap still at the table who is saying with this woman saying on the tape they have a feeling of entitlement to which you say the race card comes up all the time the conversation when you're having with her reflects badly on whoever this woman is and she feels comfortable saying that to she feels that she's that she can make these kinds of of racist remarks markson is she in the government again i'm not going to to comment carolina a drag other people into it i it could have been anyone bridge says you called him last night to apologize what did he say do you will he was very upset and you know and that that hurts i tried to explain explain to him the context of what i was some of the remarks and and and so on i apologized to him for my i i don't know i can use the word practice of venting so i did my best to explain to him it wasn't a long conversation he he was upset and did not want to speak any further you said in the tape we can hear as you said the race card comes up all the time man don't play that on me i've been thirty two years working with those guys don't play that on me you say that that's not who you are the person that that dumb rich noses the real you but these are these are these are when you think that no one's listening is what you say so what did he get and again it's it's difficult to anyway i tried to explain what i meant by that line is is basically much of my professional professional and personal career and time in in labrador these thirty two years have has been working with in or around the you know and i have have been challenged as a politician and otherwise when you're trying to resolve someone's request and get to the bottom of it and i've had people say to me tramper perry you're not dealing with what i want you know providing what i want you must be racist towards the end to end my line has been to them i said please i don't say that to me please don't play that card and i'm sorry for the phraseology of it but much of my life has been dedicated to advancing and supporting the new as they move towards versus self government can we just discuss what he wanted which is i've seen a correspondence going back several years of a request that they you have any translators when people go to do their driver's test the written test and that is the case and there there is an issue that's it's come up and and this is something i was dealing with through my constituency office so i was trying to get to the bottom of why government was concerned about how how the translating was being done so there's some issues in there that i was investigating and i was seeking the help of the the assistant deputy minister and that was the message i was leaving for dominant dominic to advise him that i i did have people looking into the matter but maybe i don't put this at at your feet but the government of white ball and that several years they were asking for it's pretty simple i mean to get some translations so they can get these licenses they need for work i was looking it up in ontario you can get written written test translated into about fifteen different languages including hindu in serbo croatian what would be so difficult after all these years to have provided them with translating services so they can get their licenses and written written test in in in in in new what what i can tell you is i do believe that the government has attempted to find a translator to positions but been unable to fill them so dominic has been filling that role and i really don't know much more about okay that well maybe the way toward reconciliation here is that you can get that fixed why not absolutely is that what we are you gonna do that well you know i still have request outstanding i'm still the MOHA for the area and i have a request in i know the department is looking into it and i i look forward to their response and provide it to mr rich and we'll we'll see what we can do well maybe if they'd been solved you wouldn't be in this pickle right now yeah perhaps perhaps mr tim thank you okay thanks carol perry trumper used to be the minister of municipal affairs and the environment for the newfoundland in labrador government he resigned today but will remain as a liberal m h we reached him in happy valley goose bay when studying postmen as in men who deliver the mail a pair of researchers in france were hung up on a single question when you may have asked yourself what they wanted to know is the the internal temperature of a postmen scrotum more specifically and this is the key was one testicle warmer than the other the researchers were very very enthusiastic about the subject matter there's no question about that where there is a question about it is why but mark abraham's for one is gladly pursued suit he's the editor of the annals of improbable research and last night he awarded the postman scrotum study and several others the coveted two thousand nineteen gene ige nobel prizes we reached mr abraham's in cambridge massachusetts mark don't leave us hanging here can the left and and right testicles of a french mailman actually be different temperatures according to the study that won the nobel prize last night done by a couple of french scientists it's very common in france that the left and right testicles of the postman are different temperatures this is the thermal asymmetry of the human scrotum study yes yes exactly same study they went further to look look at the naked or closed postman in france do you have any idea how they did the research yes i do uh-huh they put temperature sensors on the left testicle and the right testicle of the postman and i think it was every two minutes they would take take a reading of the temperature they chose postmen because they wanted to see what happened over the course of a day or many hours of people who who are on their feet walking around they also did a similar thing with people who spend all day sitting for a living bus drivers and five more more or less the same thing with both of them and you know that men everywhere who are listening to this interview other sitting down or walking around now thinking about this very thing yeah and i'm sure there are people listening who have temperature sensors who are spending all of their thought at this moment trying to think of the best way to apply the student so we always have you on when the annual event happens in this hour always so many extraordinary prize winners there's but this is the twenty ninth year of honoring trivial achievements in academics and but you introduced a way of reminding people they have only sixty fifty seconds to thank the audience we introduced every year we go out and we find a very cute eight year old girl who has ice water in her veins it's very important that we find someone with that right personality she sits on stage the whole time and i introduced her at the start of the night and explain whatever she i feel that somebody has talked long enough she will let them know the way she does this is to walk across the stage up to the person who's talking into the microphone look up at that person and say please stop i'm bored please stop i'm bored she doesn't stop until they do it works and what let me doesn't always work because you had some researchers to who were winning a prize who wouldn't stop we had an epic battle last night one the winners a doctor from japan he had a lot to say and he seemed determined to say no matter what this little girl did he kept it up for oh maybe twenty or thirty seconds which felt like an eternity but then he gave up there is no way who's going to win and what was his the study this is dr watanabe he did a study to measure how much saliva is produced a typical day by typical local five year old child became from japan all the way over to massachusetts to collect his prize and he brought with him his three sons who are now adults thirty five years ago when he did this study his three sons who were children at that time they were the ones who drooled for him to collect last night up on the stage at harvard he had his sons they're drooling again to demonstrate what we are now as it happens there is well we i love having you on to tell us about the awards but also because we've often done number of the prize winning science experiments we told our listeners there's last november about combat poop that it comes out in a cube form i understand the wombat poop folks one an ignoble last night oh yes they did some of them came from georgia tech university and the other part of the team flew in all the way from tasmania australia the tasmanians one of them put on a gigantic wombat costume and a couple of the scientists from georgia tech were wearing gigantic wombat to it how should i put this it it seemed to catch the imagination the nation if everybody there you know sometimes after twenty nine years of you doing these awards i wonder if there are academics who actually see published studies so they can may be getting ignoble and the one i'm thinking of is the one the ignoble for biology for discovering that dead magnetized advertised cockroaches behave differently than living magnetized cockroaches well to take your questions in order yes there are people who do do experiments and publish papers in hopes of getting big nobel prize they never win it's very clear when we see those because they just they don't have the right quality of funny usually they're not thoughtful king so those those neverland but there are a lot of things like the cockroach roach study that don't seem at all funny to the people who do it and they're trying to answer some particular question which may seem obscure to other people who haven't had much reason to think about it and it's only at some point later that somebody points out to them would it looks like to the rest of the world the cockroach which people i think we're not aware of the ig nobel prize before they got it that's true of most of the people win the prizes this double quality it's serious and yet it's it's funny at the same time anyway mark we'll we'll speak again next year thank you take care of yourself okay you to mark abraham's is editor of the annals of improbable research and the man behind the annual ignoble prize we reached him in cambridge massachusetts you're lost on the arctic tundra the temperature is dropping you do have a sandwich but you can't eat said sandwich without cutting it and and you have no knife then suddenly you remember something from a book by canadian anthropologist wade davis a story of a man who triumphed in similarly dire circumstances and now there's hope all you have to do is make a knife out of your own frozen poop that story of a man forging a sharp blade late from his own feces appeared in mr davis one thousand nine hundred book shadows in the sun so it's a real story but could it possibly be a true story professor mitten mytton erin and his colleagues felt it was important to find out professor aaron is an archaeologist and anthropologist that can't state university in kent ohio professor aaron first of all can you just give us the gist of the story that way davis tells in his book yeah so the story basically is that there was an innocent man who is being forced to move off of his settlement and his his family took away his tools in order to convince vince him to come along with them and he refused to move off his his his homeland so in the midst of a winter gale he defecated into his hands hansen fashioned a knife from the frozen cece spraying saliva then the story goes that he killed the dog with that nice use use this ribcage as a sledge and used to hide to harness another dog and he sped off into the night wow that's quite a story it is quite a story torian and it's one that i think has captured imaginations of lots of people including myself when the book came out in nineteen ninety eight i heard way davis davis tell that same story to diane ream on NPR's michelle and because i heard that story i was inspired to go into anthropology and in fact i still l. today have the tape cassette that i ordered from NPR of that way davis interview so i think you know professor davis has just been an inspiration to just countless the people around the world so as a fascinating story but you decided to apply a lot of skepticism to the story why is that well little did i know that twenty years after the story came out i would be co director of an experimental archaeology lab here at kent state and and and we regularly reproduce ancient technologies in order to reverse engineer them and figure out how they were late last year that it just sort of hit me that but this idea of a nice thing fashioned from frozen human feces hey had never really been tested before and just i think as any good scientists we were curious you decided that i mean the in order to do it you had to recreate conditions that might have been around this in youth man and his in his decision to to escape this way so how did you go about doing that well i mean it's first important to note that no experiment is ever perfect and no experiment can ever perfectly replicate reality but we did the best we could and and so what i did was for eight days i went on a high protein and high fatty acid diet which is sort of consistent with and arctic diet and after a few days of that i started producing the necessary test samples tom we start freezing samples and to be honest i was surprised at how hard rosen human feces could become and and you know during the course of experiment scientists start to see pattern but they have intuition about the results and i start to wonder this this may just work we make make a night out of frozen human okay so the story is that he fashioned this knife out of his frozen feces and then he proceeded to basically to skin and a dog that he used as a sled so what how did you reproduce use that part of it well what we wanted to do was give our knives the best possible chance to succeed so we actually had dry ice with us cancel we're able to stick their knives into negative fifty degrees centigrade dry ice to get these things really really cold and then in addition to that we we had a metal file and so we're able to sharp in these feces knives as best as we could and then what we did was we used the refrigerated meat instead out of a fresh kill because we thought well a fresh killing that story would be a warm thing that would potentially melt knives and we want to see these nice could cut so we used used refrigerated meat so we really put in place variables that allow these nice the best chance to succeed it was a very conservative test unfortunately when he went to use the frozen knives it was like a brown clan fortunately it just left very nasty streaks streaks on our meat and didn't cut at all so okay so what what what did you learn from this wow how you can't really approach the study with anything other than us in humor but you know we did this for a reason we know from countless studies over the last hundred years is that indigenous people have produced mind-blowing technologies just very innovative ways to solve problems and i think that's one reason why this story of a frozen knife made from feces was so widely adopted across the academic and public literature i'm i'm 'cause fits that narrative the problem though is that once you have stories are unsupported supporting narratives and stances of any kind and then it becomes a slippery slope and other stories that are unsupported can also be used to support stances and narratives and then once you're in that situation fiction real trouble because then you can start using unsupported non evidence based stories to support narratives and stances that are harmful to society racist ones prejudice ones and the like and so i think at the end of the day what this study does is it reaffirms the importance importance of evidence based science do you think it's possible to there's any other kind of tool you can make from frozen poop i mean just in case someone wants to try this oh my goodness i mean surprisingly literature review for this study human feces have been used for all sorts of technologies sometimes prehistoric work or indigenous peoples will dip their arrowheads in human feces as a sort of poison in historic times balls of flaming feces would be used in tribute have you shave and and sort of catapult i'm in fact there was a recent study as well where researchers were actually creating plastics from human feces so you know the idea of being used as human technological record isn't outside the realm of possibility well you've you've opened up a whole other area every cycling for people unfortunately so professor aaron thank you telling us your story well thank you very much uh-huh bye-bye menton erin is an archaeologist and anthropologist with kent state university we reached him in kent ohio and we've got more more on that story including photos of the useless poop knife on our website of course we do CBC dot CA slash h for far too long we humans have contented ourselves with the idea that we are unique from all other species species in the animal kingdom and we've believed the traits that set us apart from other animals also place us on top of the evolutionary ladder we're not just special special with superior and yet one defining characteristic is never touted as evidence of this supposed superiority our habit of gathering in groups groups to take turns singing to one another more often than not badly we tend to address it only euphemistically we call it doing karaoke so it's no surprise we don't list it among our exceptional traits it actually makes us question our own evolutionary supremacy but it turns out there's another reason we you shouldn't feel special about drunkenly hollering don't stop believing because there's at least one other species that engages in karaoke humpback whales and they do it better than we do after studying the migrating patterns of humpbacks in the south pacific for decades scientists have homed in on in an area about eleven hundred kilometers off the coast of new zealand raoul island as it's called appears to be a layover between the breeding and feeding in grounds of humpback whales were males of different pods exchange songs with an with one another which they then incorporate into their own mating calls us a lot like our karaoke but the only swill around is seawater so you know these wail singers must be killer and elizabeth may has set herself some lofty goals in this election campaign the green party leader isn't satisfied with polls put her party within reach of real power in the next parliament miss may says sir true ambition is nothing less than saving the world with the clock running