35 Burst results for "Unilever"

"unilever" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:46 min | 4 months ago

"unilever" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"On Bloomberg radio Alex Let's dig into some of the specific stocks that are moving this morning We're joined by Bloomberg's Lisa fam here in the London studio I'm good morning Lisa Let's start with Unilever Nelson peltz the activist has joined the board Yeah so Unilever has said that the company try and has 1.5% stake in Unilever and appointed pelts as a nonexecutive director Peltz will join the board in July and become a member of the compensation committee So just to give a bit of context people familiar with the situation had told Bloomberg news in January that try and a mess and meaningful stake in the consumer giant over the past few months But this is the first time that this has been confirmed by the company IBC analysts say that they hope that pulse can stimulate positive changes to culture remuneration and organizational structure like he did at Procter & Gamble even if he shares with down 11% this year before today's news and the stock market are the stock hasn't yet opened today Okay Lisa moving on to some M and a action This is to do with the German special specialty chemicals company lanxess As well as private equity house advent They say that they'll acquire the engineering materials business from DSM for around €3.7 billion This will be financed by advanced and the two firms will form a new polymer's joint venture So Langston will contribute its high performance materials business which is valued at €2.5 billion It's important to keep in mind that DSM has agreed to combine with a Swiss ingredients maker which will form the largest maker of fragrances and ingredients for the perfume and beauty product industries GSM will get a cash injection to help fund the deal from the sale of its injured engineering materials business So both stocks both langs and DSM have been taking higher in recent days though they still haven't recovered from this year's losses We do see Langston shares up 10% at the moment We also have some news from the Swiss electronic components maker U blocks which makes all sort of wireless components for the automotive industrial industries and therefore can be something of a bellwether It raises its outlook Yeah so the company said that outlook for the year has improved thanks to strong billings continued strong order intake and well managed supply challenges So as a result you block now sees revenue growth of 27% to 39% for the full year as well as a bit of growth of 17% to 21% Still the company acknowledges that macroeconomic and geopolitical factors including tangled supply chains inflation and the war in Ukraine will remain as risk factors for its 2022 guidance In terms of stock performance you block has fared better than some other companies with the shares up 8.6% this year before today's announcement though it shows haven't yet opened today Okay Lisa fan thank you very much for a look at stocks to watch this morning Next we'll take a look at the day's top stories with Leon garon's morning Leanne Steven Good morning and thank you EU leaders have agreed to pursue a partial ban on Russian oil paving the way for another possible package of sanctions targeting Moscow European Commission president Oslo von der leyen says it marks major progress Council should now be able to finalize a ban on almost 90% of all Russian oil imports by the end of the year This is an important step forward The remaining 10% on these one we will soon return to the issue Meanwhile the bloc's members spent hours struggling to resolve their differences over the ban with Hungary its main opponent the sanctions would forbid the purchase of crude oil and petroleum products from Russia delivered to member states by sea a temporary exemption for pipeline crude is included in that package Here in the UK business confidence rose in May for the first time in three months with more companies planning to increase prices businesses were most concerned about rising costs and slowing growth in the next 6 months Bloomberg's own pots with the details Lloyds bank says its business barometer increased 5 points to 38% this month That's the highest reading since February and ten points above the long term average On price rises over half of companies polled plan increases that's the 5th consecutive monthly gain However confidence in the retail sector fell slightly to its lowest level since March of last year That amid concerns on the squeeze on household incomes They just figures add though to the sense that the economy is strong enough for the Bank of England to push up rates again in its fight against inflation now at a 40 year high In London I'm you in parts of the big day break Europe China's factory activity continue to shrink in May but at a slower pace as many of the titers COVID restrictions began lifting gradually in some areas The official manufacturing PMI rose to 49.6 from 47.4 in April That compares with the median estimate of 49 in a Bloomberg survey of economists the non manufacturing gauge also increased Fed governor Christopher Wallace says he is backing rate increases of half a percentage point for several meetings in to reverse a surging prices in the U.S. wallet says he is not taking 50 basis point hikes off the table until inflation nears the fed's 2% target I support tightening policy by another 50 basis points for several meetings In particular I am not taking 50 basis points 50 basis point heights off the table until I see inflation coming down closer to our 2% target He also says economic models suggest quantitative tightening will be equivalent to around a couple of 25 basis point rate hikes And finally Chelsea F.C. is a new hand U.S. investor Todd boley has completed his 4.25 billion pound takeover of Chelsea football club It ends almost 20 years of ownership under Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich who was of course forced to sell under sanctions imposed over the war in Ukraine the deal means that for the very first time more than half of the premiership are now packed by American money Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quixel powered buying more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries I'm leann gerrans this is Bloomberg Alex Webb joins us today What a pleasure Alex Webb Said no one ever Thank you Leon Let's dig into that inflation story The latest French inflation figures have come in at 5.8%.

DSM Bloomberg Unilever Alex Let Lisa fam Lisa Let Unilever Nelson peltz Peltz compensation committee langs Swiss electronic components
"unilever" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:38 min | 9 months ago

"unilever" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"And just finally before I let you go, how much frustration is there? As you mentioned earlier, there is a certain level of disagreement amongst NATO members also also in Europe. How much is the U.S. doing at the moment to try to build some kind of consensus? And at the same time how much frustration is there? Well, I think there is frustration, I think, but the reality of the situation is that Europe is a large mass of land and lots of countries with different philosophies and outlooks on the situation. And the United States is working very hard to try to find common ground, not just with its allies, but amongst its allies in Europe. And I think that is partly I mean a lot of people see this as just sort of U.S. Russia negotiations. And that is part of it. But these sort of intra Europe and inter Europe and NATO negotiations and then Ukraine on the side is also very much part of it and makes it a much more complicated situation. What do you expect from the U.S. next? Well, I think their ongoing talks, I think there will be talks again next week. Again, trying to bring Ukraine. There are still unresolved issues around previous the previous invasion of Ukraine and I think that they have what they call the Normandy format, which is a format, which was established, which has not been very fruitful, and they're trying to go back to that in the coming weeks. Again, trying to keep talking to avoid military action. Thank you for your insights. Hello. That was the former U.S. diplomat Louis Luca and now here is monarchical space Reynolds with the days other new set lies. Thanks Marcus. UK prime minister Boris Johnson is under further pressure today after reports that he held a short birthday party indoors in June 2020 at a time when most indoor gatherings were banned during the country's first lockdown. Downing Street has played down the event, insisting the prime minister attended for less than ten minutes. A senior member of the U.S. negotiating team charged with reviving the 2015 Iran nuclear deal has abruptly left his post. Reports suggest that Richard nephew had advocated a tougher stance and departed over a difference of opinion. It comes at a critical juncture with less than a week left to reach an agreement. The organizers of the Australian open have reversed a policy that banned attendees from wearing t-shirts saying whereas Peng Shui. After demonstrators wearing the t-shirts were escorted from the tournament. The t-shirts are in reference to the Chinese tennis star whose well-being remains a concern after she accused a senior Chinese party official of sexual assault. And the annual Pirelli calendar for 2022 is out now and features a very recognizable musician behind the camera. Brian Adams took the reins and brought along some other icons such as share and Iggy Pop. You can find out more about that at Monaco dot com slash minute. Those are the days headlines back to you Marcus. Thank you very much page. Let's then continue with the latest business news. I'm joined survivors, UN ports. Good afternoon to you. And shall we start with news on job Scott's. And Marcus, yes, kazuma goods giant Unilever says it's going to cut 15% of senior management positions and also they're going to trim junior management staff by 5%. Now, the consumer goods giant based in London, the big global producer of consumer goods has been much in the news of late. It's been under attack from activist investors built up a stake and it's pushing the company to do more to trim costs and to get its underperforming shares a little bit higher. Now, the company has also been in the news for a failed bid for the GlaxoSmithKline consumer pharmaceuticals division that at the university wanted to buy that to four 50 billion pounds, but GlaxoSmithKline said the price was just not right. So in the end, Unilever backed out of that a lot of investors also not keen for unity to make that takeover. A lot of takeovers unpopular with investors take over unpopular investors in the taking over company, of course that is rather than the target. They're always very pleased. Now Unilever says it's going to break up some of its divisions. It's going to separate the business into 5 groups. It's going to the health and beauty care on, which is one of the slowest growing bits of the business is being broken up into two. There's also speculation over the ice cream operations which includes brands like Ben and Jerry's and Magnum. That's also a slow growing division. There were some circulation that Unilever would get rid of that, but for now, just like it's going to stay with the business. Now, Alan joke the boss of Unilever seeking to realize that the company around healthier habits Unilever is aiming to build up a portfolio of plant based meat and dairy alternatives. He hopes that's going to generate a €1 billion worth of revenue by 2025. So having to move from ice cream into fake meat. Tell us more about what we have been hearing from the investors are they happy with that move? Well, you leave shares just down to touch, yes, they were certainly up yesterday. They jumped on that news. Now, when activists investors get involved, it can be a good sign if they can push the company's bosses into doing some of the things which have been weighing on the shares for some time. You leave, of course, is an enormous corporation. It shares underperformer over the past year or so. I want to ask you about Canada's housing bubble problem. Interesting story on the Bloomberg terminal on website today that's about Canada's housing market for 12 consecutive years. It has been soaring to record heights. This is driven like a lot of places by tight imagery, particularly in Toronto and Vancouver. That has seen property prices really soaring. Now, Canadians have been playing a bit of a dangerous game to hold down the size of their monthly.

U.S. Europe Ukraine Unilever NATO Louis Luca prime minister Boris Johnson Marcus Richard nephew Peng Shui GlaxoSmithKline Brian Adams Reynolds Russia Pirelli kazuma Monaco
"unilever" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:26 min | 9 months ago

