39 Burst results for "Unicef"

Fresh update on "unicef" discussed on Spanish Proptech

Spanish Proptech

01:51 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "unicef" discussed on Spanish Proptech

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Columbia Sarah Lethal Twitter Thomas Tina Forty Remedy Spotify Latin America Quintas Domingo Martha Latin America Asia Spanish Latin Canadian Bhutto Middle Eastern Matthew Andrew Google
Over 168 million children miss nearly a year of schooling, UNICEF says

UN News

01:19 min | 1 d ago

Over 168 million children miss nearly a year of schooling, UNICEF says

"At least one hundred and sixty eight million children. Labor missed out on classroom learning in the last year. Owing to corona virus related lockdowns the un children's fund unicef said on wednesday schools in some fourteen countries remained largely shut for almost twelve months as authorities attempted to hold back ovid nineteen infections. The un agency said in a new report in response to the findings sector jemele antonio guiterrez warned of global education crisis. Now efforts should be sped to safely. Bring every child back into the classroom. He tweeted here. He is speaking outside. Un headquarters in new york one of the most dramatic consequences of congress as being terrible suffering children and families because of the two of them. That defense school mandy. Fortunately at the chest with with the virtual means that's a or the forest populations without internet connection. We have millions of people of the school and that is a tragedy as the one year anniversary of the covid nineteen pandemic approaches on the eleventh of march unicef chief. Henrietta four underlined the catastrophic education. Emergency that worldwide lockdowns have created with every day that goes by children who are unable to access in person schooling full further and further behind and the most marginalized paying the heaviest price. Miss four added

Un Children's Fund Unicef Antonio Guiterrez UN Congress New York Henrietta Unicef
Fresh update on "unicef" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

01:08 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "unicef" discussed on Morning Edition

"NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Noel King. New Research looks at who is dying of drug overdoses during the pandemic. Studies done in Philadelphia and California show more black Americans are dying of overdoses than white Americans. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann wondered why, and he talked to experts who told him about a problem of racial bias embedded in the way people with addiction or treated In the toy. A. Jenkins talks about her mom. She likes to focus on good memories playing games together with simple things like Dish soap, rainy days, she would take us outside and we would make bubbles. Jenkins family lives in upstate New York. She says her mom, Sonia, Huey, had a hard life and started using drugs as a teenager. The loneliness and isolation of the pandemic made things worse. Her mom was using math. Then in November, she was arrested. Jenkins says. That might have been a chance to get help. She asked, you know, Can I get the rehab? I have a drug problem. They said No. Rehab wasn't an option for her. Jenkins has a month later, Sonia Huge, who was 48 years old overdosed on meth contaminated with fentanyl. We had a phone call from my mom's boyfriends. He found her dead. Scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say fatal drug overdoses nationwide spiked 20% during the pandemic more than 83,000 Americans died. The CDC doesn't track drug deaths by race. But Dr Utakata Tree at the University of Pennsylvania says it's clear the surge is hitting some communities harder than others. It wasn't until we started looking at the level of race and ethnicity that we realized that black and brown communities were being disproportionately affected. Countries. Peer reviewed study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association focused on data gathered in Philadelphia what she found shocked her. Overdose deaths among black residents surged more than 50% during the pandemic. Among white residents, overdose rates didn't rise it all in some months, they actually went down Cove. It acted as salt in the wounds of health and social inequities that are perpetuated by structural racism, both in Philadelphia and across the country. Other scientists report similar findings. Drug deaths Rising faster among blacks than whites. Doctor I. Ana Jordan at Yale University is part of a team studying overdose data collected in California It is really concerning the covert 19 Panther has sharply exacerbated the inequities of the overdose. Crisis even within the last year, which is really, really scary. Those inequities congee traced to the war on drugs, which distorted the nation's response to addiction. Long before the pandemic hit. White Americans are far more likely to be treated for addiction with healthcare and life saving medications. While people of color are more often punished for drug use, the prototype of a criminal people were involved in a criminal behavior, arrests and incarcerations. That was the way it was dealt with. Dr Steven Taylor is with the American Society of Addiction Medicine, which issued a statement last week condemning racial bias in addiction care and calling for reform, Taylor says in many black communities, people with addiction are still more likely to encounter police than a health worker. That's what has been in place for a long time. I don't see that we've made progress in that access to care is so limited in some black communities. Experts describe them as addiction treatment. Desert Doctor and Zynga. Harrison runs a black owned addiction recovery network based in Massachusetts, she says. Even when black Americans do find treatment, they often face more bias and stigma from care providers who are overwhelmingly white. You can hear it in the tone. You can see it when you're waiting in line and a person who's not black comes in and they address that person before they address you. Harrison says that bias often skews medical decision making in ways that put black lives at risk. She points to another JAMA study, published in 2019 that found black patients with opioid addiction were 35 times less likely than white patients to be prescribed buprenorphine. That's a medication that prevents relapse and overdose. These experiences add up time and time and time and time to say This system does not have my best interests at heart. Another gem, a study published last month found overdose deaths in urban communities could be cut nearly in half in just two years. But researchers acknowledge that would take sweeping changes, including much more access to medication and long term treatment. LeToya Jenkins says people in her family who still struggle with addiction are wary of seeking help. They have that fear. If you go to get help, then people on a turn you and have your Children taken away If they are seen somewhere is using drugs instead of Hey, um, can I get you to a treatment center? Get somebody to help. You know we're gonna throw you in jail. Jenkins says she wishes a real safety net had been there for her mom. If they would have listened to her pleas for treatment. I feel like strongly that she would be alive right now, researchers say without major reforms, high rates of overdose death Will keep ravaging black communities long after the pandemic is over. Brian Mann NPR news As President Biden pushes to get US Schools fully open soon and art exhibit aims to help people visualize what it means that they're closed. The outdoor installation is called Pandemic Classroom. It's at the United Nations, and it represents closed schools around the world. It features bright blue, unused schoolbags sitting at 168 empty desks. Every desk represents one million kids who have missed almost all classroom instruction because their schools were closed. Here's UNICEF's global chief of education Robert Jenkins, 168 Million is a very difficult number to kind of wrap your head around. She's so large, so we thought this would be a useful way of At least giving some sense of what the scale of the crisis is. There's an even larger group of students more than 214 million who've missed at least three quarters of classes. Since last March. A new UNICEF report reveals that Latin America and the Caribbean have had the longest school closures with every day that goes by these Children will be falling farther and farther behind, and the most vulnerable, are paying the heaviest price. And so our call is to prioritize the re opening of schools for all actions.

Steve Inskeep Robert Jenkins Sonia Huge Noel King Jenkins Brian Mann 2019 American Society Of Addiction November Letoya Jenkins Unicef Philadelphia Massachusetts Taylor Huey Sonia California 35 Times Last March NPR
Attacks on Nigeriasschoolsarea way of life,butkids are returning to class

UN News

00:17 sec | 6 d ago

Attacks on Nigeriasschoolsarea way of life,butkids are returning to class

"Tax on schools in northeast nigeria and elsewhere a- a way of life and their impact is devastating on children's mental health despite the dangerous boys and girls returning in their thousands to places that were previously in the grip of boko haram extremists according to the un fund.

Nigeria UN
Fresh update on "unicef" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "unicef" discussed on Morning Edition

"As President Biden pushes to get US Schools fully open soon and art exhibit aims to help people visualize what it means that they're closed. The outdoor installation is called Pandemic Classroom. It's at the United Nations, and it represents closed schools around the world. It features bright blue, unused schoolbags sitting at 168 empty desks. Every desk represents one million kids who have missed almost all classroom instruction because their schools were closed. Here's UNICEF's global chief of education Robert Jenkins, 168 million is a Very difficult number to kind of wrap your head around. She's so large, so we thought this would be a useful way of least getting some sense of what the scale of the crisis is. There's an even larger group of students more than 214 million who've missed at least three quarters of classes since last March. A new UNICEF report reveals that Latin America and the Caribbean have had the longest school closures. With every day that goes by these Children will be falling farther and farther behind, and the most vulnerable are paying the heaviest price. And so our call is to prioritize the re opening of schools for all actions to be taken..

