28 Burst results for "Union Army"

"union army" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:59 min | Last month

"union army" Discussed on WCPT 820

"War 11% of the confederate army was made up of enslaved men forced to join One of these men was Robert smalls Smalls a decade like a federal supply ship known as the planter During his time smalls earned as much as he could about navigating the ship So he and others could escape and on May 13th of 1862 while officers were sleeping smalls along with 16 others took the planter out of the Charleston harbor navigating through all 5 checkpoints while heading to open waters looking for the union blockade Smalls raised a white flag of surrender letting union soldiers or the ship giving them guns ammo and documents about planned confederate attack Being a wealth of information small was given the role of the union navy captain Stories like smalls are one of the many factories convincing president Lincoln to allow free African Americans to serve in the Union Army This has been a W CPT veteran minute Joan esposito live local and progressive on willow springs is powered by ComEd lower your energy bills and reduce your carbon footprint with the comet energy efficiency program Ladies and gentlemen it's the Stephanie Miller show Negotiations are messy This is a big package And I think at the end of the day when we deliver these real benefits to people taking on climate change universal pre-K universal child care housing immigration and healthcare real change on prescription drug pricing people will say oh that's what you were negotiating on That makes sense Now I've got something.

smalls Robert smalls Smalls confederate army union navy Charleston harbor Joan esposito Smalls president Lincoln Union Army willow springs ComEd Stephanie Miller
"union army" Discussed on The Drug Science Podcast

The Drug Science Podcast

05:34 min | 3 months ago

"union army" Discussed on The Drug Science Podcast

"And addicted. You know countless numbers of chinese. And and help you know. Bring down what had been a pretty glorious civilization. so it's it's not a happy story in that sense and but it shows you that these kind of vectors of imperialism in trade had been going on for very long time and that drugs have fueled it in many many ways. Well that's right. I when i get introductory tilk drugs policy to students at imperial college. Is this magnificent university. One of the best universities in the world. What do you think funded it foundation and they also they might if they think tool they might say coal rallies and i say no drugs and then they kind of look in horror. Because it's been we've talked to white that of our history and in that case was it opium dealers. Well i mean basically. This empire was built on older lewisville selling opium to the chinese setting candidates to the indians. I mean we may indians high cannabis from us even have it grew wild. I mean while there yeah we extraordinary ruthless. And then of course you know. Bring tea and coffee. Well you know a lot of great. American fortunes is a footnote in the book of where i talk about these. These august american fortunes that that that have their name on our libraries and art institutions museums. They were opium dealers and that's been erased from history. I didn't know there was a lot of money. Made an opium and a lot of it was people in the west wanting to keep it out of their country and push it onto another country and we. We were all involved in that trade. But there's another twist in your book about caffeine in and drug wars. Which of course. There's your civil war. would it be fantasy. The war was won by the north because they stuck. They had all the coffee and couldn't get it. Well it's probably too simple but that's true that were we set up a blockade so the south could not get all sorts of goods one of which was caffeine and we understood that and on the north We had the northern in the union army had provision. I think thirty six pounds of coffee per soldier They understood the power of caffeine to keep soldiers happy and an effective and in fact there were generals who would wait until their armies were maximally caffeinated before attacking and they would tell them to fill their thermoses. The coffee not water all right and in the south they were kind of you know He just didn't have that edge but the larger story is that the north in every sense was a caffeinated civilization. It already had in an industrial revolution..

imperial college lewisville union army
"union army" Discussed on Mind inn Podcast

Mind inn Podcast

02:13 min | 4 months ago

"union army" Discussed on Mind inn Podcast

"Union army for the i i would say no no. This is so hard. I cannot change helping is so i think that would be the best introduction that i think give you guys. It's iceberg ourselves where we can be together. I will talk about everything I will talk about everything. I have a lot to say. And i and. I doubted like ten or twenty years. I would want out of subjects to talk about. I have lived a very fruitful life. I lived a very hard life. And i have seen scenes that i never thought i would be able to see in my life yet. I did now. I look around me every day. I see things that i never thought was possible. Not even in the slightest but it is possible now all over this possible. I see it every day i see i feel it in my bones each day so it's getting windy again so i don't think you could. You would be able to hear my voice or majed run over. Run over by a or something. So i'm gonna cut it short. And i'm gonna tell you guys you can count on me being here if i don't die at call her something guy who's always starting something we'd kill me If not that happens. I would be here as long as i live. You are not going to get rid of me that easily. So that would be my introduction. Sublimely route nope. Nope nope nope..

Union army
"union army" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

04:13 min | 4 months ago

"union army" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"Lincoln decided that the union army needed more information about its soldiers in order to best distribute resources so he ordered this enormous study to assess the union army physically medically and mentally and then in explicit obedience catalase new science averages calculated an reported. They actually say basically. We're we're following. The father of this new phil kelly. These freshly calculated averages informed the distributions of food rations and the design of weapons for example if you are going to create muskets well. How far is the trigger and you could actually calculate average reach for soldier. This also affected military uniforms which used to be accustomed some but in the civil war. So many people had to be outfitted that custom uniforms would be impossibly expensive so the uniforms had to be mass produced. But they couldn't be just all one big floppy size and so now they're realizing oh well you know if we break it into into subtypes like there's a large and this is what we mean by this big torso. This brought a shoulders. You know small medium large. That's going to carry over into the way they think about the mass production of clothing. Yep the sizes small medium and large which might be on your shirt tag..

union army phil kelly Lincoln
"union army" Discussed on Tales of American History

Tales of American History

03:51 min | 10 months ago

"union army" Discussed on Tales of American History

"Army A one is a direct pursuit. Go right up following them The other is to Attack see if you can attack that the army you want to pursue on its flanks The third is to follow a parallel course and that was hooker strategy hooker strategy and in fact that is the preferable strategy of pursuing an army. Don't go behind it cushion. You can't do anything to that. Army behind it On a parallel course you may cause it to move more rapidly than it wants to What an army has to move faster than it wants to. It can disintegrate Particularly if it's a retreat. This is an advance still. If they're moving too fast because of fear that they're going to be met somewhere well it could fray then army so you move on a parallel course even though you're risking as as happened losing sight of exactly where your enemy is. i mean. They're in the mountains there. You've got to get to a position where you could confront him And that's the deal and you've got it's a race And you make a rice. And so that's where the prologue of your book and story of meade's command at gettysburg begins and telling you it's a very compelling story what i one of the things i love about. This book is the beautiful illustrations. You've selected including the here to four unpublished photograph. Of general george gordon meade during the pennsylvania campaign that is the illustration for the frontispiece of that is a really incredible picture. But you've got lots of amazing photography in this book beautiful illustrations By contemporary artists who were eye witnesses to the action This is a richly illustrated book the presentation of it The way it's been presented by its university of north carolina press. It's beautiful donna. Shing lee beautiful It's it's i really can't wait to see it in print for those who are interested you can you can it. It comes out on the seventh of june and amazon. Already you can pre-order it on amazon you can also pre-order it through the university of north carolina press on its website but Amazon of course is the easiest one for everybody to get to. And it's again named need at gettysburg a study and command and it picks up where we left off lucky to seeing it. And we'll talk some more about this book and some forthcoming podcasts. As well certainly will. Well thank you for talking with us today. Ken and as i said it's good to be back with dynamic studios and mr neil kesterson are sound simon. Thank you so much you're welcome. We'll see you soon. Become an american hero. Who participates in our mission by joining us at witnessing history dot org download our documentaries and free teacher education materials that conform to grade level education standards at pbs morning dot org follow witnessing history on facebook twitter and linked in..

amazon Amazon Ken neil kesterson today third university of north carolina p twitter facebook george gordon meade gettysburg north carolina press one dot org meade pbs morning dot org seventh of june witnessing pennsylvania history
"union army" Discussed on Tales of American History

Tales of American History

07:00 min | 10 months ago

"union army" Discussed on Tales of American History

"Let's take a journey back through time with kent masterson brown as we discuss the first twenty one months of the existence of the army of the potomac leading up to the battle of gettysburg. Welcome kent thank you. It's great to be here. It is good to great well. So let's talk about the union army before the battle of gettysburg. Let's talk about what it looked like. And what it did it's the army of the potomac is what we're talking about and The army of the potomac was the union army. That was assembled a beginning in august eighteen. Sixty one and A union army had just suffered a defeat at the hands of confederate troops. At what is called the first battle of bull run on july twenty one. Eighteen sixty one and that battle is not only a defeat but it was a humiliating defeat When you think about it As the two armies were about to engage the The union army then was called the army of northeastern virginia and it was commanded. By major general urban mcdowell and as they moved toward bull run They were. They confronted a confederate force that was commanded by general joseph e johnston and An army an army called the army of the potomac that was commanded by general p g t beauregard and To make it simple the battle did not go well for the union army from the start ultimately they were not only defeated in the field but there they were routed and the route turned into a panic and all along the hills on either side of this engagement worse spectators from washington with picnic. Baskets going out to watch this thing and of course in the middle of this humiliating defeat. Not only did the army go into panic and retreat back toward washington but all the spectators did to of here you are. i mean. Nearly three thousand union casualties are on the field The army has been routed and humiliated and his running back toward washington. And this is abraham lincoln's baptism of fire. This is the first thing that happens to one of his armies in the american civil war. Well after that humiliating defeat. To abraham lincoln let general mcdowell go reassigned him and named major general george brinton mcclellan as commander of what was left of that army and mcclellan brought. What was left of that army and other regiments coming into washington into an army that he called the army of the potomac. Okay and On november first eighteen sixty one mcclellan was named not only not only. Was he commander that army but he was actually named commander in chief of all united states. Army's after the retirement of general winfield scott so here you have the army of the potomac To give you an idea of the size of the army of the potomac get. Roughly at this stage of his life was probably about sixty thousand troops divided up into various army corps. it had supporting it and pulling it upwards to fifty to sixty thousand horses and mules and It was an enormous force but its purpose was to protect the capital and to hopefully defeat the confederate enemy in virginia And so if you're looking at any of the great battles in virginia during the civil war Particularly the war from eighteen sixty one until eighteen. Sixty four You're looking at the army of the potomac most exclusively not quite but almost and in eighteen sixty four. Now you get other armies active in virginia but the army the potomac continues all the way to appa matic's so this army put together in the fall of eighteen sixty one and it goes all the way until apple mathematics in eighteen. Sixty five okay. That's a that's a great overview would like to talk a little bit about your forthcoming book. We're so excited about this Your new book is called mead at gettysburg. A study in command. And it's coming out in early june of twenty twenty one so it's publication. Imprint is imminent now Let's talk about the focus of your book. What happened with the army of the potomac from the beginning of the war until meade took command and at and right before the battle of gettysburg. The book of course is about general. Meade george gordon meade and It is a a book that addresses meads generalship How he commanded the army. He became commander the army and how he commanded it both at the battle of gettysburg and during his pursuit of lee's army after the battle of gettysburg But to look at with. George made becomes commander which is on june twenty eight eighteen. Sixty three This poor army from the time of its creation in the fall of eighteen sixty one until george. Meade becomes commander on june twenty eight. Eighteen sixty three had not won one battle in virginia against his enemy. Sell for the first twenty one months of its existence. It's going from battle to battle and never winning novick. This enormous well supplied well. Equipped army backed by the united states. That's right okay. that's right. It was defeated In every