"unilever" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It is 9 30 a.m. in Hong Kong and here in Singapore I'm Juliette solly And I'm Ryan Curtis looking at the markets in the Asia Pacific as we've been mentioning this morning A lot of selling here and some pretty aggressive moves to the downside the markets just opening up here as we speak Hanging index off one and a half percent The hang sang tech index down about two and three quarters percent So not only do we have to worry about tightening fed policy but also omicron and now geopolitical concerns as well We'll get to the markets with Doug prisoner in a few moments but for now the top stories Jules Bitcoin trading around $35,730 It fell over the weekend hitting a level 50% below its record high in November but the drama doesn't stop there because now we're also seeing some technical problems with one of the world's biggest blockchain networks We get more on that from Bloomberg's Denise Pellegrini Solana is reporting that validators that use their computer power to help verify the network will they run into trouble with excessive duplicate transactions is what they're calling it And so on his website says it has released an update to attempt to mitigate the worst effects of this problem So on the lab's cofounder meantime has retweeted a comment attributing this problem to current market volatility It's not the first time the company has seen something like this The blockchain network suffered a 17 hour outage back in September sparked by what it called resource exhaustion Today's Pellegrini Bloomberg day break Asia This rate cuts will not be sufficient to stabilize the economy according to yu Yong ding a former adviser to the PBOC you said that under current conditions the Central Bank's role can be pretty limited He said he would emphasize the importance of fiscal policy and a faster increase in government spending that he thinks is needed The PBOC has taken a series of easing steps recently They include cutting interest rates key interest rates for the first time in nearly two years and encouraging banks to lend more quickly While Nelson peltz activist hedge fund has built a stake in Unilever this is adding a lot of pressure to the company's CEO and Europe Bloomberg's Susanna Palmer explains We're hearing peltz's tryon fund management has bought a stake in Unilever over the past few months the exact size of that stake is unclear although it's being described as meaningful The emergence of an activist investor is the latest challenge for Unilever CEO Ellen joke He's fresh from a failed bid to buy a consumer health unit from GlaxoSmithKline Billionaire peltz is turning his attention to Unilever after retiring from Procter & Gamble's board back in August He spent nearly four years there that brought several dramatic changes aimed at improving P and G's performance Susannah Palmer Bloomberg day break Asia All right the time is 33 minutes past the hour The interconnectedness of markets we're seeing a lot of selling in all the markets seemingly for many reasons that exist globally Let's get to Doug Chris He can explain it all to you I don't know about that but let me take a few stabs here One of the things I think is very curious given the fact that the PBOC China Central Bank is moving to do a lot more in the way of accommodation The currency does remain very very robust here At 6 spot 33 60 now against the greenback we're up about a tenth of 1% against the dollar and it was curious too because the PBOC said a weaker reference rate for the yuan the daily rate Vis-à-vis what the market was looking for Now we also heard from policymakers at the PBOC that liquidity will be kept stable before the spring festival that happens next week in spite of that we see weakness not only on the Chinese mainland where the Shanghai composite is down about a half of 1% but in Hong Kong as well where the hang seng is weaker by more than 1.2% In this case its consumer discretionary along with healthcare and information technology shares leading the way lower In Tokyo we've got the nikkei right now off about 7 tenths of 1% in sold the cost be down about 1.4% and in Sydney the ASX 200 is ahead Check that a weaker by about four tenths of 1% The big event in the week ahead is obviously the fed meeting no change in monetary policy is expected although we're hoping for some clarity not just on a timing for the next rate hike which is the market is convinced will happen in March but also on the balance sheet and whether or not it will be shrunk after that march rate hike It was over the weekend at Goldman Sachs was saying in essence the fed is going to be a lot more aggressive than the market has been expecting So now if you look at the bond market ten year treasury is up and yield by a little bit more than two basis points where at 1.77% And that move up in rates is strength in the dollar ever so slightly The Bloomberg dollar spot index rising about a tenth of 1% The yen is weaker here on a relative basis at one 1385 down a little more than a tenth of 1% against the greenback and crude oil recovering although for the 5 trading days last week WTI was up about 1.8% where higher now by 1% trading 85 95 in the electronic session We'll take another look at markets in 15 minutes Juliet Thank you dog 35 minutes past the hour time for global news The U.S. is ordered families of diplomats to leave Ukraine at Baxter's in San Francisco with the latest dead Yeah Julian Wright U.S. officials say Russia could invade now at any time The.

PBOC Unilever Juliette solly Ryan Curtis Denise Pellegrini Solana Pellegrini Bloomberg yu Yong ding Nelson peltz Europe Bloomberg Susanna Palmer peltz Ellen joke GlaxoSmithKline Billionaire pe Hong Kong Susannah Palmer Bloomberg Asia Pacific
"unilever" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 9 months ago

"unilever" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Me comes after a plunge and Unilever share price as investors question the rationale for the deal So off that those ADRs are up 9% GlaxoSmithKline by the way those ADRs down to the tune of about 2% moving on to the luxury space Swiss luxury company Richmond said it had its fastest holiday season sales growth in at least a decade Those ADRs up just shy of 6% and Charlie lastly burberry group forecasting 35% earnings growth this year signaling that the luxury goods market is thriving again those ADRs up 6% chart Sorry we think very much creedy go to yep There is an ETF for that too the first meal of the day may soon be served up to investors through an ETF the direction breakfast commodities strategy exchange traded fund will track an index focused on coffee orange juice wheat and lean hog futures according to a filing with the SEC Recapping ten year yield 1.82% S&P up 16 up four tenths I'm Charlie peloton is a Bloomberg business flash This is balance of power with David Weston The state of American energy is strong Our nation has the resources and the expertise to meet our energy needs Eventually we'll end up with a vaccine that will be able to do better against multiple variants Where the world of politics beats the world of business But that has to raise rights And by the way that's a good thing The cause of inflation has been this historic pandemic which is upended life in so many different ways in particular has upended America supply chains Balance of power with David Weston on Bloomberg radio Supply chain problems hit grocery store shells fighting misinformation and social media without the government and President Biden holds a rare.

Charlie lastly burberry group David Weston Unilever GlaxoSmithKline Charlie peloton Richmond SEC Bloomberg Bloomberg radio Supply America President Biden
"unilever" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:59 min | 9 months ago

"unilever" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"After being struck by a debris though officials say he is doing well Passaic fire chief Patrick Trent cost says Cruz will continue to make sure there aren't any issues Every 20 minutes we are walking through the building with their chemist and we're making sure that there's no reactions happening Residents who live nearby had been advised to keep windows and doors closed today GlaxoSmithKline said it rejected an offer from Unilever for the drug makers consumer healthcare unit last year that valued the business at about $68 billion Glaxo in a statement today said that it had received three unsolicited offers from Unilever for its consumer healthcare business the final one on December 20th Glaxo said it rejected all three because they undervalued its consumer healthcare business and its future prospects Shares and Applied Materials hit a record yesterday We get more about that from Bloomberg's dug prisoner The catalyst came earlier in the week when Taiwan Semiconductor said it intends to spend as much as $44 billion this year to expand and upgrade capacity The news provided a tailwind for the chip equipment group and analyst at Jeffries reiterated a buy rating on Applied Materials the stock gained 5% on Friday to a record $167 Bloomberg stud prisoner reporting Looking ahead to earnings this week Well banks are in the spotlight Wall Street's biggest banks including Goldman Sachs Morgan Stanley and Bank of America are set to publish earnings next week Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries I'm susannah Palmer This is Bloomberg You're listening to balancing power with David Weston on Bloomberg radio The consumer price index released this week confirmed a 7% inflation rate for 2021 In a statement President Biden said the report showed some progress but there was still work to do.

GlaxoSmithKline chief Patrick Trent Unilever Passaic Taiwan Semiconductor Cruz Bloomberg Goldman Sachs Morgan Stanley Jeffries susannah Palmer Bank of America David Weston Bloomberg radio President Biden
"unilever" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

05:10 min | 9 months ago

"unilever" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Alive today. A huge challenge for all businesses, many businesses will not survive this. A company like Unilever is resilient, it's huge. And so it probably will be able to weather this storm better than others, but there's no question that you will face some very difficult decisions if you haven't already in terms of staffing personnel laughs furloughs, et cetera talk to me a little bit about some of these hard decisions that you are already finding yourself having to make. You know, I really, really passionately believe that when they're going through a crisis like this, a company like Unilever has to protect its workforce and protect the pain. We.

"unilever" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

05:25 min | 9 months ago

"unilever" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Motivation, retention will be an outcome of that. A lot of companies talk and not just talk but really focally committed to diversity. Pretty much most fortune 100 companies around the world diversity is one of their core values, right? And as it is with Unilever, and you have achieved, for example, 50 50 gender balance and managerial roles, which is which is super impressive, but I'm sort of ask you to play a thought experiment with me, which is for people who sort of hear the diversity thing and know that it's the right thing to do, or that culturally, it seems like the right thing to do, but aren't doing it. What argument would you make to them that there is actually not just a moral downside but a business and financial downside by not emphasizing diversity. You know, one of the things guy we did was invest in our top thousand leaders so that they really buy into why we need gender balance. Beyond the point I have less patients for business case and I'm famously viral in a video that I've never been viral before till this sort of video of me snapping and getting angry at Davos went viral saying show me a business case for why men are good for business and I'll write your business case for why women are good for business. You know, where's their business kissing men are good for business? We just assume it. It seems very easy half the world is women, of course, we should have more women in our business, but not everybody buys that. So we actually invested time in our thousand leaders for some the business case of bills. The people who bind to it because they have daughters and the daughters start asking the question, are you saying I'm going to go into a world where my brother is a better chance than me really is that the world you're building and that makes them think the summit is the talent angle for some it's the moral angle. So you've got to convince your top 1002 thousand leaders and whatever way the Best Buy into it that there's rational emotional moral risk all sorts of reasons for doing this. So we did lots of wonderful things. We focused on numbers and we focused on culture we did both. So in numbers, we ensured that every job we a point for has to have a balance slate. They have to be as many talented women that you find as men. We instituted a place what we call gender appointment ratios. We said simple gender appointment ratios is in 5 years. How many opportunities you had to make an appointment in your batch? How many times you're pointed a man how many times your point at a moment? Simple. If you have a gender point of ratio one, it means for all the opportunities you had, you're pointed equal number of men and women. So it just threw a spotlight on the leaders who were simply not making progress because in 5 years if you've not been able to make decent appointments, just really have to question yourself saying what's going on here. So the combination of immense leadership commitment and focusing on numbers, focusing on culture, so it's a combination of all of these things. Lena, you oversee a 170,000 employees around the world, and obviously you're dealing with so many different types of workplace cultures and environments, right? The workplace in Germany is very different from the workplace in the UK or Korea is very different from the workplace in Japan. The workplace in India is super different from the workplace in Jordan or in Lebanon. But as the head of HR for a worldwide company, how do you reconcile those differences? You know, a guy you touched upon a very important thing. You know, one of the biggest joys of my job is that one size doesn't fit all. I always have to think about this. I have to flex everything we do to make it relevant to the context we are in. I give a very simple example. Remote working, working out a phone, which is now become all of our reality with COVID. When we went to do a lot of agile and remote working as part of a diversity and inclusion agenda, you know, people in Europe said great. I love this, you know? It works for me. People in Japan said, no, I'm not sure I want to do this. We have smaller houses. And I'm not sure what I said about this in my house. The women in Pakistan said, listen, my mother in law lives with me. And if I'm working, she thinks I'm available to talk. It doesn't work for me. Women in Saudi Arabia said, you know, actually, want to get out to the office for a few hours. The day for a so something that looks so simple. We're giving you the flexibility to work out of home many time you wish. Wasn't joyfully received in all parts of the world with the same enthusiasm. So it's taught me many lessons on how our people programs have to be nuanced for the context they are in have to be flexed have to be translated into the context. Both literally as a language translations, but also figuratively to make it relevant for the population of speaking off in that country. Lena we're in the midst of the greatest global health crisis in living history, right? There's been nothing like this since 1918 and certainly for virtually everybody who's.

Unilever Lena Japan Lebanon Korea Germany Jordan India UK Europe Pakistan Saudi Arabia
"unilever" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"unilever" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"This is wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. Lena, I want to ask you and I have a deeper into practices in HR, right? Because retention I mean, retention is key, right? Because when you are hiring onboarding somebody, bringing somebody, first of all, finding the right person. And then bring them on board and then keeping them as expensive. It's very expensive to lose somebody. You've already invested a lot in bringing them on and training them and giving them skills. It's cost you a lot of money and employer. So when you think about all of the priorities that you have as a leader of HR, is retention right near or right at the top. You know, I must say that I believe if you work hard on engagement and motivation, you will end up retaining. I'll give you some numbers for Unilever. A global attrition is less than 5%. What retains people is one if they feel the stretch and challenge in what they're doing. The second thing that keeps people is when they feel that they can lift the purpose and passion. People will stay when they feel they have leaders who provide them the empowerment and space. And they will stay if they feel their rewarded and recognized for what they do. Their valued for who they are. So I feel that the harder we work on making sure people feel engaged with Unilever's purpose feel engaged with their own purpose and what they want to do. They feel like you really cares about their well-being about their learning that we learned a retaining them. I can tell you the fundamental reason that people leave because they're not stretched. They're not valued. They have a boss who sucks. It's many of those reasons. It's never money. Money is the reason they might say because it's much more convenient to see somebody else gave me a package that was better than having the difficult conversation seeing my boss is a difficult person to work with. So my advisers work on.

