35 Burst results for "Unin"

Fostering A Culture In Talon - With Sean Zhang - CEO & Cofounder at Talon Esports

BIG Esports Podcast

06:25 min | 2 months ago

Fostering A Culture In Talon - With Sean Zhang - CEO & Cofounder at Talon Esports

"Really true. So what other question then see said that you're operating seven different teams is that will under the banner or multiple different brands. It's all under the talent umbrella. The only one that's slightly finished the PSG talent league of legends team in Taiwan but they're all under the talent umbrella we have. The same consistent approach when it comes to remain performance management approaching. The second half of this year has actually been incredible. The games that we're in we're close to being I or delivering championships super excited by. But yeah, it's all under the talent umbrella consistent sort of performance management. and. That's why we've been able to have good results across all titles verses like. Other teams might sponsor teams where they basically have existing teams and just whack the logos onto it but we're not believe is that because we feel like you know the culture that you drive the value that you drive and the ideas around the philosophy. I think us to be controlled by us because that's the value that we provide. Right. So for example, we have the play come in I. Want Him to be able to think all the team I want him to be able to take feedback I want him to be somewhat humble and I want him to have the good work ethic because if you don't have those things as know as well like you know doing a lot of sport, Jiu Jitsu and weightlifting if you don't have those basic things in sport and the same in East sports. Impossible to be successful, and so for us, it's like we want to control that and also having we've made the mistake before just sponsoring teams then just like we can't control likes. How often their training? What time they waking up other following systems because often they're not and then you get really mixed results since we found that doing it ourselves, controlling it ourselves without coaches are sort of systems that we have in place to control things. Is actually a lot better because it reads a lot more consistency just one of the main thing. Interesting yeah I mean it you know it's obviously worked for guys pretty well in illegal agents and I guess like. I think it's good study for anyone to look at like the golden five and six one point six with like Mayo and Cuban and lauded and pags era. You know these guys will except for Pasha. Those guys were together for the best part of Ten Years Hall Unin Pasture I think for maybe six or through everything through when there with A. Box when was vote as pro with whatever I say came from says one point six into sky and to retain like that you could say that a Lotta this strategy because they're attained wasted a lot when I was a semi pro player, their strategy was to make it a three v three situation always win because I been together for so long they synergy was so great. So in the clutches in the trays fully foles they in advantage when it comes to the situation, they are pips boot machine because otherwise like. It with my team Sammy pertain that I had in Australia without reaching those hots we always had trouble getting a fifth plan for exactly the same reason you talking about we had full people who are very on the same wavelength we were all massive nodes is in we used to study the game like mad more. So than anyone else in that Thomas especially and we very tight knit but we always had trouble finding that fifth and when we finally found that right fee who had skill to were able to qualify for a life whatever that we played, but it's interesting to say you're saying that you know it's the. It's definitely not the way that most teams attacking it. If if at all, they'll build it around one stop Playa saw an article come out from Tame sacred say saying if you were to do it again, would you do it the same way? He said Yep the way that I did it in the why do it again was? One of the best players in the world or the best poppy, and then it'd be able to tame around him and that's what we saying value right now you know they'll pick up. Ace Blitz Organization will announce the new roster, which is actually is one. Inside they're going to build around that I. Did. You know anyone else in the market doing what you guys are doing in that respect. In our region. I know I know like, for example, like the the Korean teams have very much orientated towards like. They find their own talent. In, talent out I think there's a good academy system. They're both fully legends and overwatch. I think within like Hong Kong Taiwan. In some but I think honestly, this sort of our our speed, let's say we take an example right? We got into that game November of last year. We got a first championship in the first six months we won the MSS which like a an event between Vietnam. We lost the final this time, which was a little bit disappointed qualified for well. If I, compared to some of the other teams should talk them a little bit but like. They've been around for like five seven years and never got a championship within the LMS or within the region, which is l. combined to become the yes and so i WanNa say think that what we're doing in. Like. It makes a difference because it shows that we're able to speed up very quickly and we were able to basically bring together a bunch of guys like the guys that we have with illegal. Of course, they gripe plays individually. Bebel meshed together into something that. They've been at previous teams like our juggler. Midland is we're at previous teams in the lms that never won championships, but they came here and they won championships and even overwatch team yesterday Korean contenders. Top of Group A we went through trials we came from Pacific where no nineteen bunch of players that people thought these guys will as bins and they played a big success. But came to us, and then we've been put our approach to coaching into it. Now, they like really would play collectively as an individual. So I think like for us one of the biggest things I think which is on his all the coaches that we hire like we get guys like want to die basically full the team and work incredibly hard. Also WanNa be like fathers. Because in the end, it's like if you look at it top coach, it makes everything difference and if we have the same philosophy around. Work work ethic ability to take feedback being humble. All those things just add up and I think. A lot of emphasis on that I think we've put a lot more emphasis than any other team at least within our. Region saying, Korea, a lot of teams are doing a really good job when it comes to Kademi building talent. Yeah I feel like. Just sponsoring the team. It's just like kids. Yeah. It's hot. You know this too much room for lock and in our business it's like we want to be able to deliver championship because right now at this stage when all the biggest sports team in the world where like to small to medium size one, one of the best. Methodologies is to deliver championship. Boca, seeing a lot more on that

Taiwan Ten Years Hall Ace Blitz Organization Hong Kong Taiwan Vietnam Mayo Sammy Boca Bebel Thomas Korea Midland Australia Kademi
How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

Data Skeptic

06:33 min | 3 months ago

How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

"So my name is Mush. Pot. Suzuki like the car last year a student at Yale University in Computer Science and mathematics and I'm supervised by Adrian Vata and from goalie. I'm very happy to be here and thank you for inviting me. I got exposed to your work. When I read the paper, I invited you to come on and talk about mostly today is how many freemasons are there consensus voting mechanisms in metric space so no less than three interesting ideas for me in the title maybe we should give some background to open up with consensus. What does that mean is that? Just the majority or how will we be using the word today? Consensus mechanism is Mecca Zeman which to select a candidate they're only if everyone agrees on it for instance, they said you're running for some group Peter, you get accepted only if everyone in the group agrees on it and you want you accepted otherwise. so that's like unanimity the Neha in here. Yeah. It's basically the same as unanimity but in different. Settings. Unanimity also implies that it's a property where you have if everyone agrees on that, you accept it but something can happen. If you know, let's say you can use different rules otherwise there's a different sort distinctions there, but it's basically the same as unanimity that particular choice leads to some interesting things and you guys are presented this really concise analogy to the freemasons. Well, I suppose getting down to the actual counter freemasons trying to conduct a census here that just formalizes. A funny title to give because as you know that freemasons are interesting sort of group there. Member only if everyone agrees on sort of it, fits our mechanisms today run their group through consensus voting Gotcha so it wouldn't surprise me if just given how much sort of folklore the surrounds the freemasons that there might be at least a few listeners confused about whether or not there are real organization. Could you throw a few facts Edis? have. Amazing temples in Montreal, phrases, I live in Montreal. So they have a huge temple here and they're very active and I don't know too much about their inner workings or I've never been inside the doors but they're very oh yeah you can go to their building for instance so real organization and in terms of getting accepted into it if I wanted to go in that building up there in. Montreal is this the actual mechanism they literally use or is this a sort of an analogy? So I don't know this for sure but I heard I read online that in order to get accepted that everyone in taboo are everyone in that group has agree on it. So is the medicine that they actually use. Cool. Well, I guess whenever that started it wouldn't be surprising that it could grow quickly. Right, if I was thinking of starting my own such organization and I I, invited my wife. Now we have two members and perhaps she and I can agree her sister joins and my sister joins. But at some point, someone's going to say no to the next member what can we learn about that and how do we study it? What are the interesting Totta questions? So you have two different settings. Here. So wondering is not remodeled people's opinions and you say I prefer my wife says I prefer my daughter you know or or so and so forth we need to the preferences of people. So one of the classic ideas in voting theory and actually just modeling through machine learning or any sort of the setting is this prioritizing people's opinion or privatizing people. So for instance, let's say you could be. Leaning like the political left or right. There's a spectrum for which you are lighted. Let's sure you can be at the centre or you could be very right thing or it could be a very level. So we can model that as any number between minus one and one, but two one being the right-wing minus one being the left-wing. So then that's one example of how you prioritize people right? Because you wanted to this rigorously and mathematically. So we need a method to represent people and our model is at. ISSUE, have this in which you represent urine. You couldn't space in some point. Is You your opinion and you vote for someone who similar to? Let's say you're very right wing than some candidate comes in then you're more likely to vote for someone who is right being than left-wing to someone who is closer to you in opinion or characteristic that's our model of but this question was asked actually before in one emissions but in one dimension. So you're basically just have an inch between minus one and one, and this was an extra Unin by very famous. Nogal. Yes. Paper in two, thousand, sixteen, two, thousand, fourteen I forget. But we did this in higher dimensions in actually specifically two dimensions because it introduces so much more complexity when you go up in a dimension, right so Francis, why do we need higher dimensions is because before you you're presenting people left and right but people are more complex than that. You can't just represent a person by just one number for instance you. have to use multiple features as people say. So you have this multiple characteristics of people and they become dimension. So we do this in two missions surprisingly the mathematical difficulty of asking this question John Huge becomes actually much more difficult in two dimension than one dish very interesting and I guess maybe the answers grounded in a lot of details. But is there an essence to what that challenges is it that there are more simulations or? Is there a complexity theory aspect of this? Why is a two dimension so much more difficult than one so for instance, if you look at random shape, you can characterize this voting as looking at something called random convex or some random shapes. The question bows down on understanding certain random shapes and here assuming that the candidates are appearing. Let's say uniformly at on interval you have existing group members and she accepts somebody then he becomes. Group member and you evolve. So the candidates are uniform at each time step and so to answer the question we knew looking at this sort of random judge shapes in one dimension there's only one shape is just an interval intimate conviction in one dimension is just an interval. Some number between attack could be minus zero point five to zero point one is, but let's say you go into the mission all of a sudden there's so Many different shapes so many different things second happen if the shape is convinced or even just not convex in two dimensions does different more complex shapes can get in one mission. You only have interested in two dimensions you have gone as you have China goals, you have something that approximates your face even that could be shade in two missions, but that's not going to happen in Wand mission

Montreal Suzuki Yale University Adrian Vata Mecca Zeman China John Huge Peter Francis
Loving Kindness Talk

Everyday Zen Podcast

05:14 min | 4 months ago

Loving Kindness Talk

"Last week, we been doing the practice of. Sending love and kindness to ourselves. and. I hope all of you have been enjoying that practice I'm sure you've done it before. And we've been. Saying I think in different ways all along in this study. that the practice. Of loving kindness is a little bit counterintuitive. It isn't quite. What it seems to be. So when we`re Practicing, to send loving kindness to ourselves, it's not exactly. That we're trying to love ourselves and feel you know. Warm. Love for ourselves. As much as as it is this practice of generating loving kindness we're trying to undo. something. In ourselves. That is stopping up our hearts. So, if you are practicing sending kind loving kindness to yourself and you discover that you're not feeling so lovey dovey about yourself and maybe you're frustrated. Don't be frustrated just do the practice. It actually is working a lot better than you think because it's not really so much about your feeling. A lovey dovey feelings about yourself. I heard from at least one person in this last week. Who told me a very long time? She has been trying without too much success. To send loving kindness. To someone. been having a really hard time with for a while. And it just hasn't worked at all. But when she started sending love and kindness to herself. She found that her feelings for the difficult person. Improved quite a bit which surprised her. She had no idea that that would be the result. So it's interesting how the practice works. It's usually unexpected in its effects. I think Sharon tells a story in her chapter about someone who? Tried and tried and tried to practice love and kindness for someone and complete failure, but then she. saw the person and found that she had kind feelings toward the person completely unexpectedly. So Just keep. Doing the practice it has affects. Anyway. Tonight I would like to go into the practice of loving kindness for a difficult person. And so I'm. Going to. Help us through. Aversion anyway of some of the stuff that charon sharing at the end of chapter five. And an on page. Seventy nine, she says something that to me. Seems so important and so basic. To this practice. She says this. To develop loving kindness toward a person with whom we have problems. We must first separate our vision of the person. From the actions they commit. That may upset are harm us? So when you read that little sentence, you know it reminds you. Of How automatically? We. Fall. Back. On the illusion. Of A person. Of Our. Belief you know in persons are starting with ourselves. Even though. We've been contemplating the teachings forever and ever, and they always say over and over and over again. There's no such thing. As a person. In the way, we imagine a person to be. So if someone. Harms us. And we believe. Hold on one second I'm going to. Put everybody on. Yeah. Someone. Harms us. And we believe that there's actually an existing bad person over there who has harmed us. And now we're upset with that person but that is actually not the case that's really not what's going on. There are actions and consequences. Yes And the harm we suffer is all too real. Yes. But Actually It makes no sense and it's completely counterproductive Unin. Always. To blame the harm. On. An actually existing person.