down on reversing or even slowing down climate change she claimed in last night's debate that she's the only only she's the only leader with a plan to turn things around green party leader elizabeth may joined us in our toronto studio elizabeth may welcome to the as it happens open studio it's really wonderful to be here i'm so used to talking to you on the phone that's right and now how did you feel about the debate last night i feel very good about it actually i mean it was disappointing that justin trudeau decided not to come but i felt that sticking to issues talking about the platform i i have a lot of depth of knowledge in all the topic areas that were being debated last night so i felt very confident and at ease i hope that i mean i'm not the right person to ask but i thought i want so review the reviews are in and and very full of praise for your performance i i'm just this moment when you went over to shake just in to those was non hand i i remember even the twenty fifth election you were full of praise for justin trudeau it was an unusual thing people pointed out how you're not it with elbows out against your opponent you always admired him do you still have that admiration for justin trudeau i i'd say i have fondness i try to be friends with everyone you know i i think it helps i think it helps achieve things in parliament when we can work together and the shaking of the hand of the person who wasn't there was really just a bit of teasing i didn't mean it to be mean in any way but i have to say people say he's broken promises that that's not too weak to express how i feel these are massive betrayals we were told twenty fifteen will be the last election held under first past the post i committed myself fully to the parliamentary committee on electoral reform and we heard from thousands we heard from over one hundred thousand canadians overwhelmingly want to get rid of i passed the pro post and have fair voting and i know a number of friends of mine who you who had been in parliament in the harper majority government who didn't win their seats for reelection and said well it was because i had people coming up to me and saying i have to vote liberal this time but i don't don't have to do it after that because justin trudeau's promised we're getting rid of first-past-the-post we were also promised we were going to be climate leaders i never imagined in two thousand fifteen that in twenty nineteen canada's target for action would remain unchanged from that of steven harper so these are massive massive betrayal UC but what what what does that mean then if you are in a situation where you can be that say the king-maker but where you can actually if it's a minority government did you can support the liberals lsu would you would you support liberals given that you feel massively betrayed by one could look back and say what a what a tragedy for all those wonderful promises that the liberals with thirty four forty percent of the popular vote duda first past the post god majority because if they had had to have our support from the beginning the promises would have been kept this is something about minority parliaments that really matters the term is used prop up as though you make decision once and then you ride out bad consequences now i look back minority parliament of lester b pearson that parliament delivered healthcare canada pension plan on employment insurance it was a minority but there were seventeen new democrats who back in those days days cared more about getting things done than who got the credit would you support justin trudeau in that way would you have worked with him in his part i will work with anyone who is prepared to deliver on on the essential crisis right now existential crisis which is the climate crisis canada is one of the laggards in the industrialized world our record is terrible and if we got any collection of members of parliament from any collection of parties to say this government will move our target market to a plan that is consistent with holding to one point five degrees celsius and we will take that campaign global to ensure that the world meets the language of the paris treaty which is to hold global average temperature to no more than one point five degrees warming in order to hang onto human civilization a work with absolutely anyone but not a blank check would work with andrew scheer it seems unlikely that he will come to the point where you're discussing this seems very unlikely but would we have to talk to everyone when my colleagues and green parties around the world have had this experience more than we have had in canada although the leader of the green party of british columbia andrew weaver i did the same process of i i talked to they talked to christy clark liberals tell you got a million emails or he was saying what they prop up christie click on there talking that's what you do talking to everybody and working within the parliamentary alimentary system means in order to get things done compromises trade-offs you have been criticized in the course of this first of all you declared that it would would be in a war footing when it comes to climate change but you've also sets important to defend jobs and that you have said that there are still more use for the oil sands you said the policy and a lot of people including not a lot well the quebec greens for instance are saying that this is well this contradiction is is is not your uranium out there is no contradiction the oil sands will be phased out by twenty thirty or twenty five in that frame then that timeframe we're talking about very very clearly sixty percent reductions in greenhouse gases in this country by twenty thirty you don't get to that by any you have a single fossil fuel expansion you can't have any new drilling you have to ban fracking to make this happen you have to cancel LNG plants you don't build a pipeline you don't have any new fossil fuel infrastructure sure but you do want to take care of workers of course you do because the green party is committed to equity and workers need time for that fair transition but you continue with the oil sands sam can you not see how some people especially young people can see that as some kind of even hypocrisy that you can save some one-sided did that when a war footing that we have to face the planet is on facing extinction but maybe we have to work with the oil since carol look if you look at our plan and our carbon budget and we'll be putting more details online with our platform this is a a herculean task and transformation of our economy ought to meet the carbon budget there's no compromising with a carbon budget but when you're looking at how fast can we built up the key energy energy infrastructure that we need which is a canadian system that works from province to province east west and north that takes some time we have to build up infrastructure to deliver liver one hundred percent renewable energy one hundred percent renewable electricity we have to stop having the internal combustion engine at all these thanks take some time but you again you've said this is a crisis and we had david zucchini on show yesterday who said that he's now going coast host to coast talking to young people and he says he doesn't see a single party that represents the the crisis that he is talking to them about young people don't have enough career always making the tours nonpartisan as possible but the mission possible of the greens there's no compromise we shut down fossil fuel dependency as rapidly as is physically and humanly possible a decade and a half you're talking about well we'll be rapidly reducing the amount where scaling back rapidly if you're if you're shutting down the oil sands in a ten year timeframe that's rapid i'm sorry no one's going to say i and i don't think that i've not even heard of anyone in the environmental movement saying you turn the key tomorrow we turn it off we are doing everything possible in a plan that goes to sixty percent percent reductions twice the current target of liberals and close to twice the current target of the indy and eliminating fracking banning fracking shutting down on any new pipeline cancelling the transplant and five one i haven't heard anyone think seriously that our plan lacks ambition it's hard work to see how we're going to plant trees raise platinum local gardens put in energy efficiency to every building this country will be creating millions of jobs by the way it's not just fossil fuel workers they'll be they have good the skills that are transferable we're going to have to look at the hundred thousand abandoned oil wells in alberta that right now represented toxic legacy about ten percent of them mm can be converted to geothermal electricity production we're looking at a very concrete serious plan that takes the line on how many fossil fuels were using and slashes it quite rapidly so there's not an ounce of hypocrisy and anything i've ever ever since on climate crisis i can't imagine that anyone who looks at our plan could think otherwise we have elizabeth may in the studio here at as it happens talking about her campaign i want to ask you about quebec and your candidate pierre nantel who is said he is declared himself a proud quebec sovereigntist and are you comfortable comfortable with that yes i've known for a long time because he's been serving in the federal parliament of this country for eight years as a new democrat and is he says he hasn't ever thought thought it was appropriate as a federal member of parliament to do anything active about separatism he holds a view of of sovereignty for quebec many many quebeckers do many any other existing members of parliament do in other parties but the key question for me when talking to me about joining us and he is motivated by the climate crisis that's why he's joined the green party that's why he's a green party candidate for reelection in lung license and i said well the only question i have about anyone from quebec who's ever flirted with separatism awesome is do you think it's on your agenda now i don't want anyone in the green party caucus federally who doesn't understand that we have to hold candidate together and united canada canada is necessary to deliver on climate action and that's where pierre stands now okay but you welcome sovereigntists that's what he says is that true well i'd rather have them joined the green party we're not working to separate work takes about we don't wear a party that's very committed to canada my number one priority is always to see see this country more unified more robust more resilient and with a deep sense of social justice we are like a family and we have to take care of each other because someone uh-huh the toronto star is quoting that national unity is quote not one of your party's core values is that true statement put out an error and retracted immediately that is absurd so it is one of your core value of course we're sure that racism is was already playing a role in this election campaign and jagmeet singh leader the end ep has been meeting that had on it's been it's been some ugly moments for him there's no question the green party is benefiting from a reduction of support for the MVP in many parts of this country are you comfortable with the idea that the greens may benefit from racism i celebrate the fact that this country long last has a visible minority leader of a major political party i've been at as you can as obviously i'm the only woman leader of a federal our political party and i've i've definitely faced discrimination that comes from being the only woman leader a federal political party i've been as supportive will more supportive of the MVP inject meet sing without any any reciprocation i didn't ask for anything reciprocal junk missing is the member of parliament for his writing probably because of green help not running a candidate in a leaders courtesy agreement is not saying the MVP has ever offered any other party we offered it to the end ep i don't think the decline in support for the end ep she is about racism there are other issues at play many of them will we were told by a former MVP executive in new brunswick who has joined the greens th that the that was the case that the ep was losing support because of racism mr richardson told us the transcript again to before coming on air because because i haven't ever met mr richardson north ever spoken with him what he seemed to be saying was that there was some level of discomfort and he thought it would have been been rectified if mr sang had ever come to new brunswick if you want to meet people build your support on the ground you have to visit and i've gone to every province in this country in the last seven months during the time that jagmeet span leader of the ep i've been to new brunswick three times and as a sitting parliamentarian i really have a very heavy schedule making sure i do the work for my constituents so i don't understand his strategies they're his strategies and his alone but there are multiple reasons people in british columbia are furious with the new democrats that's over the betrayal on site c but are you comfortable with the possibility that the green party will benefit from that racism i reject the premise i would be very very uncomfortable with us benefiting ever from racism but the end ep is suffering from a large number of issues jagmeet singh cancer a straight question on whether he supports the ellen ellen g candidate development that will drive up greenhouse gases and blow through our carbon budget there are a lot of things mr singh does doesn't have an easy time answering and that contribute news i'd i'd say that's the main reason for their decline but i you know i sympathize with them i hope they'll go they're going to hang onto i've got a lot of friends in parliament i like working across party lines and i don't take any joy in another party that shares a lot of our values doing poorly that's been very good to have you in in the studio with me elizabeth may and i hope we will be speaking again during this campaign hopes arterial thanks so much thank you elizabeth may is the leader of the green party of canada she was in our toronto studio as it happens has invited the liberal conservative conservative NFL dp leaders join us later in the campaign to follow oh all the big campaign stories go to see dot CA slash news download the ABC news app and you can find our election coverage on the CBC listen at plus other great stuff as well the fotos those are striking a ten foot high boundary wall painted terra cotta read in circles the camp and eventually barbed wire will sit atop that wall the early stages of the building's designed to hold some three thousand detainees lie within the images were taken in india's assam region journalists and human rights watchers getting the first glimpse himself a detention camp that india's government says will how so called illegal immigrants and they come just days after the release of citizenship lists that excluded the names of some one point nine million people living in that region zeba siddiqui is a reuters journalist who's been covering the construction of the camp she's spoken with some of the laborers doing the building living some of whom fear they may end up inside we reached miss siddiqui at the new delhi airport save a i tell us who exactly might be detained and in this camp that the government is building so it's unclear who might end up at this detention camp that india's building there are about twelve hundred people ruled to be illegal immigrants by tribunals in sam who are currently at a detention facilities built inside jails in sam so well one official government official told us that those people will be moved to the detention camp but there's a lot of fear about whether you know one point point nearly two million people who've been taken off to citizenship pless in assam are also going to end up in these detention centers how did they a identify how did the indian government in the government of assam identify these one point nine million people in the state that now says are illegal ego so what they did is this is a supreme court ordered exercise in assam there's been a movement against illegal immigrants for a long time for decades actually elite and the supreme court of india in two thousand fifteen ordered for the exercise to be to be started what the government has asked for is all the people who are living in a living the submit documents proving that their ancestors lived in india before march twenty four nine hundred seventy one which was the eve of the bangladesh liberation war from pakistan hansen spent bangalore-based was created the we've had to submit documents like birth certificates and property data and school certificates advocates of voter voter lester to show that they are the indian citizens which is a complicated exercise india especially in a place like assam which is very very poor one of india's poorer states and many don't even have birth certificates and errors in the nimes so it's difficult to establish consistency distance t- across the documents i've read a number of reports of people who are waiting to find out if they're on if they made the list of being being considered citizens and the shock of finding that their names are not are are the names are not on the list they're not considered to be citizens even although they have never lived anywhere else so what kinds of stories are you hearing from people you speak with yeah absolutely i mean they have been army officials issues who found themselves not under this so there's there's all kinds of people that i've been hearing people have been really tense about the whole the process local activists have compiled numbers of suicides that these connected to this process because losing citizenship is a huge deal well some as i said is also one of india's poorer states these people in many cases don't even have the means to travel to appeal you there was a draft list that came out people who were not in the draft list had an option to appeal but people in many cases i met people who told me that they didn't even have have the money to travel to these governments enters too far the hearings and then to find out that they're not on the list is given given that there's no clarity about what's going to happen with them whether they will be deported abolish better they would be sent to a detention center or geel makes him very anxious summer summer comparing it to what's going on in kashmir where the the the muslim mostly muslim population of that state kashmir and jammu have lost their their their rights and that the the status they had