Unilever Lena
"unilever" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

11:53 min | 9 months ago

"unilever" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Me understand that management might be a better career option for me, and that I loved commerciality. I loved business. I loved being around people. I was all about leadership engagement, motivation, and he just sort of gently nudged me to think of management and to think of human resources. So he was basically saying to you, hey, look, you know, I don't know about this engineering thing. It might really not be you for you. You may not be right at it. You know, it's a risky thing to say, because if you're someone's mentor and you say, look, you never really cut out for this, but you might want to try this thing. I mean it was very good advice, but it could have turned into the person that you thought, oh, this guy said I couldn't do it, but I still persevered. You know what I mean? You know, they're also working for three four months as a telecom engineer. You know, I was bored out of my mind. I was waiting for lunchtime so I could interact with people. I was in an R and D laboratory and trying to understand more about fiber optics and picture and picture television. And you know, your heart, my heart didn't sing. And you're here when I talk about purpose and bash and my heart didn't sing. So you know instinctively, okay, this is not where really I'm getting from. I remember talking to my father and seeing who was a big sponsor for me and was the number one person in the family who said, yeah, she should get educated and we shouldn't worry about whether she's going to have a career or not, let it just do what she needs to. I remember telling him that I wanted to do a personality. It wasn't even called human resources in those days. And he was so disappointed. He said, you know, why would you do this now that you've studied to be an engineer? Why don't you do more things in engineering? So it was a tough moment being 20 years old and thinking, oh my God, what am I going to do and just feeling this incredible pull and draw to do human resources, but generally being other than my mentor, most others thought it was in such a great idea. Human resources is such a specific and I mean, especially for a young person to think this is really what I should focus on, how did you even know that that was going to be the right fit? Obviously it was, but how did you know what that point in your life? You know, one of the things I talked to a lot of young people, including my sons, my young sons, who were 21 and 18 is if you asked ten people who know you well, what you're really good at. And what makes your heart sing, they can tell you, they can see it. And it's a little bit of that. I sort of instinctively had a draw and pull for this, but I didn't know it could have been a terrible mistake, but I was investing two years to do an MBA. It was not the end of the world. And I knew that if at the end of two years, I came back thinking this wasn't for me. Maybe I could go back and be an engineer. Yeah. As it happened from the very first class, I sort of felt this makes sense. I felt at home. But you know, in many ways, learning to trust you instincts, learning to ask people around you, learning to trust yourself mentors has been part of some of my lifelong learnings. It's amazing because you have spent your entire career with Unilever so far. You joined Unilever out of business school in India in 1992 as a traine as a summer trainee. Unilever has obviously huge it's a multinational. It has huge facilities and production facilities all around the world, including in India, how did that happen? Were they recruiting on the campus? On campus, recruiting on campus, I attended the campus interview. I joined as a summer intern for two months. I loved it. I loved the quality of people I was working with. They loved the quality of work and then I was fortunate and blessed for them to come back and tell me they wanted me as a management training or what we call the Unilever leadership future leaders program what we call it today is to call it the management training program in those days. And they came back and gave me an offer and I grabbed it with both hands and there's been no looking back. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor yogi tea. We know that sometimes finding a moment for yourself isn't so simple, but self care doesn't have to be complicated. In fact, it can be as simple as brewing yourself a warm, comforting cup of yogi, honey lavender stress relief tea. With soothing aromatics like lavender, chamomile, and lemon balm, this relaxing herbal tea blend encourages you to take a moment to pause, step away from the chaos of the day and sip your way to a more stress free state of mind. Support your well-being with yogi tea. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Squarespace, with everything you need to create a beautiful and modern website. Start with a designed template and use drag and drop tools to make it your own. With Squarespace, you have the ability to customize the look and feel with just a few clicks. All websites are optimized for mobile and content adjust so your site looks great on any device. Head to Squarespace dot com slash NPR for a free trial, then use the offer code NPR to save 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain. Welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy Roz. So all right, so you join Unilever as a trainee and what was your job? Well, I mean, because you presumably, you're thinking, okay, you're already interested in HR, and you're starting to think about HR, but that was not your first job there. No, the first 5 you know the first couple of years as the management trainee, I spent in sales for 6 months. I was selling tea in Haryana and not India that I was a salesperson. I ran personnel for factory. I understood about industry relations. I can only think back with great happiness, pride, learning, colored, what you may. I also realized pretty quickly that I was one among a very, very small group of women. In fact, I have all the record for being the first woman at many things in understand lever. You know, I often say that I didn't break any glass ceilings, but I was actually breaking glass base, but because for example, I was the first woman to go into a night shift in a factory that made margarine in India for Unilever. And I was the first woman who went and built a road along with rural villages in 8000 support. So I started the first footsteps into the privilege and the burden of being the first woman at many things in her labor. So the first 6 years were a number of what I call grass root experience. I learned what it takes to make up products to sell our products to work with unions. And I'm a big proponent of saying, you must in a business really know what are the growth drivers of your business? How product gets made? How it gets sold. You must experience that you must do it. So those were the first 6 years before I started moving into more and more human resource roles. And eventually you became the general manager of HR for essentially for Unilever's division in India right Hindustan Unilever. Yes, I became the general manager for the home and personal care business running HR for our largest division. And then I became I was on the board of minister lever as the executive director of a human resource and again had the burden and privilege of being the first woman in a hundred years on the board of Hindustan lever as the executive director for human resource. So after my first 5, 6 years in the business doing, like I said, crossroad rules I did a number of rules. And started partnering different divisions and then became the head of HR in 2007. When you are running HR in such a complex and incredibly vibrant country like India, I mean, I can't even imagine what it entails, right in terms of just the level of detail and the different types of employees. I mean, you've got everyone from presumably from people in the factory floor to people in C suites that you are sort of shepherding through the process. Absolutely. Huge complexity. I'll give you some of the numbers we had 46 factories with 96 trade unions. 15,000 people in the business and a 100,000 people who sold for us in different merchandisers distributors. So yes, it was massively exciting. Huge, complex, big scale. It's the good largest company in India and its market capitalization does. So yes, you are in the spotlight, you are under focus. And innocently, but also had a huge reputation for building a lot of the leaders for India ink. It was called the CEO factor of India and continues to be called that. So huge proof file of building talent, not just for hindsight, but for India. Ink. So massive honor and privilege for me to have done that job for 5 years of my life and it built a lot of the skills that helping me be the chief HR office of a Unilever today. Lena, you were with a group of senior team from Mille ver in Mumbai in 2008 at the Taj hotel when it was attacked by terrace, I think most people listening will remember that horrifying story almost I think 200 people were lost their lives and that attack and you were you were there. You had to I guess hide for 24 hours during that siege. What do you remember about it? Guy that was without a doubt one of the most difficult nights of my life and something that changed me as a person as it would when you realized that might not go back home to see your kids again. You know, my husband and I were both stuck in the Dodge that night and hiding the entire night having two boys 9 and 5 sitting at home waiting for the parents to turn back after dinner and seeing this horrific news and television that the Taj was being attacked. And you know, without any doubt was a terrible night and one, you know, I wouldn't wish on my enemies and hiding the whole night hearing shotgun shots through the nights screens. It's just, you know, one of those things that change you forever. One of the things I remember from that night is the extraordinary bravery and courage of the staff and attached who worked so hard to get us to safety, there was a young girl malaka jagan who was no more than maybe 23 24. I remember her briefly encouraged her member how much the staff tried hard to find places for us to hide so there was a higher chance that one of us would survive among couples. And I also remember feeling after that and reflecting after that that I would follow my heart with even more passion and even more density because I don't want to waste my time in this world. I've been given a second chance, not many people have had.

Unilever India NPR Hindustan lever Roz Haryana Mille ver Taj hotel Lena Mumbai malaka jagan
"unilever" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

04:58 min | 9 months ago

"unilever" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"The world. I'm guy raz and on the show today, Lena nair, global head of HR, at Unilever. My job today is to be in the service of 170,000 people of Unilever. It's not to run HR and be a boss of a big function. It is to be in service of people. How can I build a better business and by building a better business better world? Lena's journey from internship all the way up to the C suite at one of the largest consumer products companies in the world..

Lena nair Unilever raz Lena
"unilever" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"unilever" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You an hour and a half into Europe's trading session and it is read on the board The stock syrup 600 is down three tenths of a percent here in the UK You're seeing losses of four tenths of a percent down 27 points The kaki haunts is in similar territory a slightly worse picture over in Spain The ibex down 8 tenths of a percent on a sector bisector basis You do have some green in some of these sectors personal care is gaining close to 1% real estate is also just eking out some gains Bottom the list though you got basic resources banks and industrials You have a slate of earnings that have gone through today You've got Scandinavian banks You've also had Barclays Unilever SAP as well so investors weighing up the earnings picture of the impact of inflation as well on their radar In terms of what we got from Asia the MSCI a specific blended down at 7 tenths of a percent bit of a mixed picture on the mainland in China weighing up concerns about evergreen that could be on course for a default this weekend Down two tenths of percent on the Shanghai comp in your currency space the Bloomberg dollar index is gaining up a tenth of a percent Euro dollar currently at one 16 down similar territory on the back of that dollar strength The ten year over in the U.S. currently at one 64 1.64 is the yield on the U.S. ten year In the commodity space Brent is training at $85 for the Brent price and cryptocurrencies as well You're looking at Bitcoin is 65,000 dollars per Bitcoin All right well coming up in about 30 minutes time here on London DAB it is Bloomberg surveillance that early edition Miller Kayleigh Lyons in Anna Edwards joining us now from Berlin is Matt Miller I have to say I'm really excited about your interview with the CEO of Norway sovereign wealth fund because what is it They own something like one and a half percent of all global stocks Yes they own more stocks than anyone else in the world Which I think is totally cool as well Tron grant is the deputy CEO of Norway's sovereign wealth fund And they're in the middle of a shift because they might have to divest some of their big carbon emitters like Exxon and Chevron They had a new government elected last month and as this new government comes in center left government they're going to push Norway's biggest well fund in the world's biggest owner of stocks to change its holdings So that's like that causes some real wake And the other thing is they are excited about getting other wealth funds other sovereign wealth funds on board even like PIF out of this Saudi Arabia which would be insane if you had ten or $20 trillion worth of Simon well funds say we're going to divest from our carbon emitters So I'm excited to talk to him as well but as Tom said we have so many earnings that we can't ignore You had Barclays coming out which is important to our viewers a lot of them will be getting bigger bonuses now You had ABB the biggest weight right now in the stock 600 it makes robotics heavy electrical equipment automation technology And it's worried about supply constraints So it's down it cut its outlook Unilever the maker of my favorite food in the world hellman's mayonnaise as well as dove's open Ben and Jerry's ice cream It says that inflation is going to last at least another 12 months At least another 12 months So all of that plus SAP is out with earnings You know it's not a $180 billion company and it's traded in New York as well So very important to watch even if no one really understands what SAP does Can I just say QP manets definitely superior to hellmann's Are you serious Is there a's out there that you honestly feel is better than hellman's mayonnaise Japanese mayonnaise the best I promise you can send you some I'll try it But I'm doubtful I've never on 47 years old soon to be 48 I've never had anything better And mostly I can't stand other quote unquote mainly It's mostly salad dressing you know Fair enough All right Matt we've got to expand your palate here We're looking forward to catching that on Bloomberg surveillance early dish and I promise they'll probably be less Mayo chat on that show that's coming up next year on London DB digital radio And for our U.S. listeners you can catch Matt and Paul swe hosting Bloomberg markets at ten a.m. Okay from condiments to banking Buggers makers made the most of the booming deals market They helped to offset more muted earnings that it's trading as units so that was in the third quarter investment banking fees rose almost 60% to close to a billion pounds following the strong performance of U.S. peers and as had predicted 775 million pounds in revenue from this business Revenue from fixed income training though that plunged 20% as the rally that drove record profit a year ago faded Our colleagues and Edwards and Mark cardinal spoke to the Barclays CEO just Stanley earlier this morning I mean I think overall the investment bank had a had a very solid quarter In investment banking fees and the primary side whether it's advisory debt capital markets equity capital markets we had the highest quarter in the history of Barclays And in the markets business they continued with very strong profitability And you'll have mixes between thick and equities and in other parts of the business But overall we were very pleased you know we delivered a record 7 billion pounds year to date Barclays has never been this profitable and has never been as well capitalized in the markets business has done its part Good morning Jessica Guys clarify you kind of see the underperformance of your key fixed income business which has been such a strong point for Barclays in the past It's missed estimates again is down You see this is cyclical and not something they need to be worried about There's no cost cutting that area no plan to restructure it There's no particular plan to kind of fix that business You don't see it as needing to be fixed Right now the investment bank is the most profitable part of the bank's overall operating platform It's done exceptionally well during the course of the year We have a great team I think we manage risk very well So you know when you're delivering plus 15% levels of profitability I think you stay with the team that you have on the field and we feel fine In the overall capital markets it has grown in size significantly over the last couple of years as central banks have injected liquidity to provide financing for customers and clients around the world That capital markets is not going to shrink And so I think you want to have a markets.