Robert Jenkins Unicef Last March 168 Million More Than 214 Million Latin America One Million Kids 168 Empty Desks Caribbean President Biden At Least Three Quarters Nations Every Desk United States United Schools
Covax Program Ships First Covid Vaccines to Ghana

TIME's Top Stories

00:42 sec | Last week

Covax Program Ships First Covid Vaccines to Ghana

"Received the world's first delivery of corona virus vaccine from the united nations backed kovacs initiative on wednesday the long-awaited start for a program. That has thus far fallen short of hopes that it would ensure shots were given quickly to the world's most vulnerable people the arrival of six hundred thousand doses of the astrazeneca vaccine in the west african country marks the beginning of the largest vaccine procurement and supply operation in history according to the world health organization and unicef it is a linchpin of efforts to bring the pandemic to an end and has been hailed as the first time. The world has delivered a highly sought after vaccine to poor countries during an ongoing outbreak.

Kovacs United Nations Astrazeneca World Health Organization Unicef
Fresh update on "unicef" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

01:04 min | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "unicef" discussed on Morning Edition

"She likes to focus on good memories playing games together with simple things like Dish soap, rainy days, she would take us outside and we would make bubbles. Jenkins family lives in upstate New York. He says. Your mom's Sonia Huey had a hard life and started using drugs as a teenager. The loneliness and isolation of the pandemic made things worse. Her mom was using math. Then in November, she was arrested. Jenkins says. That might have been a chance to get help. She asked, you know, Can I get the rehab? I have a drug problem. They said No. Rehab wasn't an option for her. Jenkins has a month later, Sonia Huey, who was 48 years old, overdosed on meth contaminated with fentanyl. We had a phone call from my mom's boyfriend. He found her dead. Scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say fatal drug overdoses nationwide spiked 20% during the pandemic more than 83,000 Americans died. The CDC doesn't track drug deaths by race. But Dr Utakata Tree at the University of Pennsylvania says it's clear the surge is hitting some communities harder than others. It wasn't until we started looking at the level of race and ethnicity that we realized that black and brown communities were being disproportionately affected. Countries. Pure reviewed study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association focused on data gathered in Philadelphia what she found shocked her. Overdose deaths among black residents surged more than 50% during the pandemic. Among white residents, overdose rates didn't rise it all in some months, they actually went down Cove. It acted as salt in the wounds of health and social inequities that are perpetuated by structural racism, both in Philadelphia and across the country. Other scientists report similar findings. Drug deaths Rising faster among blacks than whites. Doctor I. Ana Jordan at Yale University is part of a team studying overdosed data collected in California. It is really concerning. But covert 19 Panther has sharply exacerbated the inequities of the overdose crisis even within the last Year, which is really, really scary. Those inequities congee traced to the war on drugs, which distorted the nation's response to addiction. Long before the pandemic hit. White Americans are far more likely to be treated for addiction with healthcare and life saving medications. While people of color are more often punished for drug use, the prototype of a criminal people were involved in a criminal behavior, arrests and incarcerations. That was the way it was dealt with. Dr Steven Taylor is with the American Society of Addiction Medicine, which issued a statement last week condemning racial bias in addiction care and calling for reform, Taylor says in many black communities, people with addiction are still more likely to encounter police than a health worker. That's what has been in place for a long time. I don't see that we've made progress in that access to care is so limited in some black communities. Experts describe them as addiction treatment. Desert Doctor and Zynga. Harrison runs a black owned addiction Recovery network based in Massachusetts, she says, even when black Americans do find treatment. They often face more bias and stigma from care providers who are overwhelmingly white. You can hear it in the tone. You can see it when you're waiting in line and a person who's not black comes in and they address that person before they address you. Harrison says that bias often skews medical decision making in ways that put black lives at risk. She points to another JAMA study, published in 2019 that found black patients with opioid addiction were 35 times less likely than white patients to be prescribed buprenorphine. That's a medication that prevents relapse and overdose. These experiences add up time and time and time and time to say This system does not have my best interests at heart. Another gem, a study published last month found overdose deaths in urban communities could be cut nearly in half in just two years. But researchers acknowledge that would take sweeping changes, including much more access to medication and long term treatment. LeToya Jenkins says people in her family who still struggle with addiction Are wary of seeking help. They have that fear. If you go to get help, then people on a turn you and have your Children taken away If they are seen somewhere is using drugs instead of Hey, can I get you to a treatment center? Get somebody to help. You know, we're gonna throw you in jail and says she wishes a real safety net had been there for her mom. If they would have listened to her pleas for treatment. I feel like strongly that she would be alive right now, researchers say without major reforms, high rates of overdose death Will keep ravaging black communities long after the pandemic is over. Brian Mann NPR news As President Biden pushes to get US Schools fully open soon and art exhibit aims to help people visualize what it means that they're closed. The outdoor installation is called Pandemic Classroom It's at the United Nations said it represents closed schools around the world. It features bright blue, unused schoolbags sitting at 168 empty desks. Every desk represents one million kids who have missed almost all classroom instruction because their schools were closed. Here's UNICEF's global chief of education Robert Jenkins, 168 million is a Very difficult number to kind of wrap your head around so large, so we thought this would be a useful way of least getting some sense of what the scale of the crisis is. There's an even larger group of students more than 214 million who've missed at least three quarters of classes since last March. A new UNICEF report reveals that Latin America and the Caribbean have had the longest school closures. With every day that goes by these Children will be falling farther and farther behind, and the most vulnerable are paying the heaviest price. And so our call is to prioritize the re opening of schools for all actions to be taken. For that process to be done safely. Jenkins does say this time away from traditional school has encouraged educators to innovate. Teachers have had to figure out new ways to reach students and pay more attention to mental health and nutrition. Thistles. NPR news You're listening to morning.

Sonia Huey Robert Jenkins Jenkins 2019 Unicef Massachusetts Philadelphia Brian Mann Taylor Letoya Jenkins November American Society Of Addiction California Last March 35 Times Utakata Tree Steven Taylor 168 Million Zynga Yale University
Ghana Becomes 1st Country To Get COVAX Vaccine Doses

NBC Nightly News

01:32 min | Last week

Ghana Becomes 1st Country To Get COVAX Vaccine Doses

"Was a milestone day and the ambition effort to get two billion doses of vaccine to the developing world. Cynthia mcfadden with it. It's called the margin logistical undertaking in history in the wee hours of this morning it finally began today. We're in ghana. And this is really a historic moment. As six hundred thousand doses of the astra zeneca vaccine arrived in the african nation. The first vaccine to be delivered as part of a msa effort led by the world health organization and unicef called kovacs to send at least two billion doses of vaccine to the world's poorest nations if one country is left unvaccinated this disease will bounce back and forth. The vaccine was shipped directly from the largest vaccine manufacturer in the world. in india. In each of the kovacs countries healthcare workers will be the first to be inaugurated. Hundreds of thousands of syringes also arrived in ghana ship from a massive unicef warehouse in dubai. Meanwhile overnight one hundred thousand syringes arrived in the maldives which will soon get their vaccine allotment. Certainly a down payment on hope but consider this so far about two hundred million. Vaccines have been administered. But nearly half of those two only two countries china and the us leaves more than one hundred countries that haven't administered a single

Cynthia Mcfadden Ghana Astra Kovacs World Health Organization Unicef India Dubai China United States
UNICEF begins shipping syringes for the global rollout of COVID-19 vaccines