within the state of india so i is it a fair comparison to say what's happening in kashmir is similar to what's is happening in the sam i think that both of these are very different things in kashmir what's happened is it a special constitutional status of the fish me state has been revoked and yes that's led to some of the special rights that people had people losing those rights but what's happening in assam is completely different because these people are at risk of becoming stateless and it's one point nine million people going through a really complex legal process this that puts the burden of proving citizenship on the people themselves but in the case of assam as well the you know the government has repeatedly he said assam officials in sam have said that they would be that they would be looking at providing refugee status to the hindus were not on the list so they we have repeatedly expressed expressed the intent to sort of keep the hindus excluded from the list in india but they they have not made no such assurances to the muslims when might they start putting people in this detention center so the dog indeed of completion according to their workers and the contractors we spoke to a who working at the camp they want to complete it by december we don't i don't know if that's going to happen photographers to finish by december now what happens after that we'd have to wait and see because we officials haven't really commented on that vaguely fatty on a when people might actually start being you know being taken to the camp i you've spoken with people who are workers workers they're working in the construction who fear the day may end up being being held and being detained in the in this in this compound they're helping to build build right so spoke to workers there including a few women who told me that they were not on the of the citizenship listed come out again very poor women who belong to indigenous tribes and they were forced to work in a sense because they needed the money they earning as little has four dollars a day and that itself is important money for them because they don't have you know many other ways to earn money many of them in surrounding villages are are daily wage labourers so they're forced to work at the scam they were sort of joking about how they might end up there but again you know at the end of it when you talk to them a little bit more they talked about how they were about the whole process and that didn't know what's going to happen with them but that but that they had to continue to work there to honor living all right say but we will leave it there i appreciate that you had to bring us up to date on this story thank you thank you so much thanks bye zeba siddiqui is reuters journalist based in india we reached her today in new delhi and you can see those photos of the compound in india's assam region on the as it happens website CBC dot CA TA slash a. i. h. for years research has suggested adjusted that neonicotinoids insecticides can be bad news for bees the pesticides also called neo knicks are often used to coat seeds like canola and soybeans i beans and can be harmful to pollinators but it seems misery loves company according to new research in the journal science it's not just bs at risk neo neo next may also make migratory songbirds sick to christy moore sees an echo toxicologist at the university of scotch on and the senior author of the paper we reached her in saskatoon professor morrissey what effect are these insecticides having on songbirds these chemicals cause a fairly fairly strong effect on the birds appetite and they rapidly lose weight so helped us six percent of their body weight in just six hours and and all of this weight loss was a fat which is something they really need for their journey to the breeding grounds further north and so how were you able to monitor them coming to see the effect that the insecticides on the birds we only held the birds very briefly and then we used accua mar or sort of a miniaturized MRI machine to look at their body composition before and after giving them the chemical or if they were in the control group they were just given vegetable oil and then we held him for six hours and release them wearing a a lightweight nanotech so these are tiny little radio transmitters that we can glued to their backs and this allows us to track what happens to them and how did those two groups compare we had birds in the control group that on average average they left within half a day of release so fairly rapidly they were continuing on their migratory journey but the birds in the low group left a few days later the birds in the high group significantly delayed their migration they left three and a half days later than the controls roles so this fact of leaving the those few days later was from eating just tiny tiny amount of the chemical so the equivalent to them eating just maybe a tenth of a corn seed that was treated with awe imidacloprid or three or four canola seeds that might be treated with semitic so these are really small doses and why would it matter that they're delayed by just a few dave well it's critical for their migratory journey you to put on this fat really fast and get onto the breeding grounds essentially the early bird gets the worm when they get to their breeding grounds early they are have a higher probability of finding mates getting nest and being successful in in reproducing so anything that delays their migration and their arrival arrival on the breeding grounds is very likely to affect their a chance of reproducing as well as their own survival because now they're also potentially going to interact with predators or storms or other things that could further delay them we have on this show we have done a number of interviews about the effects of neonicotinoids loyd's these kinds of insecticides on bees and pollinators and showing well the argument is is that they have serious effect on this pollinators is this the first time time you've been able to identify that migratory birds and songbirds are affected as well yeah you're absolutely right that the majority of the research search that's out there is on beneficial insects which include those pollinators the bees more recently aquatic insects and that's that's really what's driving a lot of the regulatory decisions to ban or remove these chemicals or reevaluate them for their environmental safety and birds ends of essentially being well frankly ignored in in most of those risk assessments and there's more and more research showing that birds are in fact eating treated seeds is that our spilled or just not drilled in the soil surface you know so they're not buried very well the issue of course is for farmers who i use these pesticides to protect them against predators like flea beetles and others and and they say it's an inexpensive insecticide and the they used others that are not as effective they might have to actually put more volumes on the crops and have the same effect perhaps another wildlife so what a farmer supposed to do about this yeah i mean you raise a really good point you know farmers are making the best of a bad job ray tom and they have a set of tools and they have an unpredictable environment with pests and whether that that are really huge challenges to growing across every year and i guess they the main issue is that we have set up our farming systems our agricultural systems in this industrial austrial model which is really large scale single monoculture crops that are heavily reliant on these pesticides nights in fact seed treatments themselves are not really tied to the pest problem really they are putting on the seed before the crop goes in the ground so this type of agriculture that's using seed treatments is just in case there's a pest problem and so that means every single seed that goes in the ground actually has this chemical cocktail on it so importantly we have to move away from these dangerous chemicals and look for solutions that are much more integrative and using diverse crops and trying to sort of trick her fool the past rather than creating these big monoculture buffets in the meantime what are they supposed to do because the canadian canola growers association says that they can lose an entire canola crop and just a number of days if they can get wiped typed with pests so what what if there are alternatives other ways of doing it are they available at this point to canadian farmers for sure there there are in many growers that are experimenting with new ways of growing crops says inter crops for example so they grow two or more crops together at the same time this confuses the past prevents the pest from taking hold in fact many of these inter crops actually have higher yields overall compared to growing them separately including canola for example grown with peas so by making the system more diversified they actually can maximize maximize the beneficial insects too that are out there killing off the pest species and also attract birds that can protect their crops so the system becomes more resilient without reliance on these chemical inputs right very interesting study professor morrissey thank you for speaking with us thank you very much kristie morrissey is an echo toxicologist at the university of saskatchewan and the senior author of a new study in the journal science she's she's in saskatoon you've been listening to the as it happens podcast our show can be you heard monday to friday on CBC radio on sirius XM following the world at six you can also listen to the whole show on the web just go to

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No mushy middle: Adam Gopnik defends liberalism in his LaFontaine-Baldwin lecture

Ideas

54:59 min | 9 months ago

No mushy middle: Adam Gopnik defends liberalism in his LaFontaine-Baldwin lecture

"Hear new ideas on every topic imaginable on the Ted talks daily. podcast like why museums should honor the everyday not just the extraordinary or connecting over shared values. Like family and community is the key to having a meaningful discussion about climate change plus much more subscribed describe to. Ted Talks daily wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast. This is ideas. Here's a little ideas philosophy quiz. Do you see humans as rational beings. Do you support port individual rights and freedoms equal opportunity. Do you favor the rule of law and reason debate. Should the government be accountable to the people. If you've answered yes to or more of those questions you might just be a classic liberal and there you have a lot of intellectual history behind you. Liberalism is not universally popular right now. People on the right see it's beliefs as elitist and out of touch and the left finds it outdated ineffective but the liberal tradition still has strong supporters thinkers. Who say we need to preserve liberal institutions and values in in this world of extremes? Take Adam Gopnik the author and essayist for the New Yorker magazine. We live in a grim moment. And it's no surprise is perhaps that people in Preston previously colonized countries have those crises but it is a shock certainly that when we looked to the authoritarian model we find it in the the United States. What's apparent and all of those places? Is that the values that liberalism stands for of individual freedom and the idea that social reform is possible and always necessary. Those values aren't going the way. Those values have not disappeared their party their present around the world there embattled last Fall Adam Gopnik came out with a book in defense of Liberalism. It's called a thousand small Saturdays and it informed the talk that the New York work-based Montreal raised writer gave here in Toronto. The annual Lafontaine Baldwin Lecture reflects on democracy citizenship and the public good. It's named for the leaders of Canada's first democratic movement and it took place last September I connected recently with Adam Gopnik and you'll hear that conversation soon but first here. He is with the start of his lecture. We live at a moment at a time when the core values and practices of liberal democracy are under assault in a way that they I have not been at least since the nineteen thirties. We see it. Throughout Europe in Britain in Hungary and Turkey. We see it. Most immediately and most painfully in the United States of America where every day a new insult to the basic practices assists of tolerance and pluralism is offered where every day some hideous affront to the very idea of the rule of law is offered and and we see ourselves too passive to helpless in the face of these affronts so much so that it's sometimes said the tradition of liberal democracy is simply vanishing from the world as an historical vestige remnant. That no longer has any real real relevance that's a frightening thought terrifying and one that keeps me awake at three. AM The idea not that. Any particular political party might be in or out of power but that the basic ideas of the oscillation of government of the possibility of arriving arriving at self government through reason is over. I began to write a book trying to address exactly this. This idea not very long ago and when I tried to sum up what seemed to me. The core practices the core principles of liberal democracy kind of liberal humanism. I didn't want to turn to abstract principles. I wanted to turn to the live. Examples of real people and my thoughts immediately turned learned to my very favorite my most heroic couple amongst the Great Liberal Democrats Liberal humanists the greatest of all liberal philosopher John Stuart Mill and his lover and wife and as he always short the world his greatest teacher partner. Harriet Taylor now. Some of you may know the story story of Melon Taylor how they met at a dinner party in London in the eighteen thirties and immediately fell wildly in love with each other even though she was married and had three children to whom she was devoted and how they began a clandestine romance so much so that they would slip in other notes inviting the other to meet them and their favorite place to meet was in front of the Rhinoceros cage in the London. Zoo if you think about it you realize that that was marked by the kind of acuity that is only provided to philosophers because because they knew it wants that everyone would be looking at the rhinoceros and no one would be looking at the couple on the bench outside the Rhinoceros cage but while they sat on the bench looking at their I nostri says they shared the ideas that would be central to the moral adventure of liberal democracy on the one hand mill was working on his great book on Liberty the Foundational Document of our belief belief that the end of liberty is not known to us that liberty is an absolute rather than merely instrumental. Turn that there. There is no idea that doesn't benefit from being scrutinized no leader who can't be criticized no theology the doesn't evolve from inspection that idea of the right and the necessity of individual autonomy were central to him. But at the same time Harriet Taylor was inventing and putting forward the ideas that would lead to their other great and foundational book on the subjection of women an equally powerful testament but this one of the necessity of absolute social equality between the sexes is not the smaller slow promotion of women into certain areas of public life but the absolute equality of men and women in every sphere artistic economic and political and the key conception born at that moment. was that those two impulses. This is the impulse towards individual liberty and the impulse towards inclusion the impulse towards social equality. We're not contradictory. No they were complementary complimentary. One Fed. The other one was necessary for the other. We couldn't have a fully human idea of liberty if any part of the human family remained enslaved or disenfranchise and by enfranchising and emancipating for Tha Taliban of humanity. We we gave each one of us ever greater orbit for the possibility of exercising our liberty by which mill didn't just mean the narrow liberty pretty of self seeking no not at all by which he meant the full possibility of each human being discovering and exploring their potential to the poets or musicians philosophers or saints if they so chose and on that beautiful foundation wrought in front of the Lorraine Australia's cage that idea. We celebrate tonight. The idea that individualism and inclusiveness are not negatives but are complementary positives was born. I love the idea of the Rhinoceros as well because Ostra seemed to me the perfect heraldic emblem of the liberal democratic idea. What is after all well? Our nostrils is simply a tale L. A. recounting of a Unicorn. Travelers went to Africa and they saw ugly rhinoceroses with a squat lot horn in the middle of their forehead and they came back and as we all do when we come home and talk to the people we've left behind we say oh. I saw this amazing animal mull. It was silver and white with long main in a long curlicue corn in the middle of his forehead and so the Unicorn took the place of the Rhinoceros in the imagination. On the tapestries in poetry of Western man. The only problem with the Unicorn is that it doesn't exist. The Rhinoceros authoress is squat. Ugly more sinful. -Ly Unappealing animal has never been created by God or Darwin and yet yet it's the formidable creature it's the creature that exists and persists and is powerful. And that way it's a heraldic emblem of of the liberalism that we try to perpetuate and celebrate exactly because it isn't sexy. It isn't necessarily glamorous. The forms the terms the treaties and the papers by which it's introduced to us may often seem tedious or Dole or merely procedural and and yet more than any other movement it has produced societies of relative peace and unexamined pluralism. That vision that dream of inclusion and individualism hand in hand together has this. I say never been under the kind of assault. It is at least in the past seventy five years and some people say that vision is simply finished its extinguished it. No longer has historical currency. I think we should be grateful to some people who have reminded us very recently that that isn't so anyone who believes in the value of liberal democracy should first of all be hugely grateful to Vladimir Ladimir Putin because Putin announced unequivocally that his enemy his ideological enemy his chief political foe was liberalism liberalism he said is defunct now. The liberalism he was saying was defunct was not the NEO liberalism of reborn or reinvented free-market societies. No that's