Sharon Unin
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:59 min | 4 months ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal. I one hundred percent agree into because of that I think about what the solutions, all the problem. I always come back to equity. And that's ultimately I think about risk driving for and I think what makes this time so ready Angry special in many ways, is that the asking leadership to support us with? Of. Traditional tax. Supporting. Mental. Internships I think already doing now is we're actually asking our structures like quite literally reopen is themselves to include us and then from where all collectively dying today. Tearing structures, things I. think that's really the only way that detained from a call out that house structure best is the Cha I'm. Deploying mechanisms to. Erase. Racism, I I think it is about equity. Entering do you have anything to add to that? Now I think this are. Really great points. I. It's definitely. A lot of things that Lindsey and my style and the executive or have been working on in terms of. What our goals out of its in having a long term strategy with friends is really essential. There's no way you can teach someone to unlearn something that was you know systematically in place for all of this time. So it's essential for us to not only educate work alongside people who are really willing and ready to make those changes. Over time in for us, it's a three to five year period with benchmarks and timelines and touch points. To see where are in how they are evolving

Founder Black Fashion Council Harlem Sandrine Charles Salting Sandrine Charles Charles Henrietta Galina Brandon Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay United States Brandis Daniel Chief Executive NBA Consultant Lindsay People Chairman Executive Editor Branston
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | 4 months ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Black Fashion Council Founder Henrietta Galina Brandon Sandrine Charles Sandrine Charles Salting Harlem Charles Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay Brandis Daniel United States Chief Executive NBA Consultant Chairman Lindsay People Executive Editor CEO
Our Season Finale Starring the Founders of She Podcasts and Skyes husband Don

Inside Podcasting

04:38 min | 4 months ago

Our Season Finale Starring the Founders of She Podcasts and Skyes husband Don

"Hello and welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discussed their craft. I'm your host. Sky. Pillsbury. This is a post show episode, but we're doing things just a little differently today I all chat with Elsie Escobar and Jessica Kupperman about last week's interview with sixteen nineteen producers, a Diese Egan and Anti Brown Jessica and Elsie our the founders of she podcasts a community that helps women and non binary podcasters through every step of their podcast journey. The pair met online years ago and joined forces to create a free facebook group that now has over seventeen thousand members. Jessica Elsie also hosts a really fun podcast called she podcasts in which they talk about all things podcasts, and they are the founders of she podcast live an in person conference I attended their inaugural event last year and it was wonderful. Their next event is scheduled for next. October. that's October of twenty twenty. One For the second half of our show due to popular demand I am bringing back my husband. We will take a look back at the season. I hope you enjoy today's conversations and I'll be back at the end to wrap things up. I am thrilled today to have with me, Elsie Escobar and Jessica Cup for men who are the founders of she podcasts. They are also the women I consider to be my podcast Mama's. Even. Though I am almost one hundred percent sure that I'm over than them both. So with that welcome Jessica and Elsie, I'm so happy to have you here. Think. You yes. All right guys you are my guest hosts and I'm your subject and I'm ready for you go. Just you have the questions I will chip in. Okay. There are so many shows and episodes right now in podcasting about race and racial relations. So why did sixteen nineteen speak to you specifically? Honestly it made me feel angry that I had not Known so much of what was talked about in this podcast. Hadn't learned any of it in school and I went to a very good public school and yet I felt like everything I was hearing felt new to me obviously I knew basic facts about Abraham Lincoln and the civil war and things like that. But I did not understand any of the nuance and I certainly did not understand how happened what felt like so long ago right it did sorta feel to me like ancient history did not understand how connected it was to our current world. For example, healthcare I had no idea that I mean our healthcare's. Louis it was mind blowing like the fact that we have the worst healthcare system of any developed nation and the fact that that can be traced. So clearly back to the fact that we did not want to allow black enslaved people or even black UNIN slaved people to have equal healthcare. You know the fact that we can trace that back is. Rushing and tragic, and it's tragic for all of us you know and those kinds of realizations just felt so jarring and I had a real emotional reaction to listening to the podcast both because I just felt so much more empathetic to people who are living the black experience in the US but also it was also emotional because I felt cheated of that knowledge and so the reason why I wanted to talk to the people and I still feel so incredibly fortunate that I was able to get them on the show and bring shine. Any kind of light on that for other people was incredibly rewarding and that's why I wanted to have him on on the show they. It's funny. I've thought about this like they talk in the episode about how they want to lift up Nicole's work and I felt that in talking to them, I was hoping to lift up their work and Nicole's work. You know sort of getting even more Meta here but just wanting people to recognize and see this podcast and maybe have the same kind of transformative experience listening to it that I did.

Elsie Escobar Jessica Elsie Jessica Jessica Kupperman Jessica Cup Nicole Pillsbury Twenty Twenty Facebook Abraham Lincoln United States Egan Louis
"unin" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

04:34 min | 4 months ago

"unin" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"They're all over the place. They give us a window into the world or maybe into just their day. And so, of course we're going to have to hear your answer at the end of this show, but you you pose that question in one of probably probably my favorite book of yours, and consequently I read things on order. It was the book of yours that I read which was in the world and kind of talk about your salvation journey and in it, you said I've got to open here right in front of me and. It was more or less. Every other sentences underlined so that's how I may. This book I just decided to highlight the whole thing that. You said in there. My life depends on ignoring all touted distinctions between the secular and the sacred, the physical, and the spiritual, the body, the soul, what is saving my life now is becoming more fully human, trusting that there is no way to God apart from real life in the real world I wonder if you could unpack this for those of us who maybe have been making those distinctions and have a hard time sort of unhooking those concepts from one another. I will and because at this point in my life, I used religious language, less and less. I, DO WANNA. Point out. That's the most dense confession I ever made that the. The sentence you just read really to me is is what Christian face has given me so. So There are just lots of kinds of Christianity's but what? I guess because I spent an earlier part of my life in a pretty divided. Path in other words where I was encouraged to keep the sacred apart from the secular et Cetera. Et Cetera et Cetera et. It just I. Guess I a rebellious nature. That just seemed wrong to me when when I read the Gospels in. The last chapter last chapters, but when I read the whole gospels who could have been more invested into physical life on earth than Jesus I. I've been preaching lately on. Consider the lilies of the field the way he could look around and see anything and make it part of what he was talking about so. So to unpack it. It just It's used to be unfaithful to the Gospel is I received it to attend only half of what it means to be human, which is to be an Unin- fleshed spirit or a spirited. Went to Gospel, singing, convention I one in my life a couple of weeks ago, we signed for two and a half hours. It was all future tense. It was all about heaven, and while it was, it was wonderful, and it was great Step into the southern Christian heritage I really missed hearing anything about my life now. No. So, so I don't think I am packed up very well, but just. To any that as student of the Gospels.

Unin
"unin" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

04:08 min | 5 months ago

"unin" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Yup Ceremony and Mark Implicate your second to Salah. Say Say Montana. Say it but a couple of money much and North Dakota you. Say North Korea spot up the developer decanters, d'Ivoire demo that Montana a modest consol guilt. Almost multiple. A your but other. Personal didn't allow Grammar in. A not. GonNa feel. Hit. More little. Time you. The this will. Also. Eat Out. Of My? They. A him associated. A game photodynamic. Long, little near. Happen in. In brand. They blocked the. A Avondale. As, himse seem better. In Kentucky. In in. Miss on Galaxy Autism. confessed. In the. Highest in the Gunilla Entail. Stay. In Tulsa. Finish. It ups and there's. Gas HAMAS can. Also Come all escape. Nothing on. Interested gave. Up. A We should go to. But the mood Jason McGrath says one one thirty be Organiz MONTAGNA. Socio finished by newly the Montana. UN They Matsunaga as empathic. With the mass particle have knows Maravillosa. Mukamal Komo! Radius E to Masters partee supposed to call our sutras. Is We a Tutti a Katie? You miss her. Yes, to officers, protease actively that is the Mojo in the. contract. In grand. There's. One thirty. A variety Damian, local donut Komo on thirty. In some miles muscle. Doesn't. Thirty plus apparently the on honeystone. Doggy. Asking to get ice. One. Active that know. Janos. As I was GONNA lay magazine, but on a second Bunia. Estate, with, our, style up the middle..

Montana Avondale North Korea North Dakota Katie Jason McGrath Maravillosa developer Tulsa HAMAS UN Kentucky Damian Autism.
Are airlines clear for takeoff?

CNBC's Fast Money

04:30 min | 6 months ago

Are airlines clear for takeoff?

"Also got some encouraging new numbers from the TSA the agency, screening more than half a million passengers for the first since the coronavirus pandemic hits and Credit Suisse issuing some calls on the space southwest, the big winner getting upgrade as analysts believe the airline is well positioned for a comeback, but the firm downgrading united and spirit so are the airlines clear for takeoff Jeff Mills Holy. Cow United Airlines up twenty percent today. It's interesting, and I just WanNa make the first point which I think is critical at these levels and in this market when you're buying into the airlines, you have to understand what you're doing. What you're doing is buying into a Beta trade, which is completely linked to the reopening so this afternoon. Just for fun. I looked at American Airlines Delta MGM. Casinos, a couple of the cruise lines, and I looked at the correlations. If you go back to twenty, nine thousand nine as an example, then you average. Average out the correlations. If you just do a little matrix, it was point four three, so not that high from the bottom. Those stocks have been correlated an average of point nine six. You're basically looking at the same chart so when you're buying into an airline I don't know that it's anything idiosyncratic relative to the fundamental, so I want to make that point very clear upfront I've been cautious as it relates to the airlines. I think there are some risks as we move into the fourth quarter. Is Business travel going to come back. Are we going to get a second wave of the virus? I think there's this pent up demand right now, so you're seeing traveler throughput increase, but those TSA numbers we above five hundred thousand for the first time we were at about one hundred thousand per day at the depths of the the economic shutdown. Let's not. Not Forget I mean that's good, but this same day in two thousand, nine, thousand nine. That number was two point six million. We have a lot of ground to cover in terms of getting to where we need to be from demand standpoint. Last thing I will say just in terms of picking names within the space I. Think you WanNa. Look at A. A few things you WANNA look at exposure to business travel you WANNA look evaluation. I, also think you WANNA look at exposure to international travel, because that demand hasn't clearly come back yet. The name I think that might be best positioned for all of that is actually south west in terms of their revenue mix exposure to international travel, and their evaluations actually look a lot better. Some of the names like American spirit jet blue. If you look at them from an IT perspective, even that these depressed price levels given the debt that they've added during the last couple of months, evaluations actually don't look that attractive so in a space I don't like much. I think South West might be the name. Michael What do you make that? Wyndham CEO was Unin closing bell, last. Hourani, said leisure travels picking up, and he seemed bookings increase for eight straight weeks, but jeff makes a good point about the business travel. What do you? What do you think that all adds up for for the airlines? Some opportunity here? Stay away no way yet. Well. I, think it certainly depends. Name by name is picking up off such a low level that you know. Those types of increases in percentage terms are going to see material, but that doesn't necessarily mean that certain players in the space are going to be in good shape, taking a look at American for example. You know this is a company where you're looking. Looking at relatively short data debt that's trading at just over fifty cents on the dollar. And what that tells you is that the bondholders still have significant concerns. The reason the equity does so well is because it is coming off such a low level. It's a speculative by as Jeff was just alluding to on a reopening, but that doesn't necessarily mean that in. In the long term, these companies are going to end up being successful. You know if you're looking at companies that have accumulated a massive amount of debt than the enterprise values was talking about might actually be very little change, you know. It was just over forty billion dollars at the end of twenty, nine, thousand nineteen for American. Airlines around thirty eight billion dollars. Dollars now it's just the equity component that's down, but debt has been added of those big carriers. Maybe Delta Airlines is probably the highest quality, but you're really playing with in a very dangerous space when you're dealing with levered businesses that are so closely tied to a recovery and needing that second wave is going to hit them very hard if it comes. So, what do you think PK? You WanNa play a dangerous game. WanNa wait into the airline's. Name more like Boeing you walking away. No, no I want you know it's going to be hands off for me I. Mean Really What you've got here. Yeah, was the retreat here certainly but any asset that's up twenty percent I don't care if it's an airline Boeing or bitcoin up. Twenty percent takes off the table. People I mean take a little bit of profit. Wait for another day in the long run. I, do think these are challenged. All right so you are sending those warning signs

Jeff Mills American Airlines Delta Mgm TSA Cow United Airlines Delta Airlines Boeing Credit Suisse Wyndham Hourani Michael CEO Unin Bitcoin
Frailty Myths with Erinn Carter & Georgia Faye Hirs