UN News

00:49 sec | Last week

UNICEF begins shipping syringes for the global rollout of COVID-19 vaccines

"Critical task of ensuring that all countries have enough medical equipment to vaccinate people safely against covid nineteen gathered pace on tuesday with news. That one hundred thousand syringes have been sent to the maldives ahead of an inoculation drive. The shipment is part of the first wave of syringes and safety boxes organized. By the un children's fund unicef over the next few weeks the agency plans to dispatch more than fourteen and a half million single use needles to more than thirty countries including cote d'ivoire sotomayor and principi. These include the point. Five milliliter syringes. Which meant for use with the astrazeneca vaccine while the point. Three millimeter version is for the pfizer bio entex shot in total unicef aims to supply up to one billion syringes and ten million safety boxes to countries in two thousand and twenty one ahead of the broader rollout of new corona virus vaccines in eighty two low end low to middle income countries

Un Children's Fund Unicef Principi Astrazeneca Pfizer Unicef
UNICEF Gears Up for Global Coronavirus Vaccine Rollout

UN News

01:10 min | 2 weeks ago

UNICEF Gears Up for Global Coronavirus Vaccine Rollout

"The head of unicef the children's fund urged the security council on wednesday to support the agency's call for all countries to roll out inclusive national vaccination plans to end the covid nineteen pandemic this means regardless of their legal status or if they live in areas controlled by non-state entities. Henrietta four told the meeting on ensuring equitable access to new coronavirus vaccines in places affected by conflict and insecurity. Her comments come as the agency steps up plans for the global distribution of covid nineteen vaccines unicef aims to procure two billion doses of covid nineteen vaccines by the end of the year. In addition to the two billion doses of other vaccines that obtains annually on behalf of one hundred countries miss for highlighted the difficulty of reaching an estimated sixty million people living in conflict areas under the control of non-state armed groups as well as refugees and migrants who are routinely excluded from national immunization drives after repeating the un secretary. General's call for a global ceasefire. Which would help aid vaccine delivery. The unicef chief urged the security council to restart Immunization campaigns we cannot allow the fight against one deadly disease to cause us to lose ground in the fight against others. She said

Unicef Security Council Henrietta UN
Is The World Headed For A Major Nutrition Crisis?

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:43 min | Last month

Is The World Headed For A Major Nutrition Crisis?

"Unicef has just released some research that says that over thirty nine billion school meals have been missed since the start of the covid nineteen pandemic as a result of all the school closures that have happened around the world and what that means is that the onus to feed the kids that extra meal is now being put back on the families and a lot of these poor and more vulnerable communities. The families just simply can't afford to do that in these sorts of environments. The school meal is the one nutritional meal of actually get for the day. And obviously that's a massive crisis a massive problem for the immediate future of those families and those kids. But i actually think there's another level to this nutrition crisis. Which is that in a lot of the more developed countries and say the richer communities. Many people during these lockdowns have turned to fast food to comfort food because they've been locked down in their homes and as a result of that the nutritional value in that food is obviously in many cases pretty low and so i think that the nutrition crisis that we face on the other side of this pandemic is not just gonna be in the poor and vulnerable communities but in all communities and so i think in that they will be a lot more need for nutritional advice nutritional supplements nutritional deficiency treatment solutions. I think there's a lot to be to be still felt and still understood about the impact of poor nutrition as a result of this covid nineteen crisis not just in those vulnerable communities which is obviously a massive problem but i think in all communities we're going to see a nutritional crisis or a nutrition crisis that is maybe loss for quite some time.

Unicef
UNICEF chief’s appeal for access to children caught up in Ethiopia’s Tigray

UN News

00:57 sec | Last month

UNICEF chief’s appeal for access to children caught up in Ethiopia’s Tigray

"Three months since fighting began in ethiopia northern state of tigray great concern for the plight of youngsters there. The un children's fund unicef has warned in an alert on wednesday the agency's executive director henrietta. Four said that the very little was known about the impact of the conflict was deeply troubling because of difficulties getting humanitarian access. The warning comes almost two weeks since unicef and partners dispatched twenty nine trucks filled with emergency nutrition health and protection supplies entity gray where central government soldiers have confronted tigray people's liberation front forces. That convoy was a step in the right direction but nowhere near the level of access and scale of support. That is actually needed. Miss four said unicef cited reports of three hundred unaccompanied or separated children among the more than fifty seven thousand people who fled to neighboring sudan the are potentially many more among the approximately two hundred eighty thousand internally displaced in tigray and neighboring regions the un agency said

Un Children's Fund Unicef Tigray Unicef Ethiopia Henrietta Sudan UN
$2.5 billion appeal for 39 million children in Middle East and North Africa

UN News

01:02 min | 3 months ago

$2.5 billion appeal for 39 million children in Middle East and North Africa

"The un children's fund unicef said on monday that record two and a half billion dollars is needed for lifesaving assistance for thirty nine million children in the middle east and north africa. Next year this includes an increase of nearly half a billion dollars to continue responding to the cave nineteen pandemic amid a surge in cases. The funding is needed for several emergencies. Such as syria where four point eight million children are in need of assistance after nearly a decade of war in yemen twelve million children or almost every child in the war-torn country is in need of support unicef said in sudan. The agency warned that more than five million youngsters face a multitude of challenges including devastating andrew carrying floods political transition at an economic crisis in lebanon eunice f reported that economic collapse an increase in one thousand nineteen cases and ebay route explosion in august had made nearly one point nine million children dependent on assistance. The largest portion of funds requested in unison. Deal is keep children in education followed by water sanitation health and nutrition along with psychosocial support to address mental health issues.

Unicef North Africa UN Middle East Eunice F Syria Yemen Sudan Lebanon Andrew Ebay
Coronavirus: UNICEF to ship 2bn vaccines to developing countries in 2021

Our Body Politic

00:41 sec | 3 months ago

Coronavirus: UNICEF to ship 2bn vaccines to developing countries in 2021

"UNICEF is promising to deliver two billion doses of Corona virus vaccines to developing countries next year. Lisa Schlein in Geneva reports the U. N agencies working with hundreds of airlines and freight companies to do it. UNICEF is mounting this mammoth operation to make sure poor countries which often are left behind get access to life saving covert 19 vaccines. Health officials say the speed and scale of this global operation dwarfs anything ever before attempted some of the vaccine candidates require two doses and will have to be stored sub Arctic temperatures in developing countries which lacked this facility.

Lisa Schlein Unicef Geneva U. Arctic
Hackers targeting supply chain that keeps coronavirus vaccines cold, experts warn

BBC Newshour

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Hackers targeting supply chain that keeps coronavirus vaccines cold, experts warn

"U. S. TECH FIRM. IBM says it has detected systematic hacking of the international vaccine supply chain IBM says theater hackers used fishing techniques targeting firms and organizations in six countries in the hope of gleaning information about how governments intend to distribute vaccines that require supercool temperatures. Our security correspondent is Gordon Correra. IBM says that in September, it's researchers spotted hackers posing as a Chinese company, which is part of the cold chain used by Gabby, the International vaccine alliance backed by UNICEF and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. IBM says it cannot see any way in which this was a criminal enterprise designed to make money on believes the state was involved, although it does not name any suspects. In the past. Certain countries have been accused of carrying out espionage against vaccine research on this suggests that distribution may now be a target.

IBM Gordon Correra International Vaccine Alliance Bill And Melinda Gates Foundat Gabby Unicef
Kitsap school districts, NW of Seattle, eye reopening schools in January

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

Kitsap school districts, NW of Seattle, eye reopening schools in January

"District leaders across kits at county still hoping to reopen schools for in person learning after the first of the year. That update from comas Connie Johnson kids have school District announced Friday. They're still aiming for a phase return to in person classes beginning January. 11th North Kids have school district has also sketched out a tentative return to school buildings. January 11th. Starting with the youngest grades. First UNICEF, The International Child Welfare Agency, last week issued a dire warning of a generation lost to the long term effects on Children of remote learning. As the pandemic drags on. Henrietta Fore is UNICEF's executive director. Those schools not only threatened their education Being out of school can lead to poor health, Mental and physical it covert case rates remain as high as they are today, though going back to classrooms likely would not happen. Kids that counties 14 day rate for new cases per 100,000. Is that 169 more than twice what? The rate was just 2.5 weeks ago.