something. He has enormous affection for particularly in the Kleptocratic form in which it's pursued dude. In his autocratic Russia no wasn't capitalism. He was complaining about nor was it for that matter. Socialism for whose past life in its authoritarian pre-informed. He has great nostalgic respect. No the liberalism that Putin was decrying and claiming was defunct was exactly day the liberalism of sympathy and compassion that had led Angela Merkel and the German government to open its doors to refugees from Syria. The wretched of the earth in an old fashioned term. Who needed a place to come to? It was that poor liberal value of compassion of ever are expanding circles of empathy that Putin had contempt for and he had contempt Ford because it ran exactly counter to the vision of power war and ethnic nationalism which he describes and which he inhabits Western liberalism is defunct Putin said pointing to the practice of political compassion. Donald Trump I might add immediately agreed with them and said that Western liberalism was indeed. He dead you only had to go to San Francisco and Los Angeles to see that this was so a different conception of what was meant by Western liberalism. That's a true story. Sorry but equally contemptuous of the enterprise and its roots in ever expanding circles of compassion. And not long. After the students in Hong Kong began to protest on a massive scale against the removal of those practices of openness of liberal democracy that had to be sure been bequeathed to them by a colonial government but which in the classic way of political political history had come to be adapted by them as a kind of emergent system an emerging system in the Darwinian sense meaning. Something that comes was to us from one origin but which we find multiple uses for and that we can make our own and that was exactly what the Hong Kong students were saying about the liberal system that they had inherited they weren't striking. They are not striking on behalf of economic opportunity which one might find in China. They were striking to prevent the arbitrary enforcement of law to reinforce exactly the rule of law which means simply that though the cops and judges are paid right by the government. They are not told what to do. By the government they answer to some larger system of justice then Mir tyranny and power those two examples should at least make us clear about what side we wanna take. What's at stake at this extraordinary and dangerous breath historic moment? It might make us one for one thing to enumerate those institutions those practices those principles of of liberal democracy. Some of the major ones some of the macro ones. If you like some of the obvious ones are ones that we all know and and we can all name. Free and fair elections elections can involve everyone from the far left to like it or not the far right in which everyone has a chance to articulate a view in which those views can be debated in the public sphere in the public square and in which Results can be found. which however often inequitable or unsatisfying? Nonetheless correspond in some way to the consensus of the country free elections fair procedures the rule of law meaning an idea of justice that is not simply responsive to the whims of a tyrant. All of those things are part of the Macro Organization of Liberal Democracy. Things like open universities universities where people can speak and and right dissenting ideas without fear of being censored or squelched we know those institutions. We probably underestimate them. Somewhat because of our familiarity the era with them we grew up with those institutions. We think they're hardy because they're so familiar to us. And as a consequence many of us on right and left alike rarely stop to think about how vanishingly rare those institutions and practices are in the history of of the world. How utterly unusual? It is for us to believe that we can go to the ballot box and cast their vote for whom we choose that. If we are arrested we will not be accused of political crimes. Someone will have to show US guilty of an actual crime that if we teach the university. We are not responsive to central committee or to an autocrat but rather responsive only to our own ideas of intellectual actual integrity. Those are extraordinarily practices and they are vanishingly rare in the world history and they are incredibly fragile. The reason we live in a moment emergency is exactly because we are witnessing how incredibly fragile those practices in his shoes are how quickly they they can be extinguished by the wave of ethnic nationalism. That rolls around the world by contempt for fair procedure by simple unexpected disdain for the very workings of a democratic system like that in the space of two years norms and premises that we thought what were sterling strong have already been vaporized in the United States writer Adam Gopnik with the first part part of his twenty nine Lafontaine Baldwin lecture on liberalism before we hear the second part of the talk. Here's a conversation I had with. Adam gopnik about his interest in liberalism and his book on the subject. A thousand small sanitize some of your recent thinking about liberalism came out of conversation relation with your daughter. She had been alarmed by the. US election in two thousand sixteen which brought along Donald Trump. And I just wondered what was it in the story of liberalism that you thought would reassure someone of her generation generations. Of course well first of all the Canadian translation of what she was is alarm. She was more like shocked. Staggered freaked out and and terrified to be perfectly honest. I went out on a long walk with her around our New York neighborhood and and I completely fail to reassure her or explain my values to her or lift your spirits but I left that exactly as a task for the future and and I wrote what amounted to a long letter on liberal values for Olivia the thing that I wanted more than anything else to make her aware of is. Is that the choices before us. We're not between merely between extremes that there was an incredibly rich specifically liberal tradition that involves involve not some kind of wishy washy centrism or constantly trying to split the differences between two opposing size. But it involved making a series series of moves for radical reform for the rights of women for the rights of sexual minorities for the rights of ethnic minorities that could be achieved through acts six of persuasion and with the respect for pluralism. I came of age. I grew up in Montreal at the time of the rising tide of Quebec nationalism. which brought so much good with it in terms of positive affirmation of Catholic culture in density and also brought within it for good or ill the possibility posssibility of secession the possibility of the end of United Canada and Canadians of all kinds and particularly within Quebec argued and fought there? There were moments when it seemed to the anglophone minority that the Francophone majority was bullying them as they had once for and for very long had been bullied but but in the end we came up with a plural solution that to date keeps Quebec within confederation still guarantees the essential rights of the anglophone minority minority in Quebec and assures the future of the French fact throughout Canada. We take that for granted because it wasn't the most dramatic possible outcome of that problem but once again now if you put it in the long perspective of human history. The idea. that a form of nationalist self-assertion could be positively resolved in the completely nonviolent way in terms of larger pluralistic. That's pretty amazing. So going back to the letter her which we started with how well did that work in reassuring your daughter not at all a UK. She's nineteen year old girl. Parents don't reassure their children drink quite that way part of the comedy of the story. Is that Olivia. Who started out when I was writing the book somewhat to my left she? was you know being going going to high school at a very progressive school in New York City has now moved sharply to my right and I just spent the holiday with her arguing about you know the rights and wrongs of free speech with her welcome. I write on the Libertarian End. You do mention free speech and there is a mistrust of free speech on the Left Uh of liberal left opinion on the right. Is it just a moment in history are the foundations if if institutions sort of crumbling from lack of support. Well that's the that's the crucial question. That's the million dollar question and it's a question I tried to raise in the Lafontaine. Baldwin Lecture Liberal political practices in one thing the liberal institutions that support them of which we are participating in right. Now you and I are having a conversation on a government supported radio network without fear favour. I don't know what you're gonNA they ask me. You don't know what I'm GONNA say and nobody I hope is peering over our shoulder. That's an astonishing achievement. That kind of liberal institution if you look just at the narrow range of human history in center of yoga the huge range human history. It's unimaginable that we would have that kind of freedom. The question is is it enough to reassure us at this moment quitting time. Is it enough to reassure us. We face crises. We face enormous. Crises seem insurmountable. The crisis of climate change the crisis of inequality countless crises. At every moment in modern history there have been crises that are extremely acute and it seemed insurmountable at every one of those moments. Someone is sad and usually it's the best educated. The most intellectually minded among US liberal institutions will be inadequate to that challenge. They said that in the nineteen eighteen thirty s they said it again in the nineteen forties and on and on and yet historically add every moment those same liberal institutions of persuasion and pluralism have proven vigne adequate to that task. Now we're engaged in a real argument about the limits of free speech and the rights of free speech. I'm very sympathetic. To a less US and less libertarian view of free speech than the one that's commonplace in the United States. The one that my daughter Olivia was arguing for I quote at length. One of my great heroes. Heroes a Rosie Abella of the Supreme Court of Canada WHO's made a very coaching case in her jurisprudence and in her writings for a somewhat more narrow narrow view for the view. That hate speech is a real thing that hate speech has to be disciplined and legislated against and then we can talk about restricting hate speech without suppressing civil liberties so this spectrum of opinions possible on this question what's essential is to put that spectrum of opinions into play in a way. Hey that respects the other's pluralism isn't a form of surrender to mean. Liberalism isn't centrism. It's exactly an understanding that there will always be dissent. There will always be difference and we have to find ways to channel those differences in ultimately productive way. If we were to speak practically what do you think of as a golden time and place for functioning liberal democracy. Not Now with you on that. I and I know that that that wonderful Irish jokes you know how do the man the traveller says. How do I get from here to cork and the Irishman in the field? Well I wouldn't start from here and maybe we wouldn't start from here. So where would we start that start from. I think we have wonderful examples and what I tried to do in the in. This book is give you some heroes and heroines to look to. We don't always have to look to heroes and heroines though we can just look to the common practice of building building social capital of what I like to call commonplace civilization. We see how much the history of liberalism of tolerance of enlightenment depends ends on things like Coffee houses places where people can come together and they can exchange ideas and less that seem peripheral or trivial or or dated in some way. I spent an extraordinary lunch hour with an Iranian dissident who was talking about the crucial role of the coffee house in the EH emancipation and in the liberation of women in Iran particularly in Toronto. The religious police are constantly closing down coffee houses because they know that they are free spaces spaces where women can take off religious garb where they can talk over a cup of coffee on terms of equality with anyone with each other With men that's an extraordinary INARI way kind of seedbed of social change so I don't think we have to look just too high historical moments. We can look just as has urgently at the common ground in which Liberal democracies grow. I said in election. I think it's it's the crucial point. I was trying to make in that lecture. Sure that the fruits of liberalism are quite rare and fragile historically but the roots of liberalism are planetary. You can find them in every culture and Confucian cultures and Buddhist. It is cultures. You can find that idea of the crucial conversation of self emancipation through talking to others. That's a deeply fleet humid and universal idea Writer Adam Gopnik talking about liberalism the subject of his recent book a thousand small Saturdays. You're listening to ideas. Were heard on BBC radio one in Canada across North America on Sirius. Xm In Australia on our end and around the the world at CBC DOT CA slash ideas. Find us on the free. CBC LISTEN APP and wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Nola I hear new ideas on every topic imaginable on the Ted talks daily. podcast like why museums should honor the every day. Not just the extraordinary ordinary or how connecting over shared values like family and community is the key to having a meaningful discussion about climate change plus much more subscribed to Ted talks daily wherever you get your podcasts. And now more from Adam Gop Knicks Twenty nineteen eighteen Lafontaine Baldwin lecture recorded last fall in Toronto. Wherever you look whenever you try to understand how it is the democratic institutions can function and even flourish? You realize that they lie on a strong foundation of what sociologists call social social capital meaning the conditions and the little communities of trust within which we all have to live. If we're to engage in the larger adventure of liberal democracy we have to have experience in dealing equitably if with annoyance with people who or not of our clan not of our nation not of our kind in order to engage in the larger and more abstract pursuit a free and fair liberal democratic institutions social capital can seem like a terribly remote or abstract ideas small communities of of sympathy entrust even though we all inhabit them. One of the classic examples is the power of the Coffee House. One of the great rediscoveries of Literature of the French enlightenment of the Eighteenth Century in the past fifty years how crucial how vital the role of the coffee house was. The enlightenment was made we know now not in courts but among the saucers in the coffee houses where people could come together argue converse share ideas and it wasn't simply or most important. The specific ideas specific debates that they shared no what was important and is that they had the habit of debating. They learned the social practice of sharing ideas. They were familiar with the notion that you could sit down with a stranger and rise illuminated enlightened and that social practice in itself became the seedbed for the ideas of equality in solidarity that would bloom later. Coffee houses sound terribly remote. But they're terribly vital. I wrote a long essay not long ago in the New Yorker about the role of coffee houses in the emancipation of the Jews of central Europe. How each one of the great European cities he's had a coffee house that was frequented by Jews who were just emerging into their own wholeness and fullness people and where they could literally go and try on outfits try on a new kind of close to see what new kind of people they chose to become? The Coffee House was the pivot point the cockpit in which this great act of self Amancio patient self education could take place and don't think think don't think that the coffee house belongs to the past. If any of you have studied the urban history of Iran and of the great city of Theron particularly. You'll know there is an ongoing war between the young men and women who coalesce and come together at coffee houses where they can speak as they choose who's dress as they choose and the theocratic religious police who consistently tried to shut down those coffee houses exactly because they recognize the toxic threat that free conversation poses to the autocratic imagination. Those are the kinds of smaller communities. I've trust of conversation that are essential if the larger institutions of liberal democracy are to survive and flourish flourish. We call it social capital sometimes with my own favorite name for this enterprise comes from great park designer liner New York Frederick Law Olmsted who also designed the great park on Mount Royal where I did all of my skating and skiing and courting as a teenager ager on instead was a journalist before he ever designed square foot of Parkland and he went to the south in the pre civil war period of the United States and he tried to contemplate not just the horrors of the concentration camp society that he saw all around him but also to understand what seemed to him. It's enormous cultural impoverishment. And when he returned to New York he said what the south lax wchs because of the hideous moral straightening of slavery is what owns Ted called by the beautiful name of commonplace civilization and Titi mean by commonplace civilization. All the things we do that have no overt political role. which exactly as I said before a custom us to the necessary work of building community? He said in the north everyone is sure to become interested in social enterprises school road cemetery asylum highland church corporations bridge ferry and water companies literary scientific art. Mechanical Agricultural and Benevolent Societies are young. Men and women are members and managers just reading rooms public libraries. Gymnasiums came clubs boot clubs ball clubs all sorts of clubs Bible classes debating societies military companies. They are planting roadside trees or damming streams for skating ponds or rigging diving boards are getting up fireworks displays or private theatricals. They are always doing something. And in that way olmsted had the vision the inspiration to build a great park in the center of Manhattan exactly in order to allow that kind of