Cultivating Place

12:21 min | 11 months ago

Frailty Myths with Erinn Carter & Georgia Faye Hirs

"Aaron Quarter in Georgia Her Sti or two of three Co founders of frailty myths is an organization based in Oakland California whose mission is to reimagined feminine any and build power by bringing our whole selves into our work of cultivating place wherever and however we do that they join us today to explore health concept of frailty miss can be implicit elicit bias in the gardening world. And how we're all better off when we can see these biases admits for what they are and compost them openly into more nurturing concepts around self and other. Thank you for being here today. And welcome Georgia and Erin Erin. Thank you so much for having us. Hi there so I want to get started with the two of you giving me your work in your own own words because it's always better that way. Let's start with you Aaron because you are the one that reached out to me to see about vote having a conversation. About where your work. And my work intersects in that beautiful space absolutely. Thank you so much for having us. I'm so excited to be here and talk to you more about about what we do not miss about what you do at cultivating increase. So yeah frailty miss is a is a nonprofit that was started by Georgia myself. Another Co founder of ours and we've existed since two thousand in sixteen in Oakland California. That's where we're based out of. But we host workshops all across the country for Women Trans and gender non conforming folks and the mission of frailty miss is to create a space in a community where Women Trans and gender non-conforming folks can heal trump Z.. Trauma that what is Patriarchy that is generational trauma and have a space to reconnect with our feelings of strength power community and justice. And we do that. Through hosting free workshops in the community on skills and spaces are traditionally dominated by men and that includes woodworking sailing climbing gardening cultivation And our goal is to build a space and build a community where we can try new skills through. We can try new things where we can challenge ourselves and again break free of that myth that to be a woman to to not be man means that we are weak and don't have the ability you to be strong and changed the world. Yeah I love the three part sentence I guess there are three part phrase or motto auto on the website. Feel your inner power. Grow your confidence change the world. That is to such beautiful some Asian Let's move to so you Georgia with the way you see the work. Maybe in any different way than Aaron just described and or maybe your were your personal experience of it short and I Echo Erin as far as Thanks for having and I think I agree with everything that Aaron said. The piece that has felt especially powerful mean in the last few years is part of the journey that that Aaron and I and the other frailty facilitators as part of the work and as part of the workshops that has been particularly profound is a The quality of nurturing and curiosity and care and so there is what feels to me a very revolutionary act and not only taking space base back but kind of reconnecting and healing from the impacts in the Traumas of these oppressive systems. That we've internalized in such a deep painful away and the ways that we can connect that back to Earth to gardening to self and community reliance the way that we hold each other and and navigate through conflict to do that in a way where we're collectively lifting each other up in healing versus tearing each other down or kind of competing. They're all of these very small on very profound ways that were also challenging these systems that have unfortunately become really normalized. And that we've internalized in ways that for myself I often often find myself myself out of frailty myth workshop being desperately moved or touched by something that someone has said or shared in realize is that it was some pain from some experience I had tucked so far away that it didn't have words for it now through the act of building a stool or or failing at a thing thing that someone didn't think that they could do but feeling in a way that safe has allowed them to access and me to access these these kinds of points of pain and then he'll from them and that feels when it comes to change in the world and the work that frailty Mrs doing in that we're doing within all of our communities Ryan's hands are really really like there isn't much I haven't found other spaces for. Yeah and you know one of the reasons that I find this. So so compelling is when you think about gardening which is my primary focus it? It is easy to say. Oh yeah there's a lot of women who guarded like how many how many women don't garden. It can be seen as a very female dominated space but the fact is there are whole sections of the gardening world. In its wholeness that are traditionally not taken up by women and you know seeing one of your videos that that is showing your community how to use a skill saw how to pound nail how to build a whole structures pictures how to do you know whatever the kind of hands on construction bigger machinery work that makes gardening in landscaping even on small scales. Easier and more interesting and you can just do more with it are often like Oh. I'M GONNA get many of my husband to do that or my my brother or my dad and the empowerment that is taken away from you with that mindset is incredible so I was super excited to have this conversation with you. I'm fifty four. I only learned how to use a table. saw maybe five years ago and it's one of the greatest tools ever uh-huh okay so let's step back a little bit till we get into more detail on exactly what you do when you're workshops and into some of that more emotional space of what happens when we unlock this kind of power for ourselves and tell us a little bit about each of you and kind of where you grew up where what were your experiences that led you you to be people that wanted to do this kind of work which is is a little challenging. It's it's probably Expansive in sometimes painful ways which I think Georgia already kind of hinted at And yet like those growing pains. Get us where we want want to be so. Let's start with you Georgia since they started with Aaron before tell us a little bit about your own background. And what kind of grew you into who woman Were person that wanted to be doing this kind of work. I grew up in Indiana and in in a relatively big family but was the first girl born in my family and kind of grew up and spent most of my adolescence and into my early teenage years feeling really isolated. Because I wasn't the kind of girl that all of the people around me were that people wanted me to be. I would get like like I didn't connect with those with makeup and and I remember really being really frustrated as a young person thinking like well. Why don't and why do I have to fight so hard to get access to do to do fun stuff or to be in my body and why is it so I felt kind of shame that I wanted to be more physical and also frustrated and angry that I didn't feel like I was allowed to do that but also shame that I wasn't doing a good job of being a girl and also really angry women because I felt like they were the ones that were putting in? This felt like a very suffocating box and so I kind of found myself UNIN journey of both being like of of isolating myself away away from women in turning myself into this kind of like go. I'm not like the other girls. I'm not like the other women because I felt like that was the only way I could get access and it was really. It was a really lonely and really frustrating and like I said. I carried a lot of Shane for many years around that I was I was failing as a woman. I was wasn't doing what I was meant to be doing. Is A girl and I also wasn't getting the same kind of access or space to the things that I I wanted to do and felt as I as I got older they went to school. I met Aaron in college and I started really kind of unpacking and learning about systems of oppression. Shen particularly of Patriarchy about you know movements that I didn't know about and started to really unpack. My anger toward women didn't wasn't wasn't actually about women in the box that I was felt restricted to was was a result of these these oppressive systems and so I moved moved into working in activism. I always had odd jobs mechanic shops. I found myself working on Greenpeace ships where I was trying to get as much as many skills as I could and Aaron at the same time was in Grad school and we had these simultaneous conversations. About what space space look like. And what access look like in the way it was manifesting in our lives and I remember feeling like that was in so much kind of physical and emotional oceana pain that I felt like my option in shit filled with with men from all over the world was to either assimilate into this very toxic culture masculinity of of posturing of pretending like I didn't have feelings or emotions or that I wouldn't have access to anything if I if there was some other way into into that kind of idea failed to was birthed about what it looks like. Would it would look like and feel like to create a space where we could be our whole selves where we could be honest about our fear of table saw and still learn to use it where he had smashed things with hammers and still gently hold flowers and appreciate them in that. You know that none of those things are inherently gendered gender you identify with or whatever gender identify with is fundamentally what those things are. Because I'm doing them and so there was I think in the creation of frailty medicine the the burning of the of the idea was a very long kind of life life journey that we were on an independently and then collectively and I think for me. It really comes down to a practice that has never stopped. which is how can I? It'd be more hole in. How can I be more fully in my whole self? And how can I heal the shame that I've built up over the years about pieces of myself. I didn't feel like I was allowed to access and so for me failty miss because I'm very comfortable with tools has opened up space for me to be more in touch with things that I felt like. I wasn't allowed to do like gardening and like baking or being gentle or telling people that I'm scared or that I don't want help worried where I do want help. And so there's a wholeness there that I think for me has been something that even though that's why the organization started the manifestation and what it feels like is. There hasn't been something that I have experienced. That is more powerful in my own than allowing myself to be in that kind of space and seeing what it does for other people to be respected as their whole selves and not need the answers. You know

Aaron Quarter Georgia Erin Erin Oakland Co Founder California Indiana Ryan Shane Shen Grad School
U.S. stocks shrug off trade deal concerns, close higher

CNBC's Fast Money

05:44 min | 1 year ago

U.S. stocks shrug off trade deal concerns, close higher

"It is the record rally that just keeps on running stocks touching new all time highs again today but our next guest says you should probably enjoy the good times while they last because they won't offspring and northbound traders spent Henrik who stayed up late for US overseas then and we do appreciate it. I mean you and I have talked a lot about this worldwide exchange of the programs. This is as the market whether you want to call it the Fed steroid or whatever it might be. Just won't quit anything in the charge that you see that indicate to you. This thing is about ready to roll over not about my charter. Actually on on massive sell but the liquidity momentum is extremely strong. And it's it's like the Fed has been playing secret Santa all year long handing out gifts of asset price inflation and the big issue for me is what I what I see here in the macro context first of all is to say that two thousand nineteen has been read revelation Central banks cannot extract themselves from the monetary easing being monstrosity. They've created two thousand. Eighteen was the only year since the financial crisis with central banks actually reduced liquidity on the net basis and immediately blew up in everybody's face and so two solution in two thousand nineteen was go right back into adding liquidity with obviously global rate cuts everywhere aware and then the addition of Qe and not itself. So we're we're basically stock where we're exiting this decade the same way we entered it kicking and screaming with trillion dollar deficits massive central bank intervention load to negative rates. And absolutely no iota of vision on how we're are ever going to raise rates again or reduce balance-sheets because they all going into twenty twenty just pressing the pedal to the metal. So the question is what's the endgame amy old admittedly and and what we see is there's no bull market without central bank intervention and that's the big challenge for the for the next decade but there there is central bank intervention. So I I assume the bull market could keep going. I mean it's hard to believe spend but twenty years ago. I was in this building reporting on sort of the Nasdaq boom in the Internet. Boom is there anything anything when you look at the charts and not trying to spook anybody here but when you look in the charts. Is there anything technically or in the policy construct or whatever that resembles ninety nine. Well actually. This is really interesting. What's happening this year? Keep in mind. When when the Fed we have to divide the year into two parts the the first nine months and the last three months the first nine months was all about you know ending? The quantitative tightening and Unin became about rate cuts to cut defense out of cut rates three times seventy five basis points but then. Everything changed in October. When the Fed was forced to respond to the overnight rate issue the the report crisis in September and basically in October the Fed went wild they're adding balance-sheet and liquidity? At a rate we've not seen since the two thousand nine in crisis so basically acting like this big crisis underneath what's happening with all this liquidity. It's it's accelerated markets higher and brought a lot of sectors stop were struggling beforehand. What's really interesting here is that this is Kinda the same as construct We saw nine hundred ninety nine. Remember nine thousand nine hundred eight. We had a a twenty percent. Correction the Fed. Cut Seventy five basis points. We had the big rally in one thousand nine hundred nine but it didn't really kick off until until Alan Greenspan span came in late in the year of nineteen ninety nine and added a bunch of liquidity in anticipation of the White UK crisis and that lifted markets of dramatically and then ended up topping in March of two thousand the extended all this liquidity added. Here is artificial and has to be pulled back back. Markets maybe overshooting real quick though. Is this inflation. Or we having reflation trade or we having ultimately setting up for deflation sounds to me like a bubble that bursts that still gets us back to deflation even though always going higher copper is going higher etc.. You know it's interesting I. I'm looking at some big structural charts like gold gold as a big bowl flag on it. Petit has a bull flag on it. And if you look at a actually the the rate action here in in Q.. Four it hasn't confirmed this rally at all in bear flag so we've yet to see the Rian flation evidence in terms of the Bond Market Henrik north man trader raiders spend. We have pre. Listen I. It's been you've been strong and on this market. I know it's been a tough market if you've been short but you've you've come out and you've been honest about the calls and and where you feel about it so it's been Henrik. We do appreciate you coming on. Thanks for staying late overseas. We'll see again appreciate that. Thanks Brian. Listen guys I think spend take some heat because they'll say I'm negative. Negative given the market has gone up. But what he's saying is if and win the Fed ever pulls back Right at this market is going to. That's is exactly right. And his point that central banks tried to do that in two thousand eighteen and it led to twenty nine. Thousand nine is a scary tale. It's just it's a cautionary because eventually we are going to get back where we have to removed that liquid it is. It is interesting that when you start to see what everyone's judging this on rates and rates alone start to look at balance sheets where qt was ineffective. The same result is raising rates at every meeting and now Q. E. adding in the same results as cutting so they're not doing anything to rates. They're actually cutting rates by proxy through through their people people. Come up they probably come to you guys all the time and they say why isn't impeachment affecting the market you know why because impeachment whoever's in sixteen hundred Pennsylvania Avenue you can't compete with a trillion dollars in central bank liquidity.

FED Henrik Alan Greenspan United States Boom Unin Rian Flation UK Petit Brian Nine Months Trillion Dollars Trillion Dollar Twenty Percent Three Months
LAFC get over El Trafico hump! Zlatan's last game? Plus, ATL roll on, NYCFC biff it & Sounders end Rimando's career

ExtraTime

23:22 min | 1 year ago

LAFC get over El Trafico hump! Zlatan's last game? Plus, ATL roll on, NYCFC biff it & Sounders end Rimando's career