Comas Connie Johnson International Child Welfare Ag Unicef Henrietta Fore
Let's Talk About Toilets

Why It Matters

04:31 min | 4 months ago

Let's Talk About Toilets

"So world toilet day is coming up and the response to hearing that there is a serious. Un sponsor day for toilets might make people laugh or feel a little iffy on discussing it. So why would we need a day like that. Well what would you do if you didn't have a toilet a fair point. This is brooke yamaguchi. She's a water sanitation and hygiene specialist at the united nations children's fund also known as yuna south based in new york. She knows a lot about toilets. I mean the ability to manage our bodily functions and these things that we frequently don't talk about but are so core toss bodily functions of urination defecation for half the population menstruation. Really at the core of our dignity. it's also a foundation for health without a toilet that contains waste and then separates it from people coming in contact with that waste. We would all be exposed to harmful pathogens that cause many different illnesses and diseases and it doesn't stop at the toilet either so without waste being safely transported away from our toilets and from our homes and treated somewhere we would all be surrounded by wastewater and our neighborhoods and in the environment so in terms of the numbers. Can you give me a wide angle view of toilet access as global issue. Will there are three main things that we measure the global level. This is tom sleigh maker. he also focuses on global monitoring of drinking water sanitation and hygiene at unicef headquarters in new york. He sees the big picture of how this plays out around the world. He spoke to us on a rainy day from london to one. Is the population here. Practice open defecation. So that man's added kind of told us a tool a may just is that bush's fails beaches little. Walter crosses the other thing that we measure is the population with basic sanitation service. So means that they have. Some kind of hygienic toilets but is not being shad with other people. It's not shadow the household and then the next level of service up is what we call safely managed sanitation. I'm not means that you not only have a hygiene twins but you also have a mechanism in place to ensure shaming west. That's produced is then being treated on despised safely before being discharged pakistan arm and how many people fall into each of these categories so the global level resell have six hundred. Seventy three million people practicing cash there about two billion people still lack even basic level of service wanting people worldwide and if you look at the population without sanitation that's more like four point. Two billion people that is more than half the people on earth and runs the risk of getting sick every day. Do we have an idea of how many people die as a result of this problem. Whol have estimated globally around one point. Two million deaths could have been prevented through access to cat drinking water sanitation hygiene. The problem is particularly acute for young. Children are very vulnerable. And so i think we estimate there around three hundred thousand children under five who die each year as a result of not having bicyc- water sanitation and hygiene. So when you look at a map where do you see this happening. While some regions and countries have much further to go. If you look out you'll say that particularly sub saharan africa asia and will say ice yanni of civic have much lower levels of coverage of sanitation. And this is polly today with greenwich stages of developments in my slate core countries. But even if you move up the ladder you start to look at issues of treatments and disposal of waste even in europe and north america and australia and new zealand. We're still only at about three quarters of the population that has high says site. All countries have further to go in order to improve sanitation but obviously by roles starting at different positions.

Brooke Yamaguchi United Nations Children's Fund Tom Sleigh Unicef Headquarters New York UN Walter Bush London Pakistan Saharan Greenwich Asia Africa North America Europe New Zealand Australia
UN: Child Malnutrition Soars in War-torn Yemen

UN News

03:34 min | 4 months ago

UN: Child Malnutrition Soars in War-torn Yemen

"The children of Yemen are suffering acute malnutrition president at rights as the world's worst humanitarian crisis grinds on UN agencies have warned in an alert based on new food security analysis in some areas more than one in four children is acutely malnourished. said the UN Children's fund UNICEF along with the World Food Programme, WFP and the Office for the Coordination of humanitarian, affairs or. They cited data from one hundred and thirty three districts in southern parts of Yemen which are home to one point four, million children under five. It revealed a ten percent increase in acute trish in so far this year even worse is the more than fifteen percent rise in children suffering from severe acute malnutrition meaning that at least ninety, eight, thousand under-fives are at high risk of dying without urgent medical treatment from Geneva. Here's UNICEF spokesperson Eczema. Kado. The most significant increase is among young children who suffer from inferior acute malnutrition. This is a condition that leaves children around ten times more likely to die. Z's as such as cholera, diarrhoea, malaria, or acute respiratory infections, all of which are common in Yemen. According to Wip by the of twenty, twenty, four in ten people in surveyed areas of Yemen about three point, two million people are likely to be severely food insecure data for the remaining districts. Northern Yemen has yet to be published, but the situation is expected to be equally concerning based on historical trends. Fighting between government on non-state actors has continued in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province where civilians have been killed thousands displaced the UN hazard an update from Austria, the UN Humanitarian Aid Office reported that more than two weeks since clashes began near Lashkar Gah city. The security situation remains volatile while talks between the Afghan government and Taliban representatives continue in Qatar fighting has also been reported along the road connecting Chicago with Kandahar city in the East with improvised explosive devices planted on main highways continuing to threaten those looking for shelter. Amid attacks affecting fifteen medical facilities, the World Health Organization W. H.. O.. Also reported that the closure of clinics has affected thousands of people although handful of partially reopened. Science needs to be more accessible, transparent, and in tune with people's needs if global threats like the covid nineteen pandemic ought to be overcome effectively, you agency heads said on Tuesday in a joint appeal for free access to scientific reviews, data tools, and software audrey. Azoulay. From yes. Go Ted Ross at an Gabri ACIS from the World Health Organization has. Michelle Bachelet High Commissioner for Human Rights called on the international community to take all necessary measures to make this happen with the additional support of Fabiola Gianotti who had Sunday European Laboratory for particle physics. The appeal also intends to promote trust in research and technology at a time when rumors and. False information I increasingly common in a statement UNESCO the UN agency for Education Science and Culture said that the recent response of the scientific community to the cave nineteen pandemic has demonstrated how well open science can accelerate the achievement of scientific solutions to global challenges. But the agency insisted that sustainable solutions to global threats require an efficient transparent and vibrant scientific effort from everyone in society not just scientists in line with the wishes of UN member states UNESCO is developing guidelines explaining how countries can implement open science policies to bring citizens closer to science and how they can commit to helping to share scientific knowledge around the World

Un Children Yemen UN Un Humanitarian Aid Office World Health Organization Unicef Coordination Of Humanitarian Education Science And Culture Unesco WFP Geneva Michelle Bachelet Fabiola Gianotti Ted Ross President Trump WIP Cholera
COVID-19 vaccine: UNICEF to stockpile more than half a billion syringes

UN News

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

COVID-19 vaccine: UNICEF to stockpile more than half a billion syringes

"Countries around the world gear up to distribute covid nineteen vaccines, the UN Children's Fund. UNICEF. has begun laying the groundwork for safe and efficient delivery by buying and pre-positioning key equipment. The agency said on Monday it will begin by stockpiling around five hundred, twenty million syringes in its warehouses to have a billion ready for use throughout twenty twenty one to ensure syringes arrive before vaccines are distributed. This will be on top of the roughly six, hundred, twenty, million syringes that it will purchase for other vaccination programs to US next year against diseases such as measles anti. FLOYD UNISEX CHIEF HENRIETTA FOUR Spelled out that in order to move fast later, we must move fast now noting that by the end of the year over half a billion syringes should be in place that's enough syringes to wrap around the world one and a half time she said

Un Children's Fund Henrietta Four United States Measles Floyd Unicef.
Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