genevieve brown neil kesterson american americans america
"union army" Discussed on Tales of American History

Tales of American History

04:05 min | 10 months ago

"union army" Discussed on Tales of American History

"Now let's take a journey back through time with kent masterson brown as we discuss the first twenty one months of the existence of the army of the potomac leading up to the battle of gettysburg. Welcome kent thank you. It's great to be here. It is good to great well. So let's talk about the union army before the battle of gettysburg. Let's talk about what it looked like. And what it did it's the army of the potomac is what we're talking about and The army of the potomac was the union army. That was assembled a beginning in august eighteen. Sixty one and A union army had just suffered a defeat at the hands of confederate troops. At what is called the first battle of bull run on july twenty one. Eighteen sixty one and that battle is not only a defeat but it was a humiliating defeat When you think about it As the two armies were about to engage the The union army then was called the army of northeastern virginia and it was commanded. By major general urban mcdowell and as they moved toward bull run They were. They confronted a confederate force that was commanded by general joseph e johnston and An army an army called the army of the potomac that was commanded by general p g t beauregard and To make it simple the battle did not go well for the union army from the start ultimately they were not only defeated in the field but there they were routed and the route turned into a panic and all along the hills on either side of this engagement worse spectators from washington with picnic. Baskets going out to watch this thing and of course in the middle of this humiliating defeat. Not only did the army go into panic and retreat back toward washington but all the spectators did to of here you are. i mean. Nearly three thousand union casualties are on the field The army has been routed and humiliated and his running back toward washington. And this is abraham lincoln's baptism of fire. This is the first thing that happens to one of his armies in the american civil war. Well after that humiliating defeat. To abraham lincoln let general mcdowell go reassigned him and named major general george brinton mcclellan as commander of what was left of that army and mcclellan brought. What was left of that army and other regiments coming into washington into an army that he called the army of the potomac. Okay and On november first eighteen sixty one mcclellan was named not only not only. Was he commander that army but he was actually named commander in chief of all united states. Army's after the retirement of general winfield scott so here you have the army of the potomac To give you an idea of the size of the army of the potomac get. Roughly at this stage of his life was probably about sixty thousand troops divided up into various army corps. it had supporting it and pulling it upwards to fifty to sixty thousand horses and mules.

washington august eighteen fifty joseph e johnston george brinton abraham lincoln battle of gettysburg two armies american civil war mcdowell first twenty one months july twenty one sixty thousand horses one Eighteen first thing november first eighteen sixty winfield Nearly three thousand union ca about sixty thousand troops
"union army" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

Problematic Premium Feed

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"union army" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

"Listen Sir that it was the perfect. Compare you know. Labor. Union to. A large political party I mean that's a good question to posted a group from. If people want to. Attack that. I think that. European the question. I was saying I don't know if it was like fully fair for me to compare you know like this labor union to a large political party. I think. CICADAS. That would definitely make the same comparison I think that he's kind of like I think at the whole book he's kind of making the same point over and over again. And and that you know. It's just now we have like kind of the modern iteration of this, right? It's not the Republican Party. Right. But it's it might as well be the same right now do you think we've spoken about how their actions fit into historical trends? Do think that's been covered or does anybody WANNA go into that I'm going down this list of guiding questions suggested. This one there's one thing that I think we sort of like really touched on but kind of relates to what we're just talking about was. The One of the major list for that union victory in civil war was. Was African in the slaves. Rebelling joining the Union forces a man following the victory, the Union army itself Turned on. An attacked. And and Wiped out any of the strongest sort of like. remaining. African groups that were that maintain their sort of structure in that wanted to fight for an independent, a more independent nature of the integrated one and the. At an institution. So when they that day sort of forced, it moved into reconstruction, which then privileged getting black sort of petty bourgeois people into power, which is Also been really painfully slowly reading. Wretched of the earth when he's he talks about how? That's like a really common tactic. For any sort of colonizing force is to..

Union Union army Republican Party
"union army" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"union army" Discussed on 600 WREC

"A pivotal union Army victory at Gettysburg President Abraham Lincoln announces that the nation will celebrate an official Thanksgiving holiday on November. 26 18 63 speech, which was actually written by Secretary of State William Seward declares that the fourth Thursday of every November therefore would be considered an official U. S Holiday Thanksgiving. Ahead this week in 1957, the Soviet Union inaugurates the space age. With its launch of Sputnik, the world's first artificial satellite had a diameter of 22 inches and weighed £184 circled Earth every hour and 36 minutes. US government, military and scientific community were caught off guard by the Soviet technological achievement and they're united. Efforts to catch up with the Soviets heralded the beginning of the space race. Thiss week in 1965, Pope Paul the sixth Arrives at Kennedy International Airport in New York City first visit by a reigning pope to the United States during his packed one day American visit, Limited entirely to New York City. The pope did five major events, including a public mass at Yankee Stadium on this week in 2013, espionage and military thriller author Tom Clancy, whose books include The Hunt for Red October Patriot Games, dies in Baltimore at the age of 66 following a brief illness at the time of his death, more than 100 million copies. Of Clancy's books were in print and 17 of his novels had reached the top of The New York Times best seller list. And that's what happened. Thanks for listening to this week in history on I Heart radio. I can't believe it now, he says. I can't thank you enough for this product. People have tried all the alternatives. They've searched everywhere else path and they haven't heard of hyaluronic acid..

Tom Clancy Soviet Union New York City United States union Army William Seward Pope Paul official Gettysburg Abraham Lincoln Kennedy International Airport Yankee Stadium President The New York Times Baltimore
"union army" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"union army" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"For a pivotal union Army victory at Gettysburg President Abraham Lincoln announces that the nation will celebrate an official Thanksgiving holiday on November. 26th 18 63 speech, which was actually written by Secretary of State William Seward claims that the fourth Thursday of every November therefore would be considered an official U. S holiday. Thanksgiving jumping ahead this week in 1957, the Soviet Union inaugurates the space age. With its launch of Sputnik, the world's first artificial satellite had a diameter of 22 inches and weighed £184 from circle Earth. Every hour and 36 minutes. US government, military and scientific community were caught off guard by the Soviet technological achievement and they're united. Efforts to catch up with the Soviets heralded the beginning of the space race Thiss week in 1965. Paul. The sixth arrives at Kennedy International Airport in New York City first visit by a reigning pope to the United States. During his packed one day American visit, Limited entirely to New York City. The pope did five major events, including a public mass at Yankee Stadium on this week in 2013, espionage and military thriller author Tom Clancy. His books include The Hunt for Red October Patriot Games, dies in Baltimore at the age of 66 following a brief illness at the time of his death, more than 100. Million copies of Clancy's books were in print and 17 of his novels had reached the top of The New York Times best seller list. And that's what happened. Thanks for listening to this week in history on I Heart Radio Hard radio. Here are the top Bon Jovi songs that you've filmed us. Number three..

New York City Tom Clancy United States Soviet Union union Army official William Seward Bon Jovi Gettysburg Abraham Lincoln Kennedy International Airport Yankee Stadium President The New York Times Paul Baltimore
"union army" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"union army" Discussed on KTOK

"A pivotal union Army victory at Gettysburg President Abraham Lincoln announces that the nation will celebrate an official Thanksgiving holiday on November. 26th 18 63 speech, which was actually written by Secretary of State William Seward declares that the fourth Thursday of every November therefore would be considered an official U. S Holiday Thanksgiving. Jumping ahead this week in 1957, the Soviet Union inaugurates the space age. With its launch of Sputnik, the world's first artificial satellite had a diameter of 22 inches and weighed £184 circled Earth every hour and 36 minutes. US government, military and scientific community were caught off guard by the Soviet technological achievement and they're united. Efforts to catch up with the Soviets heralded the beginning of the space race. Thiss week in 1965, Pope Paul the same Six arrives at Kennedy International Airport in New York City first visit by a reigning pope to the United States during his packed one day American visit, Limited entirely to New York City. The pope did five major events, including a public mass at Yankee Stadium on this week in 2013, espionage and military thriller author Tom Clancy, whose books include The Hunt for Red October Patriot Games, dies in Baltimore at the age of 66 following a brief illness at the time of his death, more than 100 million Copies of Clancy's books were in print, and 17 of his novels had reached the top of The New York Times best seller list. And that's what happened. Thanks for listening to this week in history on I Heart Radio. When it comes to driving change, there's no action as powerful as casting a vote, so Levi's wants to help get as many people as possible registered and ready to vote this fall. Text..