Barclays Unilever Norway SAP Miller Kayleigh Lyons Anna Edwards Tron grant Barclays U.S. hellman Bloomberg Matt Miller Bitcoin evergreen Paul swe
Boycott Ben & Jerry's and Unilever

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 1 year ago

Boycott Ben & Jerry's and Unilever

"Should be Out of business. New Jersey Mayor Blast again The daily Mail, not The New York Times, not the Washington Post. New Jersey Mayor blast Ben and Jerry's virtue, signaling pro Palestinian stance and S How come you still selling China, Saudi Arabia and Syria if you care about human rights. The company released a statement in July 19 that's selling ice cream and occupied Palestinian territory. It's called Judean Samaria. You might want to check the Bible, you Was inconsistent with our values. The ice cream maker is owned by British consumer goods conglomerate Unilever. Which has its U. S headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Mayor Mario Cran, Jack. This is a good man. That town's mayor sent a letter about the ice cream makers decision on Monday to Unilever. He called Ben and Jerry's decision virtue, signaling and question while still sounds, I screamed other countries with appalling human rights records. A spokesperson for the mayor described the letter to the daily mail dot com is threatening legal recourse against Unilever. And that's spelled you and I. L E V E R Town officials will be introducing a resolution regarding the company on Wednesday evening. You should go to your town officials, folks, You should go to your Your county boards, supervisors and others and tell them to do the same thing. That you and they want to boycott Ben and Jerry's and even better Unilever. To the extent you're able to And when you're in a lever As a board meeting in America shareholder meeting. We should show up at that, too.

New Jersey Unilever Mario Cran Jerry BEN The Daily Mail Washington Post The New York Times Samaria Englewood Cliffs Saudi Arabia Syria China Jack America
"unilever" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"unilever" Discussed on Switch4Good

"Did have trouble. I understand using the term mayo. Right can you tell us about that. You're right that there is trouble. And that was part of the american egg. Board focused on same in the same with another company called unilever which is why largest food companies What they tried to do is claim that if you sell a product that's mayonnaise. You have to have exit And of course you know just was not gonna put eggs in there mayonnaise. And secondly the regulation says the word mayonnaise. Just mayo as you know. Alexander is called mayo. It's not called the word mayonnaise. So by the letter of the regulation. You can put anything you want a male and so the company fought it and eventually of course america org dropped everything. They're doing because of being exposed unilever they fought a lawsuit against him decreed. I mean at the time have to create probably had a couple dozen people. I went to largest corporations. The world has ever known. Imagine a couple dozen. People garages get a lawsuit from the largest corporations in the world but unilever dropped the lawsuit because they got a lot of negative attention For following this suit. And i i gotta tell you to give unilever credit. They've really since then. Have embraced plant based and i give him a lot of credit..

unilever Alexander america
Florida Governor Ron DeSantis Says Unilever, Ben & Jerry's Better Watch Out

Mark Levin

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis Says Unilever, Ben & Jerry's Better Watch Out

"BDs movement Um and Unilever and Ben and Jerry's, for God's sakes, who eats that crap anyway? But I'm just moving on. So anyway, they've taken a very, very anti ice America move against the state of Israel, and, uh You have a law in your state? You've triggered it. There's a process that you're going through and you were saying something else. So Florida did it. Texas has done some similar in New York and 33 of the four biggest states of the country, and we all have pretty big pension plans. And since then Unilever's lost a lot and their stock price. And so Ben and Jerry's only represents a real small portion of the company. But for whatever reason, when they acquired Ben and Jerry's, they let them have their own kind of Social awareness Committee that makes these decisions. So Ben and Jerry's made the This decision, and they had the right to do it under the way the corporation structure, but it's really bad for Unilever. So I think they're going to have to do something to reel this in because it's just totally unacceptable, and it's going to hurt the company, the large the parent company with with with what they're doing, but it's totally ridiculous and we're going to bite back and I'll tell you we did this early in my tenure as governor against Airbnb. They tried something similar. We did it, we bit back. An Airbnb changed their tune. So I think Unilever is going to have to change their tune very shortly.

Unilever Jerry BEN Social Awareness Committee Israel America Florida Texas New York Airbnb
We Can Launch a BDS Movement Against Unilever, Too

Mark Levin

01:09 min | 1 year ago

We Can Launch a BDS Movement Against Unilever, Too

"Example. The Company that owns Ben and Jerry's. What was it, Mr. Producer? I mentioned it earlier trying to find it. Unilever. Ladies and gentlemen, we ought to determine what products Unilever's selling in the United States and not purchase them. We need to hurt their bottom line. We can boycott, divest and sanction to its a perfect example of what I'm talking about. Divestment campaigns, pressure banks, corporations, local and state governments, religious institutions. Pension funds, etcetera withdrawal investments in in support for the various Marxist movements. Sanctions campaigns. Pressure local and state governments to end taxpayer subsidies and other forms of support for institutions. That ties these various Marxist movements and policies now For instance, people who want to get involved in this Should find out when Unilever has its public shareholder meetings and attended mass. Organized meetings. Go there and make yourselves hurt.

Unilever Mr. Producer Jerry BEN United States
Ben & Jerry's Is Boycotting Israel

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Ben & Jerry's Is Boycotting Israel

"What does that mean? Then injuries. Actions set a precedent that differs from many past boycotts that had made headlines which have often focused on products produced in today, and Sameera are used by the I D. F. The past got winery, located in Sharp Binyamin Industrial Park of the West Bank's area C fought for the right to be labeled made in Israel, even though it was located outside its sovereign territory. So what does this mean? The boycott criteria set by Ben and Jerry's would make any Israeli or foreign company that helps stock a supermarket. With those products susceptible to boycott in other words, that sells that even cells into today and Samaria. The supermarkets, the ice cream parlors or anything would be subject to boycotts. So they want to cut off and starve. To the extent they are able to. People who live in their homeland. Even the European Union doesn't ban the sale of its products to settlements. One need only wander into a grocery store and look at the number of franchise labels based on foreign global companies to understand the gravity of the situation. What's next? Heinz ketchup, Hellmann's mayonnaise, even the newly imported Starbucks coffee that has suddenly graced the supermarket shelves Ben and Jerry's independent border directors. This argue that its intention was to boycott Israel and that it opposed the decision. Parent company, Unilever and the Ben and Jerry's CEO to limit the boycott solely to occupied Palestinian territory. Quote unquote Occupied Palestinian territory.

Sameera Sharp Binyamin Industrial Park West Bank BEN Jerry Samaria Israel Heinz Ketchup European Union Hellmann Starbucks Unilever
Ben & Jerry's Show How Radical Leftists Use BDS Movement

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 1 year ago

Ben & Jerry's Show How Radical Leftists Use BDS Movement

"I want to go through a few examples. Welcome, by the way. Welcome. Of how the Democrat Party and their enablers and surrogates never give up. And how they use almost anything. Even the criminal law. To try to acquire power. Keep our crush their enemies crushed their opponents even And why it's important for us really to start. Organizing and pushing back. As we are, and we will. Let's start with this one. Ben and Jerry's Ben and Jerry's. All It is, is an ice cream there was starting in Vermont. Too radical kooks. And they sold their little Ice cream stand. I know it's not an ice cream stand. To Unilever. Don't want to read something to you. This is just one of several today. But it's nonstop. And this is this one's from the Jerusalem Post. Ben and Jerry's Israel boycott a BDs game changer. Five reasons why boycott divest and sanction Now those of you who have the book there's hundreds of thousands of you know who do have the book If you look Halfway into the last chapter on the action issues. We choose liberty, which is push back. You'll see. One of the first things I say is, we need to use the BDs movement intolerant to our purposes and use it against our enemies.

Jerry BEN Democrat Party Jerusalem Post Unilever Vermont Israel
Israeli PM Vows 'Aggressive' Action Over Ben & Jerry's Ban

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Israeli PM Vows 'Aggressive' Action Over Ben & Jerry's Ban

"Israel's prime minister vows aggressive action over a Ben and Jerry's brown Naftali Bennett spoke to the head of Unilever off to its subsidiary Ben and Jerry's announced it would stop selling its ice cream in the Israeli occupied west bank uncontested East Jerusalem but his office has quoted him as saying that Israel will act aggressively against the clearly anti Israel step the announcement was one of the highest profile company rebukes of Israeli settlements in the west bank and East Jerusalem terror trees Israel captured in the nineteen sixty seven but he swore I'm Charles through this month

Naftali Bennett Israel Jerry BEN Unilever East Jerusalem West Bank Charles
The Center's Ben Bennett on the Beauty Brand Incubator Space

The Glossy Beauty Podcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

The Center's Ben Bennett on the Beauty Brand Incubator Space

"I'm fascinated by the beauty brand incubator space. And you know it's something that you know you heard about your murmurings about but until you're actually in the industry. I don't think you really understand the nuts and bolts of it and i think it's so surprising you know what i if i was someone. Layperson wasn't in the industry to hear that like a j air. Unilever gap is hiring an outside agency to do all of us for them so for you. You know when you were getting these calls and getting approached. She know develop brand new brands. And have say at these major conglomerates. What was that like for you. I mean it kind of takes the veil off a bit about what companies are really doing themselves and what they are right. Yeah i think if you're not in the industry it is it is surprising. You know if If you were if we had you know executives from laurie al or or unilever here you know on our on our in our conversation today. I think they would tell you that they know what they do. Well and they know what they don't do well and incubating a new brand or developing a new brand is is challenging. You know it some when you think about the machine of large. Cpt accompany at the the processes and the the strategy that is put into to globalizing a brand and really And turning it into a household brand. It's a different dna then Then the kind of young scrappy risk you have to take to to try something new and the willingness to to be

Laurie Al Unilever
Daniel Martin Talks Tatcha and the Royal Wedding

Look Behind The Look

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Daniel Martin Talks Tatcha and the Royal Wedding

"So daniel. Thank you so much for joining me today. I am very. I've been wanting to have you on forever I just started this. in september. and one of my best friends is troy and nathaniel. And they they were like yeah. When are you having daniel on and so much better you in the city. Yes oh my god we yeah. I live on the upper west side. Oh okay we're we're getting together. I'm half vaccinated. So he to me totally okay. So we're we're definitely getting together. I can't lay god. I can't believe we're talking about like that now like it's happening we're actually able to plan like summer and spring get togethers. It's very a turning that cova corner. So my god thank god covid for you has been kind of interesting because you were blessed with this position at tasha. Yes hiding out did that. How did that come to fruition. Had been in the works before. Call it oak. Yeah yeah totally so I saw vicki of gosh. I wanna say it was the summer before the new year and She was like look this and it was during the time of the acquisition with her with now unilever. Okay and It just came out of the blue. And i was like well. I'm on contract with dior and on his beauty and you would have to. You know for me to accept this. You have to get me. You know basically me out of my contract and then see yeah. She came back in there like we can. And at this point. I was six years in with your three years. In honest i have such an incredible relationships with brands but i was always able to play with with tasha because they knew my history with vicky. They knew that in both were exclusive. They were non-exclusive able to have my hands with other brands. That were non compete okay so very fortunate to have that opportunity but at that point i was like i kinda. You know it'd be. I would love to get in full time so to speak to really get into product development education. And just kinda slow my roll down.