TIME's Top Stories

07:28 min | 5 months ago

Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

"Are now emerging in refugee camps. Why did it take so long for the virus to reach them By Melissa Godin. For a number of months, the world's largest refugee camps appear to have been spared the worst of the coronavirus pandemic but human rights groups now say cove nineteen infection rates are on the rise in the temporary. That house millions of the world's most vulnerable people with alarming consequences both for those vulnerable groups, as well as the world more broadly the United Nations high. Commissioner for Refugees reports that globally twenty one, thousand of the world's thirty million refugees have tested positive for the virus across ninety seven countries at the end of September. Thirty two new cases were reported in the refugee camps. In Cox's Bazar. Bangladesh home. To seven hundred, forty, five, thousand Rohingya an ethnic minority fleeing violence and discrimination in. Myanmar. In Greece, more than two hundred, forty refugees have tested positive for the virus on the island of Lesbos, and in Lebanon, Syria and Palestine. Cova nineteen outbreaks have occurred at several camps over the past month though UNHCR reports the numbers rose sharply in September. The true number of cases remains unknown because of limited testing. Aid agencies had long expressed fears about the potentially devastating impacts of the virus for those living in crowded camps where medical services are sparse yet for the first six months of the pandemic case rates remained far lower than expected while low testing rates in refugee camps could explain why so few cases have been reported experts say camps isolation from host communities, as well as the imposition of strict laws down measures curb the spread of the virus even if refugees have so far been spared the worst of the pandemics immediate health impact, the outbreak has taken a huge toll on refugees lives. The global economic recession has led to major cuts to humanitarian funding for refugee camps, causing food shortages, and. Employment Opportunities for displaced people with the Norwegian Refugee Council estimating three quarters of displaced people have lost income since the pandemic began lockdowns have also further restricted refugees mobility with countries like Greece placing tighter restrictions on refugees than the rest of the population. Moreover, many experts say governments are using the pandemic as an excuse to violate refugees rights. Governments are using covid nineteen as a pretext to block people from the right to seek asylum says bill freely the director of human rights watches. Refugee. And Migrant Rights Division. It runs roughshod over the basic principles of refugee protection. He says now, as the virus begins circulating in camps around the world experts worry that refugees who have already suffered so much from the pandemic may not get the medical support they need. If the disease gets introduced into more refugee camps, it would be a tinderbox says freekick noting that the virus would spread rapidly the low case rates we have seen so far free lick says are just a lucky break. Why have cove nineteen rates been lower than expected in refugee camps? covid nineteen rates in refugee camps or unexpectedly low in part because the camps tend to be isolated from surrounding communities limiting the odds of the virus spreading into the camps camps are situated often in the most desolate unwanted land that a country can find free like says, no one casually goes in and out national lockdowns also help protect refugees from the virus in Jordan, for instance, which hosts seven hundred. Forty seven thousand refugees mostly from Syria the government implemented. One of the world's strictest lockdowns, shutting down airports for several months and jailing people who broke quarantine. There was tight lockdown that was put in place towards the Third Week of March including the shutting down of all the borders and airspace says, Juliet Toomas. UNICEF's Chief of communications for the middle, east, and North Africa, about Jordan this help she says. Additional restrictions placed specifically on refugee camps also helped limit viral spread. Many camps have reduced the number of people entering and exiting. For instance, in Bangladesh's Cox's Bazar only twenty percent of the usual number of humanitarian workers were allowed to enter during the first few months of lockdown and deliveries were made less frequently in order to reduce potential transmission according to Saad Hamady a south. Asia campaigner for Amnesty International many of the operations except the essential ones were carried out remotely Hamadi says, these are the measures that might have reduced or delayed the spread of the virus. There are other factors however, that could explain low case numbers. Half of refugees worldwide are under the age of eighteen according to the UNHCR and their relative young age may make them less susceptible. To having a severe infection with the virus if young people are ACM dramatic or have mild symptoms, they may also be less likely to get tested. It's also possible that there have been cases of course at nineteen that have gone undetected and camps. While some testing is available, it's hindered by shortage of testing supplies and medical personnel to carry out the tests. Some refugees also don't. WanNa get tested for fear that they may have to self isolate and therefore be unable to carry out any income generating activities they rely on for survival in Cox's Bazar the world's largest refugee settlement in Bangladesh less than one percent of the population has been tested. The lower case numbers could therefore be a result of low testing rates. The actual number of cases could be higher. But experts say that despite low testing rates cove in nineteen infection rates in camps still have not been as bad as expected. Even if you carried out a large number of tests, it still likely to be a low number of infections says somebody if Cova Nineteen was spreading through camps undetected camps would witness rising numbers of people requesting medical attention or rising numbers of deaths neither of which have been the case in several camps according to UNHCR data I do think there's a hidden outbreak to an extent, but we're not seeing other indicators showing a massive outbreak says to Jacobson cares country director in Syria were not seeing a host of people falling ill or dying.

Unhcr Bangladesh COX Norwegian Refugee Council Syria Government Cova Greece Jordan Director United Nations Melissa Godin Commissioner Myanmar Migrant Rights Division Juliet Toomas Asia Unicef
Stillbirth rate rises dramatically during pandemic

UN News

00:58 sec | 5 months ago

Stillbirth rate rises dramatically during pandemic

"Nearly. Two million babies are still born every year or one every sixteen seconds a figure that could worsen due to the covid nineteen pandemic according to a new U. N.. report. Most stillbirths or eighty four percent occur in low income countries but high income nations face this challenge. Losing a child at birth or during pregnancy is a devastating tragedy for a family said Henrietta four executive director of the UN Children's fund UNICEF. Many of these deaths could have been prevented with high quality monitoring, proper ante, natal care under skilled birth attendant she added. UNICEF issued the report alongside the World Health Organization who the World Bank Group and the U. N. Department of Economic and Social Affairs. The partners warned that a reduction in health services due to covid nineteen could cause nearly two hundred thousand additional stillbirths over a twelve month period.

Unicef World Health Organization U. N. Department Of Economic A World Bank Group Henrietta Executive Director Un Children
SushiSwap Has Officially Migrated Away From Uniswap After a Week of Ups and Downs

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

01:22 min | 6 months ago

SushiSwap Has Officially Migrated Away From Uniswap After a Week of Ups and Downs

"So sushi swamp has been one of the most dramatic events in defy recently, which is saying alive because it's been an extremely eventful summer a couple of weeks ago Sushi swap forked the code of swap, which was at that point by far the largest decentralized exchange or automated market maker. However Sushi swap introduced a token on top Sushi, which would reward both liquidity providers and token holders. Then the main dove behind Sushi swab named chef. No, me cashed out after. Generating a lot of interest in the project and a lot of money for him or herself right after Sam. Bank men freed the CEO of a cryptocurrency. Derivatives Exchange. He was behind a project that is building decks on a competing boxing called Salona made a proposal to build support for Sushi swap on Salona. And then. Because of the outcry over how chef nomi cashed out chef, no media was forced to hand over the Admin keys to Sam, and then finally after all that there was a migration took place of liquidity from UNICEF hop over to Sushi's FAV. And in the end one point, two, billion dollars ended up on Sushi swap while UNICEF wop was left with four hundred million

Salona SAM Unicef Nomi CEO
"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

02:06 min | 9 months ago

"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

"There's childcare opportunities so that everyone is able to come. No one feels like there is a barrier because they have to. Take Part in other responsibilities they have. And then the other thing would be panels. Who is on your panel being very deliberate about thinking about thought. It is only one woman who's on your panel, and because there are a lot of women in the blockchain space, you can really bring value to conversation so being deliberated and doing the work. And that would be. My last point is being delivered deliberate in your effort, so are you reaching out to the right group of people for whatever your initiative is? Who are you reaching? Are you just reaching out to traditionally male dominated groups, are you reaching out to the women live groups or associations? That's all really important in increasing the amount of women participations space. Excellent excellent I mean I I completely agree in also know your point. You know it's. It's about you know. There's gender diversity, but it's also about you know the general. Diversity. And not something which is especially important. Today was the black lives matter. movement is going on. Diversity is critical from all different angles and we as injured blogs definitely would encourage that as much as possible so I'm I'm going. Thank you both very much for sharing your insights on on how UNICEF is using blockchain and walking through some of your interesting projects, and this wraps up. This in trouble is podcast. We hope you've enjoyed the episode. Ariana. I would love to invite you back on this show probably about eight to twelve months time to see how some of your projects have evolved. And that love to do another world tour with you, but all the different projects you're doing around the world, so thank you so much for both of you for participating in this podcast. Thank you so much..