Soviet Union New York City United States Tom Clancy union Army William Seward official Pope Paul Gettysburg Abraham Lincoln Levi Kennedy International Airport President Yankee Stadium The New York Times Baltimore
How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

BrainStuff

04:57 min | 1 year ago

How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

"Brain Steph Lauryn Boban here. Here in the United States, it's Hispanic heritage month, which officially began as Hispanic Heritage Week in nineteen, sixty eight. Unlike many other campaigns that observe and honor the contributions of a particular group of Americans Hispanic heritage bump run throughout. September. But rather starts on September fifteenth and continues through mid. October. So, why does it start in the middle of the month? Well, a Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala Honduras. Nicaragua. All celebrate their Independence Day on September fifteenth. Mexico's is on September Sixteenth Chili's is September eighteenth and believes independence. Day Is September twenty first. By, stretching into October, the holiday also includes de la Raza on October twelve, which is a kind of rejection of Columbus Day because of Christopher, Columbus's many crimes against humanity and see our episode on Columbus Day for more about that. De la Rosa instead celebrates the melding of Hispanic races or Raza, and cultures. In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, let's talk about three times at Hispanic Americans have changed the course of history. Some three hundred years after Spanish, conquerors became the first non native Americans to view the Mississippi River and later the Grand Canyon one host. Jeff Marianne Hernandez helps smooth transfer of the territory of Florida into US rule Florida was still part of Spain when Hernandez was born in Saint Augustine in seventeen eighty four. But that changed when he was selected to serve in the House of Representatives and was sworn into duty in eighteen, twenty three as the first Hispanic person to serve in. Congress. In historical context Hernandez being a slave owner is a controversial figure. Still. He remains the first one, hundred twenty eight Hispanic people to serve in the. US Congress. Maybe of more relevance today is the first Hispanic senator elected to a full term in Congress. New Mexico's Dennis Shabas in nineteen thirty five. We spoke with Paul Orbits Historian at the University of Florida. He said in addition to being the first American born Hispanic senator. He's critical for the time we live in because he fought on behalf of all working class. Equally, he fought for higher wages legislation he fought for people to have the right to organize a union he fought for more progress and you as foreign policy for Latin America he organized N. Double ACP leaders against Jim Crow Segregation. Then, a Chevette as one of those people we can use Hispanic heritage month to talk about our connection other people's democratic struggles. Today's Congress. The one hundred sixteenth has forty seven members of Hispanic heritage. Hispanic Americans also helped turn the tide of the civil war. Some twenty thousand were involved in the conflict. While some in the southeast sided with the confederacy especially those who came from wealthy families with plantations or other businesses in Louisiana Alabama more supported the union. or it said a lot of Mexican American soldiers fought on the side of the Union army in the southwest and actually helped defeat the confederacy in the southwest. Hispanic people in the West back the Mexican government to and celebrated the country's defeat of the French at the battle of Puebla on May fifth of sixty two single Demayo in a victory that may have helped prevent the French from siding with the confederacy and thus ultimately helping the Union win. A bit more modern only about eight years before the US Supreme Court ruled in Brown versus the Board of Education, that segregation in public schools is unconstitutional as Spanish schoolgirl showed the way. Sylvia Mendez a Puerto Rican and Mexican heritage was just eight years old when she and her brothers were denied enrollment into the white only Westminster School district in Orange County in nineteen, forty three. At the time about eighty percent of California, school districts were segregated. Her Parents Gonzalo. Felicitas Mendez enlisted other parents to fight the decision and they took the school board to court. After appeals that were abandoned short of the US Supreme Court Mendez Versus Westminster became the first successful federal school desegregation case in the nation that was in nineteen, forty seven. The case was important arguing that segregation itself even if schools were separate but equal was harmful unconstitutional under the fourteenth amendment specifically, the clause, the calls for protection of the laws for all citizens. In appeals Sylvia's case was argued by Thurgood Marshall who went on to argue for the

Hispanic Heritage Month Jeff Marianne Hernandez Congress Senator Us Supreme Court Mendez Us Supreme Court Felicitas Mendez United States Steph Lauryn Boban Costa Rica El Salvador Guatema Nicaragua Mexico Columbus Raza De La Rosa Dennis Shabas Union Florida
It's the Little Things

Your Brain on Facts

06:39 min | 1 year ago

It's the Little Things

"For want of a nail, the shoe was lost for want of a shoe. The horse was lost for want of a horse. The rider was lost for want of a writer the message was lost for want of the message the battle was lost for want of a battle, the kingdom was lost. Small things can have reverberating effects on history both good and bad. In fourteen fifty three, the great walled city of Constantinople fell it had withstood sieges for eleven hundred years. It had held off fire from the then state of the art cannons for weeks. The Byzantine said even Ford soldiers trying to tunnel under the wall autumn Turks were finally able to overrun the great city because someone left the door open. One of the many gates in the fourteen miles of wall had been left open during the night and the Ottomans flooded in. Killing Constantine the eleventh in the battle and bringing an end to the eastern Roman Empire. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. It was a freezing Christmas night in Trenton. New Jersey during the revolutionary war. The English Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall. Commander. Of a mercenary infantry regiment of fourteen hundred has seen soldiers from Germany sat down to a good supper and an evening of entertainment. He and his men were celebrating their recent victories over George Washington's volunteer army, and of course, the Christmas holiday. Safe from the bitter cold and the pelting sleet inside a wealthy merchants home that they had commandeered. They relaxed safe in the assumption that no one in their right mind would possibly try to cross the Delaware River at night in a blinding winter storm. Someone challenged role to a game of chess, and before long he was deep in tactics and strategy. There was a knock at the door. And exhausted young. Messenger boy came in bearing a note from loyalist farmer. It's important to remember that about a third of colonists still consider themselves to be British and didn't want the revolution. Raw paid the boy little notice took the note and put it in his coat pocket without opening it. That pocketed piece of paper would cost him and the war effort nearly. Two hours earlier and ten miles away. Washington's men had begun being ferried across the icy Delaware. River. It took over ten hours to get all twenty four hundred men over to the New Jersey side. The conditions were so adverse five men froze to death. Then began the arduous march to Trenton in the dark. The plan had been to attack the town from all sides before dawn, but the troops didn't arrive until eight am. During the attack which lasted only an hour forty of the German. Henson's were killed and the remaining thousand surrendered. Colonel was mortally wounded. When his body was found the unopened note warning of Washington's crossing was still in his pocket. If role had read it, he would surely have had his gross of professional soldiers prepared. He allowed his pride and the weather to lull him into thinking his enemy was not a threat. Had he won the battle he may well have killed George Washington James Madison James Monroe John Marshall Aaron Burr and Andrew. Hamilton The. Second, most common premise in alternate history circles behind what if Germany won World War Two is what if the south one the American civil war? Two pieces of paper dropped in a farmer's field almost brought that about. Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Whose statue in the middle of my hometown of Richmond, Virginia has recently been given the historical context. It's so sorely needed. In the form of tons of. Graffiti. Issued Special Order one ninety one during the Maryland campaign before the Battle of Antietam. In the order lead divided his army, delineating the routes and roads to be taken and the timing for the units to reconvene. Adjutant Robert H Chilton penned copies of the letter endorsed them in Lee's name. Staff. Officers distributed the copies to various confederate generals. General Thomas Stonewall Jackson in turn copied the document for one of his subordinates, major general, D H Hill who was to exercise independent command as the rearguard. A Union soldier Corporal Barton W Mitchell of the twenty seven. Th Indiana volunteers found two pieces of paper bundled with three cigars as he marched across a farm in Maryland an area recently vacated by Hill and his men after they had camped there. The order provided the Union army with valuable information, concerning the army of Northern Virginia's movements and campaign plans. Upon receiving lease lost order. Major General George McClellan leading the Union army of the Potomac proclaimed. Here is a piece of paper with which if I cannot whip Bob Ely, I will be willing to go home. He immediately moved his army in hopes of foiling lease battle plans. When Lee heard a copy of special order one, ninety, one was missing he. He knew his scattered army was vulnerable and rushed to reunite his units Antietam Creek near Sharp's Berg. Lee's troops arrived tired hungry and many were sick. The Battle of Antietam, would go down as the bloodiest battle of the American civil war with casualties recorded as twenty, three, thousand dead wounded, which was usually as good as dead or unaccounted for over the course of the half day battle. That's nearly two thousand soldiers in our one every two seconds. When night fell both sides ceased fire together, their dead and wounded. The next day Lee began the painstaking job of moving his ravage troops back Virginia. Here, some scholars argue another solitary decision had far reaching consequences. Despite having the advantage. McClellan. Allowed Lee to retreat without resistance. From his point of view, he'd accomplished his mission by forcing Lee's troops from Maryland and preventing confederate win on union soil. President, Lincoln however thought McClellan missed a great opportunity to potentially end the war three years earlier than it ultimately would.