Daniel Nathaniel Troy Vicki Unilever Dior Tasha Vicky
Bahubali Shete CEO of TinyChef on His Journey to 1M Voice App Users

The Voicebot Podcast

08:30 min | 1 year ago

Bahubali Shete CEO of TinyChef on His Journey to 1M Voice App Users

"Remember when you and i i spoke about what you were doing that. You're working on the the knobs and the scale different things in order to automate all the mechanical parts of cooking. And then you're going to add. Recipes is just that was like sort of a secondary element in some ways and you totally flipped. It eliminated the first part. So i guess that makes more sense because you started out in the iot that's equipment and then you wound up determining that wasn't the best way to go. So what data points did you get. And and how did you collect those data points. The convince you to make the switch in your focus so Don't change the cooking equipment very often in the sense that smart kitchen appliances which are coming definitely You need smart kitchen appliance. You need robotics but consumers do not have enough space in the kitchen to add more wrote gadgets in the kitchen they already have enough and they don't chain them in unless there are no small blender on those kind of products so the basic cooking up a novel on wednesday by his dad with them for any answer fifteen years and it's it's not easy to change and you cannot retrofit on these devices because they're so attached to things that the look and feel and us except those products are very important so i felt that numis been not willing to know either it off changes equipments and hence the market was becoming very niche game smart kitchen appliances and i felt that i was right in saying that that it is going to be yields before the Plans has become a commodity. And become you know get used to them and start using them in the kitchen and in the meantime you know me as a startup definitely wanted to find where the pinpoint sought and assault them. And that's really felt that the pain points really in the journey and that's where we shifted our focus to this. How long did it take you to come to that conclusion to be already reality mad about you. Know five thousand knobs and be able to ship it to them. We made a road running campaign and all that and then we had noted on everything. Get so you had a indigo kickstarter. Yeah in new right. So you fully funded that you actually produce the product you could have shipped them the product but at that point you decided it's it'll be better for us to refund the money than to have to deploy this product in support it because you didn't really believe in that market segment anymore. I say so. That must have been a very painful decision to make. It's it's both painful as well as emotional for me. Because i come from robotics in address space and i'm so attached to hardware. I believe i can saw putting hardware than getting away from data and then being myself as a businessman rather than being technologist was said that a decision so tell me how that decision played out. was that just. You looked at the data. You made the decision or did you have a mentor. advisors other people in the company that you consulted with. How did that play out. This is really important. I know a lot of people have had go through these pivots and this is sort of a soft pivot but a significant one. Be great to share your experience on that. Yeah definitely for explain a very major role in that. So it is in vlad. I met so many People i met from meek it companies see yours to Big marketing gle ascent from campbell. Nestle and unilever walmart so many people and then i had the vehicle does the idea in understand the views on it and definitely doesn't have any clear advice coming from all of them which was also deflecting in my initial trials Consumers that it was difficult for them to add up or product in that existing kitchen and yeah a lot of an Next so it was. You talked to a lot of people they all gave you. Basically the same advice you were seeing the problems on the customer side so it just became obvious even though there was a painful decision for you emotionally given your background. Yeah well it's hard to. It's hard to kill the baby right. I mean i think that's what we would say is a baby for adoption or whatever it is you're doing and focus So then the the feature that you thought was going to be complementary to your main product became the product so once you decided that this how did you change. How did you change your strategy. What did that mean was going. You're going to be doing differently. Reduced doing more of the stuff that you already doing the recipe side or did you have to basically start over I had to start or in some sense It was in the same direction. Same solution same in a find though solid from the consumer angle but the approach is completely different. I i i i may have said this in one of the podcast but you know one of the consumer is such just nine initially conducted a focus group discussion. One lady told me a benign asked her a question that what is that your family as as it acknowledgee vici-. You had that in the kitchen to help you in the kitchen. And she said google maps to said my husband who is seventy plus. Now who couldn't drive denise back even in our own city now he's able to drive in any part of the world anyplace from any to any point with all the confidence just because he has maps. It doesn't get up. And i wish that technology was available in the kitchen with which i can walk. Can anybody can walk into the kitchen. Cook any dish they will and that goes in iowa for me. So that's fascinating so that's a really interesting insight so you you spoke with this one customer and you realize what they needed was google maps for cooking. And it's really interesting because we really think about recipes is being more mechanics of it. So how do i know what to do. When and what sequence. But it's really as much as anything a confidence builder if you could build them something like a cooking concierge or adviser that helps them through the entire process. So there's both a functional and emotional aspect to it grew and when i looked at it I also realized that there is so much of resources so many this is available in thumbs up man you can find it as a bs in a local all lack but still not satisfied for the simple reason that didn't know what to trust because it's one thing about searching for some election bleeding some reviews but other thing about cooking that dish yourself for your family it could end up being a messy meal basil. They didn't know whom trusted partner in himself. At spiezio sweaty critical of them and an back. I felt that you know be need not only a good content but a good experience in order to make be committee For consumers in the kitchen so to become the will the good expedience than realize that we need any is solution which understands colletti techniques colletti science. Which can then have a very fruitful conversation with the consumers and make that choice. I expediency really a natural expedience intense. I started my journey on the i or colletti

Numis Unilever Nestle Walmart Campbell Google Denise Iowa Spiezio Colletti
How Can We Hydrate Our Skin?

Allure: The Science of Beauty

04:09 min | 1 year ago

How Can We Hydrate Our Skin?

"Hey everyone welcome to the science of beauty. a podcast from allure. I'm michelle lee. The editor in chief. And i'm jenny by executive beauty director. And on this podcast we're gonna be diving into the science behind beauty and the products that we are always talking about an testing at a lower. Today's episode is all about hydration. And because we're taking this deep dive into the world of k. Beauty hydration as possibly the most important topic. That's right michelle and in our previous episode on layering. You heard dermatologist. Marie jin talking about the importance of hydration and how layering can help lock in moisture. So how do we help. Hydrate our skin in the first place to answer that question and more with dr christine lee. A senior research and development manager with age see our partners in producing this episode. Christine can you introduce yourself and tell us a bit about your background and pristine lee on the senior. Rnd manager overseeing unilever space. care business. In north america. I received my phd in two thousand in physical chemistry from the university of florida. And then i joined. Unilever and of worked on the hd brown for about two years so christine agency is based in seoul south korea. And i know you work really closely there with researchers. What can you tell us about. What's trending beauty right now. So in asia a lotta. The skincare formulations can karan's really focused on achieving bright hydrated glowing skin in korea specifically hydrating formulas are really key to rejuvenating the skin so it looks and feels smooth and soft but in addition in asia consumers just are so familiar and comfortable with multi step routines really elaborate application techniques. Like they talk a lot about double cleansing deep massaging. They'll even talk about like rubbing product in with your knuckles. They talk a lot about slapping and patting and tapping. so they're you know they're just really familiar and comfortable with application techniques that we don't talk about in the us as much. The other thing too is really interesting. About the asian consumer is the way the words they use to describe the look and feel of their skin that they're looking for so they'll talk about or glassy or porcelain skin and that much of this is really foreign to the american woman but it just really shows kind of the level of involvement Asian women have in their skincare routine. It's like my perfect skin. Everything you're saying. I'm like yes. Yes yes more of that please. You mentioned hydration which is of course the topic of our episode today as basic as it seems. Can you just define hydration for us as it relates to skin. I mean short really. Hydration pretty much means increasing the skins water content really at the end of the day. Dry skin is more than just a lack of water. When your skin is dry or dehydrated it can start to appear flaky doll. It really starts to feel uncomfortable tight irradiated. It can start to feel like you're getting more sensitive. This really is indicating a much more fundamental breakdown in the Healthy biological processes that are intended to keep skin soft and supple and smooth skins normal renewal processes slow down in absence of sufficient hydration which then leads to further dryness than it starts to pull your skin into this downward spiral alright. I don't love where this is going. What happens in the downward spiral. Our skin's natural explanation processing slowed down which leads to an accumulation of skin cells on the surface and these kind of accumulated or aggregates of skin cells. Start to form flakes which are another indicator of dryness and drier skin surfaces also lead to increase surface texture roughness which traps light which causes the skin to lose translucence and appeared dull and lifeless whereas hydrogen scan on the other hand is smooth radiant feel softer more elastic. More comfortable touchable. So it's not religious the dry or white hydrated it's really kind of biologically related. Wait supposed to versus comfortable. Soft smith hydrogen.

Marie Jin Dr Christine Lee Unilever Michelle Lee Korea Asia Jenny University Of Florida Karan Michelle Christine Seoul North America LEE United States
Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale

"Let's talk about the professional path and You are now the vp gm of the hispanic business unit for pepsico. What was your path to get there. Yeah i am studied engineering for college. So i was math and science person in high school and my physics teacher mr adrian nouvelle who actually was so important to my life that he came to my wedding by way and kind of steered me into the space helped me with College application letters recommendation. And so i studied engineering before. You're so i've been in a manufacturing environment for awhile. Bump steel toed shoes uniform union arment. And that's really where i started my career At the same time my company was so gracious that They paid for my mba. So i went to Uconn in stamford connecticut to take classes at night and really got more exposed to concepts of business management marketing research and just really loved it and so then when i asked for a new gig they said finance or sales and unlike okay sales and sales and all i need to go into marketing because marketing guides what we're doing in sales and i think they could do a better job and so i was lucky that my General manager at the time created a job and that was that was the beginning of my marketing career. So very classically trained at unilever and then pepsi around marketing from like you know the analysts all the way through up till now you know a vp gm. Which i'm really proud and excited about and And yeah i feel like i'm in a really great role. Right can make a big impact on the careers of our of our folks drive to mercy inclusion and drive the business results faster than general market because the population is growing so quick so and There's just so many things that are benefiting from being in this role that That i'm really grateful about. But that's kind of the the journey really. It was not linear at all Did not start off wanting to and marketing that side of my brain and that analytical process orientation i think does just a market yeah i think increasing edge to a home maybe ten years ago when you made the original switch i think today it's much more analytically rigorous than it has been in the past But yeah no. That's that's phenomenal. And i've had a few folks on the show. That have transitioned from engineer to sales marketing. And it's it's funny the way you went through that transition in how you described it because a few of them have described it similarly meaning they. They went from engineering the sales and then they realized my words not yours. How bad marketing screws it up. And they need to go help marketing. Try to figure that out because it it comes down to the sales folks at some level whether their marketing is getting it right or not so. It's an interesting learning curve and A pathway that. I've heard before. So what would what drove what drove the creation of the hispanic business unit. And how are you guys thinking about like measuring success. That's a that's a big scene seemingly to me as an outsider like it seems like a big big thing like a big shift in how you're organized. Yeah this was created. I believe in twenty eighteen by out. Carrie who at the time was still pepsi. Co when of are really incredible leaders kirk. Tanner who's our ceo and My current boss. Greg lyons our cmo and they just really realize that you know the hispanic Business is untapped potential and if we have a fixed mindset about it and we're not going to capture that growth and So what's the do different because in the past. Yeah we had a multicultural team. That definitely had A role but didn't necessarily have ownership and so the do different had to be to create an organization that was dedicated to this and have the right resources. And that's what they did and And it's been pretty successful. Ever since the the key measures to the other question you had really is around. Hey can we help grow faster with hispanic consumer than the general market. Can we help build equity with this fan of consumer and And those are some key metrics we look at and so far. We've we've been We've been pretty pretty successful doing that.