UNICEF
"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

05:04 min | 9 months ago

"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

"There seems to be a fair amount of overlap between the work. Each of those organizations are doing, and my question is how much collaboration exists between your respective bodies in furthering understanding in development and agreeing on important issue on standards. Right, so there definitely are. You know both formal and informal networks upon which collaboration is happening. We have colleagues and peers at a variety of entities that we communicate with and share ideas with and Sambas. You know maybe have come from similar companies before organizations before. You know within the UN as I mentioned. We have the United Nations innovation network. which right now actually has over sixteen thousand members, sixteen thousand innovators across all of the entities are coming together to talk about payroll insights blockchain. And other kind of new and emerging technologies. And the Atrium, as I, as we have discussed a bunge already. As the mechanism is the tool by which know specifically those innovators I'm excited about. Blockchain can get together and collaborate, so we're seeing this agency. Collaboration happened already. UNICEF doesn't entity as over five thousand employees around the world and Sophie Take that times as I mentioned the. There's over one hundred for new entities I'm not even sure there's so many different ones around the world. And, so creating these more formal channels, such as H. Graham to come together and collaborate is sort of a first step. And, we also have different groups in learning groups that bring together. People from different entities, so we have a blockchain learning group and course, so that's more kind of foundational were different. You know individuals from different organizations come together and just learn what is blockchain an. How can it be used? We also have a crypto working group. Where the next step beyond the blockchain one one, it's different organizations and entities coming together to say like. Can we use cryptocurrency? Why should we you know? What are the risks associated I'm? How's it being used? Maybe by governments and by private sector entities, so trying to dive deeper onto a topic, and then again with the venture fund. This is a way for us to collaborate with other issues within the NSF and beyond. Through Investment! Opportunities, so there definitely are mentioned formal and informal ways of interacting with all the different agencies, but we definitely are aware that there is a lot going on. There's no need to recreate the wheel, so dialogues are happening for sure. An excellent excellent. Yeah, and I completely agree. We can't recreate the wheel there. There's so much work that each of these agencies you know I'm sure within the UN, but also outside of the UN are doing. I mean you're you're you're you're guidebook is excellent, but there is a lot of similarities with some that similar ish guidebook that the CD or the World Trade Organization agonized so. Definitely no one encourage as much collaboration between all all these agencies and The, last question I'd like to ask you..

UN Blockchain World Trade Organization UNICEF United Nations bunge Sambas Sophie Take H. Graham NSF
"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

04:58 min | 9 months ago

"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

"Origin to the farmer, and you can donate part of your purchase price of your coffee back to the to the farmers. So that's really good. Now we mentioned earlier on again in the PODCAST Kazakhstan on how? Your drones and blockchain teams are collaborating together around the holidays or certificates. Is that what is that the same piece of work you're doing with regards to the how it's being used for smart contracts, and or is slightly different project. It's different, actually so We're working with our Catholic stand office on a project called Digital S, and if you don't know what a digit is, you might be surprised when you Google at that. It's an abacus and to calculator. Put together. We kind of joked that this is our project of bringing the old on the new together, and so is physically what? Is Is looking to digitize are some of the financial processes in Kazakhstan, and this is around vendor payment, so we work with implementing partners often our country offices and a lot of the processes that we do around this around project. Releasing funds. Can still be a very manual process that includes a lot of physical paperwork endorsed. This project was twofold. One could be digitized some of these processes. So! Obviously, that part does not require a blockchain, but when we do ties them. Is there a way that we can you smart contracts to streamline some of the business rules in the business logic that's associated with these processes. And also when we're doing this, can we create transparency in the payments that were making to these vendors, and so this was again a prototype so very small scale that we did last year to test an initial set of hypotheses. And that project is built out. It had a tremendous amount of learning for the Kazakhstan office, but also we had our supply division in our finance team involved so a very collaborative effort at UNICEF for us really understand. What does it mean to live in a digitally digitally finance world in?.

Kazakhstan Google UNICEF
"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

05:26 min | 9 months ago

"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

"And, so that's called. you can learn more about that and then also staff engagement. So how do we incentivize people both within UNICEF? There's another different you agency that's looking. kind of incentivizing different behaviors using tokens, and what does it look like? If you complete tasks token, you can exchange that token for whatever it could be so those are some of the some of the exploration that are happening and again these are also featured in the practical guide in far more detail, excellent and we're gonNA. Do some deep dive into a short little while, but I wanted to ask you a question because you both know have worked in the private sector now you know you're working for this public institutional body. And? You won't even seems to be quite progressive. In terms through the it's the UN innovation network to be working on all these different projects. Do you find that? Perhaps you know there's always wrong stereotype that for things to happen at institutional level or public level. These things usually take a lot longer private sector because some of these some of the procedures mentioned are very progressive, very modern. What are your views on that? I yeah. I can take a stab at that. So I do think it is not maybe as fast as the private sector. But I think that that is a good thing. We talk. Excuse me, we talk. Sometimes about the private sector you know saying move fast and break things. We don't WanNa do that within the United Nations. You know we're dealing with you know. Yeah exactly refugees children. You know people that we don't. We don't really WANNA put them at further risk so I think I'm the pace at which we move in for us. All the things I mentioned are were very was like these are prototypes. These aren't fully fledged products that were were launching across all hundred plus you in entities like the role you know UNICEF innovation really is to do very small prototypes taking our experiences in the private sector. You know our contacts in the private sector looking at some of the models and trying to safely experiment. But what is exciting and I think what's great about not only the univision network, but even some of the higher levels of the United Nations is that there is an eagerness to apply these technologies. You know there's different reports that are being commissioned in papers, being commissioned from some of the highest levels of the United Nations so I do think there's a bit of a misnomer oftentimes you know people tell us like we had. No idea unicycles even doing all of this know give them our innovation website in their mind blown. So I do think there's a bit of a gap in maybe communication between the two worlds. I'm, but we also have great private sector entities that we collaborate with that we leverage, so we're starting to bridge that gap, but I think we are moving at a safe safe space. Great Great, so let's now look at practical examples of how UNICEF is using bunching technology, so we we mentioned earlier on the Atrium and I understand. It's a joint project by UNICEF the world. Food Program a United Nations Development Programme. Could you tell us.

UNICEF United Nations United Nations Development Pro UN univision
"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

03:05 min | 9 months ago

"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

"Categories of use cases that we like to view all of the existing projects within the UN through so the first is. Using blockchain as a single source of truth, which again if you're in the blockchain space, you probably hear this a lot. If you're not that really just means like one single record despite records that have different information, but really one central place that you can go to and see what the truth is for both public records on supply chain tracking. The second bucket is tracking the exchange of value within digital finance cryptocurrency I'm so, what does it look like to have you know? Assets become digital and then be able to see those move, and then the third bucket is increasing organizational efficiency. Using smart contracts in digital engagement so. I have a couple examples for each of those so within the public records on supply chain tracking. There actually is a project. And Afghanistan looking at land record management. To, the collaborative project between two different UN agencies, and so they're trying to do is actually take land records. Put Them. Onto blockchain, so that all different government agencies in UN agencies can go to a single place to see. Who owns what land in the registry had been? Transferred. As well as for supply chain. The World Food. Program has a project. Looking at, how do we digitize the supply chain of food in one of their largest corridors between Djibouti and Ethiopia. Some again taking you know what is an analog paper process making digital? And then you know putting in mechanisms using different teachers of blockchain to. Make it more efficient. For tracking the exchange value within. Digital Finance Defy I'm cryptocurrency. We have building blocks, which is actually the project that made me excited to get into blockchain. This is my kind of a hall moment of. Can Be used beyond just you know. Trading so building bikes familiar as the World Food Program's project Arrest in several refugee camps actually, but what they is instead of using paper vouchers to get on goods at the stores within refugee camps. They actually use biometrics. And so it's digital accounting for some those beneficiary vouchers. And then UNISOM, actually in the fall launched a crypto fund so alongside the Venture Fund that Christina talked about we are now making investments in both pointed ether, which is super exciting and what this has started to do is actually allow four. Transparent donations and investments tracking, which is your brand new to the United Nations is still pretty new in the NGO space, and then lastly for organizational efficiency for smart contracts which we love. We wrapped actually. A first prototype of smart contracts within a vendor procurement so.