Robert E. Lee Army Major General George Mcclellan Maryland Union Army New Jersey Trenton Virginia Antietam Constantinople Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall George Washington Ford Delaware River Writer Antietam Creek General Thomas Stonewall Jacks Washington
"union army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"union army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Processing facility. I worked here for 32 years. I was a male handler. So yeah, This place is near and dear to my heart. Simmons retired three years ago before he turned 60. He says a career with the Postal Service helped his family have a good life. I was able to raise them. I'll pay for my son's college education. Provide a good middle class lifestyle for us and to know that I would have my retirement taking care of the Postal Service has long given African American workers a place to avoid some of the discrimination that exists in the broader employment world. History Professor Phil Rubio says that started just after the civil war. When Congress passed a law that ended the whites only hiring practice for postal jobs and African Americans, starting with Union, Army veterans, abolitionists and others began finding their way into this government job. Rubio says the pay wasn't always good. But the job came with some prestige, and it offered security benefits and civil service protections that improved over the decades. Today. African Americans are 27% of the Postal Service about twice their share of the overall workforce. Among those who say they benefited from postal careers is actor Danny Glover, My mom and dad worked for the Postal Service, but most of their working lives in this 2015 video. Glover says. His sister and brother also worked for the agency. And he worked there as a teenager during Christmas brakes working for the Postal Service, and they did with my parents to buy their first home. This video was part of a campaign to protect the Postal Service from privatization. Among the advocates for that is Chris Edwards, an economist with the libertarian Cato Institute. The postal industry is no longer any kind of natural monopoly, and when you don't have natural monopoly I think we oughta let entrepreneurs come into this industry and show with how they can improve it. But private sector jobs don't pay as much total compensation for the median Postal service employee last year was just over $96,000. FedEx is about half that, and ups is in the middle of the two Privatization likely would bring downward pressure on postal service wages and benefits, which would hurt African Americans disproportionately. But Edward says there's another issue of fairness here. People paying for postal services are paying all the benefits, though it seems to me that the government should be reflected somewhat of the private sector. Postal worker unions have been among the loudest opposition voices to privatization. The Postal Service is not a business if a fun It's a service to the American people. Judy Beard is legislative and political director of the American Postal Workers Union. She started at the Postal Service more than 50 years ago to pay her way through college. She says. These jobs benefit more than black postal workers and their families but shopping in the community by chaos in the community. Toward the church in the community. The Children are going to school in the community, so all of that just raises the whole community. Meantime, postmaster General de Joy has suspended budget cutting measures put in place this summer until after November's election. But says the steps are.

Postal Service American Postal Workers Union Professor Phil Rubio Danny Glover Simmons Judy Beard FedEx Congress Cato Institute General de Joy Chris Edwards Edward Army political director
Mass Hauntings in Gettysburg

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:12 min | 1 year ago

Mass Hauntings in Gettysburg

"Mass haunting 's in Gettysburg for over one Hundred Years Gettysburg Pennsylvania's been flooded by reports of paranormal activity from Phantom cries, wounded soldiers, lifelike apparitions, many visitors to Gettysburg of untouched by haunting. Past Gettysburg was a site where confederate and union armies clashed on July. First, eighteen, sixty, three, the battle. Was Day bloodbath that will change American history forever when cannon smoke clear the union soldiers had one but nearly five thousand horses and fifty thousand men lay dead or dying ninety. The confederate soldiers never received a proper burial now, more than fourteen decades. Later, these unsubtle spirits may still linger and Gettysburg. This historic town is home to a surprising number of Phantom. Forms captured in photography including the ghost of what appears to be General Robert e Lee the Daniel Lady Farm was used a confederate army field hospital soldiers. He suffered from artillery wounds usually lot of chest wombs lost limbs were brought to the farm to recover suffer through the final moments of their lives. The farmhouse and barns saw their share of ghastly horror. The ghosts of general. Isaac you'll and his ten thousand men still reportedly off the farm cash town and just eight miles west of the tiny town cash town was the site where the first soldier was killed during the Gettysburg campaign of the civil war. The current owners believe they have proof of their ghastly and ghostly visitors chat Palomino in his wife had. Pictures from nineteen, Eighty, seven through two, thousand, seven, a strange orbs and skeleton showing up in photos according to Mr Palladino he and his guests have heard their share of thumping doors. They've also witnessed lights turning on and off on their own doors lock IAN unlocking themselves. The history of Gettysburg hotel is filled with tales very haunting 's a ghost of A. Woman. Who has been seen dancing in the hotel's ballroom paranormal investigators believe the spirit of Union soldier James Colbert on of company K Pennsylvania reserves still roams around the hotel or the Bala dairy in offer spectacular views of the countryside. It's sometimes gives visitors a terrifying glimpse of life after death located on hospital road in served as a union field hospital during. Day Two of the battling Gettysburg Suzanne Lawn key. The owner has collected dozens of stories of photos of her guests ghostly encounters according to a psychic. The in appears to be haunted by confederate soldiers buried underneath a nearby tennis court. The ghost train tourists could take a ninety minute ride on the ghost train the only ghost tour. Gettysburg that takes visitors across. The actual battlefield. One of the tour storyteller says he and the passengers of smelt cigar smoke and see the souls of soldiers roaming on the train or near the tracks won't traveling across historic battle mass

Gettysburg Gettysburg Hotel Gettysburg Pennsylvania Daniel Lady Farm General Robert E Lee Mr Palladino Isaac Tennis James Colbert IAN Bala Dairy A. Woman K Pennsylvania
"union army" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"union army" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"School High school in a university. This country is the greatest blow for freedom of the individual human being there has ever been in human history. The Constitution did not enshrine white supremacy or any other supremacy. It did not enshrine racism. It provided the way out. It provided the route out. It provided the mechanism out. And guess what? 600,000 Americans died to end slavery. 600,000 Americans, most of whom did not own slaves. They were residents of the North To join the Union Army. Anyway, I think Trump's speech. It was exactly What I've been saying he should do push back against this cultural revolution. It is now clearly determined to care down our history to tear down our culture and to tear down our entire way of life, not to mention tear down the country. And it was a gutsy and it was courageous because trumps all alone. He doesn't have a bunch of Republicans standing up in celebrating him, and they damn well ought to be He doesn't have a bunch of people other than us other than you. He doesn't have a bunch of people standing up and cheering him on. He's standing up for the founding of this country he is standing up for the defense of this country is standing up for the preservation of the American way of life. The American way of life. Has shown the way for everybody else on this planet. It makes no sense the hatred of this country. It literally makes no common sense. Unless You acknowledge. That the people harboring this hatred. I don't know what they hate because they have not been told the truth. Of the magnificence in the greatness. Of the founding fathers of the founding documents. Of the efforts. That were made to establish independence. A country that has come to the rescue of every other nation on Earth. During times of disaster. And has not asked anything in return. A nation that has the ability to project power unlike any other nation on Earth, and we do not use it to conquer. Other people. Or other countries. In fact, we use our might and power to liberate people. From oppression. Poverty. Misery. And, yes, slavery. A brief break. We'll come back and continue with Mohr right after he makes it look easy,.

Trump School High school Union Army Mohr
"union army" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"union army" Discussed on 600 WREC

"And so the union had to had to be. In existence before they could declare independence. But it was the constitution. That enabled Abraham Lincoln. To embark on the civil war. Because This country could not stand as founded if slavery were to continue because of the constitute the Constitution did not. Espouse slavery. The Constitution did not Maintain it. The constitution did not provide for it. The constitution in fact, provided A way to end it. The premise to end it. The premise and all men are created equal. Endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights can't be taken away. And among them are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. This is now. The stuff off racism and controversy and hatred. No This is the stuff of abject total ignorance. Promulgated by a bunch of irresponsible teachers. In Middle school High school in the university. This country is the greatest blow for freedom of the individual human being there has ever been in human history. The Constitution did not enshrine white supremacy or any other supremacy. It did not enshrine racism. It provided the way out. It provided the route out. It provided the mechanism out. And guess what? 600,000 Americans died to end slavery. 600,000 Americans, most of whom did not own slaves. They were residents of the North To join the Union Army..

Abraham Lincoln Union Army Middle school High school
Understanding the border dispute between India and China

Between The Lines

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Understanding the border dispute between India and China