Mr Adrian Nouvelle Arment GM Pepsico Uconn Pepsi Stamford Unilever Connecticut Greg Lyons Carrie Tanner Kirk
"unilever" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"unilever" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"What they were. That's the audience that they got. That's how it grew, and that's what made him different from other ice cream places. So you dance with the lady you came to the dance with, but just don't call her lady because gender is a social construct. But more importantly, there are they both are enjoying their $150 million that their net worth is when they sold the company out to Unilever. Sure if you dug into a bunch of stuff that Unilever buys or sells, I'm sure you can find some sort of racism there. And does that also fall instinct fall back on toe Ben and Jerry because they're still associated with the company in some way. Um, let's just wrap up. Yeah, Let's catch them if that's what it's all about. Yeah, let's catch him in a racist line. And then the same dollars. Get ourselves over that ice creams and chunky monkey. All right, arm? L Yeah, I just want to say again. Yes. Once that sound effect ends, you can listen to the whole podcast, which is actually more fun and fluffy and just activism. If you text Ben to 99 73 You can listen on Spotify up a podcast or at your last meal podcast dot com. Award winning podcast. I might add nominated justice. Good is winning. That's what I always say. Yeah, you don't need a can. You know just a nomination. That's the thing you take, right? Come on now. Right. Thank Rachel Bell. Appreciate it. All right, Tracy Taylor. Here we go. Highway to out near assault in the base in a row to crash there that has traffic, alternating in both directions, and I'm hearing it, like two hours. People have been waiting to just try to get through.

Unilever Ben Jerry Rachel Bell Tracy Taylor assault Spotify
Viennetta Returns

Eater's Digest

04:17 min | 1 year ago

Viennetta Returns

"Via data a favorite dessert from the ninety s from the nineties. I'll is coming back so we have brought on lead social media manager at mussa to talk us through it. Welcome to the show adam low. I'm so happy to be back and talking about something that's so so near and dear to my heart so for those who do not now explain what is being at us or via neta is Basically an ice cream cake. It's in a loaf shape and it's known for its signature ruffled. Look on the edges The classic one is made simply of vanilla ice cream and chocolate like magic. Shell chocolate And that's that's it. That's it's it's a chocolate and vanilla ice cream cake is the most straightforward and also Infancy way to talk about something that is famous for being quote unquote fancy. So when you say something is is back. Has it been rereleased or is it one of those things where it's like now cool again is being Rerelease after being. I believe it was discontinued sometime in the late nineties Although in my research for this i could not nail down a specific year When it was taken away so Vienna is owned by unilever like the international ice cream. Conglomerate and vienna is has been sold in markets all around the world for years. It's only in the us while most famously in the us that it has seen discontinued for the better part of twenty years. That's awesome was hurt. It's back yes but It's it has been continuously available in the markets this entire time. So why do so. Was this a huge moment online and like who who who was. Who's freaking out about this. Okay everybody was freaking out about. This is the is the most distinct way i can put it. Mostly millennials is. The best is probably the best description. I would refer back to what my colleague john said when she wrote this up She was talking about how this is. This is a desert that was widely available when we were kids and something she mentioned that was also like hundreds of people who are sharing. The story about this is When people saw this in their freezer they knew that they were going to have guests was something you serve. People saw the fact that that everybody remembers it but it's been gone for so long Created dislike nostalgia bomb that went off. The thing is it's like i said it's chocolate vinyl. it's certainly not Some exquisite flavorful creation. It's it's so much in the style of this thing with the way it's the the edges are ruffled and lay it on aso layers of chocolate and vanilla We actually had Sir on ada. From a few years ago we had a post about video that was filmed inside the vienna factory in I think i think it's in portugal. Where it's it's the assembly line basically and it's just the machines shooting ribbons of vanilla ice cream and chocolate and then slicing them Chopping them into the lowest that they get sold in and then packaging them. It's like he's the assembly line of how it's done. That post has in the entire time. I've worked continuously like made people Crazy when they see it everybody sees it and they wanna share somebody else. they're like. Hey remember eating this so yes long way of saying yes. There was a tremendous nostalgia about this. That honestly has been very obvious. This was going to happen whenever they brought the annetta back. So it's really just very surprising that they haven't brought it back before this because the potential for nostalgic marketing in a product. Like this has been there for for all this time. They were saving it for when the world needed at the most.

Mussa Adam Low Vienna Unilever United States John Portugal
Quit Your Job, Invent an Amazing Natural Deodorant, and Sell It All for Millions

The Beauty Closet

04:45 min | 2 years ago

Quit Your Job, Invent an Amazing Natural Deodorant, and Sell It All for Millions

"So, Jamie I loved yearbook it's called Super Maker crafting business on your own terms and it just came out this week. I got an advanced copy at I. Think it's Great. It's just this incredible super entertaining personal journey, and then it's also how this sort of how to create your own business how to all in one So this narrative and then there's all these amazing boxes with tips in how to's so I'd kind of recommend to just about anyone. I truly couldn't put it down. You really get into this sort of the raw edges of what it means to have your own business where you're you're mixing things together in your kitchen, and then some potential huge account from overseas calls needs five finished units by the end of the week. Did we set out to make thriller a Memoir Business Book All in one or did you start from one vantage point in the move to the others while I? Thank you. I'm so glad you enjoyed the book that means a lot. Well, when I started my main focus purpose behind the book was really to be an inspiration source of information for further entrepreneurs. You know I've been through it from the ground all the way up to building the company to acquisition and. I. Understand. Now like everything it takes to build a business. Is Not easy of course, but I also knew that. The other business books out there just like. They can gloss over some of these things or maybe they're written by people who've never run a business themselves. So I really wanted something that was easy to understand that was written from a person who Wasn't a serial entrepreneur by had just you know kind of stumbled into business for the first time and I wanted all the lessons in there to really come from a place of experience. I wanted everything that I was suggesting to readers to be no based in in real experience that I had gone through and then the memoir piece. No. That was that was a fun important angle for me too because I think like especially like the earliest years of my life I mean it's it's it's a very short part of the book in the beginning but I think it really sets the scene for like. What it means to like, follow your passion into build a brand out of appear love. So that was important and I think it keeps the book interesting I did want people who? Weren't necessarily interested in building a business to still enjoy the story. You know that's why the memory pizza so. Also, Schmitz customers I I think it's really interesting to to learn about the stories behind brands. You know that's something that always fascinates me and I you know Schmitz has a huge customer base. Now I think they're going to really enjoy the story and I think it's just going to help You know add to that to the love thirty feel for the product and the brand so building a company from almost nothing to. Being. Sold at farmers markets to selling target and whole foods and literally more than thirty thousand other locations around the world. Then getting bought by a giant company like Unilever, all in seven years is such an incredible story. Is it hard to believe it happened and you know would your family and people who knew as a child say oh yeah. I knew she do something like this. Yeah. I every day still I'm just like. Like. How did that happen? It happened so fast and I think what added to just like the craziness of it too is that I, started the company when I was pregnant and so I was balancing motherhood along with entrepreneurship and so just like the last ten years of my life had just spent like this whirlwind of just like becoming a new person and like learning new things about myself and Yeah. My family's proud I was always like it's like the black sheep of the family. So I grew up in the mid west like tiny little town, no entrepreneurs and my family and everybody. was like living the the ideal life I guess you know you go to college you start your family and you never move and it just you know you're happy. In it never just felt right to me I, always knew there was more I just wanted just more diversity and exposure to new things. He does that was quick to move after I graduated college Sunday anybody was surprised by it. You know I also had been like jumping between jobs for most of my early adulthood and I think my parents always a little uneasy but you know had to trust in my choices and even the earliest days of the business you know I know they were a little unsettled with. The the lifestyle on another risk hasn't building a business, but they were proud and always there to support me I think know the one thing that's so special specifically with my parents is that they would go into stores and stand in the Dealer Niles and fix up the shelves make sure Schmitz looked perfect in in even talk to customers in the aisles and say you need to try this product and so you know they've been they've been fans and supporters to from day one and they they're still doing it.

Schmitz Jamie I Super Maker Unilever
Kraft Under Fire for Sexualizing Mac n Cheese

Business Wars Daily

03:50 min | 2 years ago

Kraft Under Fire for Sexualizing Mac n Cheese

"When you think of macaroni and cheese what comes to mind comfort food and easy cheap meal for you your kids or your broke college student or something more risque. Wait if I confused you just now clearly, you miss the drama that happened earlier this month for kraft, Heinz the maker of the number one boxed Mac and cheese in America wound up embroiled in controversy over an ad campaign that most definitely attracted attention to celebrate National Noodle Day October six. In case you missed it on your calendar Somehow Kraft Heinz launched a playful campaign suggesting people send nudes that is noodles to friends and family. The double meaning of course was intentional sending nudes could mean sending nude photos in some of their ads, pictures of a box of Mac and cheese were deliberately out of focus as if the company was hiding something you know. And video featured former Saturday night live actor Vanessa Bayer. Trying to make the distinction between noodles and nudes. It's been pulled from crafts social channels, which I'll get to in a minute but take a listen clear not advocating you send nudes to anyone I'm talking about news not news I want there to be no confusion do not send nudes definitely send news even as it sent social media into a tizzy the campaign was a hit twenty thousand comfort loving tweeter took the brand up on its offer to mail free boxes of the cheesy stuff to loved ones. But unless you subscribe to the theory that all publicity is good publicity, the backlash created a craft crisis parents tore into the multibillion dollar brand on instagram. They said sexualizing macaroni was inappropriate for kids and accused craft of inciting children to send nude pictures. Many angry viewers threatened to ban kraft MAC and cheese from their pantries and turn instead to rivals like Annie's Mac and cheese owned by General Mills, some threatened to boycott. All craft products and some critics went even further according to buzzfeed Cunanan supporters got into the act. buzzfeed describes Cunanan as a collective delusion believers in what has also been called a right wing conspiracy theory subscribed to a number of different baseless notions including that something called the deep state promotes child sex trafficking buzzfeed reported that some Cunanan believers accused craft hines of using it's Mac and cheese nudes campaign for just this purpose. In the end, the company pulled its campaign in a statement brand officials stated, blandly, we sincerely appreciate and hear all of your feedback. As it happened, the news promotion was intended to end only a few days after it began anyway, whether craft considers its campaign, a win or a loss is hard to tell at the moment but consider this not only did craft managed to. Give away thousands of boxes of noodles but the controversy generated thousands of mentions on social media and in the press also keep in mind that making processed foods. Sexy is not a new idea for kraft. Heinz back in February of Twenty nineteen long before our world was upended, the company ran an actual ad on a porn site likening Mac and cheese attraction to addiction to. Well something else entirely that adds steely promoted devour a kraft Heinz frozen food line. That made headlines and sales. It's a big deal for consumer packaged foods players like Kraft Heinz Kellogg in Unilever Comfort food sales have fattened up during the pandemic now officials from Kraft Heinz, and Kellogg promised market very aggressively during the second half of this year to keep momentum up according to industry publication marketing dive given the ferocious rivalry between giant packaged food companies. There's really only one conclusion to draw about a brand that doesn't just go to the edge of tasteful nece but jumps right over it. Even today's cancel culture craft Heinz knows. Exactly. What it's doing.