commonplace civilization to flourish generation after generation new arrival of immigrant after new arrival of immigrant. Because he understood that it was a variety of engagements that building of social trust among unlike kinds that real democracy had to reside now. That's an idea that's been reinforced and re stated again and again in every part of the recent recent literature of the Social Sciences. We don't get economic development as a consequence of conditions of social social. Trust no just the opposite is true. Economic Development happens as a consequence of our building social trust as a consequence of of our investing in education as a consequence of our learning to live in a rural world. We get just backwards if we think of those things as the the decorative ornamental embroidery on the fabric of liberal democracy. No they are really the foundation of it that capacity to live to relate in a coffee house or any kind of shared community one to the other something else. That's terribly terribly important to see about that. Relationship between the undergrowth and the overgrowth and that is that while the fruits of liberal democracy democracy maybe incredibly rare and extremely fragile. The roots of the Open Society are incredibly robust an planetary the great economists to send has written wonderfully about how those basic underlying preconditions can be found in in every society as preconditions for the possibility of economic growth and social stability. They don't belong to anyone tradition. Though we celebrate eight the Western tradition to which so many of us in which so many of us have been educated. Far broader vestiges of the Confucian past of the Buddhist past have also contributed equally to creating the conditions of inquiry and openness that enable liberal democratic institutions is to flourish the roots of those institutions exactly because they lie in common human practices of sharing and coexistence turn out to be extraordinarily powerful even as we become aware that the fruits of that tree can be incredibly short-lived fragrant but in need of constant protection. I think often of exhibition that I saw in New York not so many years ago was devoted to the city of Jerusalem in the year. One Thousand and what it showed remarkably and movingly was the three peoples who shared the city at that time as they do now Christians and Muslims and Jews on the whole whole managed to get along to coexist rather Abeille they coexisted in spice markets. They made objects for each other. They illuminated luminated each other's books. Oh there was suspicion in bad feeling mistrust and enclosure nonetheless. They coexisted sufficiently efficiently so that there are objects and artifacts which art historians still are not. Sure if they're Christian objects made for Jewish Jewish market or Muslim objects made for a European market a beautiful blurring of boundaries was essential to the practice of social coexistence the existence of course at the end of that century the proceeds came and with them massacre encounter massacre and counter counter massacre and that fragile and yet deeply human coexistence was ruined all that liberal institutions attempt to do all all that the practice of liberal democracy attempts to do. Is the idea that we must make that human practice of coexistence into a permanent principle of pluralism. That's all it is. That's what it involves because the human practice of coexistence is so planetary so so widespread and so many cultures it can always be reborn but because it's so difficult to turn that practice into a permanent principle all of pluralism. It always risks being destroyed again. What do how do we go forward? I I to protect the larger liberal democratic institutions with our lives to refuse the normalization the things that can never be made normal or accepted as normal not to engage in the kind of passive resignation which is infected far too many of my American America countryman the constant rationalization the sense that if it hasn't hit me yet or my group it's tolerable. It's not too bad. We need you to take to the streets into the ballot boxes with our heels and our lives to defend those larger institutions. But at the same same time we have to recognize those institutions will be worthless if they are not constantly reinforced by building community near near at hand by making and reinforcing commonplace civilization. We can feel in my adopted city of New York every week. And every day how brained the social trust the social capital of the city becomes as that commonplace civilization is destroyed by social title inequality as it's destroyed by the pervasive. Feeling that we are all in this together but that we are divided. Doc as a people destroyed by the reduction in the ratification of the public sphere for the common good of libraries and universities the privatization Asian even though the one lesson we can take from history and social science alike is exactly that it's investing and building a rich public sphere. That's it's the necessary precondition for the private sphere to flourish and persist. Democracy begins in education pation in sympathy. Adam Smith himself believed not that markets would make men and women free but it free men and women might choose markets that double action is essential if we are to survive this dangerous and perilous time. It's difficult title and yet in another way it's amazingly simple. One of my favorite stories ever told is of that. Great an astonishing Sufi mystic not sit down clown prince of the Moslem imagination my favorite of those great enrich comic mkx anecdotes is one where Mullah Nostra. Dan is on one side one bank of a river and he sees someone a stranger on the opposite bank and the stranger calls goes out to him. How do I get to the other side and Nostra? Dan says you are on the other side. I think that's one of the most politically potent tales and fables ever told because what it reminds us is that we all begin on the other side that that the ground immediately beneath our feet is the place where our work must start and that. It's the axe of sympathetic imagination. The Nation that enable us to understand that the other the man the woman the outsider stranger on the other side of the the river is actually exactly in the same position. We are just as other and just as rooted if we can make that vision of pluralism orgasm a pluralism rooted in acts of sympathetic engagement with everyone we see on the other side of the river then liberal humanism might survive and the Rhino might live. Thank you very much it. Thank you the for all your optimism. Generations of young people around the world are growing up without knowing in liberalism in fact lots of political leaders actively derided. What effect do you think that might have on the global political future? We live in a grim moment and N. it's no surprise. Perhaps that people in in Preston Previously colonized countries have those crises. But it is a shock certainly that when we looked to the authoritarian model we find it in the United States in its one of its most potent and ugly and seemingly poisonous forms. What's apparent and all of those places is that the values that liberalism stands for the values on the one hand of individual freedom and the value of perpetual social reform? The idea that social reform is possible and always necessary. Those values aren't going away. Those values have not disappeared. There hardy their president around the world there embattled but one of the points I wanNA make which may seem pessimistic but which I believe is actually a source of hope is that they have always been embattled there was never a time of sort of fatuous liberal certainty maybe there was a six month period in nineteen ninety nine but apart from that the really never been time fatuous liberal certainty liberalism with its belief in pluralism with its belief in the power our of persuasion with its belief in the possibility of reform is immoral adventure. And it's immoral adventure that has been dangerous difficult perilous errorless since the moment people began and it will continue to be dangerous difficult and perilous on the less worthwhile. But isn't it embattled partly because because of how you described it in the lecture that it is more of a temperament than it is an ideology is that not part of its flaw. That's surely a source of some of the unused people feel with it. Human beings like authority like having something that they can rely on that they feel as fixed and authoritative and liberal values. I used by throwing authority constantly into question by saying we can ask anything that no authority. Either of a book or an individual leader is beyond scrutiny. You're on worthy of intense critical. Viewing it certainly. The case that that creates an enormous anxiety An enormous unease. He's one of the ways people deal with that kind of anxiety. The anxiety of liberty is by turning to towards authoritarian solution. And that's been true. TRUTV from the time of ancient Athens right to the time of Contemporary America. That anxiety will always be there but we can try and do is have a practice that gives examples of all of the enormous individual and social benefits. We get from believing in pluralism. What I do think you can say and what I thought you might the the direction you might be? Moving all is to say isn't the crisis of liberalism in large part the creation of liberalism. That exactly that the side of liberalism that leads Tusk towards Free markets for instance. Isn't that exactly. What creates the social unrest economic anxiety income inequality it creates this enormous unrest turns then against the institutions of liberal democracy? It's twinning with capitalism. You mean exactly in plain English exactly that twinning thing is not central not central to the history of liberalism. John Stuart Mill again. Who I think of the greatest? Liberal thinker sat in Parliament Socialist A He saw economics essentially as a series of pragmatic questions about distribution and varying models. He had no kind of religious investment in free markets but he saw liberty as fundamentally human liberty the freedom of expression freedom of opportunity the freedom of women to be completely on par terms of equality with met he saw those things as fundamental. And I think that that's one of the healthy ways in which liberalism which has to evolve which has to respond to new circumstances last to continue to evolve and respond new circumstances. I think that the Identification Advocation of freedom with free markets is a kind of liberal heresy which can be extremely noxious dangerous year talk. Last fall had a specific mood for lack of better description but already so much has happened in the world. A lot of it is very dispiriting. Do you still put faith in the power of Liberal Democracy Chrissy despite its embattled state it depends whether you get me at three PM were three. Am If we were talking together. Three A. M. I would be full of despair. Spare how can you not be that. This is a time in which values that seem to us. In the beautiful words the declaration of Independence Self evident values of individual liberty the value of truth the value of public debate are being a squashed despoiled every day. In the what was once the most powerful democracy the world in the United States we see elsewhere in India for instance world's largest democracy the practices of pluralism being trampled on. So it's very hard to stay unduly optimistic on the other hand in the nineteen thirties. Most highly educated people said I don't know if it will be right wing fascism or left-wing communism. But it's clear that that the values of liberal democracy are too weak to combat those forces forces and that turned out to be completely wrong and at the height of the Cold War. People don't remember this any longer but I'm old enough to remember it. What everyone said is liberal? Democracies are so week so riven within themselves and they're so decadent and they're so materialist that they can't compete with Soviet and Chinese style to Tala -Tarian ISM which check all the regimentation necessary to success and that turned out to be completely false was exactly the soft power of the West. It was Frank Zappa that helped liberate Czechoslovakia Slovakia rather than arms or regimentation every point in modern history. People have spoken up. I lived through nine eleven in New York when we heard the same thing again. Oh liberal societies are too tolerant to ironic their two-week. These cosmopolitan societies with we need to rearm ourselves goes against the Islamic fanatics. Were too weak and again that proved false. Our strength lay in our diversity in our pluralism in our irony in in our humor in our tolerance and at every moment. That's been the challenge and at every moment a liberal values in liberal democracies have so so far so mounted the challenge. It's no guarantee that that will continue to happen. Dark Ages calm but it gives me a little boost of belief at three. PM lusting some of your language in this talk that you gave is actually quite emphatic. And Resolute. You reject the passive resignation of Americans and believe that we should protect the larger liberal democratic institutions with our lives. It sounds a little bit a lot. Like you're politically stirred. What what are we to make of that? What is the prescription that you're providing to the rest of us? I was trying to be as positive awesome. Give and as stirring as I could be speaking to a lot of people in a in a big hall and they're different forms for different occasions. That seem to be very much the decorum of that occasion. But but I do believe that we should not be wishy washy in defense of wishy washiness. I believe that we should be passionate in our defence of of pluralism. I believe we should be passionate in our defense of reform and of liberal values to come back to the beginning of our conversation. I think we can so uneasily. Look past or take for granted the extraordinary accomplishments of liberal democratic societies which are completely fail lable which are far from absolute absolute and we still have a huge ladder of further reform to ascend but nonetheless when you want to look for societies and the horrible long painful history of humankind that have broadly distributed imperfectly distributed but broadly distributed prosperity. That guarantee the the rights of minorities of all kinds including sexual minorities that are closer to having achieved Equality between the sexes than almost any other in which people can speak up and be heard largely never perfectly without impediments and without censorship or government interference and if we believe in those values than we look at the society's around us we look at Canada and we think about how remarkable achievement liberal liberal democracy of candidate is and instead of being perpetually discontent with it. We should take a long pause to realize what we've accomplished and vow not not to let it pass. How do we do that? How do we do it by politics by participating by passionately caring by taking part in in the hard gritty work of political organization? My son Luke. Who's doing graduate grain? Philosophy took a year off to go organiz in Staten Island. The most conservative indeed reactionary part of New York City where we live to support an extraordinary candidate. Max Rose an army veteran in a district but no one thought he could ever win and they win an army of young kids and they had a lot to learn they had to learn how to talk a credible the language of patriotism to people for whom patriotism with everything they had to learn to talk about service soldiering. They had to learn to talk a language of persuasion Asian which was not yet familiar to them and they turn that district around. Max Rose wanted as a progressive for the first time in in fifty years. That's hard work. That doesn't doesn't come from a days occupation. It doesn't come from a day's parade that's the hard work of organization. That's the hard work of politics. It's exactly the same mm-hmm hardwork if I can come back again to our Canadian samples that Tommy. Douglas did in the depths of the depression out west when he began. What would become the model of medical care? In the world. In Canadian Medicare they didn't happen overnight and it didn't happen through acts of passionate self affirmation affirmation. It happened through the hard work of organization and politics and I could go on and on instances of those things one of the heroes of my book is by Rushton. The Guy who actually organized recognized the Gay african-american actually organize the march on Washington. Not The man made the memorable speech but the man who did the work of chartering the buses and cutting cutting the sandwiches that made it possible by Rushton's famous for having said once that Dr King Martin. Luther King was a great man as a saint but he couldn't organize Vampires Pires to go to a bloodbath. That's the kind of organization those are my political heroes. The people who are capable of doing that the buyer Rushton's and Tommy Douglas's of the world who do that work which is the non-glamorous but incredibly hard and vital work of real political organization. It's easier in Canada or even even still to this moment in the United States than it is in India or Or China or many other parts of the world or in Russia. We don't put our lives in our freedom at stake steak every time we do it. They do in Iran. But it's still the necessary work that we have to do and we have to recommit ourselves to that work in my own. Tiny Lilliputian away. I tried to do it by writing. That's what I am. I'm a writer and I've turned from writing the domestic comedy. The manners of the middle class life to writing about politics and about political philosophy exactly because it seems to me a time when our citizenship has to take precedence even over. Arrar artistry are the manslaughter made us in that way. And I think that that's a universal truth at this moment of emergency and crisis Writer Adam Gopnik Doc. His book is called a thousand small. Sanitize the moral adventure of liberalism he also delivered the twenty thousand nine hundred Lafontaine Baldwin lecture. Here here in Toronto last fall that talk is presented by six degrees the Global Forum for inclusion presented by the Institute for Canadian citizenship. This episode was produced by Lisa Godfrey. Danielle do val is ideas technical producer web producer. Lisa you so Nikola look shish. It's the senior producer Greg. Kelly is the executive producer of ideas. And I'm Nola Iot for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts.