"Together China in India account for more than one third of the entire population of the world, and if you believe the predictions of Keisha Mahbubani, remember him. He's been a skit on this program. He's the distinguished Singaporean intellectual. He says the future is Asian, and it's China's and India's to shame. But as my next guest points out. There, a deep historical tensions between these two budding global superpowers, which might make that impossible. China and India share land border in the Himalayas which has been in dispute since nineteen, sixty two, and it's been a pretty quiet style for decades, however, since May tensions have been rising nuclear powers facing off in a remote corner of the Himalayas, the disputed Kashmir region. This is the first the classroom this border in forty five years Indian government confirmed twenty of its soldiers were killed in the clash. China seems to now be making new claims to territory now. Will this be the event that pushes India away from Chana. Chana for good, and what does it mean for the rest of the World Tom V. Madan is a senior fellow in the foreign policy program at the Brookings Institution. In Washington. She's the author of a new book called Fateful Triangle. How China shut US India relations during the cold. War She's got an article in this month's foreign. Affairs magazine on how China is losing India Tovey. Welcome to between the lines. Thank you for having me Tom now. The border dispute between China and India has probably been the most tasteful. Conflict in the world. No one died and forty five years. What sit this conflict of? It was set off because of some early moves in early May that. had. Brought forward troops and equipped military equipment at different points on the China. India boundary the line of actual control. In the western sector particularly of their border, which is eastern Hlavac and at multiple points, what we saw was attempts to change the status quo whether it was to establish a permanent presence in built in areas, but both sides claim. Or attempts to stop a Indian patrols from moving in those areas which they have traditionally done. That's set the context. It's been going on since at least early May. What we actually saw what was happening to June, sixth meeting between senior military commanders was that they had agreed to a process of de-escalation and disengagement but something went very wrong in the course of this de-escalation. And this is where the incident took place. Now this particular incident has just been a larger in scale and an this whole stat of larger scale, but also regrets aggressiveness and the ones we've seen before, and there are reports that both countries are deploying some serious weapons to the bases close to the border. Is this just posturing, or is there a serious risk of Esscalation I? Think these kind of situation. There's always a risk of escalation. We've seen at least three. faceoffs three major face before this one between the Chinese and Indian military's in two, thousand, thirteen, two, thousand, fourteen in two thousand seventeen This one is could have larger in scale. We've seen as we did. On June fifteenth that even though they have traditionally had a whole series of agreements, standard operating procedures protocols in place between the two countries to avoid the kind of Esscalation we saw injured fifteenth. They clearly are not sufficient anymore, so let's put this in a broader historical context. China and India and went to war in nineteen, sixty two over the border. Now this of course was at the heart of the Cold War. Taibbi take us back to the geopolitical context of the time what was going on? By the time, the nineteen sixty sixty-two war broke out between China and India. You've seen a few years from about nineteen fifty seven about five years already of rising China Idiot tensions you've seen. The Indians relies that The Chinese did not consider. The boundary settled that they were building. A roads through territory India sought was India's. You saw scuffles skirmishes at between. The. Two sides patrols at various points on the boundary. You also saw the escape of the Lama. At a number of Tibetan. Refugees remain to stay in India in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, which the Chinese soil with deep suspicion and suspected that the US and you had worked together to engineer about escape. And, so you seem kind of rising tensions between China and India and at the same time you see you saw. The US India actually because in a national park because of their shared concerns about China actually starting to move closer towards each other for the for the the US This saw a in democratic India as both Jew potential, a political counterbalance, but also democratic contrast to soviet-backed Communist China accident, very interested in supporting it. N India welcomed that support, and so that was the. what was? Preceded that sixty to war, but which occurred when the Chinese decided. To move what they call the self defense a counterattack. And in nineteen, sixty two. Move across across the boundary took and defeated India quite badly, which laughed a number of different. It's a it's left a lot of historical baggage. The only major war the Union army has lost

India China N India United States Himalayas Tom V. Madan Esscalation Chana Indian Government Keisha Mahbubani Union Army Brookings Institution Tovey Washington Hlavac Senior Fellow Taibbi
Juneteenth: People are hungry for change

Squawk Pod

03:00 min | 1 year ago

Juneteenth: People are hungry for change

"We observe June team alongside millions of other Americans. It's a one hundred fifty five year old holiday commemorating the day enslaved African Americans learned of their freedom on this day June nineteenth in eighteen sixty five major. General Gordon Granger of the Union army arrived in Galveston Texas and informed the enslaved black population that the civil war had ended, and slavery had been abolished eighteen, sixty five. That's over two years after president. Lincoln's emancipation proclamation took effect. Texas on the other confederate states ignored the proclamation, and in doing so submitted enslaved African Americans to thirty extra months of uncompensated labor and inhumane treatment this. This day the day honoring the reinstatement of freedom that should have never been taken away the day that freedom was lawful, and yet still withheld represents many Americans, the difference between the ideals of the American dream and the reality for black people in this country, the June team holiday has largely been observed by the US black population wall, and efforts to make June Tiv a national holiday have fallen short in Congress as twenty twenty, though forty seven states and the District of Columbia have all passed legislation recognizing June Tepe as either a state holiday or a day of observance this year. Corporate America is also making president. Several large companies are honoring the day as a paid holiday for employees, Google. Uber General Motors Ford J. P. Morgan Nike and others are observing team today CNBC reporter Gene Wells reported today from once center of Commerce. That's also marking this special day. All the dockworkers at all twenty nine West Coast ports, including here at the largest largest port complex in the country are taking an eight hour work stoppage today for June teeth and up at the port of Oakland, where the local is seventy five percent black. They are going to have a a march and a caravan as local President Trent. Willis says there is systemic racism at times still even within the Union we've had incidents of hanging nooses. That we sense addressed. And just just here and there we've had some some evidence of systemic racism. Showing its ugly head. Here, where we work every day, Corporate America is all in on this saying that June teeth will be paid permanent holiday including target, which will pay working employees, today, time and a half. Other companies are still open, but canceling meetings like Amazon, which will offer workers, a variety of opportunities online to reflect on the day and GM where in many plants the work will continue, they will stop for eight minutes and forty six seconds in recognition of the death of George. Floyd one note about the ports guys in this union dockworkers are allowed one work stoppage a month. They are all happening to take it together today

President Trump United States Galveston Texas Corporate America Union Army Gordon Granger Uber General Motors Google Amazon Lincoln Floyd District Of Columbia Oakland Congress J. P. Morgan Nike Willis Cnbc
Companies and state governments celebrate Juneteenth, giving workers the day off

Randy Baumann and the DVE Morning Show

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Companies and state governments celebrate Juneteenth, giving workers the day off

"Today is June eighteenth a June. Nineteenth commemorates the ending of slavery. In the US the origin of the holiday comes from June nineteen, eighteen, sixty, five, when General Gordon Granger of the Union army, arrived with soldiers in Galveston Texas and told enslaved African Americans their the civil war had ended, and they were free more than two years after President Lincoln had signed the emancipation proclamation. June teeth is now celebrated in black communities across the US, and some have called for it to become a national holiday. Nearly all states recognize June teeth with some limited special status in this year. The NFL Nike and twitter have all recognized. June eighteenth as a company holiday. Governor Tom Wolfe is marking June. Teeth is a special holiday closure for employees under his during. For the first time is office as the more than seventy three thousand workers will get either the day off or a compensatory day to use it another time. If they are often, office remains open. The Governor says today is a moment to honor African, American history, and to reflect on how everyone can promote equality, liberty and justice for all people.

Governor Tom Wolfe United States General Gordon Granger President Lincoln Twitter Union Army NFL Texas
Sojourner Truth

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Sojourner Truth

"Today's warrior was an evangelist to became an outspoken advocate for abolition temperance and women's rights. Let's Talk About Journal Truth. Sojourner truth's name at birth was Isabela. Balm free. She was born into slavery in Ulster. County New York in seventeen ninety seven. In eighteen o six at the age of nine years old, so joyner sold at an auction along with a flock of sheep for a hundred dollars. Join our later described. The slave owner is cruel. She endured repeated beatings at his hands, so joyner was sold once again. This time to a man named John Dumont. Interestingly, because to journal grew up in New York, state originally settled by the Dutch she actually only spoke Dutch were living with Dumont. She learned to speak English At that time support for emancipation in new. York was growing. Dumont promise that he'd set so join our free before it became the law to do so. But eventually, so joyner came to realize that he had no intention of freeing. Sojourner fled with her infant daughter in eighteen, twenty six one year before the abolition of slavery in new. York, She was forced to leave her other three children behind. When she later reflected on the escape, sojourner said I did not run off for I thought that wicked, but I walked off believing that to be alright. During her journey to freedom. Journal! into the home of a quaker couple Isaac and Maria van wagon. After learning about her predicament, they took so Jordan around her baby. In until the states Samantha patient of slaves took effect. The van wagons treated with kindness and compassion, so join our leader said that their benevolence inspired her to become a preacher. During her stay with the couple, she became a devout Christian. Around that time, sojourner officially changed her name from Isabella. Balm free to join her truth. because. She felt it represented her mission of fighting for justice. joiners famous words, truth is powerful, and it prevails. Echo that sentiment. After, moving to New, York City, joyner worked as a domestic servant. She became active in the Methodist Church joining the African Methodist Episcopal denomination. So are also used her experience to help others volunteering as a social worker for former slaves. Despite being illiterate, so joyner became a popular speaker and the abolitionist movement, she spoke in front of hundreds promoting religious tolerance, civil and women's rights. In eighteen fifty four at the Ohio. Women's rights convention in Akron. Joyner gave her most famous speech called Ain't dia woman. She spoke about racial and gender equality and refuted aecom an argument that women should have equal rights. Because Jesus was a man. In her speech, she asked. Did Joe cry, come from. He came from God and a woman manding have nothing to do with it. When the civil war broke out, so joyner helped recruit black troops for the Union army. For her efforts in the war and the abolitionist movement sojourner was invited to meet President Lincoln in eighteen, sixty four. She continued to teach and lecture about social justice until her death in eighteen, eighty, three at

Joyner New York Sojourner John Dumont Isabela Joe Cry Ulster Aecom York City President Lincoln African Methodist Episcopal De Isaac Union Army Samantha Methodist Church Ohio Jordan Akron
Sojourner Truth: The life and legacy of pioneering anti-slavery and women's rights activist

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Sojourner Truth: The life and legacy of pioneering anti-slavery and women's rights activist