Kraft Heinz MAC Kraft Heinz Kellogg Kraft Vanessa Bayer Cunanan Buzzfeed America General Mills Annie Hines Unilever Comfort
Thousands of workers are literally stuck at sea

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:29 min | 2 years ago

Thousands of workers are literally stuck at sea

"The CEOS of some of the largest consumer products, companies, Unilever procter, and Gamble Johnson and Johnson are weighing in on what they say is a question of Human Rights on the high seas because of Corona virus measures some three, hundred thousand people who work on commercial vessels you know the kind that carry food and Health, and hygiene products among other things are stuck on their ships unable to leave governments around the world of closed ports, borders, and other travel facilities that allow crew changes and not being able to change crews on these ships is a problem for the health and safety of workers, as well as a pretty good way to clog up supply chains from Washington marketplace's Scott Tong, reports typically commercial ship workers signed contracts of six or ten or twelve months, and when that's up the ship swapped crews at the next port. But whenever they came near the boards, the poor is not allowing any Gano. Bronco Berlin is with the International Transport Workers Federation. He says some workers have been stuck on board for seventeen months in that some ports except products but not people in one case, several ports refuse to take the body of ship worker who died, and then we actually find the way that the body was taken in Singapore, and after fifteen days on board the ship, the issue over work crews is clogging up the supply chain. Tom. Dairy CEO of the Institute for Supply. Management says officials in places like Australia are now starting to ban improperly staff ships from sailing because we're seeing these ships were taken out of circulation as it were. We've seen rates for freight crossing the Pacific. Were than quadruple since June he says, delays are causing fridge and dishwasher shortages in the US and keeping goods moving is critical to the multinational firms that are now pressuring the UN to get involved. The group is the consumer goods forum. In Da Berge Array is director we call face the risk of global relations. Jing. Disrupted and all of this expense of Lucas wellbeing meantime the workers remain mostly invisible says Andrew. Kinsey is marine risk consultant at the user alliens when you go into a store and you look at items on the shelves, their way got to that shelf. Was via. As a consumer, we're blind to it but eighty percent of the goods in the world are delivered by see I'm Scott Tong for

Scott Tong Bronco Berlin International Transport Worker Gamble Johnson TOM Unilever Procter Gano Da Berge Array Institute For Supply Washington Marketplace Kinsey Singapore UN CEO United States Consultant Australia
Palm oil labor abuses linked to world’s top brands, banks

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Palm oil labor abuses linked to world’s top brands, banks

"An Associated Press investigation has found an invisible workforce some of the poorest corners of Asia toilet in the palm oil industry many of them and during various forms of exploitation including child labor rights slavery and allegations of rape in Malaysia and Indonesia these workers tend the heavy reddish orange palm oil fruit that makes its way into the supply chains of many iconic food and cosmetics companies like Unilever l'oreal Nestle and Procter and gamble Gemma tentacles the rainforest action network says the industry has been built on the backbone of human trafficking expect they'll talk back buying of modern slavery and it's been built on the back buying all of these companies being out of violate human rights norms left right and center with no consequence it's virtually impossible to avoid often disguised on labels as an ingredient listed by more than two hundred names I'm sorry shockingly

Rape Malaysia Indonesia Nestle Procter Gemma Associated Press Asia Unilever
Palm oil labor abuses linked to world’s top brands, banks

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Palm oil labor abuses linked to world’s top brands, banks

"The two international an Associated latest farms government Olympic Press developing investigation committee figures president cope show has with Thomas an the unusually nineteen found Bach vaccines high delivered an number invisible a pep of say Americans talk workforce pharmaceutical to Japanese are still some companies government of the seeking poorest are officials trying unemployment corners and to local give of organizers aid the Asia public as much toilet about the information in labor the the palm reschedule department as possible oil says industry twenty eight about hundred twenty the testing seventy one many regimes Tokyo of them thousand and during games as drug various people makers in Bach the U. forms talked S. and filed about public of exploitation the reason health for jobless for officials the postponement benefits including last child seek the corona to week boost labor virus confidence pandemic a high that figure rights any he approved slavery that says proves the vaccine vaccines the corona and will should viruses be allegations be safe ready for still the games of squeezing AstraZeneca rape next many summer CEO businesses in there Pascal Malaysia will be hundreds Soriot and including Indonesia I'm of Paul millions restaurants Stoffels these airlines workers of chief doses and hotels scientific tend the heavy officer of reddish the Johnson number being orange and of Johnson people available palm who are oil continuing say already fruit that they recognize to in that the receive makes first the unemployment its half corona way into virus off benefits emergency the for supply chains demands dropped all for increase of to many twelve the transparency iconic point next six food million year from bokeh and that banks total cosmetics few and developers details is steadily companies to but declined ensure said the that IOC over the like public many Unilever has months has faith been in contact in l'oreal the an end indication with the product World Nestle that Health some Organization of the and unemployed Procter they stressed other and experts or however being gamble rehired that there an are limits unnamed Gemma to and the tentacles that pharmaceutical information others the they have rainforest can used release companies up their action jobless because we're sitting they network must aid protect together about says patient in the half industry one confidentiality of the vote jobs has been that built were initially on and the backbone the integrity lost the of human when only the corona of thing trafficking the virus we scientific have to struck do not expect research always have set they'll been talk recovered to roll back sorry buying it says of my modern camp ultimately slavery in in the Washington same the direction public and will it's have surveys been to built trust show on the a back majority regulators buying of Japanese all around of these companies the world companies and the public and being the independent out don't of violate think the experts Olympics human will rights happen that norms next oversee year left or drug should right and trials center happen with I'm no consequence a Donahue there is shockingly London it's virtually impossible to avoid often disguised on labels as an ingredient listed by more than two hundred names I'm sorry shockingly

"unilever" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"unilever" Discussed on WGN Radio

"A non renewable source. Unilever pledged this week to hit net zero emissions from its products by 2039, former vice president of Kam Ed was charged late Friday with a bribery scandal allegedly evolving allies of Democratic House Speaker Mike Madigan WG and Steve Ruxin reports The Tribune reporting that Fidel Marquez has been charged with one count of bribery conspiracy to influence legislation in Springfield that would benefit the utility Marquez, the first person to be charged in an ongoing Investigation. Comment was charged with bribery in July and has entered into a deferred prosecution agreement with the government have agreed to pay a record $200 million fine and cooperate with investigators in exchange for the charges being dropped in three years. Madigan has denied any wrongdoing and has not been charged Steve Roxton, WG and news There's WG and sports with Jo Brand 18 runs into wins later, the White Sox are back in first after taking the first couple from Kansas City Socks can guarantee a Siri's win tonight. Mark Carman starts the pregame show at 5 30, the Maser and Darrin Jackson had the first pitch at 605 right here on 7 20. W G. N Yu Darvish in the Cubs helped their first place lead, taking the series opener against the Cardinals last night. They're hosting ST Louis for a double header today from Wrigley Advert, Al's ally, and Adam Wainwright, starting things at 4 15 from the North side. Bears need to cut down their roster to 53 today by three o'clock, the team naming Mitt Stravinsky is the weak one starter yesterday and later on from Louisville. It will be the 146 Kentucky Derby on the home of the Black Clocks, Northwestern Wildcats and Chicago White Sox baseball, Jo.

bribery Mike Madigan Chicago White Sox Fidel Marquez Mitt Stravinsky Unilever vice president Kam Ed Steve Roxton Cardinals W G. N Yu Darvish Jo Brand Steve Ruxin Wrigley Advert Adam Wainwright Mark Carman The Tribune Darrin Jackson Jo
Procter & Gamble: Let's #TalkAboutBias

Squawk Pod

05:03 min | 2 years ago

Procter & Gamble: Let's #TalkAboutBias

"Companies combating bias many American. Corporations are taking a closer look at their impact on employees and customers when it comes to issues of diversity and inclusion one of the most visible examples, the stop hate for profit campaign, encouraging advertisers to boycott facebook amid calls for the social media giant to better moderate racist content. We've discussed this initiative at length here on squawk. SQUAWK pod check out Wednesday's episode for our most recent conversation with one of the campaign's organizers, but one of facebook's and Google's biggest advertisers has remained uninvolved in the boycott. That's proctor and gamble the consumer-goods Giant that owns household brands like Gillette. Bounty tied down vicks crest. The list goes on, but while fellow consumer giants like Pepsico Coca Cola and Unilever have pulled or paused their advertising. Advertising with facebook being Jay has not even though PNG has a history of calling out big tech platforms about this very issue in twenty nineteen, the company spoke out against digital media platforms. SUGGESTING PNG could move its aunt. Dollars to services do a better job at keeping their platforms free of offensive content, and they weren't kidding. In two thousand, seventeen and eighteen proctor and gamble had boycotted. Boycotted Youtube for over a year after its ads showed up next to terrorist content, so why his PSG remained on sidelines in this boycott, the company's strategy has instead been to double down on its own approach to combat racism with ads like the look and the talk about conversations. Black parents have with their children in this country. The talk actually won an emmy a few years ago. You were not pretty slow blood. Beautiful period. Okay. I'll never forget that. This week proctor and gamble released another short video choice encouraging white Americans to speak up and stand up against racial bias as well as the Hashtag. Let's talk about bias fostering conversation about race between strangers. Everyone has bias as might be uncomfortable. Can you imagine that officer having his knee on a white woman's neck like that for ten minutes it all starts with biased. Each video is a powerful watch. Damon Jones chief communications officer at proctor and gamble joined squawk box this morning to discuss the strategy. Here's Andrew, Ross Sorkin Damn Good morning to you. The morning before we get into some before we get into some of the details, just just tell us how this came about and I'm curious about what kind of debate there may or may not have been inside the company about how to approach this. Will for years we've been using our voice and position as a leading advertiser to spark these constructive conversation on race and unbiased. You know back in twenty fourteen. We launched a campaign called like a girl to talk about gender bias and twenty seven be launched a campaign all the talk that really shine the light on the conversations that black mothers were having with their children. Children to prepare them last year, bid on a campaign called the load, and recently with the choice we wanted to catalyze even more conversation, giving all that was happening in the world so we know that a lot of the core evil that we're facing right now. Racism sexism than up over. They all start with biased and we can't tackle these problems until we begin. Begin to talk about them, so the challenge is always. How do you do that in an accurate way? How do you do that in a way? That really brings people voices by invite them into really become part of solution. That's our objective with the talk about bias campaign. You know it's an important message, but we're. We're living in contentious time, and amid what some people. People might describe a cancel culture and I. Don't know if you remember when starbucks many years ago, put together their race together program, which immediately drew criticism despite I think it's well intentioned, and my question to you is how you think about that sort of a mix in terms of how you approach this issue, and what kind of feedback you've gotten us for. Sure well I think what we know because we're all about serving consumers, consumers want to know the values behind the brands they buy everyday and as we consider these types of programs, we do it in a fear and accurate in a respectful manner, and we're very clear on our goals, and we want a society that fosters great public discourse, even when we disagree, so we bring multiple views to the table, and we handle those using a very responsible way were clear on the objectives were clear on the outcomes, and we acknowledged that eight. Not everyone's a disagree, but we want everyone to come to the table, bringing their lived experience, but also bringing perspective that are beyond. Beyond their own, so what we did talk about bias. Perish Rangers together right. People who were different have different lived experiences, White, black gay shrink all these dimensions of diversity, and we said let's talk about these things right and sometimes disagree sometimes you'll get a little hurt, but that's the proper process of learning. We've actually taken that same process within the wall to P. and G. writes. The were walking the talk when it comes to bringing people together and getting through some of those difficult conversations at the end of the day. It's not about a popularity contest, but it's about getting to the culture of respect and understanding that we all want to live in.