United Nations World Food Afghanistan Venture Fund Christina Djibouti Ethiopia
"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

04:53 min | 9 months ago

"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

"Our drones team was launching a corridor in Kazakhstan's. It was the first drone corridor to test how you would coordinate drones in an emergency response scenario and one of the things that the country office asked us for was whether we could provide certificates that were validated on a blockchain for these companies that were flying in the drone corridor so that then if they went to our drone corridor. Somewhere else in the world because we have UNICEF has several drone quarter is that they would have a recognized your ticket at that they could produce these various stroke corridors, and so at that was one of our first collaborations that we did with the drones team, but we often have conversations with data science team around what that looks like his as you mentioned, watching can be the foundation layer for a lot of these applications. Excellent Excellent Now Arianna also Christina I'm very curious to know from your personal stories allege you into working within blockchain. Is it died? You have an inner geek within your cells, or you're passionate about sci-fi. What is it not got you into blockchain? So I would say yes to both of those. Definitely definitely an inner geek that as often extra at all and yes. I actually. I'm in a book club with my friends, and we just started reading Dune and honor the movie coming out, so there's. A BIG SCI-FI GEEK here but so in my undergraduate career, I actually studied international development and global health. And Got Pretty disillusioned with how international development in aid was being done and I thought no. There's so many because of my love of Fi and reading about technology kind of in parallel with academic studies. I thought well maybe I. Should Pivot into the private sector and see what's going on over there and see if there are any new ways of thinking about how to solve some of these global challenges. And my you know getting into blockchain was actually pretty. Quincy Dental I had a boss at an investment firm that is working at..

Kazakhstan UNICEF Quincy Dental Christina Fi
"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

04:40 min | 9 months ago

"unicef" Discussed on Insureblocks

"We will be discussing how UNICEF utilizes blockchain chain, technology, and I'm very pleased to welcome Christina, Lonzo blockchain lead at UNICEF and Arianna Fowler blockchain strategist at Unit Surf Ladies. Many thanks for joining us today. Could you please give us a quick introduction on yourselves? Thanks mature having a so. Hi, I'm Christina, oiseaux leader block team team within the Office of innovation at NSF and hi. I'm Anna Fowler a blockchain strategist within the Office of innovation at USA excellent excellent, so thank you very much for joining us for this show. Could you please tell us? What is blockchain? And how does it work absolutely? So per our newly published practical guide to block chain. blockchain technology is a type of software that's made up. Different kinds of records and digital transactions, and they're actually grouped together into blocks, hence blockchain, and then when each new block is added to a shared network, it's actually connected or chained again blockchain. To the previous block, making it difficult to change on the past information, so this shared network is actually just fun. A bunch of different computers around the world or within a certain network, and each of those computers actually retains the same and full complete record transactions as they occur. That, they hold the entire blockchain, and sometimes you'll hear people refer to this word called nodes. And so really what nodes are just computers, and then once the transaction is submitted to a blockchain and created within this this record store The previous data can't be edited or modified, so it's what some people like to call like an immutable proof of record some some buzzwords in there, but happy to. deconstruct for you brilliant Brian Thank you so much for that. So Christina. Could you please give us a brief introduction to what is UNICEF absolutely and I'll? I'll do a bit of a zoom out talking about UNIVAC announcing in a little bit issue at the officer invasion.

Christina Unit Surf Ladies UNICEF Arianna Fowler Anna Fowler UNIVAC NSF USA officer
"unicef" Discussed on Marketing Scoop Podcast

Marketing Scoop Podcast

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"unicef" Discussed on Marketing Scoop Podcast

"All right so that is baby. Dry the first baby to receive a vaccine by a drone in a remote island in Vanuatu and I think as a communicator. This is what is to tell the story yet and when I look and a second to how we do it I could see it in four pillars. How do we communicate technology and innovation? And how do we actually stick to their brand which is to save children's lives and I would sum it up? Basically two four things. A Lot of times we stumble into an issue of driving the story by technology. But who cares sometimes right like? There's a niche market. That probably would care but at the end of the day we are UNICEF and we need to show that impact so whether it is tangible as central as you could see what baby troy and sometimes it becomes way more complex because it's not a physical innovation. You can actually kind of protrayed in a way of how to illustrate impact within a one year timeframe or within ten years timeframe. How will that impact a child's life and that's very important for us in a storytelling perspective? Another is to draw emotion. We all talked to people regardless of all our target audiences and for this basically we understand what the baby would feel and we understand whether mother would feel and that's very important so finding that narrative within the narrative is something we constantly look at also differentiation. What's new what's valuable to it? This is a very perfect example of why it's different are white adds value instead of doing one two three days by foot traveling with the vaccine onto an island you're able to transport in twenty five minutes that's some value at and we shouldn't forget the technology is well because technology is is what she powers this whole thing and we have to be the experts in the field so we have to make sure that we educate people they just simply what the technology is in. What's the opportunities into risk are? So that is pretty much how he told her story and it. I will go in more detail as to why we think this is successful. But once you've kind of got that narrative like what are the digital channels or communication channels. We use so basically pretty much showcase that here but I don't want to really talk about it in the context because it's pretty much the same as everyone else there's internal audience or six hundred audience. There's there's stitches loves social media. But I just want to focus in two things one is. We really focused on the technology and the private sector so a lot of for key messages. Narrative really is directed to that and secondly also educate answering early because we are a big organization spending across one hundred ninety countries and change his heart. You know change this very hard so we have to educate people that innovation is good and it will add value so then we asked what are the tactics of strategies we use and I leased the content and have been talking about this for a while now but it is to find that human interest story that people can relate to and in a nutshell? Why because once you relate to a person it's sharable and most of the time all of marketers. That's there's that's our goal is to be able to amplify that voice and be able to amplify that narrative the second approach is also looking in your internal team. Sometimes we try to outsource and try to find influencers but sometimes the most interesting diverse voices come from within and whether you have to place them an opinion pieces and media whether you let them go on tug talks weather you submit them in the most innovative people around the world sometimes looked within as well. Because you need to put a voice in your bread and that's very imprudent as well a lot of times you do partnerships and we partnered with private sector into modern she companies because they can help strengthen our solutions. But you should also look at it as what can we do together to align the communication packaged communication better? So I'll give a brief example. Which is Red Hat? Red Hat is one of the largest open source software providers that we partnered with and we did a bit of an unconventional partnership approach for them. We basically took technology team and we took thirteen. We sent them out eight weeks off site and also travel to Colombia to basically develop a prototype for For mapping every school of the world so in terms of communication standpoint. What we did was. We created mini series. We've got gone to conferences together. We did a lot of media placements and press releases to kind of package that eight weeks and if you look online. It's definitely something that is valuable to look. We also spend a lot of time in multi media because a lot of times. It's not easy to tell this story. By words. People just get lost with technological jargon of everything Ladas easiest drones example so we spent a lot of time doing data visualizations animations videos jeffs to be able to capture people's attention and to be able for them to digest it and learn more. We also look at a branding as you could see. We have a semi differentiated. Branding from our mother Brent UNICEF and I us that's very important because once we talk to these technology companies and private sector. We need to look that. We're slightly different. That we're taking you approaches and things and that's why we have to keep it consistent. Why the spending matter? It is your first impression to the audience. And it's actually the lasting impression of people remember you We also spent a lot of time building key principles. I think this is very important in terms of how we communicate and the narrative we say and as you could see we've built that principals and endorsed by so many people and that's a branding positioning for us. If people have endorsed doesn't use this principles then we asked you have achieved our objective which is to be at the forefront of innovation within our space. So what does success look like to us a given another snapshot of what it is but it's fairly similar to everyone? Sheriff Sheriff reach engagement brand sentiment. That's probably the fundamental sort of things put in a report. But I think the key insight for me that I've learned is that it varies at various. Really per partner. Particularly for initiatives like us who worked with multi stakeholders. It's probably not this one. It's probably funded. Probably Partners are probably a placement somewhere and you have to know that from the very beginning so that you can kind of kind of align and make sure your strategies in place so with baby troy. I think it's a definitely a perfect example of what I think is a success and I'll give you a snapshot of what happened. Once you've released a story in three weeks we've been able to give exclusive to New York Times. Both print and digital with been mentioned six hundred seventy nine media mentions forty two top tier. We've also been awarded Global Best Practice Program at Expo. Twenty twenty and this video that you've watched has been watch around one hundred fifty times. Well one hundred and fifty thousand times I was like that's not right so at the end. I'm just going say that acid communicator. It's very it's a privilege and responsibility that we constantly communicate how innovation could improve children's lives like maybe joy like children young people and thank.