"Today's warrior was an evangelist. Who became an outspoken advocate for abolition temperance and women's rights? Let's talk about joyner truth. Sojourner truth's name at birth was Isabel Balm free she was born into slavery and Ulster County New York in Seventeen Ninety seven in eighteen o. Six at the age of nine years old sojourner was sold at an auction along with a flock of sheep for a hundred dollars so join our later described. The slave owner is cruel. She endured repeated beatings at his hands. Sojourner was sold once again this time to a man named John Dumont interestingly because Turner grew up in New York state originally settled by the Dutch. She actually only spoke Dutch while living with Dumont she finally learned to speak English at that time. Support for emancipation in New York was growing. Dumont promised that he set so joyner free before it became the law to do. So but eventually sojourner came to realize that he had no intention of freeing sojourner fled with her infant daughter in eighteen twenty six one year before the abolition of slavery in New York. She was forced to leave her other three children behind when she later reflected on the escape sojourner said I did not run off for. I thought that wicked but I walked off believing that to be all right. During her journey to freedom sojourner made her way into the home of a quaker couple Isaac and Maria van wagon after learning about her predicament. They took so joyner and her baby. In until the states emancipation of slaves took effect the van wagon and treated joyner kindness and compassion sojourner later said that their benevolence inspired her to become a preacher during her. Stay with the couple. She became a devout Christian around that time so joyner officially changed her name from Isabella. Balm free to join her truth because she felt to represented her mission of fighting for Justice. So joiners famous words. Truth is powerful and it prevails echo that sentiment. After moving to New York City sojourner worked as a domestic servant. She became active in the Methodist Church. Joining the African Methodist Episcopal Denomination sojourner also used her experience to help others volunteering as a social worker for former slaves. Despite being literate so joyner became a popular speaker and the abolitionist movement. She spoke in front of hundreds promoting religious tolerance civil and women's rights in eighteen fifty four at the Ohio. Women's rights convention in Akron Sojourner gave her most famous speech in called anti a woman. She spoke about racial and gender equality and refuted a common argument. That women shouldn't have equal rights because Jesus was a man in her speech she asked. Where did Joe Cry? Come from he came from God and a woman mandate have nothing to do with it when the civil war broke out Joyner helped recruit black troops for the Union army for her efforts in the war. And the abolitionist movement sojourner was invited to meet. President Lincoln in eighteen sixty four. She continued to teach and lecture about social justice until her death in eighteen. Eighty three at the age of eighty six.

Sojourner Joyner Akron Sojourner African Methodist Episcopal De John Dumont Ulster County New York Isabel Balm New York City New York President Lincoln Joe Cry Union Army Ohio Isaac Methodist Church Isabella Maria Van Turner
The Haunting of Gettysburg

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:04 min | 2 years ago

The Haunting of Gettysburg

"Paranormal activity from Phantom cries. Wounded soldiers to lifelike apparitions. Many visitors visitors to Gettysburg have been touched by his haunting past. Gettysburg was assigned were confederate. Union armies clashed on July first eighteen. Sixty three the battle was a three day bloodbath. That would change American history forever. When the cannons smoke cleared the Union soldiers had one but nearly five thousand thousand horses and fifty thousand men. Lay Dead or dying. Many of the confederate soldiers never received a proper burial now more than fourteen in decades later these unsettled spirits may still linger in Gettysburg. This historic town is home to a surprising number of Phantom forms captured in photography including the ghost of what appears to be confederate General Robert e Lee that Daniel Lady farm was used as the confederate army field hospital. Soldiers who suffered from artillery wounds lot of chest wounds lost limbs were brought to the farm to recover or to suffer for through the final moments of their lives. The Farmhouse Barn saw their share of ghastly horror the ghosts of General Isaac. You'll in his core of ten. Ten thousand still reportedly hot the farm cash town in just eight miles west of the tiny town. Cash town in was the site where the I soldier was killed during the Gettysburg campaign to the civil war. The current owners believe they have proof of their ghostly. Visitors Jack Palladino and his wife have pictures from eight nineteen eighty seven through two thousand seven of strange orbs and skeleton showing up in their photos. According to Mr Palladino he and his guests have heard their share of thumping doors. They've also witnessed lights. Turn on and off on their own doors locking and unlocking locking themselves. How about the Gettysburg Hotel. The history of the Gettysburg hotel is filled with tales of eerie haunting. 'S A ghost of a woman has been seen Dancing Hansen. The hotel's ballroom. Paranormal investigators believe the spirit of union soldier. James Culbertson of company K Pennsylvania Reserve still roams around the hotel. How about blood dairy in while Bala dairy in offers spectacular views of the countryside. It sometimes gives visitors terrifying glimpse of life after death located on the hospital. Road end served as a union field hospital during day. Two of the battle of Gettysburg. Susan lockney owner has collected dozens of stories photos of our guests. ghostly encounters according to a psychic the in appears to be haunted by confederate soldiers buried underneath a nearby tennis court. Gettysburg Ghost train could also take a ninety. The minute ride that only the ghost tour. Gettysburg takes visitors

Gettysburg Hotel Gettysburg Jack Palladino Daniel Lady Farm Army Field Hospital Bala Dairy Susan Lockney Robert E Lee Farmhouse Barn James Culbertson Tennis Dancing Hansen General Isaac K Pennsylvania Reserve
Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:46 min | 2 years ago

Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

"You really have to recognize that the people around you have value to add and that you may be the person in charge you have the vision. You have the responsibility woody. But if you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're gonNA lose them awesome. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better at our place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. Hey we welcome ambassador. Susan Rice to skimmed from the couch ambassador. Rice was national security advisor to President Barack Obama before serving as national security the advisor. She was the United States Ambassador to the United Nations as well as a member of the cabinet. Prior to the Obama Administration at Basseterre Rice was a fellow fellow at the Brookings Institute and began her career in foreign policy under president. Bill Clinton so many questions also ambassador rice as has just published her book tough love the title references. Her parents approach to raising her which prepared her for career in world politics. And I'm guessing a lot more. The memoir has been called both highly personal and unflinchingly honest. It's landed her a spot on the New York Times Bestseller. Lists congratulations. We we are thrilled to get the opportunity to speak with her about her historic career ambassador rice. Welcome to the couch. Thanks so much. It's really great to be with you. Both very excited right okay. So let's jump into it first question we ask everybody. Skim your resume for us. Okay scholar written and published academic work on national security and foreign policy when I was at the Brookings Institution as a foreign policy scholar I've also been a management consultant diplomat. negotiator national security expert. That's the first time we've had those bullets on this show. What is not on your your wikipedia or login? Daniel dropped. Her microphone in a very important question was the literal mic. Drop in writing. Not On your official biography or Kapadia that we should know about you. Well I mean there's a lot but one of the most important things if not the most important things is that I'm a mom. I have two kids one in high school now in one in college and I'm a wife and I'm a proud daughter daughter of two parents who had phenomenal impact on me So family to me is hugely important. What is a typical day? Look like for you now now. It's well now when I'm not on book tour normally. Okay it's so much better comparatively like I can get up at seven you know as opposed to five thirty or six. I can work out and take my time doing it. Not being rushed I can put on my yoga pants I and my fleece and very leisurely eat my breakfast. which is usually like fruit and yogurt or something like that with a lot of coffee and then it depends on what my days as about? When I was writing the book? Sit Down and focus on that. I spend time at the School of International Service at American University. where I meant to our students I do some speaking. I do some travel. I'm on the board of Netflix. And I do some other private sector so depends on what the the the deal of the day is but for the most part the great thing is I'm in charge of my own schedule and I'll have to get dressed up except when I'm on book tour you said You can travel. I'm sure you have traveled so much watch but a lot of it has been in your professional life. Where's the last place? You traveled here for fun abroad or anywhere anywhere. The last foreign trip we took took was to Peru with the family in August which was really fun. 'cause it's been a while given that the kids have jobs in camp in whatever that we've actually been able to do to a cool foreign trip together. Is there a place you haven't gone. That's been on your bucket list. Oh Gosh lots. Let me do a short summer. Yeah I would think you've been everywhere. I've been a lot of places Che's but not everywhere and there's a lot of places I still WANNA go Thailand Morocco Sosa Czech Republic. Ah Norway I've been Ireland into the big places have been you know. China had been Russia into Japan. Indonesia I've been to many parts arts of Africa most of western Europe a good bit of South America but I still want to go to Chile. I WANNA go back to Argentina. Yeah I WANNA go back to Brazil. We should do do a little girls chalet you should. It's amazing you talk about family being really important to you. And that's obviously a huge inspiration from the book. The the title of the book is a nod to your parents parenting style. Tell us about your parents. Well I had to really wonderful parents both past unfortunately but my dad. I was born in segregated South Carolina around nineteen twenty. His grandfather. My grandfather had been a slave. He fought in the Union army in South Carolina during the civil war and then after the civil war my great grandfather rather miraculously got a primary education occasion became a teacher and then got his divinity degree Went to college and after college he An after his early professional career. He established a school in New Jersey. called the board in town school and from the late eighteen eighty s until nineteen fifty-five that school educated generations of African Americans both in vocational and technical skills and in college preparatory skills and Albert Einstein and Stein and Mary McLeod but Thune. Eleanor Roosevelt. All came to the school which was really quite extraordinary in that. Legacy of service of education was what my father was raised with but born in this oppression of segregation and Jim Crow. He really was struggling to figure out how he could fulfil his potential during World War. Two he served with the Tuskegee airman and in the segregated Army Air Force and he had the horrible experience of not being able elite in restaurants off of base but seeing German. POW is being served and so he knew that he wanted to become somebody. He was brilliant and after after college he decided in after the war lead the south. Go out to California. He got his PhD in economics at the University of California Berkeley and then he spent his professional fashion career. Working his way up he worked in the Treasury Department. He worked at the World Bank in a senior position. Ultimately he was a governor of the Federal Reserve. And I'll come back to him but I learned from my father just extraordinary perseverance and basically believing in yourself even when society and everybody around around you is telling you that you're not worthy or you can't. My mom came from a totally different background. She was the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica. That came came to Portland Maine of all places in nineteen twelve and my grandparents on her side. Had No education was agenda when was a maid and yet like so many immigrants immigrants. They came with the American dream in saved and worked very hard and sent all five of their kids to college. Two of my uncles became doctors. One a university president won an optometrist optometrist and then along came my mother the baby and she was Valedictorian of her high school class. She was debate champion. She she went on to Radcliffe College now. Part of Harvard and was president of the entire student body graduated magna cum laude and because she almost didn't get go to college because she was denied a scholarship because she was black but eventually because her principal enter debate coach went to bat on her behalf. She azazel receive another source of money. She made the fight to enable college to be affordable to low income Americans. Her life's passion and she. He was known as the mother of the Pell Grant Program because she was instrumental in establishing and sustaining this extraordinary program. That's allowed eighty million Americans to go to college. My mom was it was a bad ass in nineteen fifty when she graduated from high school as an African American woman. In a very white state of Maine She he went on through her career to be a pioneer. And so these two parents who were wonderful but had a horrible marriage which can come back to really taught me to fight and to be strong and to not be dismissed her diminished or discounted by others how his career talked about in your household growing up. I mean I. I had a working mom and a professional mother from the earliest days of my life and so on the one hand. It was an example in an expectation that you can work and have family at the same time. It was rare. Frankly at that time this has been the late sixties early seventies for the mothers of my classmates for for example to be working outside of the home in a professional capacity. So I had her example and I had my father's example of rising up in government and in private it's sector we were expected to excel. We were expected to work hard and do our best. We are also taught that you know we could be whatever we wanted to be. They weren't saying you gotta be this or you got to be that but the fundamental message was whatever you choose to be do your best at it and make it something. That's about somebody other than just yourself when I hear you talk about your parents and them as role models to you and your family I think about it two ways on one hand. I'm like that is incredible. crediple an amazing and they obviously created such a strong legacy in you. Second thing I think of is that's got to be a lot of pressure at times. Did you feel that growing up. Who is funny not really not in the sense of? I was scared that I wasn't going to meet their expectations and they were going to get mad at me. They had a really important saying that. Did they sort of banged into me. And my brother which was do your best and your best will be good enough and what they meant by that was you know. Don't be a slacker. Don't be fast but if you do your best and it's not you do badly that's okay. You are allowed to fail. You just not allowed not to try your best. And so they gave us a sort of confidence in safety net. They'll be behind us. We can take risks. We can do something thing that we may not be good at but just do your best. The message was you know. Don't be lame and that was kind of their version tough love. It doesn't mean that they expected us to always get as observe. Be The best person on the basketball team or whatever the the thing was but were they gave us a hard time was when we sort of cut corners fit in the Rom- of your imagination that you would have the jobs that you ended up having served in the way that you ended up serving the particular job that I had were not in the realm of imagination. Because I didn't know yeah. When I was young I was going to be interested in foreign policy and national security? I didn't know the field well enough to say. This is what I want to but I knew that I was likely to to do something and do it to the best of my abilities and that it would be an ambitious objective.