"News it's fair that's the right you have their hand up in fingers out and they'll say five they say five we have I I mean I it's tilting towards that player improves Bob trusts him that player goes out there that player play interested in Blackman say the name of Bachman in this game but he's a second year player he was drafted as a fullback he started as a centre back in the playoffs against lot Abrahama Vich and he was good we see for Dennis to close a became a part of Giancarlo gonzalves not one of them but you're already had seven centrebacks on the roster what we're going to do about him so I would be shocked to see five or six of these names even on the team next year then we saw in the starting lineup that frontline next year as Pavonis Alessandrini Cheeto in the middle of the scar one hundred fifty goals tonight's game on whether it was his last in the last quote it's not about money I have another two months that's on his contract we will see what happens Mike because it also sounds like it might be about that's the type of thing you say when you say if you want people to watch you pay me more money I don't think it is and from like he he didn't do the pre game interview with ESPN and he seemed a little not rattled but annoyed and tailored tweeted out and said one of the Galaxy Representative said he's been like this all week I think some people took that as he's locked in but I took it as he's just kind of a bit annoyed with hall thing and the way maybe the season's gone and you could say there's a million arguments you can make a million different directions one is he's done everything he can the team hasn't put a team around him why should he spend more time trying to make this better you could also say that he came inside concord he didn't win a championship but he's been one of the three best scores in the league over the last two years after he blew out his knee and came back in a new place and did all that so nothing would surprise me but if you're let me to put a guess on somewhere I'd say he's not playing soccer next I got well it I think you're wrong about that but anyway I gotta ask you this what grade do you give Garam Barrow Scarlata for this year now there are extenuating circumstances those circumstances there's lots on anytime you are managing a team was slapped on that is a very very real I'm going to say it's a limiter on what you can do do both with Latin in with the players around now I would not give him any higher than a B minus I think why I think his job was to to construct something behind slot on that wasn't just a complete seve and it was just you had to find a way Eh get some semblance of organisation you had enough especially when pavone came in special players to do a three man game and attacking sense it can work was Unin pavone and fill in the blank even if it's early on tuna in major league soccer you just have to find a way to get your bit-part players of the guys that you picked up have you don't fit for Denison closer maybe we'll never be back but who cares it might be last year the galaxy you gotTa Win some symbols of Organization and structure and competence see defensively to get a better than a B minus grade in this sense he's inexperienced coach he's done before he's been in shaping which I know he's had more talented at Boca Juniors he's played in this league the crew when he played for them if I remember correctly you were not some expansive team he was a difference maker he made the Batak around him better it was down four four one one he played completely free role they had Allie Marino as as a centre forward just dragging defenders around it just to open it you had an opportunity to Kinda almost two structures one is Latin and whoever the hell is up there and the rest is the rest of the team guys just dig in Yeah figure it out getting your blocks don't teams have easy goals and this team I'm GonNa make a guess other than FC Cincinnati probably gave up the most like Oh my God what goals are you kidding me right now that's what how did that happen I agree with you I think it'd be minus is probably a good grade yeah probably for what's going on and I I love Guillermo so for Sir I felt bad going in part of this lots conversations I'm fascinated to see what he does Latin doesn't return like water the allegations he looks like under his vision the way he builds after that a little bit of time but I don't know that he was that creative with formations to say like I gotta figure something out we'll make the post is in but here's my four weeks test this and here's my two weeks attest this and I think in places you mentioned for Bob Rally a young guy will learn and get better where did we see that right who Leonora who played well and then all of a sudden Ralph John Fletcher's the difference maker now John Carlos Gonzales is you're right back the he had three incredible central midfielders they could never really control games like why was that night the tiger let's just see if we can get our foot on the ball on that will be our defending is well control games so grew with we I think a lot of it unfortunate wasn't good enough from him but it'll be interesting to see in year two if he doesn't have slots on how he chooses to play how his team you can kind of understand why it was in some ways because it was like the island of misfit toys and a lot of all these different teams that failed and then they come in you have Gonzaga on your Guy Z.? You lose all of a sudden you have expectations that are always over the maybe the capability of the team especially this era where they've been to close at one year I think you've got to start judging my next especially there's lots on you but you better have had a plan and I expect they do we'll see what that plan is before we move onto union Atlanta to know what you think about Bradley's Will Fang his little spots are who I really respect as a journalist I loves me I think he does a great job I think he's the future broadcasting US bilingual aspect of it with Mexico and the US and legal maximum loss be mashed up into one place he was very dominated his questioning about Carlos Vela and whether Carlos Villa had finally stepped up in a big game and Bob was incredulous and perhaps rightly so in the moment What do you think what do you think it was one person's job to ask obvious questions that everyone in the world is thinking it's another person's set up there to answer those questions I don't think anything that are asked was ridiculous I mean he asked the question he has and he asked the question everyone else and he asked actually and he's set bob up to say there's no chance anyone could say what you just said anymore he was phenomenal tonight he's been phenomenal season he's EP of major league soccer he's the best player this league's ever seen and he's going to go in and MLS Cup yeah it was that simple but it was fun the way it happened Bob a stupid Bob knows a good. TV's Bob knows everybody in that locker room is going to see that see him sticking up four to see him sticking up for for his best player the heartbeat of the team many messy the MLS messy like I I'm not saying like I I'm certain Bob's emotion in that moment because you could see he loves Carla I'M CERTAIN THAT EMOTION and was real but I'm all I think it was somewhat calculated for the to to make that a moment say like see they're always going to be asking this about what s let's go kick set go Seattle's as was win MLS Cup show every let's shut everyone up forever that's what that was I like it if that's what it was I like it I enjoyed it he's like look there's an ESPN ESPN notification that goes out after that you don't see that for they get that for the win I don't think like let let's just if that's what it takes man like you have all the historical rancid it's out there but you know how I feel about this league sometimes flavor man give me some flavor and Bob Bradley absolutely did Elliot C are moving on their the low number one seed remaining they just got to win one game and if they do that most couple in Los Angeles at Bank of California Stadium talk about it on Monday because we're that's the nice thing is Monday comes and we can really dive into Seattle L.. AFC and I just throw something out there sure I would be shocked if Seattle won that game I think that it's going to be more comfortable than the game we just watched this is the third tune in on Monday that producer honors a noted satellite is that the right the right phrasing for that unders Seattle Seattle ish person who's he's not happy with us that's fine we don't here to please you unders let's talk Atlanta Philly Alanna do what they do they win at home in the Playoffs Limitation Games it's eight in a row so far this year us Gut Communist Cup into the Audi twenty playoffs couple of shutouts Philadelphia great season great season Talla gap town gap better players bigger moments we also had this thing where it's like Philly I have eleven great players they're a great group which means they don't rely on one person but unfortunately that also meant if anyone got hurt they were behind the eight ball and you're not going to go in a scenario where you have all eleven guys healthy for every player Front Josie Outdoor Omar Gonzalez are out right Walker Zimmerman and Mark Anthony Care out so every you're always gonNA have injuries miles Robinson and Michael Parkers now not to mention Lee win in that previous like Mark Anthony Cares out loud wind came in and hit a decent philly doesn't have that former MVP game and Broncos on makes a phenomenal save but you as you watch this game it was hard to see where the goal was gonna come from four Philly and I don't think it's knock on them to go on short rest to go on

Bob Bradley Seattle Espn United States Carlos Vela Bachman Blackman Atlanta MLS Los Angeles Bank Of California Stadium Broncos Carlos Villa Philly Carla Mexico Omar Gonzalez Mark Anthony Producer
The Benefits of Unintended Consequences

As We Move Forward

01:55 min | 1 year ago

The Benefits of Unintended Consequences

"Anticipated consequence receiving receiving something different and we did not select would be an unanticipated consequence has an example response can raise your happiness disappointment depending ending on the outcome one area unintended consequences can be huge involves occasional context. I will often engage a server in a restaurant in conversation depending on how busy they are. These positions can be very informative who knows when one of these conversations mightly someone to consider something in their lives. That makes things better her. I have spoken to many people who can point to one event or even one coversation that changed the course of their lives. These unintended consequences happen every every day. Think of the occasions when teaching someone how to jump rope throw up all sing or play an instrument might result in the unintended consequence of a new hobby even a career just think how watching a performance whether athletic musical or dramatic might influence the direction of someone's life and much the same way giving encouragement and guidance of someone doing something can help affirm a leading to follow that activity even further in life teachers are obvious sources sources of these unintended consequences but so might be co workers supervisors or customers. The truth is we never know when our words and actions might trigger positive unintended unintended consequences in someone else as we move forward join me and always being on the lookout for doing or saying something to another person that might result in a positive Unin consequence in their life even though we may seldom if ever know of these consequences it is exciting to live our lives with the possibility I just think of the people who have triggered unintended consequences in your life and resolve to follow that pattern this has been as as we move forward you can find more episodes

Architecting the Netlify Dashboard with React and Redux

Full Stack Radio

13:37 min | 1 year ago

Architecting the Netlify Dashboard with React and Redux

"It's my pleasure to be speaking with bill men. Who is the ceo of netto fi. How's it going that go it. Thanks for having me. Yum really excited to talk to you because <hes> nettle fi is sort of my go-to kind of example application. When i wanna just kinda see he what i what i feel like how good and app can actually feel to use on the internet your core product now as creating an incredible sort of hosting and deployment experience for people building all sorts of modern websites but i think something that haven't seen anyone i'm talking about at least in detail sort of the national atla fi dashboard and web app itself because it's it's. It's truly an amazing experience. It's probably my favorite app that i interact with on a daily basis so so if it's all good with you thought it'd be really interesting to sort of do a deep dive into sort of how it all works and how you guys have made it as excellent an experience as it is absolutely and thanks so much for the for the kind words <unk> truly encouraging <unk> in specific from for the team. That's sexually put in a lot of work of building out the u._i. And application absolutely so. I guess maybe the best place to start as far as sir. I have been told by the people that i spoke to win. Sort of trying to arrange this conversation. You were the one who initially broke ground on the doc sort of web application in my right and thinking that yes a yes that's true so defy originally the <unk> with me and chris might my co-founder building the initial version from from scratch so in the very the very first early britishers was spit balloon which was like in a similar tool in the same space space right for for deploying front end. It didn't have the c. i. C. d. component in so annoyed a and originally went went bootstrap that it's it's started out as <unk> guests <unk> application and and and becca in the the you i was actually built in the traditional rails approach where where whether you i was part of the application so i'm reading it and i felt that really like sort of can keep running running into the constraints of said so when we started in italy fi the rail said location became a pure a._p._i. For just doing the crud operations regions in the in the u i separated that i interested in into a <unk> application that was deployed with neatly fight right so at that point we we started really bootstrapping nibley fight to built in italy in disrespecting the angular wendy's rates so the so the very first in the very first ration- of of neatly iran with an angular <unk> running on netflix talking to <unk> c._p._i. A one of the fun like one of fun quirks of <unk> because we have the immutable deploy history so i can actually still go back could end the log into there really <unk> angula version with a with a bootstrap based you i think the front end and it will selectively selectively worked for the basic since gift a._p._i. Compatibility since since then but then after we raised our offers grace of offers round of funding instead of building the team we started the plans to react to take from from angular to react aiden eight that was also at the time win win angular sort of committed suicide by by launching a stuff couldn't actually use at the time but that was completely different at nothing to do with angular wine and left england in real estate and so on in a <hes> so so so we decided to to to move to to react to nose sort of the time when i when i went into the initial sort of architecture chiller work on like how did we want to build that reactivation because obviously react this notice s opinion needed assume s angular giller one was back in the time or is some of the frameworks out today right leg especially in nearly they say it was sort of more like this is a component lear four for for your views essentially right it gives you a virtual domain so unin this some good idea around at flux architecture and so on this not really really prescribed <unk> how should really build it so so i spent quite a while ago tourniquet looking into like how can we how can we built this in in in in the best way an informed app. We settled on an on an approach with in that's based on redux. A of course react react route are <unk> in respectfully for the views in started out liking with pretty clear separation seperation like trying to separate the this idea of separating containers from pure presentational components. There's something we started like being increased strict about initially in so the idea here. Is that that if you can take the actual u._i. In trinite into to pure components that doesn't depend on any like on any connection to a statement <unk> anything like that right like joe components take some props and the thing then it becomes much easier to sort of isolate those in work under <unk> in isolation and in the beginning we just did it by sort of isolating it ourselves later on we we have one of our developers introduced storybook and end today where we really like fairly religious uses of of story book we even have public public storybooks so so if you're curious about <unk> components you can go true story dutton <unk> dot com and you'll actually see the full the full set of components for fronted awesome and that became to a two to a development workflow wear once we worked with-without practice signers in in they had suggested a new component development would always start in storybook essentially <unk> than starting starting to hook everything up to a b._i. Rethink which stopped by isolating those display components since eight i go kay. Let's let's build out these visual components in in in a story book. Let's make sure that that story doesn't just contain the good pass but also the aristide's and the and the failures in the states dates in the end all end loading stage. There's nothing i can. I can talk a little bit later but but basically we we've really started isolating those those presentational components in in building them on their own and then having like the contain components being being the ones that contain any like mockup or anything like that but would just i connect to the stores intially dispatch ovens mixture sure that that the up it appoint one of our out availability than than introduce sort of the distinction between pages containers. There's end your presentational components. Three sort of when you get out could base you'll need. You'll you'll know that if you're looking for like the top lil deploy peach. You should look in the in the peaches folder in you. You will find that one that that's what will be hooked up to the router in that's what will determined sort of the top level what what gets loaded and so on in that page will <unk> composed of containers that gets the right data data from the stole and then on day and composed said of joe presentational components that that show sued the the actual view got it so <hes>. Do you mind explaining a little bit more about this concept of a container component. Is that a term that you guys just use to describe that or is not a sort of well established name for like a pattern in react so i've i've. I've seen the like it's it's. It's not it's. I can't take credit for that. In invention in we've seen it around some thirty <unk> like was probably quite used around like the early days of free of a reduction so enraged in the the idea sort of the idea became just finding naming convention to distinguish between tween thinks that i actually bischel you. I components rate in really saying the visual you. I should just be at a tree that from from the top sort of takes some props and renders a version of the u._i. Right and if you change any of those props you will re render with the ritual dome and that sort of all just pure like not connected to a._p._i.'s or acing operations or anything like that so if you keep that part of the the the tree like never connected to the reebok store never never using like react context and stuff like that then it becomes very easy to reason about and it becomes very easy to rate that you ipod in isolation in next rated becomes very easy to feed a set of props and see. How does it behave. How how does it look like right now. In this another part of the that's really the the state management policy at that sort of like if you if you imagine the epp ed ed an abstract state tree right like where you talk to any of the i get some data you keep it in in in memory you send some update you remark somewhere that something is loading you get baked in so in rate like that sort of the whole operations of your application rate like that's the stuff. That's actually doing things loading loading things from our e._p._a. Is that's telling the guy that a new site should be created and so on right in our goal with the separation from containers in components was to keep that whole part of the application that actually that that's that's about doing things and loading things in managing estate complete is separate from the u._i. It's like the actual like how does finks look black right so something i would. Maybe be helpful to help. People sort of understand stand how you use this approach and you know if if at any point where it's sort of like mixing up timelines or something or things have changed in different ways please as pointed out to me but maybe it'd be interesting to talk about just like an example of a simple piece of the nullify <hes> u._i. And talk about what sort the pieces are there so i think like an obvious place to start for for me anyways as just like that main sites list page you land on after you log into your netla fi account i'm so this is like a piece of the app that of course it has to get this list of sites from somewhere and then has to display this list and then i'm guessing probably each row in this list is maybe a separate component as well so is there like a container for every presentation component or is a container. Just wrap up. Maybe a group of presentational components. How would what would this piece of the app sort of look like using this approach to separating the stateful components from just like the pure presentational components components yeah so so one of the fun things is that if if you go to story <unk> dot com they will be a a story. That's cold. Insights in that story has an index which is the index rates so under that you'll find all of the presentational stuff right that doesn't it depend on on on our e._p._a. Anything like that and you'll see that this like an initial state called loading which is when we are showing that index end and we don't have half any data yet this is part of this important pattern right of always trying to get some element that that looks visually like what you're going to see. He once once thinks load in front of the usa right because it gives said feeling of off responsiveness rate like something something something showed up. It's ultra one of the the things that that in my mind like this is this is one of the things that you can do much better when you when you don't try to do something like in aisamul gap or something like that right because by by just getting an application shall into the browser from a c._d._n. Really fast and then getting these kind of floating components in front of the usa do get like very instant experience right then. You'll see that this different stories like story with one side. How how does this speech loop lag with. Cyril sites show sean right <unk> example of feeding different in different props down to down to these this presentational component in his tree. Now now on the data loading side of things will have a sort of master component that we call peach so we'll have like in in our pages directory will have a site speech in that that peach if like now. I'm looking at the code for that. It's sort of it.