Gamble Facebook Gillette Vicks Crest Pepsico Coca Cola Youtube Rangers Damon Jones Google Officer Unilever Chief Communications Officer JAY P. Andrew Ross Sorkin
"unilever" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

12:28 min | 2 years ago

"unilever" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Know safety and efficacy is fundamental fundamental in building a brand in our years of training mine at Unilever this is where he really you separate yourself from all the others right if you put that rigor ran in you really do what's necessary to ensure quality to ensure that you're gonna say it's a hundred percent organic it really is you're not relying on somebody else you're you're actually doing the testing and the and the ground work on your own in what we've developed is a great partnership with alchemist kitchen and they have trained as you know herbalists in our teachers in this space and it's been a benefit for our trainers and ambassadors to be trained by them to really understand all about the quality about where it comes from the bout you know everything that they need to know to be really the you know offering their clients something they feel very very safe about delivering in we've used our website now when people go on there that you can read all about of our testing methodology and actually see the actual testing and I would not buy a an item unless I knew knew that those that piece of paper was being published and you know in front of me before I purchased anything right out so in what what Jay is referring to is the notion of third party testing so virtually every state in the country now has third party testing facilities that I made for the term third party because obviously of this test is being done inside the organization there's some rest that there could be some things kind of adjusted by that organization a third party test is basically a result that says here's the quantification of what we saw in our testing and of course all the C. B. delivery product is fully tested is Jay's mentioning with flawless results that were quite proud of that yeah we've talked a lot about amateur and professional athletes using the product what is C. B. delivery doing to leverage this group yes so I mean obviously a lot of arm **** in trainees like you spoke to our spoke about earlier all come from being around athletes whether either so the athlete is is that point now Tom Brady you know TV twelve you know those are the people that are impacted the most information recoveries key for them and what we found is the the speed of recovery or the benefits that C. B. D. delivers for them you know does absolutely help him you know fighting that information and get some tour recovery mode a lot faster so you know and I think that's why the NHL and you know and all these other sports in cities now have brought C. B. D. as a something that they're not gonna test for because they want that benefit to be a part of their lives versus you know an Advil or nope you know right so you know how do we get him off of prescribed drugs and how do we get a mind to something that's naturally in plant based right out I want to win okay so let let me let me build on what Jay just said all right so I grew up in an environment where we believe anything a doctor said and I still feel that way right I'd work long and hard to find good doctors and when I find those doctors what they tell me to do like to write yeah and Jay you're probably like that as well absolutely flip senator you're probably like that some of simile right yeah okay all right so we're not challenging the medical community anyway what we are indeed suggesting is that you should think about adding the power of plants and we're now giving you an offering call C. B. delivery to do that right to add that to your wellness regimen and see if you can get the kinds of results that we ARE anecdotally suggesting and have been suggesting on the show countless times let me also bring to bear another interesting fact you may recall the Jan Horsfall C. E. O. of a firm called Max let X. has been on our show now twice right Janice fourteen hundred athletes across twenty two governing bodies six hundred of them are excellent bian's night okay now many of them are called cana athletes why can athletes because they have had similar experiences right they are using the product to address inflammation a recovery because they must recover quickly imagine an athlete you spending eight ten twelve hours a day training in what you do in the next day the exact same thing right right and then they're competing day one they're competing day two they're competing against day three they're competing again right and so many of these athletes are beginning to see the value of it we've quoted some of the big names in the sport in sports but it's virtually any athlete regardless of your across via athlete or if you're an Olympic athlete or you're just a weekend golfer and you're a little bit tired after thirty six holes of golf and what you want to do the next day is another thirty six holes of golf all right so let's move on from there why did you call the firm CB delivery tell us a little bit more about that yes it was interesting obviously when I first met with you you know we were sitting around you know trying to think through you know what was the mission will we trying to get to and was really using the trainers are are **** as we now call them of delivering the news of the power of plants to their clients so it's kind of like one of those things you kept saying if we can bring and deliver plant based you know no collar recommendations to the client and remedies to the client and right now we're talking about C. B. D. but who knows down the road because of what we've learned this power plants is very very young at this at this stage and so the opportunity to continue to deliver to our you know the the client it is wide open for so it kind of made sense you know like we're gonna deliver plant based you know a call it I'm ready for you know information in recovery there you go all right so I agree so I I think that you know obviously I keep asking J. and J. and I am some other very talented people have been working on this project for a year you know we've been wrestling with all these issues together but I think that on like other situations the brand CB delivery which of course has C. B. D. and it kind of speaks to exactly what it is and I think when something is this new it's worth being a little bit more specific with what the product is all right okay there you go so is the company going to stick with the sales effort of folks like those that you mentioned these kind of opinion leaders these kind of thought leaders like trainers and physical therapist etcetera or can anyone who has an interest in understanding more about the power plants join the effort yeah I think that's the again each day we learn more as we go on we started with ambassadors in that were focused in on the training world but what we're learning is that as we share our own experiences all say to us Hey how can I get this because my mother and father have this issue or my uncle has this issue or I have this issue so I think we're going to see that people that really understand and want to learn more will be an ambassador for the brand because there were all seeking the same thing right we all want to feel better look better and if CBD is that added benefit that we all can receive and you know and it works I think we would be you know we want to screen we want to make sure people are knowledgeable were taken to the same rigor that we took our **** through so that yeah we are insured that they are truly trained in understand but in a karate system in you know so you know but I I think it's for everybody right no I agree so what we've learned in the year that we've been working on this just to build on that thought Jay is is at first we thought we needed people that had like a birthright to speak about wellness right so what trainer a physical therapist a yoga teacher these people are already being hired by their clients or patients as the case may be to talk about wellness right and we went in that direction I thought that was exactly right and we're going to continue to build that out sure right but what we've learned is in the last year C. B. dis getting a lot of time and attention right there's all kinds as a seven part series on Netflix Sonjay group does got another thing going on there's gun limited amount of time and attention being focused on C. B. day and yet it is still very confusing to the average person right so what we've learned is we can open up the effort to a number of people the to Jay's point want to learn about the power plants go through a training regimen and then can certainly bring that sinking to their friends family and others and can actually make a very nice living likely on the side we're not to just to get you you should make at your day job however I think that over time as the power plants becomes more and more real you're gonna see that more and more people are doing this kind of thing with my firm with our firm and with other firms certainly on a full time basis as certainly you and I are this point right the good news is just a step in is that what we've done for them is we've done all the qualifying rate we've we've made sure the testing we've made sure we're dealing with you only the best so instead of having to search on their own to find is it's this the right product is it tested you know does it meet all these qualifications you know we've done the work for them so it saves them knowing that if everything is is safe I don't wanna thank you nine and recognize once again lose Sager CEO of alchemist kitchen he helped us work through a lot of these issues we are carrying a lot of his product his herbalists are very advanced in agronomy agriculture and the well this value with the power plants and they've all been very helpful in putting all this together alright so let's move on from there and it's talk about one of the items we are carrying in the line J. yet just that we we have a full line of C. B. D. infuse products and it depends really what the trainer is recommending for their clients that's the good news right we're not asking people to take some they may not need but Hey are you I've got a tennis elbow Hey you need one of our cool sues you know rub down on their after before your tennis after your tennis you know like my mom you know she's taking twenty five milligrams a day for her issue and there's athletes and others that would be doing that same program the good news is is that the way the everything is prescribed it's there's that does seem chart so you're not guessing so people can go to this site they can say Hey I weigh a hundred eighty pounds and this is the recommended dose that I that you should be taken so people have good knowledge and you know understand what they want but some people want a gel cap I don't wanna liquid I want something out so we really have a full line of products that can meet everybody's needs into your point the innovation final is incredible there are you know what we seen you at night Justin you know just in context that we've had of what people are working on is really exciting so absolutely so I guess just to summarize it's fair to say that we have these ambassadors the ambassadors understand the product line each individual what some people might call S. K. U. S. stock keeping unit what everybody else might call a size or a flavor right is specific to a body part or a specific indication and I think the range of products that we are launching with kind of makes the case but I love the fact that there's so many new things that were going to bring to this over time once again leveraging the power plants alright so tell our audience the little bit of time we have remaining how they can find the new product please yes so you can go to our website it's C. B. D. E. L. I. V. E. R. N. Y. dot.

Unilever
"unilever" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"unilever" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The headquarters of assault manufacturer who has a natural interest in keeping things clean it becomes an advertisement for Unilever right so you're saying synchronises a big bottle of Scotch basically that's after I got there's the bronze yeah there you go but one of the other things to be aware of is that there seems to be a small irony right in the fact that the battle has started off as a social proposition and then the first buildings to emerge our corporate entities yeah right so so these modern buildings in the mid fifties in America seem like the very expression of sophisticated and modern and new which America was so trying to own and be at that time the difficulty of course is that in some ways to do this as well acquired an incredible discipline right and not everybody had it and it was also easy to copy so by being easy to copy some of the very sophisticated nuances get lost and then of course how do you do this without doing a thousand iterations losing money on the job so I think that people started to short cut that's not understanding the values of the proportions of how people move through the building the relationship of the scale itself how big can you go before in fact there is failure aesthetic failure so if you look across the streets at whatever building that is across the street who cares nineteen ninety wherever there's a kind of value engineering there right we're not in a phrase right the vet value engineering is architecture phrase for making a cheap for taking out things that might cost too much yeah right and so much smaller panes of glass right so much less expensive much less difficult to install right and again we're trying to figure out ways to make things faster better cheaper right and sometimes the design was one of the things that go forfeited yup right remember some of the most extraordinary designs have a poetry to them and that when you go in there not just about I get a lot of you actually feel something you feel something about being in a space which has been so well articulated that it actually moves you and there are a few of those spaces and sometimes you have to be there for a while before it becomes a part of how you experience that it's not going to happen in a moment's beautifully said and that is true of these two buildings each of which I have hung around.

Unilever America assault
"unilever" Discussed on An American Conversation Podcast

An American Conversation Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"unilever" Discussed on An American Conversation Podcast

"To help those who need help now. We have a partner. That's missing today. But he says he calls the police when he finds him in sleeping on a bench and do the police really come and remove a homeless person. That's taken arrest on a bench. Not Likely no yeah. Yeah but that's Manhattan beach you're right that's Manhattan Bitch. And he says they do remove them. Yeah Yeah let's even you know. Everybody calls people call with the variety of issues in police officers. You know they have the discretion to enforce or not enforce certain things based on a lot of different elements of what's going on black another call or I'm not gonNA spend my time taking a homeless person off bench. You know so police officers to be having her done in each Six working at one time. We'll know people get time off. But I mean how many are are like cruising the streets at one time now. It's La good question. We actually have on the street in any given time You know patrol officers have gone on ride alongs and we have five districts works and you usually have a lease a COUPLA officers in each district at any given time they get called or merely backing each other up You have Sergeants in other personnel. That can come out of the field. You have motor motor cops motor patrol. You're doing traffic control. They can often offer be called to a call as well so In terms of account Unilever giving time actually on the street I would say there's probably fifteen fifteen officers fifteen to twenty available to go to work part time. That's a good nothing like a good number for. Don't quote me. Yeah I mean if there's an emergency they can always contact another Another agency Oh absolutely. Yeah no they all come running. There's a major event own armed robbery or bank which I remember. We had a log remember the jewelry store no couple years back. I remember.

Manhattan partner Unilever