United States New York City Canada Adam Gopnik Coffee House writer Toronto Ted Talks Macro Organization of Liberal Iran Harriet Taylor Vladimir Ladimir Putin assault John Stuart Mill Europe Olivia Lafontaine Baldwin Lecture Nola Iot Lafontaine Baldwin
Darren Robertson - Three Simple Steps to Live Sustainably!

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

53:56 min | 8 months ago

Darren Robertson - Three Simple Steps to Live Sustainably!

"Legends and welcome to another episode of the table. Podcast I'm your host and chef. Dan Churchill each week I get to the tremendous on having a guest in studio keeps you in New York City cooking for them as we hear about their journey but we can learn from them and their experiences. They would love to share. Now is the first episode of the EPA table abroad. That's right they were doing a first. One outside of the kitchen am pleased to have a tremendous guest. Dan Robinson Chef and one of the fantasy of the three blue dogs under down is where some time. Obviously being shifted Stri-. I know some people that you want to be inspired blind and this man is just these alleged he and the boys of the three docks have put together really awesome brand. They're really help on the stand. Where food comes from begins assign ability. They started the very first then. Shah the back pot of Bronze E. three docks out scouts who now pham multiple different establishments. I'm doing what I love and really want to educate people. He more bat down. What he's doing. And what the Brandon. Three we doing in general Side fortunate to film this on the fom of where the BARN BY LOCATION IS INSANE. That yes you'll get some fun noise in the background including some resources. Maybe some cattle and some tractors said that'd be surprised to hear the versus but obviously yes. They might be some tractors going on plays. Enjoy an awesome episode of the PODCAST. The first one at saw teaching down Roberson Chef in one of the founders of the very well established three dogs. Welcome to the podcast much. My this is an exciting for me. A couple of reasons. Firstly I get to hang out on beautiful porsches at the farm I tossed in York City. Really maybe this is disappointing by the beautiful farm. Here in Bombay These tractors going on the background. John Jewish how to look at and say a number of different forms. That you somehow the web. We'd throw no the farmers very well which is really cool gentle so before we go into tonight all WanNa speak further about you and how you walk. I saw you obviously from Australia. From London. Sporting hitching office shit. I was only there for a few months. And then we went down to the see-saw temple deal folkston cancer. Very it's the South East of England. That my dad was in the fall season the and he was actually cook as well. So it and that's what. I was studying at school to be. A photographer was washing up. In what local could John? And then I was missing the Secret Restaurant Chefs. Basically let me. Why a read that as many ships mudge innovation just because these black and white rainy photos and it was quite iconic. It's on religious. Decided they're going to become a chef and that's it that was it. Well we say yeah then. What and so. I won't so two French ships. It was only the old school on a French ship in culinary school daily so I stayed at. This restaurant remains nameless because he was awful ends up really unhappy unfortunate all the other places great but it was back in his way back in the day. On a billion wasn't uncommon kitchens and Boeing Doda. You talking about the actual pots. Pans thrown Always like theme and like look quite so I'm six days before and the head chef is really short guy and he was just really angry and just didn't it was just shoulder biology's just mind games and like seventeen stuff they just did But it was. It was a lot more accepting back then and luckily the industry's changed location. And soon as I go out with that and then worked in some missions awesome places around with canes and Sussex and I the most important results that place great time. Ns Book looks like the capital. Group are those like the Gods. Have our industry back in. And he was in half the gentlemen and just was the polar opposite for this other guy and was just so generous. This time family man. It was leaving accommodation. You just merced in like six golfers you'd get on the Venison reach. There was a smokehouse got stuck with the herrings. Osama lucky this it was amazing. I actually took bronze looking back holiday experience so I stayed there for a couple years. And and the owner Peter Herbs Eighty six year old English gentlemen and he did sites me during the style of you to get you anywhere in the world and so I stayed there for free and a half years to Susha and then I decided to see needs to have a wedgie. WoN'T EAT HIS WORDS. Lots of work and so it was either. That's the French was number one in the world valley or always Ozzy's move somewhere. Japanese or French Volvo Straightens. They will was helping on about how much I love seat. Knee and back then it was very much. Neil Perry and Tetsu and so I said Oh this Guy Max London worthy Corden french-british Amos was do something completely different slack off into go with these tests. So that was it so you pretty much made a cold and I was a moved here within a month. A bag at my body and it goes gift was God's gift to the culinary world. It was always amazing. Experience missions dog contrast Madison stuff and I go in just like Mahaffy ingredients were Koji. Yes so we in Marion. The Holy Shit really humbling but such import. Move for me now. That's that's it. That's why I've gone from one touch yellow but you've completely changed gears to put in perspective. Everyone when you go from I guess Ed traditionalist would you say British French cuisine to an Asian cuisine particularly Japanese? You're essentially starting all over again like employment. You encyclopedia your ingredients cooking techniques white balance out flyers. So as you didn't really matter where you came from because you have to stop again. Yeah it was interesting. I mean a lot of the as it turned out that there's a lot similarities of techniques. Were French but he was just finishing things instead of letting the UK like everything was finished with butter. It was like okay but yeah whereas its head to. It was about and balancing. You'd finish some lime juice. Settle and I love that is. They've was really elegant. A lot lighter they probably because this climate yep I'm really fresh but I just I instantly over there but normally that just going out on is often going tonight young and go into Italian restaurants and talk and all these other stuff like that blew. My mind is in the UK was just back then. It was fishing ships. Really Bad shawny cycle waste. China is apple worse. Yes so that was. That was incredible so I thought that my plan was to do a year in Australia. Then move to New York But you know it's forty years later. I'm still here. Yeah now you've got a beautiful wife Yes we we buy Thambo. I've of man through the drafts. And she's a woman. I'm Max left a couple of kids and and you've got now five. Is it five five? Isn't it yeah? So we've got a place in with the talks. We've got to Sydney Brisbane. Place on the FOB in Byron Bay. That'd be just about smoking Melvyn in April so they going from I guess. Michelin starred backgrounds by I the British French Zan's then obviously yard going from that Because you also did. What did he do? Some you start on overseas and some awards and was it the competitions. He did tell me I was. I became his. Why Man Short free as head chef? So we did. Certainly we did a lot of Tokyo taste yeah also stuff. We wrote in charge most twenty eight hundred United Canada for me to like a chef. Everything was amazing. Like I was in China so I exit credible amazing experience but they leave the cycle. How are we going to do something else now? Because I'm cooking substantially someone else's food which was amazing. I wasn't challenge myself. But you offer something when you have cooking someone else's because everything's going to be people just go figure out where it's GonNa get rid of the ocean trout. Whatever whatever so. I just traveled for you and I was just doing. The pop scene. Can't really flourish. There was a little Seton Hall on but there wasn't really much getting a lot of just doing cooking without any rules interesting spaces so that's why I was doing. A monkey. Store stole a bundle and came on. And I'll just visit farms and just grab orgies. Cookie home kitchen sell on a Saturday morning. And the Nazis interesting spaces art galleries shops cafes and turn them into like these pop events and let's just talk about what wants to cook through that and that sort of how the dachshund about like friends defensively stipend dachshund named breakfasts and really breakfasts in bronze. And I'll just Compete smokes a fine dining restaurant for one night and we'll just do menu crystal organic cloth and just really go over the top. Any anybody really well think people all the food and so he asked me to voice to the tune of stick around and that was it and so I think I investigated it wasn't it wasn't ask why about of you and and then it just exploded at. Sei Much Fun. And we don't was may challenge names sextets and anyone that was kind of left that owning role because also try to everything that. Sydney was clicky. The whole collaboration. We do text sitting toys like grouping together. That's sharing ideas so it was a really exciting time to Sydney Sydney and Melvin. And so that's really. The ducks came out. And Start Doing. Tina's we invite to own a goal in Paris and there was a real spotlight excite with what you know people doing here so that it just kind of rock placed on. We've gotten had media exposure which was all new as well and it just it just. Yeah so it's a lot of love the way you described that sounds like that and put that perspective going from obviously being part of a bit of an engine these pets which is awesome and you got to the point where you all the person he relied upon most to organize and everything so. I was traveling with him too. Then you're on your own but this is what I love about. These podcasts and people get tomatoes. I help champion. What you've done because truly it's that is a massive gap like do all that you've built up enough confidence in who you are just like these ranging gradients. That's that's like a ship's trait to be out of that and then we ought to do it. And then you have other people trust in you to feel like these gone definitely needs to be part of what we're doing so that's massive showing because genuity is so essential to a brand to conceive and you know you've obviously start off with Brunton was the first one was. Yeah right so now. You've got your number of them. He's lighter and all I personally I remember the first all into the trade with oxygen in Bronte and it was genuinely and I remember. I was traveling too often from northern beaches. But when I was in I was life. What do I want as I went I went and asked the staff nearly hit then after finding my name said damage a lot? I can find some sort of ATE BREAKFAST. And they came out with these beautiful this performing being like chef and it was honestly one of the best breakfasts ever happened to this day or month and I think that's a genuity thing as the three docks of she's so essential and even now I'm at the. I think Bombay from a branding spectator I think the FOM. Yeah you know what I mean. And that's what you guys have done. Yeah we've been with. We've been very lucky with that insinuation and it was a I think it. Is You know off fortune because the fact that you go ask Ted to be ready to take on Pacino at twelve. Yeah yeah and I was just stuff. That was stuff that fringe thought. We were in Sioux even by many more practical concrete on the back and one of the ships them coaches so we just started investing in. We got some Bagel was still have few chickens. We were grabbing stuff. Any money would make investigates building. It went full solar hal out out pennells junk systems and it was good expensive full. She made those mistakes but it was. It was almost yeah it was. It was a little bit fringe to solve minimalist wise foot tall ten years ago. We saw banned plastic straws real surface. This isn't right and and back then it was now it's commonplace. It's almost. It should be a standard expected back. Then people marrying about strong and then we got rid of life plastic only stuff to look back once it was good to be a part of that movement a growing movement and now it's is like what so it's really Is necessarily I mean. It's happening globally like people. Are you know rather go to best minimizing rice and stuff and it's it's been so lucky to be part of that answer and comfort that we wanted it was it was it was back. The name was now we realized because it was so that was the braves in the kitchen. So we just have to approach food and a bit more commonsense white so gone with an assault trimming things having make making sure. Everything's perfect looming finding the restaurants but taking a civil huge respect to those guys as well just wasn't what we have out and fruit skins tasting texture and everything nutritious and there was all these other elements that we've like typically in in in the bane that were sold the tastiest. Bits hottest this trying to do this and so we we. We didn't create another search. Yoma Bait and you've just got to scope for creativity that wasn't there before so it's been really exciting and I still feel that now are the thing you know even coming up here. You know people. All civilians lucky no social media and media of obviously the Fed meeting with Johnson says well then as we said five years is bubble this interesting food and it's GonNa go away soon but it really is exploding nothing Nell. The average person on the street is much more about food than you know when we were when I was growing up. I don't know if you know anything about. It was just an even as a chef it was about making it look pretty and tasty and that was when he was from a now you say the country and they've got some understanding and an expectation with our offerings grown who was treated and how much goes to waste midst estimating kind of kicks more and we we all right the bog ahead this address that show so it's good it's yes it's called you know. I'm very I'm very fortunate as well like with what we do know. Was You know a lot of people? Look his kind of naive about this privilege. The stuff that we get to do yourself as well like you get these right easy like heroes nashvillehomes or Jillian. That's