JOE Italy CEO Becca Netflix Aiden Cyril Chris Aristide Reebok Nibley USA Co-Founder A._P._I. Wendy Iran Sean
Apple, Max And Ringcentral discussed on Mac OS Ken

Mac OS Ken

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Apple, Max And Ringcentral discussed on Mac OS Ken

"Apples quiet patch last week to fix the vulnerability caused by the MAC client for the video conferencing up zoom well. They're added again and apple that is the verge says apple is silently updating Max again to remove insecure software from zooms partners. Apparently the video conferencing APPs zoo and ringcentral used technology analogy from zoom that means they love vulnerabilities from zoom as well specifically the report says they installed secondary pieces of software that could take commands from websites to open up your Webcam a video conference without without your intervention and just like installing zoom before it's updates Unin installing zoo and

Apple MAX Ringcentral
"unin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"unin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Four percent surtax unin come above a million dollars the money generated would be used to fund education and transportation initiatives state representative tacky chan voted in favor of the amendment reality is we need more income but transportation education we're one of the few states does not have any tier tax system if we are able to address this extra income because of more contribution for those have a bit more to support those systems it'd be helpful opponents say if the surtax is implemented wealthy people will leave the state the amendments still has to be approved at one more constitutional convention before it could go on the ballot in november of twenty twenty two kim tunnicliffe w._b._z. boston's news radio one away not a bad day on wall street so far let's get details now in bloomberg business good afternoon to martin to carol hi martin good afternoon soon coal we're watching oil prices to will more on that in a moment right now the stock market is on its way to its first winning session in three days it's been a week of choppy trading dow up one zero three that's four tenths of a percent nasdaq up forty three s. and p. five hundred is up eleven or prices right now west texas intermediate up two percent that's a dollar a barrel to fifty two oh nine because of the attack on those two oil tankers in the street of horror news one third of all all traded by sea passes through that strait business at boston's port is booming the globe reports the massachusetts port authorities releasing numbers on the marine industrial economy from twenty twelve to eighteen the ports annual impact nearly doubled to eight point two billion dollars the.

boston texas massachusetts state representative kim tunnicliffe bloomberg martin two billion dollars million dollars Four percent two percent three days
An Interview with 'Game of Thrones' and 'After Life' Actor Tim Plester

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

11:49 min | 1 year ago

An Interview with 'Game of Thrones' and 'After Life' Actor Tim Plester

"My next guest filmography includes game of thrones kick, ass bohemian, rhapsody in the absolutely wonderful afterlife. He is an actor. He's been a playwright. He is a wonderful documentarian. His name is Tim plaster, Tim. Thank you so much. How's everything? Good evening was evening here in, in London. Yes, I'm fine. I'm fine. I think we before we spoke. I mentioned you know with the time difference, essentially almost my bedtime here, so are trying remain awake and lucid as much as possible, but I would normally be getting into bed him up Djaama's. All right about this time. No. I think the world of you for coming on, and I can't even thank you. If we were face to face at buy you a logger or whatever. Nice bitter or Brown. I l is my is my drink of choice. Fair enough fair enough. So I have to say, you know, before we get into your acting in some of your training, I didn't realize how wonderful and how really skilled, you at developing documentaries, my goodness. Tim, not that I didn't think I would think otherwise, but, you know, you think you also he's going to be an actor. It's the traditional path to acting but you're a pretty talented guy, you've got play writing you are absolutely wonderful developing documentaries, touch a little bit about that. If you would. Is kind of the two things in a way. I mean they are connected in my. Distant past of, you know how it got into doing any of this really is that I think, in my initial kind of interest in it was was wanting to be an actor kind of understood an early age. I think that that was something that was a job. And people did it and I might be able to aspire to do it one day, and I somewhere along the line I started to write as well. And then I think I had this notion that how they would work together as I could be a writer and then right? The best part, so myself to be in and be a writer actor, that was my own when, when it was, you know, I'm talking about when I was, I don't know, ten eleven years old. I wrote my first. My first play which I don't have a copy of anymore. It was an adaptation of the hound of the basketball's show comes adventure, which Adat loosely adopted from the original source material by Conan Doyle, and then cost myself as a show comes in it. So I think in a way it was quite an egotistical thing as a as a young man, I would write plays. And then I would be in them as well as the kind of the, the lead actor earned slowed and I went to college, and I continue to do that, that I then at that point, I had a real Kashin the I wanted to be a kind of comedic actor on thinking about going right back to, you know, Monty python an had growing up. My dad had grown up making me not making me watch Monty python. But my dad was Monty python San. So it'd been exposed to that kind of. A knock kick. British humor Anneli agent. I think no something that I thought I wanted to do, when I was at college, I was still writing then. But if more sketches comedy sketches on somewhere along the line while it was a college, I decided, I was ready. I got more and more interested in the writing and slightly less interested in the acting and the writing took over for a while. I ran a theatre company when I first left college and wasn't acting tool. And then I fell back into acting. I think the thing that I was scared about with the suing acting actually, as a career when I left. College or university was I just had that fair sitting waiting for the phone to ring and I just felt I couldn't face it. And I wanted to do something that I thought I could be a could be doing something move proactive. I just felt it was very you basically had to sit and wait for the world to come to. And I felt if I was wrong to I could always be developing things I could be a home. You know, writing what I could I could do you can do that on your own team? You have to you. Can't you can't act on your own, you know, it doesn't it doesn't work that way. And so originally, the first things I made were were. We're not talk. You mentioned a toll my route to, to documentaries quite a long, one really in the first short films. I made were narrative comedies and I only fell into making documentaries about ten years ago, and that was again, just it was very, it was a personal story that came to me it was it was a story about the village. I grew up with I grew up in and the story that was connected to my, my father and my uncle and kind of ideas of English identity and just my uncle. Basically suggested to me one day that somebody should make a film about. It's about this English tradition of Danzig code Morris, dancing, which is open to much much ridicule in the UK. An I'd always lofted it myself when infected run away from it as a young man in never wants to do it. Morris dancing in the US as well. Unin Canada, Australia. There are more stones teams. A my uncle just told me the story about what Morris dancing meant to him onto the village where I grew up, and he suggested some they should make a film about it. And I sold about it for awhile muscle. Why don't I, I might get? And I didn't really know anything about documentaries. It wasn't a passion of mine and. It just so I think the kind of moving into documentary came from a very personal connection initially, and then I found out, I really enjoyed doing found it was a really interesting way to work. And I think you know this thing about documentary that I enjoy so nerve wracking the unlike writing script, which had been used to you end up writing the film in the edit. Don't do it. You flip the whole thing in you, actually if you if your instincts right on the day. Thank you, filming the right. Kind of things Mateen Durant kind of paper. But ultimately, you start to do the writing when you start to do the, the editing the pace, so yeah, and you're you clearly a skilled writer. I mean that, that just is pretty evident. But are you able to do you have any are you also documentary films his own documented, or is that something you pass off the somebody else, or hire somebody else to do? What you mean kind of doing behind the scenes not a like. So when you so I, I know you the documentary, I believe was it on Shirley Collins. Is that right? Yeah. Yes. Yes. So when you look at you hire somebody to do the camera work, or are you able to do that on your own? Gotcha. I'm with you. I am not a south futa. The term is I learned that, that muchly lost year. I am not self shoots. I work with another director could rub curry. Who I made two feature films with now and to shorts documentaries. Nice yet to Scholtz to features a Nive of us, and rope does a little bit of camera work, but I don't do any I we saw we, we always we, we hire people into, to do that side of things to do Cameron sound. And in fact, last year, the most recent projects men rope worked on together. We shot in the in south in deep, South America last year, which was never been to that part of the US before and had always wanted to go. And we hide a CHA from New York actually could Damian who came down a met in Charlottesville. And we went on a road trip with him. And he, he handled picture and sound and man rope kind of handled questioning and kind of start. Tried to steer in the direction that we that we saw it should go. But I, I would like to be able to be a bit more hands on, on the camera. But that's somebody list of things to do. Derek, is it seems talk? This seems very difficult and I to say, you know, I was on your website, today, which is fantastic. I learned a lot about you manageable research that, obviously, but, you know, I was watching your film, film real and so forth. It's you know you have a couple of projects coming up in the document documentary portion of your life. It's I believe I'm going to say gray, owl, and Daniel Boonsak, correct. Yeah. So both of those are in early stages of development that kind of connective tissue between the two. I think they're both about ideas of wilderness. Think. Yep. Done. You boom we did a bit of research on, when we were I've written in states lost you. We actually spent a bit of time in Daniel, Boone, national forest in, in Kentucky, and we spent some time with this poet, cold Morris. Manning is from Kentucky and he wrote a book in, I think, thousand full companion fouls. And it's a collection of poems written in the voice of Daniel, Boone. An I read that book or read read, not just that book, but a couple of Morris Manning's books. When I was filming a HBO project in, in Canada four years ago. And that's when I first is thinking about. Maybe doing something about Daniel Boone because it had been a, you know. A figure that a known about for a long time. It's quite a not of English people know very much about Daniel, Boone. Because I always had to the vested interest in, in kind of the, the, the American west and ideas of wilderness. He was definitely a you know, a nine the I knew I didn't know a great deal by him. But I, I knew something about the mythology around Boone and Morris Manning's book is, is fantastic pace of pace of work sites. A biography as poems is just a really kind of spoke to me and made me think that, that was definitely some, some room in not to be use Morris's poems. Maybe, as, as a starting point to make some kind of. Documentary about Boone and it just strikes me that nobody's touched upon boon for awhile, Don aware of right. There are popular TV shows are now in resting in the fifties and sixties, but he's kind of fallen out of favor in a way.

Morris Manning Daniel Boone Tim Plaster Writer United States Djaama Daniel London Basketball Monty Conan Doyle Shirley Collins South America HBO Daniel Boonsak Unin Canada Mateen Durant Australia UK Kentucky
"unin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"unin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of Peru. Unin Garcia has shot and killed himself off to peace arrived at his home in Lima. With a such an arrest warrant had been implicated in a vast bribery probe centers on Brazilian construction firm three other Peruvian heads of states also onto investigation climate change. Protesters say they will continue to shutdown Ponsa London after third day of disruption. They blocked traffic glued themselves to change trains and even chained themselves to the fence outside Jeremy Cubans house. They say protecting the pennant from climate change is a mess of life and death three hundred and forty half. Now being arrested and finding the chaplain of the Paris fire. Brigade says the hardest thing about the blaze at Notre Dame cathedral was cracking the security codes to rescue the most precious relic. He's been hailed as a hero for salvaging. The crown of thrones during Monday's fire. He told the Catholic broadcast set, Katie. Jio he had to find the person holding the codes. So he could win this safe. Global news twenty four hours a day on Aaron at tick tock on Twitter, powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts symbol, the one hundred twenty countries. I'm yet guarantee. This is Bloomberg Matt. Leeann thanks very much for that. Now. Speaking of high priced items some test models of Samsung's new foldable phone have suffered defects after only days of us. That's casting a shadow over next week's introduction of nearly two thousand dollar device. The new foldable phone is meant to rejuvenate of flagging market and showcase the Asian companies technology expertise, and I have to say it does look really cool. Let's cross over now to Seoul, South Korea or Bloomberg reporter Sam Kim joins us. So Sam what's what are the problems that are cropping up with this phone? Our own Bloomberg. Reporter Mark Gherman Gotti. Dan, don't a demo unit after a couple of days of us. He killed off. What appeared to be? Okay. Lable screen. And the. Function. And they were something of a cry at the top of the hinge, then another reporter from NBC said on Twitter that heels hate phone phone showing problem with the screen grainy flickering like crazy. And he didn't even feel them. And then there was another who had a problem overall, a seem very clear that screen had durability issues. All right. So but it's possible though that these were just test models right and not actual production versions of the phone. It's an important. It's an important product for Samsung, right and for the the whole smartphone industry, isn't it? True. Given the fact that Samsung is about to release it later this month to the of general public dental units that we leave. Appear to be in good shape. Because you know, why would they release something like that to journalists when they are not ready? Clearly, I mean like you said it's the biggest muscle maker in the world. And what it does had a great effect on the entire industry. I mean, if you fail a big portion of the five hundred billion dollar industry, basically fails. A lot of people are painting hopes so foldable phone for the future. But we're talking about, you know, large. With this type of device on especially at a time. People are getting tired and picky about upgrading their phones. So this could be a problem problematic issue is there a plan now to delay the launch it was separate Bill twenty six. For the time being said it's gonna stick by plan to launch on April twenty six. I don't think they have any other choice for no because they can't exactly figure out what caused the damage screen failures that we've seen show, you know, very just go to retrieve the phone with issues for the time being and basically analyze what happened there given that Samsung hit a major recall with the note seven foals fed exploded of years ago. It might actually not be such a bad idea to consider a push phoning to launch the galaxy poll, right, or at least don't peel off the protective film. Sam kim. Joining us our own Sam, Kim out of Seoul, South Korea on the launch or possible. Pushing back of the launch of this new two thousand dollar foldable phone from Samsung. And by the way, I recommend anyone. Go ahead and check out Mark Gherman 's initial review of the phone because it looks really cool and really interesting. This is.