Susan Rice President Trump Brookings Institution Maine President Barack Obama United States Ambassador Advisor South Carolina Danielle Weisberg United Nations Carly Bill Clinton Radcliffe College Basseterre Rice Obama Administration New York Times Bestseller Netflix Basketball School Of International Servic
"union army" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:13 min | 2 years ago

"union army" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"At the end of the American Civil War he is still serving he's in New York City for a time he spends a lot of his time living in the seedy underbelly of New York if he's not working he's off and the red light district cavorting having a having some frolics time frame is it's it's not uncommon for soldiers to come home from war to have a really rough time to look for solace and places they might not otherwise have in the past to have a hard time keeping things together to undertake risky activity to I mean even to see things that aren't there to imagine a reality doesn't line up with the reality experience by the majority of us absolutely and by eighteen sixty seven the army is completely done with his behavior they find that it is unethical and a moral so they transfer him to a remote post in Florida and we're gonna let's let's pause right there because professor Murray doesn't know any of this he doesn't know anything about miners past he only knows the guy as medical knowledge seems to be living in either retirement or he's relatively well off and the guy has a lot of time on his hands and he loves words yes that's a that's a little background about minor and a and and minor is sending in these entries to the Oxford English Dictionary project to professor Murray and they seem to be really great entries there really detailed the really very they are voluminous they are deeply researched what fester Murray did not know was that his most faithful correspondent and contributor was writing to him from a lunatic asylum where he was confined for committing homicide yeah yeah that's the that's the strangest part of it and it sounds like something you could maybe have a weird nervous laugh about but the story itself is quite tragic it turns out that Dr minor was not in full possession of his faculties yeah and at this point he had moved to London right right okay so she was diagnosed in eighteen sixty eight as delusional then he was considered a suicide and homicide risks to with his consent he was admitted to the government hospital for the insane washing DC and officially retired from the US army in eighteen seventy one if you was released and he visited his family and friends and the border to ship to London hoping that a change of scenery would quote sure him but his paranoia followed him across the Atlanta and that's that's a not uncommon treatments at the time when I mean we're we're back in the days before modern psychology certainly before modern psychiatric drugs and any sort of treatment talk therapy any sort of rehabilitation like that I mean there's just a a lunatic asylum or a change of scenery you know maybe maybe something different will be nice for him maybe being in the United States is reminding him of the horrors he witnessed maybe she is too close to the brothels let's just let's send them to England yeah and his family had the means to support this travel because it was an opportunity that many people the time could not of reasonably pursued but the problem was that he is untreated mental condition began to worsen he was having delusions she was having crazy mood swings and was sinking deeper and deeper into paranoia particularly as his condition escalated she would become more more fixated on paranoid thoughts about people with Irish nationality due to that horrible story mentioned earlier we had brand the guy in the face he settles originally a place called lambat yeah and and Lambert St is it's in London conceding neighborhood and this I think is the point when we should introduce the next character in this tale the this tragedy if we want to call it a tragedy we're not the only ones because this is what ends up being called at the time the lan best tragedy George merits is the next entry into this tale George merit is a working man he takes a walk every day to the red lion brewery in London and one day he's taking a walk and he encounters Dr minor and doctor minor who is in the grips of a mental episode feels threatened rank by George merit believes that marriage has broken into his room at some point and shoots and kills George yeah it went and this is this is where I you know I I try to find some newspaper reports in the time and it's really unclear to me and this is just the case in in reporting at the time but I don't know exactly whether merit was trying to enter a door near where minor was living Lawrence this this happened near the brewery or well this is so the record show that merit was shot in the back as he was walking away from minor right so minor perhaps was in his home experiencing one of his delusions and just burst out onto the street and thought that the first person he saw was the imagine culprit and of course the thirties become involved there is a trial and during the trial the full extent of minors insanity becomes revealed for the first time in public and that's that's part of what propels the Lambeth tragedy to the stage of international news miners eventually judged not guilty on grounds of insanity and he is sent to be detained in England's newest asylum but they don't ever say how long he's going to be there I think this is the sort of thing where you know on on the one hand you can see this as a unenlightened treatments you know he's not just put to death for murder you know it seems like they're doing the nice thing they're sending him off to a place where he can be away from people he might harm but there's an understanding that there's something I'm not chemically operating in the mind it's maybe not entirely his fault right so he sent abroad more which is a place for the criminally insane that sounds like a nice thing but the conditions weren't amazing and people at the time you know it's not like they were called patients they weren't treated as folks with a medical issue the people at Broadmoor were referred to as criminals or as lunatics so basically you're looking at a situation where you're put in a room the doors locked and there's not a lot of treatment you're just removed from society minor did have his own cell in minor actually had a second cell right so he had to adjoining cells the second of which was used for his significantly you voluminous collection of antiquarian books the three he was living the high life well compared to other inmates or other patients but then called patients a calm lunatics and criminals right yeah so he had this extensive collection of books she was a very very well read person and the American vice consul general directly intervenes to allow doctor minor to have these amenities right although he's in England and he had committed his crime there he's still a US citizen and of a veteran of the Union Army so there's some consideration being given and she has correspondence as well the the entire time he has relationships with book dealers booksellers in Oxford in particular and it is through this association that he hears about the open call for submissions to what will become the Oxford English Dictionary and so a lot of this is lost to history but we can reasonably imagine what doctor miners reaction was it's not like he's gonna go travel anywhere it's not like he is living a stripper stressful life full of deadlines as recounted in a fantastic book called the professor and the madman a tale of murder insanity and the making of the Oxford English Dictionary by Simon Winchester when I came out in nineteen ninety eight yes that is correct as recounted in this book minor saw this as somewhat of an escape not a meme I it's a way it's a way to in his body may be in these four walls but it's a way for him to send his thoughts and his influence beyond all absolutely and it's a necessary escape right but he knew regardless of his stability a time she knew that his submissions might run the chance of being rejected essentially might not be able to play the game if you reveal too much about himself so we always signed his letters the same way Broadmoor cruise for Berkshire and that means his identity remained enigmatic to everybody who's working on the dictionary for years and years and years Murray minor never meet no and and a at this point he kind of built up his own reputation not based on who wi is not based on the letters after his name if he's a you know you you don't have this weight of authority from your job from your name from your class this authority but he gains with the Edie project is based solely on his work and through these submissions I mean they they prove invaluable because he's got this collective antiquarian books books that are out of print books that are ancient books that are not widely used so he's coming through these books he comes up with this massive index of thousands of words he defines them he provides their use in a sentence which you know it sounds like a spelling bee kind of thing right but that's how you know what the word is and the way you define a word is to see how it's used and if you want to look at a word that you don't know where that other people don't know you have to show how it has been used in the past and that's where his collection of books comes in super handy yes ends of initially know you'll you'll hear a couple different counts of this but eventually Murray decides that he has to meet his most valuable contributor and this this comes to a head in eighteen ninety seven there's a an event they're gonna hold called the Greek dictionary dinner and Marie is very much looking forward to meeting his mysterious again most prolific most Acker correspondent but the guy doesn't show up yes Sir I mean they've been working on this dictionary they put all this work into they have all these different contributors they have people they rely on greatly I mean think of this as the you know on the on on wikipedia the people who have the verified accounts the super whatever yelp or the you know he's he's one of the insiders and he's invited we're told and he doesn't show right and so minor says you know what I'm gonna be the change I'm gonna go visit this guy so he travels to Broadmoor and he sees this we can paint the scene here he sees this huge Victorian mansion and he's justified in those assumptions right he the feel like they're being verifies is okay well yeah I mean he never been there the the story goes that he thought so he had this address and so anything like okay like this must be where a professor lives are a doctor or a medical man yeah a nice house so.