she's living the dream. There's so many people in certainly an IRA industry the these unsung heroes. That just don't get those over eastern on ever going to be and so I am like yes. It's been reasserted. Law Work. Capitalizing breaks you get ends in death. Lobbyists healthy I think. Also having five partners much investable is free cokes Self Mocking Lebron. We had the end and then the other races at Bristol from mother ahead. And it's no it's been almost half that solve itself celebrate weeds as well. But it's always it's always. I think we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA HEADS OUT. I break but as I say it's it's really cool that you know we're talking ten stability and all those buzzwords that we see. Now when and I definitely remember you guys being at the forefront of trying to you know really does now. It's really cool to say that that. Is that people in what you guys do. We're going to chat about that because Daddy's essentially it'd be part of you know what you guys continue trying all different concepts as he said. I'm going to smash this. Cookie is usually on cookie dough essentially fade. Now I'm having amazing cooking. So head O'Brien on the smash risky friends. This week's episode of the EPIC TITLE. Podcast is brought to you by thirty grains. Now there are partner of Mon- outside of the PODCAST as well super proud because I've been taking them the tuna hockey's every morning first thing we'll do is cold water. One scoop down the hatch game over. I can do that traveling as well. Would you can talk about in a SEC. Grains contains fruits vegetables and root vegetables. A lot of people have problems digestion. They contain digestive enzymes prebiotics probiotics. Which are all you need to make sure that that system works directly you can also go to the supermarket and go down the ause the whole foods which I'm personally much more but if you're someone who's off to the convenience and even myself in the morning first thing. I know that I can rely on having feted grains has sought me out from the teens. We're always talking about protein passing cobs nor enough about the macher nutrients really help. Support those systems and getting it to do anything to to me. That's grains comes in and that's why I'm such a big believer in the parlance this you guys. If you go to athletic grains dot com forward slash epic a twenty count travel pack for free you can I order or that thirty grand? You lock me. Trouble is as you get older. You take require every single one scooping morning in an awfully taking on the job so make sure you go to athletic. Greens DOT COM FORWARD SLASH EPIC. And you can get your free twitter account troubled by the Free. I then you can take a screen shot tag me and let me know you'll you more tame starts to get all onto these awesome opportunity catches seven all right so go is just politics in advance some smashing a really good trip. But he's not Kooky so I cook a few months Max in the kitchen. So why do it style with Archie? She'd walk and and he's mess. Dinners out and this was this. Was the winner so we sort of develops it. It's also so she's my forty exactly going to Asia Development Chef and there's just a term team corrupt you. It's tonight it's good. He saw me on a Sony with dockyard. Thought it'd be bringing you guys. I was I gloss wake when I was here. I go to visit the farm and we were not in. There's actually the Macadamia which is actually open. The public you US up part of the phone is I We lease space. The restaurant which is three ups and then there's other businesses on that foam so the phones themselves is a host of different poems using different techniques. And they were very famous acres and is a Saudi bakery grit social and then we'll take the wishes such where ceilings and by law. Also play together on this umbrella with the foam. We'll see we renzo show by the way I just had a sandwich. Do Incredible. Yeah Salmon full when they came up the X. Book Street Avenue Pedigree and they start this. Yeah I love. This says these diner Portuguese talks have like a cult following the high streets off of that production. Lucile many as we with the pharmacist also. The farmers groaned all sorts of weird and wonderful vegetables and and you sold subsided like V. Rates Will Oakland cooperate. Anything that grow on our menu offers specialized so we just try on muscle. Episode OF COOKING. Food is is relatively easy to growing his throws hard especially. This is all grown so also labor spray free and you know it doesn't make any money themselves at two hundred Mil Yeah So it's pretty interesting. Tons of the moment central region egg and definitely fusion is really exciting. But it's also not a lot of work so we try to make it possible us every leaf and just now starting cooking lends itself quite well because we can actually legit showcase you know like the mall will just For St Proud an back them So yeah so. It's amazing but also to solve grow heirloom interesting. For is vegetables that we call Gehenna zone typically in the city's so that's really cool for us it's challenging. It's not what I was that we get all sorts of stuff like you'd marks Paneth Ball Berry tic- lawsuit I I was like Holy Shit like Berry topic this is like the all time distaste these like new new things. So it's inspiring the you let you start in the customer. So it's nice beautiful to live as a UP It's just pretty much like you. I love this because I feel like the concept that you probably worked with Ernest just off. I want to have a form that I can fly with. Also work within. Businesses are really employs. The theory of what the brand of three docks was yeah. Had that way to three blocks get ost Rostov. Yeah that's because you'll brand USA. Yeah so you've got some talk of US having afterward growing bits and pieces in Bronze Age. Yeah we really got interested in in food and grow grime spacey's and so there was talk of having Afam. None of is not very king's own sending messages items used hearts do both consistently We didn't have any money. It's on jokes. It's home relying. Who are these folks? They both Saddam came down and we were all as most stable in the cafe. Working a few things about this and invite his UPI. It's Chavis Spice. And it was pretty much much here. This was kind of under maitland's enemies garlic shed. And there's a copay clamp but he had this vision this kind of working restaurants for farmers and like you ask really ambitious at the time who just love the idea. And they'll see like we will serve as a cheesiness area but also just scratching the surface for me. It's not a really short farmers. Market communique like metre foams markets in Bombay definite loads of Nexgen farmers and producers well so there's influx of life brewers Barnaby Mozzarella on farm as distillers Brookies moutain and stone. Were down there so this is sort. Mo- mowing part of life's amazing food and drink. Sing says This is this is a really good song. Fleet just opened that flee of at two restaurant down the road like stand up in any major city phenomenal and a fight. Barna was heavy goods cafe culture So it just it just fell out and sign was Roy. So we'll we'll kind of convinced all Bene- to move here and that's it. We moved up within. I think four months and then emerged immersed ourselves Barham just to get to know the area. What was what was growing. And and this is what you've done and like you you gloss continues. This is what I want to know. So what what are the things that you guys deal with? In both from the cafe perspective and brands like we talk about sustainability. All it. But you know we're he lost weight now year. Talk about the taps you using. Some of the bees order can put you on top lecturing about that. I want to know how yes? Oh building a restaurant from the ground up. It just gave us the opportunity to make some like really so interesting society decisions and so there was also things we did to try and minimize waste from the get-go one of them was yeah We have huge amounts of waste in imbros E so we decided to go for all of that for most a ones as societies but I saw the debate research on those. If you So of authorities warned Chelsea all of them. You know strike. They're cutting brothers. Benny just to see either. The Weikun if you if you serve sadly integrity. This is huge in the states and so That that was that was just to convince smaller. Winemakers we certainly deal with those smaller boutique producers and so that itself. Yeah just a much bottle waste and then yet. It's like having a jug list. No milk coming on the plateau which radic heights tons of plastic. We have Zero mess panels on the roof every there which Always wrangles this field. We still we put through the Barbie sell that and then we might be done to other towns who boy other panels is a whole bunch of stuff. We do Composting is upstate. New Brainer if you WANNA foams easier but then also just. We've tried to so stay. Our guidances of using the ingredient using buy from us in collaborating with local businesses. Say there's a local soap making research firm. We give them some of our Spain coffee. They put it into soaps. Hence the skin that's why darts a copy and then forty store handmaid's mechanic shop account you save a lot of citrus skins which redrawing it's them and they'll put it three hours just solve different ways to use this stuff which is which is really really interesting but also is common sense actually saves you money. Nothing that's nothing of industries won't get on that because of that like we will try and do the right thing but it costs dollars and sense and this is a little bit disruptive to Star be realized college we actually saving thousands by DIPA journeys lease little tiny changes. So for me at the moment. I think that's that's where that's where the the goal is is just finding out more because we yes. Food prices going up. Labour's expensive rates is pretty is tough times globally. So it's just trying to kind of expose yourself. Innovation is out there and an answer shallows ideas and we're lucky Sydney Australia. We've had like in the semester. Have been beating the drum for years and years is made from those people who are friends whether it's pay for So you know Charlie dog game. That's crazy isn't it like you you're right? You think of how much things that people talk about you to composite which is fantastic particularly in this atmosphere. We you know directly you can see what happens with a compost somewhere. It's going I think it'd be like if he has to be part of the problem with people really. You know being in some way that being gets taken somewhere the same with recycling on educated on enough of what happens with the recycling process. Then make an informed. Decision has to be doing. But I think it's really cool. Is You go pasta. And you look a wise that other things that could be used in other genitive cases like you talked about the soap For for one. I don't know I think there's a lot of things that we can be doing. And ultimately the biggest barrier is is on realizing sees the effort. And it's like well the guy that's the effort if it's this if it takes a little effort to look off the future of kids and their kids and kids and yet absurd no problem you're costing I think it's actually more for with Zuid. It's molded laziness and education. What the next stage of that supply chain. That can be overwhelming. Since I'd use is pretty scary. Sometimes I go with them with Miller actually from eighties. Phenol health somebody. Just just do what you can do it. If you've bought like Little Verandah and a little WorldCom and just and just choose why the Wasi with you and the choices you make you know that times you know thousand hundred thousand. Millions of people doing that like we we. We can make change about owning a restaurant with. We've got an even larger responsibility for one opportunity as well and it's become sexy like composting worms and growing stuff. Growing your food has become cool now. Like being around for gays fermenting. Preserving food is like you know their own crafts and stuff. The suffer people were doing back in the day. Like grandparent's during the stuff they would like whole trendy sheriff's they were just doing this thing because they had sir yes like Tommaso bit tougher. There were with ingredients so. I think it's kind of come full circle now. I think Hollywood being forced to do but it does make sense and also you can save it benching tasty products of this stuff. You know. It's amazing absolutely and you can for the product. Did you ten kid. Yes so exciting. Like I've just always got little projects of bases on regiment. You seeing things in seventy of things going on right now so we've had some allays either so this naval straddling. Barry's making vinegars from those been. We get a lot of citrus fruit. Aussie dollar restaurant. We Ju- so loans lemons and oranges but in the citrusy. Calm the inaugural balls. Because they they raise the soil. So you can you can combat. The small amount widow can count it. We for law. So we're trying to figure out a way to use the tinkering oranges in lines sugar and water and turned into in the midst cleaning products. So it's sort of seize some that you can use to spray in the steel. I usually at home as well. So it's still in its infancy. My first one hundred years of you take some time is also once you strain it then the because it's the the past past being unfermented then you can complement as well as kind of win win so solving working on that we'll get to all sorts of visas. I We we knew US doing a coffee stain coffee. Butcha which is in from the from the Nova which is great though. I fused second financial car combination. The I infused it. May Frustration Ingredients context Kofi. Soc- them in myrtle and and S- policies said he always like coffee. Kombucha kind of the next level. There's always stuff sure image of Dan. This guy's really cool. Hass all side the other side of his whole shared if you ever shed. There's always a little brain scotto like gotten labels on jaws do Diet Sarah Joe's everywhere you know. What partners moment data rushland part of the Harry is still making them in because now they call 'cause my my kids are As well two two two four seven loving it like a week pretty much like a Sauerkraut will pick something with every meal and I love it. It's delicious but I love the fact. I love looking after these projects. You've just gotTA. This is funny because we're not because slow down a little bit because with the kids traveling stuff you kind of. You still have less musical jury as much. I must've made from sending it back. They're not making nearly as much richer. And Kathy forget about because you