Samsung Sam Kim reporter Dan Seoul Twitter South Korea Unin Garcia Bloomberg Bloomberg Matt Peru bribery Ponsa London Mark Gherman Gotti Mark Gherman Brigade Notre Dame cathedral Lima Jio
NYC Declares Public Health Emergency as 60 New Measles Cases Reported in One Week

Bloomberg Best

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

NYC Declares Public Health Emergency as 60 New Measles Cases Reported in One Week

"The number of measles cases in the US continues to rise with the majority of cases affecting children health officials say four hundred sixty five measles cases had been reported. As of last week, the New York City suburb of rock. Glenn county declared emergency after over one hundred fifty cases were reported there. Prompting county executive Ed day to declare an emergency banning children who are not vaccinated from schools places of worship as well. As other public areas. A state court said the order was unin forcible day does not agree. Even the fact that there had been emergency declarations snowstorms if this is not an emergency. What is day says it's the largest outbreak in the state of New York in thirty years and common sense,

New York City Glenn County New York United States Executive Thirty Years
MLB Spent Less On Player Salaries Despite Record Revenues In 2018

Larry O'Connor

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

MLB Spent Less On Player Salaries Despite Record Revenues In 2018

"Thousand unin study shows that despite some record contracts signed this off season salaries around baseball are continuing to go down. According to the Associated Press the average salary of the eight hundred seventy two players on rosters and injured list. At the start of the season is four point three six million dollars. That's down from four point four one million at the start of last year and four point four five million from two thousand seventeen even though. Oh, Bryce Harper. Manny Machado and Mike trout signed record deals this spring. The free agent market the past two seasons has been very weak for just about everyone else. Redoing baseball's financial structure is expected to be a major point of contention as the players union and the league negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement over the next three

Baseball Manny Machado Bryce Harper Associated Press Mike Trout Three Six Million Dollars
"unin" Discussed on Do By Friday

Do By Friday

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"unin" Discussed on Do By Friday

"Due by Friday. A weekly challenge podcast with Merlin, man. Alex, Cox and max Templeton this week's challenge make something out of paper. Good morning. Good morning Merlin. Good morning. I mean can you enjoy Michael Jackson anymore? Who's? Sorry. He's a he's already dead. We can't punish him any further boycotting his music. Skin, forty three months. That's my we're about that. No died. He did he did for since men for sons map Manafort what? Nothing. He's dead. So what can you say he's got gout? But if he was still if he was still alive and buying the music was helping him somehow, then I think you've got an I think that there's an interesting debate of knowing what we know about him. Do you give him the money is debate? You would want to have unin internet Bill. Cosby dies. I can like him again. All my God. No backing out of this. I have no comment the chocolate cake behind you. Is that a Bill Cosby bit? No, alex. I just made it ninety six on Wednesday. I. You already pre cancel your childhood was be ref high. I think it's I think that I never thought he was funny. I'm gonna go out on a limb and said take Michael Jackson was pretty good musician. I I like. History. History main judgment. I think he's pretty good. Two two. Oh. Got the dance on stage with them that would have been so. We would side moonwalked together. I liked the Free Willy song easy. Following the college mission scandal thing. No because I thought you tell us about it now Merlin you have Uber child. Angie, applying for college in what a couple of months, and yeah, she's looking for early entry. Yeah. If you know what I mean? Yeah. And you know, have you ever thought about that you may need to pay an impostor to take the ACT for her? Well. This already exists in so many formats, and it's played real casual. But this already exists. Okay. Here's the thing. You want your kid to get into the good camp not us? So the white kids camp for like the good camp. You wanna go to the good? You wanna go to a camp? Right. And there's way more people applying for camp than people who are not. So guess what you can do for every camp you can pay a little bit extra to get. Like an early like, it's basically like you're more likely to get in. If you pay the sex one hundred dollars that that that's just camp. I never forget. When I heard oh, Jason cocky sex. Meg when make I use the phrase feeder preschool, I don't know if that upsets, you the way it upsets me, you're familiar with a feeder high school. I'm actually not actually don't know how that work can you? I don't know what a feeder school is. Although I do hear people talk about it. There are okay. So most colleges and universities. They don't do this. They don't advertise or market this directly because it sounds. So course to do. But what you will learn if they're trying to recruit you if you're a very good student, and you fit their profile of what they need is. They will say to you. If you haven't learned already that kinda sorta voce, you know, we're a feeder school for Harvard MIT like our record basic record of having our graduates may. Make it into Harvard med school is very high. Not least because we have the relationships that can help our students get in there. And do they do they have like a formal relationship with that school or it's just like they're spending is getting their students in their no they have a track record. I mean, it's the same way. If you wanted to go like, basically, learn gymnastics, you would want to go to the school that has a high preponderance of getting kids onto the team that gets to the Olympics etcetera etcetera etcetera, if you're very aggressive about walking up this ladder, you learn this system..

Michael Jackson feeder high school Bill Cosby Alex Merlin Harvard med school gout Harvard MIT max Templeton Angie Olympics Cox Jason one hundred dollars forty three months
HIV injections to replace daily pills pass medical trial

Science Friday

11:28 min | 1 year ago

HIV injections to replace daily pills pass medical trial

"Hopeful news this week for people living with HIV a couple of drug trials have shown that a monthly long acting injection is as effective as daily dosing of pills and keeping HIV in check. This news comes just days. After researchers reported that a second man has been cured of infection from HIV man known only as the London patient. This comes twelve years after the cure of the world's first person. Now, why why a cure for these two? Well, both men in addition to HIV had cancer, requiring bone marrow transplants and both receive transplants have cells with one very particular. Genetic twist HIV resistance, if the London patient remains off drugs HIV free as he has for eighteen months. Months then that would make to people in the whole world who have been cured of the virus and only after risky procedures meant to save them from advanced cancer. So what does research hold for the other thirty seven million people hoping to live the best lines? They can with the virus. That was once a death sentence here to talk about the future of HIV research are to HIV researchers working on different kinds of treatments to pull a canon is professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at the school of medicine university of southern California in Los Angeles. Welcome back to Canada. Hi, nice to have you start to Catherine bar assistant, professor of medicine and the factious disease division university of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Welcome back to bar. Hello nice to be here. You're you're welcome. Thanks for joining us. Dr cannon as I just said, this patients cure require that you have a bone marrow transplant from a donor who happened to have this rare genetic mutation that makes people resistant HIV infection. He is as I say now the second person to ever achieve remission for more than a year. There may be another patient in Dusseldorf right on the way to the same thing. Yeah. But is this a practical cure for the other thirty seven million people know, but that doesn't mean this is not incredibly exciting and of great value on what research is odd, you know, focused on doing now is saying can we understand why this very specialized and boutique treatment worked for these patients, and can we recapitulate the elements about and find a way to do it. That's you know, safer and applicable to people who don't have an underlying council that would make them undergo by my transplant Dr bar with about other things like vaccines or other work that isn't getting as much attention. There was a case of a potential cure. They got a lot of press coverage earlier this week one publication actually leaked the news earlier than they were supposed to what are what are you excited about? Yeah. That's a great question. I mean, it is hard not to be excited about the second example of a possible cure. But but you're right. Dr cannon is right. This is not directly translatable to a large number of people. So when we think about the thirty seven million people as you mentioned who are infected with HIV right now in the world, we wanna think about things that are a little more simple and a little bit more broadly applicable, and and honestly the HIV cure research field for those approaches is a little bit earlier on. So we're looking at strategies to reduce the size of the virus population. That is infected and remains in the body despite long periods of HIV medicine, and then we're looking at novel immunotherapy mechanisms so way to train the immune system or enhance immune system to identify those cells, and then clear those cells. So you're right. There are things like vaccines there things like antibodies. There's money. Strategies that have been used in other types of cancer approaches that we're looking to apply to the situation of HIV. But I will say that many of these stages are in the very beginning of development and end though, there are positive and really exciting developments. We're not at the stage of being able to even do large stage clinical trials or or implement them. Broadly to all the peoples who could benefit. The Decca cannon. What about gene therapy? We hear so much about that. With is that a useful and applicable line of work here? Absolutely. Yes. Unin deed as we are trying to figure out how to sort of recreate what happened with these transplant patients. Gene therapy is is really playing a starring role. We have two challenges, you know, first of all we have to figure out a way to sort of devote the reservoirs HIV that exists in patients. That's kind of one of the things that happens when somebody gets chemotherapy for that council. We we don't want to have to do that. We don't have to give people chemotherapy. So instead, we're trying to sort of figure out kinda jump Lhamo targeted ways that could specifically remove HIV infected cells. But then that's not going to be enough because we'll never be able to get rid of all the HIV. And so what we want to do then it's used gene therapy to take some of the patient's own cells and make them resistant to HIV to sort of mimic. What happened with these? Stone as off the bone marrow transplants on twenty nine teen. And it sounds crazy to me that I can even say this. But doing gene therapy to recreate the genetic quack that these HIV resistant down this hot is is almost becoming routine. We have amazing tools like like, Chris bustle example, that allow us to go in and target the specific gene that can make people cells resistant to HIV JEAN CLAUDE c- c- all five. And so so that part of the treatment pot that gene therapy can do I kind of feel like, you know, we can do that already. But what we don't know is if that's going to be enough. And instead, what do we combine that with to kind of if you like deep oak people's HIV reservoir, if you can you think do gene therapy that kind of work already are there trials with gene therapy? Yes, indeed does actually trial. What's going on already what people's own bone marrow stem cells are being taken out and with reagents that are a bit like Krista cool zinc finger nuclear crisis. They act like genetic scissors, and they are mutating this, gene, the five G in the patient's own stem cells, which are then kind of return to them. So there are ongoing trials in Los Angeles looking at whether or not that can help patients if not completely kill them. At least get them some benefit in some way of controlling the virus. Katherine let me ask you. What makes HIV such a hard disease research is it just that the virus is a is a complicated problem. Yeah. The virus is a very tricky adversary. You know, it's a small virus. But it's very flexible, and it changes quickly to sort of fight off, whatever strategy we use. So it can quickly develop resistance to HIV medicines. And that's why we have to use multiple medicines at the same time in order to even suppress it, effectively, not not a radical the, you know, the reservoir for care, but just to maintain suppression. But the other thing that makes it really tricky is that it's it's a type of virus called a retrovirus, which means it takes a copy of its DNA or its genetic material and puts it into the host cell and so shortly after infection and just a very short period of time the virus embeds itself permanently and an HIV positive person's body. And so that that window to prevent the seating of HIV is very very narrow. And so basically every person who becomes. Infected with HIV has these permanent copies within their own selves? And that's this major barrier for HIV care that all the research is sort of trying to reduce and hopefully completely clear more and more. We're seeing the overlap between cancer research and HIV as you point out both of these men involved in this cure had cancer and treating the cancer. Also got rid of the virus. Doesn't mean there are still other things from cancer treatments that we could apply HIV. Yeah. I think that's actually a very exciting area of research. We are borrowing a lot of immunotherapy strategies as well. As a lot of the knowledge that cancer. Researchers have gained from exciting new and really groundbreaking treatments and cancer. But one of the problems is, you know, when you think about someone who has a a life threatening cancer that that maybe caused their deaths in three to six months, you're really willing to take a lot of risks in order to try to extend that person's life so side effects are Texas cities for for very exciting therapies are are tolerated in that situation. But when we talk about HIV positive individuals is doing well on HIV medicine, and and really leaving living a very functional life. We're not willing to entertain serious toxicities. And so that that margin or that window of what we're able to tolerate in order to see the effects of these exciting, immunotherapy strategies is much smaller. And so that's one of the limitations of applying many of these exciting immunotherapy strategies that are. Are currently being so successfully employed in cancer limited by the number of candidates who have both cancer and HIV finding them. If you wanted to. Paula. What do you think? Oh, yeah. No, absolutely. I mean, you know, really, if if you if you have a blood cancer, and you failed initial treatment. So that you then become a candidate for transplant. It's almost like, you know, the planets have to be aligned, and you know, you have to have HIV have a blood cancer need a bone marrow transplantation. And then find a donor who is not just what we call it tissue much somebody who can you know, service, your bone marrow donor, but he also has this Rudge mutation the see all five mutation that only about one percent of the population. Do so, you know, it's it's always going to be a very very unusual circumstance. But one of the things that I think quite exciting is, you know, increasingly Counci doctors know about this. There's a large consortium in Europe called icy stem, which is actually it's. Funded by the American Foundation for aids research, which is the charity that Elizabeth Taylor setup, and they are putting together a database of potential bone marrow donors who are carrying the mutation. They got more than twenty thousand people on the books, if you like ready to go, so although it's always going to be a very unusual and only be possible in the smoker to patients, I think what's exciting is that you know, that's going to be made available to people who you know, who qualify for that. And who wants to undergo that