New York City one hand one day
"union army" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:38 min | 2 years ago

"union army" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"That terrible war around nine in cemeteries throughout the capital region or filled up had to make a decision on what to do with so many soldiers who had fallen in the line of duty and senior union army leaders who looked very unfavorably on Lee is a traitor to his nation and had hundreds of acres of land just across the river began to enter union soldiers there yeah they knew that the claim that the United States government had Arlington was somewhat dubious as a legal matter because they had taken a tax sale and refused to take the tax payment from Lee relative who showed up to pay at so they decided to start incurring soldiers first in the backyard of Arlington house they knew that if they had lost if they ultimately lost the claim to that land is legal matter they could at least hope to claim it as a practical matter and from that point forward Arlington kind of built out gradually over the years that's why the older sections the oldest graves from the eighteen sixties are right in the vicinity of Arlington house the war ended in eighteen sixty five people went back to their farms he went back to the cities but they were right in the Union Army about their dubious claim to Arlington Lee passed away three years after the war never having sought to reclaim the land merry made an effort to reclaim the land let's just say that asking the Congress to dissenter thousands of Union Army remains on behalf of the traders widow was not saying this very popular by senators and congressmen she passed away in seventeen eighty six sixteen seventy three and it fell to their first born son himself looking better officer to carry on the family climb notice Custis Lee although as a reminder of the deep roots of our nation at that land and also of the tragedy of the civil war his full name Robert E. Lee's first born sons full name was George Washington Custis Lee senator Tom cotton when the District Court found in Alexandria asking to evict the military commander at the base there to fix the different into the cemetery and and ultimately to Invicta all the souls that were at rest there and that court that lawsuit wound its way through the courts until ultimately in eighteen eighty two and United States V. lady the Supreme Court ruled for the family of Robert E. Lee I roll but in fact the United States government had taken that lands without due process or without just con compensation of law and the title reverted back the Custis Lee what is posted dilemma because Custis lane L. had title to that land where thousands and thousands of union soldiers had been entered that had already become sane as sacred ground by our fellow citizens hundreds of troops remain there customs had the right to reject them all but he said he had no intent to do so he simply wanted to vindicate his family's claim and save they're just compensation for this land so overseers of weeks and early eighteen eighty three there were negotiations between the US government and his attorneys and ultimately they settled on the price of a hundred and fifty thousand dollars to transfer the title clear of any cloud from the Lee family back to the United States government so Custis Lee sign on the dotted line about data transmitted it to the department of war and the person who accepted that date in his official capacity for United States government a secretary of war was Robert Todd Lincoln the first born son okay for him like an which I think can serve as an important reminder to us today yeah although we live in politically divided times although it often seems in Washington that people can be at each other's throats there are times in our past in which we have been even more divided yeah just eighteen years after that most divisive time in our country's history when over six hundred thousand Americans true arms against each other and died on the field of battle the first born sons under great president and his rebel antagonised could act in concert to establish our national cemetery which is truly sacred ground now cemetery continue to grow and expand its list of just like our nation is left of the last hundred fifty years as every war proceeded it's veterans will be added Confederate veterans will ultimately accepted for interment at Arlington National Cemetery it became famous throughout the world in nineteen sixty three when president John F. Kennedy wasn't her there it's the home of three unknown soldiers have come to stand for every American is laid down his life in the line of duty and today there are over four hundred thousand cells at rest in Arlington National Cemetery if you go there this afternoon you walk there tomorrow you'll be able to see many of them but probably the best way to take a on is when you're flying in or in or out of Reagan national airport the next time you do that I would urge you just to take a look out the window look out the window to the east first though you look to the east and you look down the mall we'll see giant monuments to giant man men who helped found the nation and help save the nation George Washington Abraham Lincoln Thomas Jefferson it is altogether right and proper that we have those giant monuments to those giant man but in looking out the western side of the airplane there you'll say Arlington all six hundred twenty four acres more than two hundred thirty thousand gravesites more than four hundred thousand souls whatever the Unknown Soldier the amphitheater at Arlington house some of the larger world there and you'll see tiny monuments the giant man and giant women because if it wasn't for all of those men and women who we honor in Arlington National Cemetery what those giant me I'm the owner to the east Washington and Lincoln accomplished would have been impossible and at this stage in your life in this age you don't know what the future has for you many of you will have great opportunities all of you will face challenges and setbacks you don't know what the conditions will be on the path your life but you do know this but you can make a difference for your family for your community for our nation for the world maybe one day they'll build giant monuments to you but even if they don't you can still make the kind of difference that every person in Arlington who has one of those small white marble monuments to the made for their fellow citizens and for our nation and our world thank you all god bless you United States senator Tom cotton Republican from Arkansas today at the young America's foundation conference in Washington I know we have some microphones set up at least on one side.

six hundred twenty four acres fifty thousand dollars hundred fifty years eighteen years three years one day
"union army" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"union army" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The battle field look like wars from quite a bit before that it's a it's a modern war and a lot of ways it but it sort of font as if they were still using weapons from a previous time that's why I think the K. cancel fees are so it's not always the way though everybody's fighting the previous war yeah the end but but this is one where there's some big technological advances being made right as the war takes place that again by the time the war this is jumping ahead to the following year by the by the following year the Union Army has units equipped with repeating rifle while they have later the same year or early next year a submarine sinks a million Worsham sh worship people have this all idea of now it at Gettysburg they're just taking advantage of stone walls are piling things up but as the war goes on they start fighting from trenches and and and Orson work fortifications that by the following year outside of Richmond the eight they don't have barbed wire yeah but in every other respect this looks like a first World War Adil field so this these advances are coming very rapidly it's very hard for the soldiers to keep up even someone like Robert E. Lee who commanded this great army during the civil war he was a regimental commander he had he commanded a few hundred cavalrymen before the you know the size the civil war very few people had commanded any large units they were very the more one of the things that happens in the civil war is because officers are essentially leading from the front there's terrible casualties among officers and that's why you can't fight after dark because your whole authority system of officers we think of civil war soldiers marching around with flags and rams St but all that those bugle calls were signals that told you whether to attack or retreat where the flags were told you where the center of your unit couldn't operate you key I couldn't operate and also I think by the the end of the day yet people were simply exhaust okay and it sounds like you're saying that although they had there had been technological advances and things become mechanized that they haven't really figured out tactically how to take advantage now they figured out how to use railroads and how to make lots of weapons but not how to use them on a battlefield in a kind of way that didn't inflict enormous damage to this one now pretty major math when when we envision I think what most of his invasion of the civil war in the battle of Gettysburg we envision it wrong Lee and I think that you'll be surprised by what we tell you after this break on WBZ what.

Union Army Gettysburg Orson Richmond Robert E. Lee
How Bad Science Killed A President

Science Vs

03:17 min | 2 years ago

How Bad Science Killed A President

"Come to you with a story who attell a tale of science madness and murder. Let's get to it. Okay. So I'm going to take you back to eighteen eighty one the civil war still fresh, the telephone has recently been invented, and this guy James gov, ILD has just been elected president. This is how I want to introduce it. That's my watch. Wendy's famous enough trumpet. Do we like this Garfield villa? What do you of we do like him actually gobbled was a general in the union army is very anti slavery, and it was a thoughtful guy. He liked to read and fund fact you're gonna love this. He is the only president to have ever proved a math theorem. Well, right. Gothard seemed destined for greatness, but he didn't get a chance to be great because he was assassinated. So to get into the story I've gonna take you somewhere. I'm going to take you to the national museum of American history in Washington. DC. Oh, you have your own realm is. Oh, you didn't need the mouth Trump. But I understand this is like an strain, getting to be easy him before the pit go. We're going to get the side and help us tell the story is Sarah Murphy. I am a collections manager in the division of political and military history. And I go token to Sarah about the guy who shot president Garfield and the assassin's name was Charles guitar. He was a little mentally unbalanced. He had delusions of grandeur so guitar trust to get a job with the government. They reject him for that job. And that, that tips him over the edge, and soon he thinks that God is talking to him. And telling him that he's got to do something. And then he just got in his head that he was being told by God that he needed to remove Garfield. So guitar buys a gun and he stopped following Goth field. And in eighteen ninety one the president doesn't have a security detail. Gothi LD is a sitting duck Hughes, basically stalking the president and watching where he was going had. Not how long full a couple of weeks. He's taking nights on every way he's going and basically figuring out when he's going to try and shoot him and the president. Of course, has no idea. He's in danger and on the morning of July. Second eighteen eighty one God's going out of town, the president's going on some vacation because the middle of summer holidays, and he heads to the train station to start his whole day like they got out of the carriages and walked in, and they would just gotten inside like they weren't because guitar was waiting for them. He knew that they were going to the train station that day, so he was essentially laying in wait, he had just this look on his face of, like calm and collected and raised his gun and. Fire the first shot that grazed Garfield arm. And that's when Garfield was like, oh my God. What is this guitar shoots again? These one nails president Garfield in the back the president falls to the ground and all hell breaks

President Trump President Garfield Charles Guitar Garfield Villa Garfield Arm Sarah Murphy Hughes National Museum Of American Union Army James Gov Murder Gothard Wendy Collections Manager Washington DC Stalking One Nails