really need to give love your show But we've also stuff in here and it's good because the Christmas so passionate well as well. We use of our intentions used to create at business. O'brien who want where everyone is. Not just about the slight cough like chef figure. It's like the Bristol. Should be as as or as the as the Obama was the simliar the any finding now. No industry suddenly light of the ROCKSTARS. This is accolades for the front of House. Managers where that didn't exist. It was all always about the ship and it says it shouldn't be that Elsa nowadays like notes Delicious magazine and there's No Producers offered this level so absolutely very its core was called sailor and that's that's really blossoming in having a huge knock-on effect And value added run of the public. Now will you know going eighteen? Ask Right but now people experience so whereas he comes over to the Bar. No eight anywhere regional. He can go visit the cheese. Laker you go visit the very checkouts. Dunwoody Jeremy and just really immerse yourself in that food experience Guy Johnson cabinets did do whatever the case. Great Main. Let's say that doesn't value. We're very fortunate sibling Australia. You know that you you can do. I like the backyard's incredible with the phones. Right like the hinterland. Driving around the dislike stuff oldest evoke season. There's like a day where you take John for the dollar. Fifty imposture is next caller. This is unbelievable. Yeah certainly we really forced. Its its course in the like well. We're not perfect that about that in the next next segment but as as we had to break. I want us. I just to just to be clear. How out the OATMEAL IN? She wearing headphones right now to make sure not screw them audio sorry toy but as at least can hear something like a rooster in the background. It's funny this like I've always been around the world genuine sitting in a farm we've done we had to O'Brien in legends as I know this devastation going on a strategy right now with the thoughts. I will say that. It's what humbling as a sign that we all once united as the first thing people do is your family okay and then the second question is how can I help thank you to. Everyone is reached out to myself and anyone. Who's an OSCE? Everyone is getting the same support in Sinus. Yes there is plenty older. I just want to let he is not as a number of leaks in my show notes where you'd be out to help support whether it be Wildlife Nusa Ball's Brigade Victorian one as well a number of Asians Roddy funding resources. That we need. So yes everything's just one dog can help say something to do or do we just heads one of those names. They'll take you directly to the source instead tonight on my stories of what we're doing myself at Charles Trivial and also online number get involved with so once again guys issue and say. Thank you for showing you support. It's really close. Say How close behind. Stralia and his giant. Thank you once again And if you do want to evolved secret heads shards on my podcast page oldies club. Thanks guys versus still crawling back touching by somewhat some of the stuff that you guys doing you frigging dachshund and what you you always look at it and I think I think anyone that comes through with these these areas simply passionate like you genuinely passionate and excited to learn more about if imitation and all the processes that are involved and so that's why you apply to it and it's an extension of what you do all your personal view what you say to them put into three hundred ox is evident because if you want passionate why if you didn't want to go home and play with it and those things like you know why you can come knock that is it doesn't matter because you wouldn't be came to talk to anyone about it without the nights that you have to be as I love. I just love the industry look. I love most talented group of shifts. I cannot overhead sets. Do we still wish to still in contact and still share ideas. We'll running restaurant so working shifts now doing completely different things. I love those involved industry when I'm ready ninety and my that's awesome you know. Just the world of food is price lightning nonstop and the more you learn about anything just something else. This is called. So what are you we. We talked briefly about plants and plant based movement. And I I think you share very similar vision with main sense that I'm on for what you know. In terms of eighty patents which ones that firstly sued us but also take into account the environment. And what's GonNa be going long-term when I sued Osu US individually so if you're a Vegan awesome if you're not begging gripes work with you but you know we should be looking at plant based alternative meat alternatives as a wife covering what's already wholesome so on the Theresa we Mike and Mike? That is an awesome plant based protein. Meat Alternative so when you guys. I've eaten at the phone number times now. You really cherish plants and champion plants in a way. That's really exciting. We had roasted With the Almond. Yeah that was soy tic- man and just shy taste. How vegetables and plants generalists. Sorry tasty is that just calm built into the way that you. You're you're like vision. Yeah let's just things like you kind of vegetarian. Food Vegan food back in the day all be of convenient. Wbz Laws and and now there's this shifts around the world but suddenly Brennan Savage Amazing Vegetarian restaurant and Mike aspects. Science hasty is protein. Yeah and I think that's been really inspiring for US having access to stop And I think there's definitely more an expectation. Think silly now with with Restaurant and so we just make sure new. Come up here. We are everything for everyone. And there's definitely a movement now full you know based on the challenge of just coming up with something that was really tasty nutritional not use an restricting the use of bicameral chicken or steak. Nothing is now the stove really cluedo. Komo area in Anakin how that makes us feel and silly how that affects the land and so for me. Yeah I mean we we still figuring it out but I just I do. I'm very familiar. Eating protein is an absolute privilege. And so just choose already call eight. Brunson's tons of we only fruits veggies pulses lost hints. And Yeah to slow food. That makes me feel good to like sluggish. Still still pre your train. A fair bit So yeah but it's I'm really like I'm a love. The conversation around veganism on our region advice. Good stuff and I love that. We wouldn't have these conversations you when I was in my early twenties and I think that we all these questions. We developing a true understanding of growing food and nutrition a brilliant. But yeah for me. Yeah this definitely. There's always a couple of decent options on all of our men's breakfast lunch or data and so now he's kind of like brought all good. No problem at like. I said this allergies now. It is what it is and so now. I know yeah I think is interesting where it's like we'll see. I'm a huge fan of like Trans of. May Not think this wants to stick around. I think like the interest of what's going on environmentally and for us as human beings get the most out of out food with with doing least amount damage is is around and so yes. It's interesting my Pump that I if I'm sitting home and listening to this in the car and looking wise it ought to be doing you know. Just even simple things from food perspective more sustainably. What a couple things a quick quick tips that you can other than radio. Three books has a tips in it. All it's touched on preventing the often insatiable Santa Pets. Yes it's amazing. We talked for wherever the FOAM. Just have to just a minimalist. Waste such an easy way when you we all have the best intentions. We gotta Foams so go anywhere. Short generally always a bigger bellies and so much food goes to waste. And we if this is well you know a couple of kids and whatever but you know putting things in jaws letting them for men in crane these beautiful flavors ejects in what furball seeks and they think that such an easy way. So that's that's that's one less stop for even if it's just chill bilingual and just think about your your waist. Definitely so of of the wall. And compostion supple. Would you have low which she's actually dug in so our raised bed? Yes the world's with sword and so they'll ate scraps go out do their business in the in the so and then come back fade and it's also great. More sons woman is school just if nothing else you know. It's not just just on the chase war but they can. They can evoke conversation and to get kids. My son will go out and both of them. Charlie is our out in Kabul scraps in the banana skins. And they're putting in there and they'll just have an understanding from an early age of the benefits that that's awesome. That's really cool I'll just think the other one just gets you appreciate what we re very very privilege of. What's on offer show? Hey Up but I think certainly loads cook. Yeah a thing certainly certainly being the father. It's been so important I in a slightly. Us books every information. The stuff y'all doing this it doesn't have to be complicated but I think just the understanding of being able to cook food. Cook yourself for your family. Like has huge benefits not just nutritionally Asian just the convenience and an economically. So let's just take a couple of ingredients FRIEL doot and turn it into something delicious so free. That's awesome dude. I'm holding my morning retain usually so I'll try so tech team. So we were in the trenches the moment the nineteen year old Charlie. So he he wakes up and Jimmy Graham and then we'll go for coffee or taken to the beach to be pretty mostly between the ocean and the river. Yeah he'll play in the sand and then I'll I'll generally jump in the ocean if it's Maxi's tune or guy for surf Coming here at breakfast Do then agenda. Try in charge very few photons. The weakness is a new academy up vote. Which has been incredible is so darn. If you don't like you send it back. Darren is also. I'll make sure of of St of health. Probiotics are specially water thing. Usually with a bit of be or there'll be a complete you realize that was just like department at the moment so he the choice and is the Cobra. It just added clammy. That's awesome so he's an interesting one. I don't get how chestnut podcast too often. But if you were down robes food a meal and ingredient what would you be and why I already have the answer. This it's going to be said this and stop. Yeah well you're GONNA be like a scopus something I mean. That's a good one. Just not not difficult difficult. Actually see. What's new is like Michigan Senate absolute clause who grants SPAG ball eight myself for the rest of my life cycle. So you've got you've known as well which is really a griot partnership dead. Yeah so what were we open? Just want to Evanston of copy editing. I've been really so. We can go down swiftly free seat restaurant South. Still do what we do here look piece salads immense crawfish ones and again everything for everyone. We'll just make but you can come here and have a Pie Vegan. Who Make from scratch. Video Wigan sit down of happy that you're always. Does you know crab whatever it is that the full. Shebang so yes. That's pretty accelerates. Its own here in town tonight absolutely absolutely because like the Surf Bach. And usually when you do think like your theme parks like that kind of stuff. I think those kind of activity parks the foods crap. Historically you Roy. Yeah when we first coast Santa Terrible. It's a sales improper. The guys that run it would genuinely just a way of nurturing. The Culture Surfing of kids teaching kids awareness sustainability. Thus far. They've asked to do so. And you Roy like back. In the day we go to sports center. You you'd smash back you know Chris Bay. This changed now. There's just no. He's like people spending so much money on food upset. Not JUST BOOZE. So think yeah. I'm pretty calm. Everyone should be like. Oh you're going to be on your really healthy activity of wives down and Melvin told him Ryan but you can also get saw fading one all the way from both. He's going to join that but it will serve Stephanie's about the you know families de Grandma just to go to watch this thing. Yeah same here. They'll be kids outdoor play area growing stuff. Beautiful inside my yeah. We'll see him down the next on and you also even shooting series wealth yourselves by hand which has been so much so so a friend of mine. Pete Rogers from Keg reductions even talking about this year to shoot various things for other brands and stuff. But she's always good but just to just do something for ourselves really showcasing food around the barn shot so And it's just basically stuff like ten minute videos. How To's and just stuff that you know given cookout. Dole's on Jaffa putting the car like it'll be barbecued flat breads and Salads and like crap toasty with a lot of it's foraged or pigs or call off from the farmers market but really simple stuff. I see coffee in there skiing. We don't really do because I think the kids running around and know if you all kinds of you're saying it's raining but we also want to leave the mistakes. So if you know that the Oprah going kicking and what she gave me involved maybe it's been so much fun so we've got a second one aired yesterday also the next week so that's on today on your channels yes it was Journalists and food the Good feed on instagram. Let me go youtube channel as well. We'll check out awesome places absolutely now. The obvious I'M GONNA CHECK. Check it out as well links and put off from the dude. I shine get so often to hang out but when we do it sits as yeah like it's been it's been awesome. I'll be back for sure to bond but when I am actually give shot and do obsolete blown away by boy do you in the boys don and this is just this self is Spa in vision with what we do is to have a supply China. They'll be out of stock MEPHAM. Exactly how guests to the restaurants that we're working so to say you guys doing here and hopefully one day we can do the signing as you look up to obviously emails. You're asking questions. Well that's nice really is like what you do in the Yoga Bickel? Thanks for. That's up to you. Ever seen is the very first episode of the EPI table on the road down. Robinson if you he inbar and if you've ever seen if you obviously gonNA Melbourne make sure to check out the three docks in any of the stuff that dying and the team doing I honestly am advocated. The food that I live by one hundred percent behind for so plays checking out in Yeah my she taggers bugs. It'd be nice behind villa.

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