Hiv Infection HIV Los Angeles Dr Cannon London Canada Dusseldorf Canon School Of Medicine University Professor Of Medicine Professor Philadelphia University Of Pennsylvania Texas Europe Jean Claude Paula
World Food Programme urges US to reconsider Palestine funding cuts: civilian impact horrendous

UN News

07:30 min | 2 years ago

World Food Programme urges US to reconsider Palestine funding cuts: civilian impact horrendous

"Food insecurity has become a major issue in Gaza and to the West Bank, not because food is hard to find. But because hard-pressed families cannot afford to buy it. That's according to Stephen Kearney, the World Food program's Representative and WFP country director in Palestine United States cuts in funding for the UN relief agency for Palestinian refugees onr is having a major humanitarian impact and WFP is currently providing food cash assistance to the most vulnerable who are earning less than a dollar a day. Mr. Kearney's spoke with you and uses Arabic chief rim Abaza when she wasn't Jerusalem on a recent reporting trip to the region and began by outlining what the agency needs on behalf of hungry and malnourished Palestinians for the year ahead. Fifty seven. That's what I want. I have woman's. About twenty and that's based on discussions with the non US dorms. Traditionally support the fee and asking them at least match the game that shit. And I haven't had negative responses. They haven't gone, and yes it goes, but based on removed so so and this year two thousand eighteen juniors lately was again, the US. Bid decision that we actually had somebody with US customs rolled from to necessarily. But what's we did? We've still you're in rule was media. Earned media starting to look at the the needs to support Palestine. We went Shula US doing time. Long time before they actually made it clear that everybody's gonna get quote, and I came out to toward. So. Do we have be role made a decision to use a lot of its multilateral? Gets and it gave me a don't keep go into this and the little bit let more to run for John Jim, but that will happen again to make it clear to our audience when we say you have a funding problem. What does it mean on the ground for the beneficiaries? Some million shot. It means a hundred and fifty thousand people don't get. And what go look at when we approved we use the Johnny Bauer transaction cash. Princeton sanctions. So we have a little cottage. Sure. So what those we give this to each household and the household can they go to show and the point. And once again is we we credit on the move nickel. Shop. We were close the shopkeepers to set criteria was the bible on my cigarettes the combat cop on the skins, but the combatant the axon business vegetables milk yogurt success. We did the shocking. Derek incidence. So you. Giving shirts to the retailer that they go to. Should we internet? No cash being transferred to mitigate the risk of fraud. Misuse. Wjr you protect the advisory eighty Dicky's other goal choose what they want to protect them as well. Because. There's nothing else to contribute to take the food. We've all the other cod. It's it's. Protections against that. You gotta remember that in Gaza. The western food, insecurity is not because food derived press the having the money to buy a vanity taxes. Can you give us an idea about the numbers of foot insecure rep people in Gaza and the west thing in Gaza unin, the western do get close to own deals with refugees we deal with number fifties? And thus the clear demarcation between us, so we did it with the Muench to sixty thousand in Gaza under the skin of the problem is great. But then we're not doing the actors the Palestinian Authority are also providing social safety nets to people, and what we do is very close to the most in we look at their beneficiaries who they're supporting and why this. And then we based on all over the news. The people who are not in support. So our criteria is set on deep. Deport and we'll buy deep poverty level in this country, three dollars seventy. The majority of beneficiaries. Well, we've we're talking if they're looking to find a job the maybe ending about a dollar a day. In Gaza funded rate is fifty cents to seventy percent for the for the youth. So this real challenges. And this again is why the problem with food, insecurity is not availability taxes because nobody's going to buy you, visit Gaza. You're interesting you go back and forth, and you meet people who benefit from all the support. What do we hear from them? Where he is very sensitive. Extreme. So even the most case. I've got issues who not only of food and no electricity. Access to water is at judge then accommodation is substantially. I've got one who's lost a giant share because rats were getting a ninety nine children. And the child. This is sort of scary for women. Everybody we deal with is in deep poverty. There are scales within so families single headed by women so come to chink, so we can set criteria within our current than Fisher fisheries to identify the most vulnerable of the most. And that's what we're doing getting ready for two thousand eighteen if I into without sort of short phone. Than to make these horrendous decisions to cook. People who absolutely have nothing. What's your message to the international community? And we're coming to me year new resolutions. Have you used?

Gaza United States Gaza Unin WFP Stephen Kearney Rim Abaza Palestine UN Palestinian Authority West Bank ONR Shula Johnny Bauer Representative Director Fisher Fisheries Fraud Dicky
"unin" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Unin and j comes up with a huge blocker save. You positionally was very good except for that. Pity RV goal. I you know, I liked his positioning tonight. I thought he was Gress if he man that crease very well got a couple of fortunate balances on the post there, and that's sometimes the balances you need, but the blues are finding ways to win the game. You get rid of that Calgary game two kings before that the blues are trending up right now. All right. And then one more thing a heck of a game by the defensive Dua, Perico and Edmonton incredible. I mean, these are two guys that they needed to shut down this mcdavid line. And they did that and some a couple of times, you know, you saw parade got a little bit out of position. Maybe he got beat by the speed, but his legs and his stick recover. So well his angles are exceptional as far as getting back to the net. He does a great job with the stick Pocono away. Joe Evanson again has been such a savior for the blues being back from his injury tonight. A couple of games gophers Calgary now tonight as well. Come back shut down these first two lines have been a great great thing for these two in. They're really evolving to be such a great shutdown pairs this league. Ryan Reilly added to that empty net goal, by the way. So he will stay at a point to game right now. With thirty two points in thirty two games for the Bud Light three stars of the game winner. Jake, the snake number three. He's my third start that. He was exceptionally kept the boys in a position to win the game all night long belt. Vladimir Tarasenko number two that big power play goal. I thought his engine was up and running all night as well. And number one for me. Brayden Schenn the sentiment of the line. That really was the catalyst tonight hit three assists. Three helpers brain Chen. My number one star hard hat. I'm Colton parade. Again, I talked about his shutdown appearance. Joe Edmonson those two were terrific. All right. So Colton Perico is the heart have winter shed tears, Cinco analogy your three stars by Joey. Let's go down to the dressing room talk things over with Robert Jonah's, Robert congratulations on the victory here tonight. I was that field to start the road trip is definitely a good start for us on the road. And which I keep going and Ben Thomas the tank engine. You took a puck to the net right there. What did you see what would happen there? What is kind of a little rush to our one with being Bosie and high kind of took away the past. So I just tried to make a move and bring it to the net. And you know, I think rig rig banged her home.

Colton Perico Gress Calgary Jake Colton parade Joe Evanson Brayden Schenn Unin Vladimir Tarasenko Ben Thomas Bud Light Ryan Reilly Joe Edmonson Edmonton Robert Jonah Cinco Joey
"unin" Discussed on Girls Night with Stephanie May Wilson

Girls Night with Stephanie May Wilson

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on Girls Night with Stephanie May Wilson

"Like, welcome. We're so glad you're here. Here's a wifi password. And we put it in these cute little frames, and we had him in the guestroom. Well, we have some girls stay with us. And they're like Steph. What's the wifi password? I was like, oh, it's right there wind changed it and forgot to update that we still have an update. Wrong. A really good intentions of really good thought. That's a good thought was what about when people are coming over just in your general space. So like cleaning up. Lighting a candle anything anything else. Like do you set out? Like, it's do what about sort of a living room kitchen area? Yeah. Again, clean tight. Tidy. Grab guest your guest bathroom and the surfaces gonna sit on make sure thing smuggled. I think I love I like candles, but only certain kind of handles, I'm not, you know. And if you're cooking don't like, I mean, like candles at don't have sent let your cooking be this sense. Because there's nothing worse than like spaghetti sauce. Garlicky good unin mixing with freshly washed linen candle. I mean, that's just gross. So don't don't let candles if you're if let your your your sense of your clicking bigger your scent. That they meet the only exception will be in the put one in the bathroom, the guest, bathroom smelly candle. I like good lighting in like to have a la- music. I think that makes a atmosphere. Totally different people come into your house, and there's a little jazz planner. There's a little something in the background. I think that sets a great mood. So don't forget music. It's a good thing. That is. So if you like turn off over headlights, turn on some lamps light. Again, I've been doing a lot of unscented Kendall's just because I like lighting them, and I go through in pretty quickly. So I have been doing unscented ones. But like save a little bit flicker. Yeah. You have a good smelling one in the bathroom, and you have some music on like that's put a fluffy blanket. Yours said, right? Yeah. Some greet him with good drink some good wine or offer have something else. For the non drinkers that's equally fun. If I have overnight guests, I think it's really nice to ahead of time. Kind of what they're what they like. If you're having guests to spend a couple of days with the couple of nights get in hidden, some of their favorite things, especially breakfast things because you can go out for lunch or dinner may be. But you know, if if he know that they like almond milk did not cream or if they like bagels in strawberry cream cheese. What you know, whatever their favorite breakfast thing is I think that's really kinda nice for them to wake up in the morning and not have their first meal at your house be in the morning rule of something that they don't like. Yeah. Allergic to or. Yeah. So. Hey, guys. Hope you're loving this conversation with Kathy as much as I am isn't. She amazing totally lucked out in the mother-in-law department. So I wanted to pop in for one quick second to thank our sponsor for this week. Our sponsor today is a company that I love in its hellofresh. I know that lots of y'all have heard of them. But just in case you haven't hellofresh is meal kits livery service that shops plans delivers your favorite by step-by-step.

Kendall Kathy Steph milk
"unin" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Right? A coup move. And I heard a story about like crocodiles, in three ver- you know, I don't know about mccowan river. Oh, maybe. Yeah. I'm surprised you even gave a crap about crocodiles at that point. And after this river, like I'm free. I'm completely free. You know, and I, I'm holding down on it and I'm looking looking at the light towards the like, like Thailand. And they move a little bit. We're gonna flip, you know who I. And then we got the tile and and then we bond Terry surrendered to Thailand police. So they're like, oh, we're gonna put you in a prison for ten days. I'm not gonna lie. That was the best. They of my life going to type prison going to type prison, right? Waking up type prison camp. I mean, because for me, I have missile inexperienced now because it's for me freedom like I can't ex- hell. I'm like. Now, finally, free Thailand recognizes North Korean refugees. So you're like, you know, you're in good hands. I know I'm in good hands and then they were sending us to salt career rate. So what happened is that you enter Thailand with unin permission but Highland like they let you go wherever they want to go because we're refugees, right? That kicking us out of Thailand to salt, right? That's the understanding. Yeah, just understanding you feel better waking up in the Thai prison than you did waking up in that hotel in China. One hundred times better and plus they fed us white rice and chicken soon a like we want like fifty pieces of corn every meal in North Korean prison. I'm like, what? This is a big step up, you know, and like they just let me sleep like how ever the want and this wake up anytime there's food, there's water. I don't have to anything. And then I was trying to apply for South Korea, but they didn't recognize misreferred g because my father is Chinese. No. Oh, wow. Yeah. So they sit like, you're in Thailand. I'm talent. You're applying for refugee status to Seoul, South Korea. They won't give it to you because you're only half Chinese and half Korean. And unlike Chinese government convention is miss refugee and they sent me back to North Korea and I went, I went to detention center and I've been to crap. And I guess some back North Korea, but you guys don't want to help me and they'll I Charles, like we've really want help. You cannot change the law. We would have to send you back to China. I'm like, crap. All my dad. You just thought you're out. I'm out now. There's like there's no hope for me. 'cause like recital Maoists only hope for me, right? Because like I'm in Thailand. Thailand will let you stay title. They won't let me stay because we'll send you back. China's sending me that now South Korea won't take into international, like orphanage date Lewis stateless I really like killing myself at their. Did you really didn't you for like a week at Chem? Like cutting just drink water? I just like I can't eat because I'm so stressed because I got moved another cell from North Korean Celta international sell to move back to China, and because I already started the process. And you're already like this happening? Yeah, this is happening. I'm I'm going to die, you know. And then like every day was trouble every day was like a war from me. 'cause like trying to find actual Korean embassy embassy like Asia. Shouting at them. Please help man on, but I met Jesus. You can. But seriously don't like one one guy who I recommend them k. you should apply for you UN. I think they'd know your situation y. I think they might take you. And then I apply for you on and then most people they have to wait a year to get a first interview, right. Prefer me like my interview with you know week. So who is this guy that told you to apply to the UN for international refugee status? Jesus. Yeah, qualify that. So he is another North Korean dude who's going to the United States and his waiting to be processed. Would you meet him international, the international refugee camp..

Thailand China South Korea North Korea UN mccowan river North Korean Celta Terry Seoul Asia United States Lewis ten days
"unin" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"He's the appeal to me of white male privilege. Talk society in connett unin kind of looks like, and he was like, I'll read it. No, I kind of wanted you to just say, yes. Oh, do it. But and so he read it like took him a couple of days to read. Does he re this finger over the dialogue? What? What's what's going the like scripts, boring. Even I get it. I, I'm the slowest script during the welcome people semi scripts to either direct or like, take, you know, give notes on whatever. Honestly, I have to like block out half a day and it's because my mind one does even if it's a great script and I got, I go from Charlie on the Sunday night guiding, I'll do so. So I think there was still a couple of roles to be cost. I think Waikiki and Honolulu was still become really, and and that's always an interesting thing for the for the table week because then you, Dan, what you need to do is bring in a ringer, and you need an actor to play the role that day that probably isn't in the running for the role, but is good enough to be able to like stand the character up on its feet in the room so that people don't start dieting. The strength of the role, and that's a tricky political situation. And no, I'm not gonna say. Because also, you know, this is ways of thing, and I'm not sure it was the case with this one. Whether whether actors agent has definitely said to them, if you nail this in the room on the movies, probably y'all's and that's actually not ever. True? I think because because even if they do nail it, there's been a reason that you'd want me to go to them whether it's because like you couldn't get the financing for the movie if it was based on them, United, someone studio doesn't like them. And so so yeah, so that's that's the tricky about about table reads is that and if and if someone wildly underperforms, I was really lucky like everyone. I'd cost everyone in everyone in the movie, which is a real achievement on that pause is brilliant and it's giant cost..

connett unin Charlie Waikiki United Honolulu Dan
"unin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And turns out that unin dating app that is only two years worth of time in one pdf file anyway she sat down to read what the app had collected about her i had the feeling i was reading somebody else love life you could see like a brief description of me who i was where did they leave what was the drink of minot was interested in or may facebook likes but what was most striking actually twist to see would we could infer from all that data sometimes i must have felt like anxious or lonely somehow because i was compulsively like writing to anyone and this application and was ashamed i didn't want people to know like so easily that could feel lonely or a bit like pathetically like that and then i was angry because i realized if they know what i'm still only where i am at that point it would be so easy to manipulate me and to send me at that time somehow like target advertising like for i do cruises or whatever they would make you feel better about myself how easy it could be to play with my emotions judy is also concerned about what could happen if a company decides to sell the data or if it's not secured properly so it gets leaked for some people they're dating data might be embarrassing but for others intimate data could cause serious harm if it became public and that potential risk might be for a very silly payoff tinder and pakhtakor and other dating apps might be marketed to serve up true love but you might actually be on there for another reason entirely more and more people going dating app not to meet people could just to get this ten great fixation boost when you have matches it's time to start thinking about how to feel better high to have ego boost like outside of being somehow manipulated to give up our data to be fair dating apps actually bombarded with chocolate ads if you've just been dumped or anything like that true but it's possible in fact it's happening now outside the dating apps but instead of targeting us using emotional cues the use our data to place us into categories so marketers know which adds will have the most impact here's a big list facebook things i am interested in cats millennials adventure this is sarah m watson she is a writer and technology critic based in singapore dynamics edible mushroom cervical vertebrae human skin color some of them make sense right i'm a millennial okay fine but cervical vertebrae i don't know what that's targeting right so we have two kinds of online identities the first is all of the information that we use to confirm that we are who we say we are so that passwords or credit card numbers the second is more squishy that comes from what we post on social media and what we're searching for online when algorithms connect the dots between all of your online activities plus.

unin two years
"unin" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Dan i relate it all to i get credit did in fact a very early unin live i figured out if you want to accomplish something go find somebody else that's already accomplishment and get there with it get it done wind up on them how to do it now many of you have listened to me for a while realized that i'm into would have been ever since i caught cancer trying to put together a train layout and i did it all wrong two or three different times i've done wrong they finally found myself a mentor they helped me do it right and once i got in touch with this mentor this mentor was asking me questions that i'd never asked myself here was trying to develop this way out to bell up this thing create this thing in life and i had no idea what it wanted i had no idea what is trying to do i just thought i could just start creating out of nowhere and something would happen they just just go buy houses can't be that hard let's just piddle around with this let's do this this way that way left way sideways and they start piddling and they piddle themselves into a failure situation where they didn't even know the right questions ask about what type of property to buy where to buy it how to manage it how to screen your tenants how to do the maintenance and not do the maintenance and what depicts and whatnot to fix what to remodel without through now no idea they just thought i'll buy a house and experiment with it an experiment themselves right into failure i've seen this over and over and over again in life and i was watching the stupid show called dexter they called stupid because the dumbest thing the world it's a show about a serial killer whose father teaches him to be a silly serial killer with perfection so they'll never get caught and in this one episode he picks up this guy that wants him to teach him how to be a serial killer and i so related to this because what happened was is the guy wanted to be a serial killer just like dexter but he couldn't because dexter fouled the rules that his father giving him rule number one don't get caught rule number one don't lose money rule number two there's got to be casual a rule number two there's gotta be an alibi right down the line he had system but this other guy just wanted to do it his way and i've seen people over and over and over for twenty seven years of consulting people just want to do it their way they wanna cut out all the rules cut out all the right answers they want to take the shortcut they wanna go right to the top executives say they won't take the elevator to the top but there is no elevator top there's only stares and you've got a climate one step at a time to get there now there are ways to get there faster and there are ways to get there without getting lost there's ways to get there without getting out of shape and not having a heart attack was all kinds of things you can learn but you still got to walk the walk before he can talk the talk and i see this happen all the time so with this dextra character what ends up happening was the guy ends up breaking the rules getting caught and getting killed warning if that's what's going to happen but see his dad warned him of the same thing if you break the rules right there's all saying you can break yourself against a rule but you can't break a rule because the rule is a rule because it will break you i remember miss story along time ago where there was this captain of this giant destroyer and he was rolling up on this light in the middle of the night you saying signalman signal that guy to get out of our way you signals this is uss something rather get out of our where we're destroying we'll blow up turn left the other like a metronome one more time something or other get out of our way to get your turn left do you not understand this is the uss something or other destroy we will blow you out of the water guy goes do you not understand that i'm a lighthouse turn left sometimes vote you've got left we right back with the radio show.

Dan twenty seven years
"unin" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

The Brilliant Idiots

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

"He sucked that little meat man the second time on senior his robin crying grown as motherfucking man you saying i'm happy birthday and you cried and use on fucking cnn crying because he met with donald trump what the fuck is your problem wearing a makeamericagreatagain makeamericagreatagain hat man what the fuck is wrong what you did is it i think all is record should be erased from the records book whoa magin how all those guys feel that played against robin in the nineties knowing that they let this straight pussy that looks like earthworm jim out rebound him every fucking game can you think about this shit main you you'll never see told oakley push shit like dinners round not come on man amazing what never right john sally would fucking never true do tough crying over kim jong unin donald trump meeting shut the fuck up as rodman was maybe the original takashi painted his nails dressing up in in fuck in wedding gowns his hair dyed what there isn't a rupel rupaul might be older dennis never gave it for one thing there's no mother fuckers he would he would bully motherfuckers on the court and he'd have god damn nail polish on he might be original takashi and he's like what's up what you're gonna do nothing okay another ring now too the co did groping very homophobic error was that all the marketing ploy i'm aware dresses we'll put fingernail polish on at gay okay nobody will try to pull me up in the pain.

donald trump robin rodman takashi dennis cnn john sally kim jong
"unin" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Booker you say put it more the deals eight was unin knuckle mood i know the love of god i responded from rio because i had to and now she's like a child of mine and i'll treat it like one of my kids when marie got to florida her great aunt bader baby doll maria wrapped it in a sling and carried it on her back like some moms do in guatemala marine her great aunt are really close they make tortillas together and seeing almost every evening in church choir the families plan is to have maria stay in florida her mom magdalena agrees for more sets leader says maria safer there and can finish school as for the lanna when she was deported she was warned that she couldn't come back to the us for ten years if she tried to cross again should be charged with a felony my billion thinks the policy of separating families at the border will scare some people away the not her she's terrified of being back in guatemala that the same man she fled from before will find her and kill her magdalena social find a way to leave again and be with her daughter for the world actually click florida tomorrow we'll hear from a woman who fled el salvador because of domestic violence she still in the us but our future here is getting murkier plus we'll speak with a supporter of the president's immigration crackdown whoever said it's only a game has clearly never tried to play soccer in the middle east for example a friendly soccer match between argentina and israel now was scheduled for this weekend in israel was cancelled today after the match drew protests from palestinians.

Booker rio marie bader guatemala magdalena us florida el salvador president soccer argentina israel maria middle east ten years
"unin" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"First round but when you look at the death of his wife receiver group if i can get an anthony miller on day two i feel really good about that former walk on all we did it memphis was rewrite the receiving record books breaking all is bruce's records not the biggest guy but when you watch him you get and tonio brown flashes it's not consistent but you get those slashes and so for me anthony miller if i can get him somewhere on a second round i feel great about that i you know the wide receiver position i think minia saint brown i know the one he's one of the few in this draft class who has number one potential you might not be a number one right now but two to three years from now when we look back at this draft class i think he could be one of the few that actually you look at as being potential number one i think you look at tight end in pomace from indiana a player doesn't get enough love another guy as a rookie might not see it right away but two to three years from now ian thomas i think we'll be talking about as one of the better tight ends from this group unin cornerback is a deep position what was the guy's not only in the first round but second third round you feel good about those players i think there's a different positions really maybe every position except for tackle you might feel good about the deaths that you can get in the second or third round dan schwartz take on shack griffin has become a huge story the guy lost his hand before he was born and has had a great career and college was the american conference defensive player of the year it's a wild story.

anthony miller memphis bruce pomace ian thomas dan schwartz griffin tonio brown indiana three years
"unin" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"The unin rolled voters were just kind of interested about a year ago basically when the field was forming more healy was seen as really the most viable challenger to charlie baker she's a relative newcomer to politics she shocked everyone by becoming attorney general back in two thousand fourteen winning the democratic nomination and has absolutely impressed people and impress the state party she has this very magnetic personality that a lot of people really identify with she has this incredible story she's i know she's lgbt she is a former pro basketball player and is this top litigator and so she really fits this persona and she's really i think come into her own in the trump era trump every few days actually didn't interview with her this fall and asked her you know madam attorney general how many lawsuits against donald trump do you have she actually didn't know off the top she's she's raising her profile and i think for people in massachusetts and in rhode island and around the country you're going to hear the name maura healey allot more frequently future different than other attorneys general i think we've seen with martha coakley tom riley they've struggled to run statewide they've struggled to break out of that kind of prosecutor mode she doesn't have a problem with that it seems like she people connect with her she connects with them when i was at the saint patrick's day breakfast roast in boston a couple of weeks ago she was one of the last people to leave that hall because she kept shaking hands taking selfies with people posing for pictures she knows how to work the rooms going back to baker for a second even as we're talking about a democratic up and comer one thing that in both rhode island in massachusetts yours have key is how much do these republicans build their party which are historically weak in both states and how much are the singular force that that doesn't have a lot of coattails and i noted down in our neck of the woods and wills you've seen to elections recently we're charlie baker came down he came down for attleboro mayor kevin dumez who longtime incumbent he lost to democratic state representative paul her and paul feeney one who was bernie sanders guy won the democratic special state senate race virgin timothy's old seat last year again even though i believe charlie baker was behind the republican in.

basketball senate bernie sanders paul feeney state representative attleboro boston prosecutor martha coakley maura healey healy attorney timothy kevin dumez charlie baker patrick tom riley rhode island massachusetts donald trump
"unin" Discussed on Blamestorming

Blamestorming

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on Blamestorming

"I bet a lot of people in congress have at some point in their life had sex with a prostitute and i don't think any of those men vote against prostitutes best interest of leadership historically have been fucking prostitute rights to their them over no that means that doesn't mean they like them they're going to help them because load of com does not civil liberties protect but a cross stitch but if aren't they going to want you know it'd be like oh well i know prostitutes i should help them out here and and not stop them from working for people that don't know what this bill entails why don't you most people so like why don't you break this down yeah so the the house bill foster already passed and it was like twenty five votes against and like three hundred something odd four it's very popular bipartisan bill unin trump's america which is should terrify everyone but the the sesto bills stands for stop enabling sex trafficking act and essentially what it does is it shifts liability from individuals to platforms when holding if they don't know yes even yeah even when the platforms don't know what's happening as to try to crack down on people posting ads for sex workers and this is across the board right so they say that they're targeting traffic victims and they say that they're targeting children but they're cracking down down on all sex workers unilaterally pushing the whole industry birther into the dark which only makes things more dangerous and more violent.

congress unin trump america
"unin" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"unin" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"Around talking about schnee timberline boots now funny thing i'll tell you that i was wearing these dan boots today it's early season boop but i was running around in alaska in march with these things on their cantaloupe these are legit some of the most comfortable boots i he love these things i'm jumping in and out of admiral i'm going from admiral just telling us the straight dope and back into ad mode it's all mixed up because of how much love these boots yanni's been running them so lightweight unin slated boot great for bow season early season hunting with all shades best of breed technology it's kind of like like my old goto boot i used to always be running bear toothbrush nays and i still love that i still have some berthus round but it's a little bit different because it's got a slightly more flexible mid sole and it's in its own insulated but here's the deal and this something we've talked about a bunch insulate a boots are warmer but not necessarily always warmer because when you're wearing insulated boots they're warm at first but the extra insulation causes you to perspire more and as you perspire more everything inside your book it's wet and that winds up lead you to sometimes colder feet then you would have started with an on insulated it's like a tricky thing to figure out is this something to factor in your mind when you hear unin slated that doesn't necessarily mean you're gonna freeze your ass so you have to take care of your feet for the best hunting boots made get hsin as and this i'm telling you man go to schnee dot com and use our promo code meat eater and you get ten percent off timberline boots i have been recommending these boots over the phone to friends of mine who are like calling about boot vice i'm saying like do get a pair of timber lines schnee dot com or give them a call.

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