partner Red Hat Vanuatu UNICEF New York Times Brent UNICEF Twenty twenty Colombia
"unicef" Discussed on Marketing Scoop Podcast

Marketing Scoop Podcast

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"unicef" Discussed on Marketing Scoop Podcast

"Everyone thanks for inviting me here. So I am Angie. I work as a digital communication strategist for UNICEF here in New York In particular for the Office of Innovation. So before we get started. I'll just give a brief overview as to what UNICEF is and what the office innovation does just to give a bit more context to what else shall case so what is Unicef so Eun Assaf is. Un's Agency for children. It is seventy two years old. We work across one hundred ninety countries and territories in two thousand sixteen alone with responded to around three hundred forty four emergencies spanning across one hundred eight countries. We are also the largest buyer of vaccinations for children. And we've supplied for you. Seven million children with educational supplies seal kind of see the context of where we work and the brand that we hold. I've been very privileged to be part of this organization but I worked for the Office of innovation so what is innovation UNICEF simply it is really trying to find new processes new products and services in new ways of doing things that I'd value so we really see ourselves as an interdisciplinary team that works across different frontier technologies comprised of data scientists machine learning specialist humanitarian design thinkers communicators looking at the interest section of the opportunities that the industries out there are providing and how we could utilize partner with them to solve the one billions of the most vulnerable. So what we do. Is we identify prototype and test these technologies and when it actually works we scale it across globally. So you could kind of see that. We are in this intersection. Would we have a mother brand and we also have a sub brand and for Marketer like meet some very exciting but yet challenging space that I work in we also see the value of partners Particularly as you could see in the screen we partner heavily with private sector and technology companies. Because you want to engage strengthen our innovation arm and so we we. I would pretty much say that. This is our target audience. Primary target audience. So I just wanted to like dealt deep into how do we actually communicate an innovation story within UNICEF? That has a very different sort of space that we work in. And I think that's the interesting part of it so before anything else. I think to illustrate this. All just showcase baby.

UNICEF partner Office of Innovation Office of innovation New York Angie Un Eun Assaf
"unicef" Discussed on UN News

UN News

14:23 min | 1 year ago

"unicef" Discussed on UN News

"As we have seen costs. Nineteen is still rampant all across the world except China as far as I remember at the very beginning unit was the very first one. They didn't see to provide assistance. So how could not have been possible that within a short period of time that UNICEF is ready to provide assistance in the fill in China good question? My reflection is in two areas one is China is still a key partner for UNICEF even though China has developed allowed in the last three or four decades and UNICEF is not a conventional recipient of Eunice eight anymore however it is a is a strategic partner. That's why we always pay attention to what happens in China and the second is our third you effort in emergency preparedness learning from the lessons in Ebola time in west Africa. We prepared in terms of program. Prp Graham Planning in supplies in having stockpiling of key commodities to deal with common diseases inserts. So the propen is really critical to allow time the action. So since the first shipment of the assistant China what has done on what has been doing in terms of providing similar systems and other types of assistance to help relieve the stress of this coronavirus in China it has been challenging our initial stockpiling exhausted very quickly because the disease the need suddenly became a global scale and the we were not able to Raleigh Raleigh materials. Oh continue the production and offering from China. There was a temporary period of stocking out of key commodities shortage gloves. Pep's mosques and it is getting better now with the Chinese manufacturers resuming walking and the we have reached some private sectors in China as well as public sectors to make special agreement to to get a lot of the essential materials ready for other countries that are facing an outbreak such as you rope in America. So it's a continuing effort to get our supply chain grady to get our technical support. Ready Children are the most critical group of people that unit service helping to provide protection and help support as far as the children in China. I understand many kids need help when they do not go to school. So how do you help in this regard to help the keys? Get some of help. In terms of relieve the great burden for the family and the stress on the part of the kids themselves and must not meet. Its has been a learning curve for. Unicef have as well as for the governments in different countries and for the international organizations including the United Nations. In the beginning we thought it was a flu like of situation. Nobody anticipated the schools will be closed. Factories will be closed and the borders will be closed although the the mortality rate among children is relatively low the secondary effect on children as you mentioned due to school kosher doing study from home affect the children's physical mental wellbeing and the UNIS in the early days. I think it is as early as in January Eunice. I've China on UNICEF. New York worked together to support healthy home learning so that children could continue to interact with others. Have Healthy Space be mindful and we interacted with children on social media how to deal with stress. So it's it's really important learning curve recently. The director of Education of Unisex issued a In one of the newspapers in America I think it is in Los Angeles California time so something to to remind us that although children are now dying from that disease per se they are shouldering a lot of the social burden that we must be careful to measure what happens to the children from school Closure what we're learning in Bala at Ebola timing in West Africa that school closure is not always healthy for children. Now for many of the poor children going to school now be able to access to save space during conflict now to have the only meal available of the day that they obtain from school. It's a huge is a huge challenge talking about the children. We should not forget on them. Mothers as a matter of fact women is another group of people. Unions. is providing support and protection. And the help we understand. There is a lot of people who are under stress including women who are breastfeeding women. Who are pregnant. So can you tell us what kind of assistance that you're providing to this group of people in terms of the support? The women very important question again. We are looking at both the direct effect of the disease as less indirect. We are looking for a collecting information on what happens to those children. Babies won't mothers. That are Kobe nineteen positive. How can they be safe in breastfeeding? And the what is the best way to provide mother to child transmission if there is if there is such a thing will watching the space is early days and the evidence is not yet clear. Lot of the initial data will come from China. We had the first outbreak and the China started collecting inflammation earlier. The secondary effect on women from children working at home and many of the Mother's Day laborers. They need to go out to earn salaries from from day. Labor kind of walk so weighing. Mindful what it means for them to have children at home without schools and the extra burden we are asking the world the husband the father the other family members and everybody to give additional support to women because the burden should not just be a layer showed that it should be shared by all of us. We understand this epidemic is brought a great impact on the health system in China in Europe in the United States. These countries have problem of confronting this epidemic with their mature health system. How can we ask the underdeveloped countries including the LDC's to get ready to get prepared for this epidemic while their systems are particularly vulnerable? So what is concerned about what has been doing to provide assistance to these vulnerable countries. Probably need help and support at this moment. In particular award is the basics that are not in place. What do I mean by basics? Electricity water to wash hand water to perform surgery water to clean the delivery room as I comb through many countries in Africa. Water in house facilities is not a foregone. Conclusion is not available in remote areas. When there's drought it's really a rare commodity eunice as has been paying a lot of attention to wash in house that civilities and the Washington school we are also supporting the functions of basic primer house cat to have nurses trained healthcare providers serving in primary health care facilities. This is really important now just for everyday house cat provision but for disease outbreaks whenever there is a disease outbreak. We come back to talk about the importance of Primary House K. But when the disease outbreak rake is over we don't spend I feel we don't spend enough effort and resources to build a primer house caste system either by the government or by the develop partners. We can do a lot better in this areas in this area to get the basics. Right we understand. There are a lot of constraints for us to deliver like travel ban border closures. So what kind of impact does it have on your protection work at this moment? All these restraints are imposed. Children on the move is Hot subject even before covert nineteen. They are children. Moving between countries from one affected areas crossing Balta to safety the closure of border certainly would have effect on the families on the children on the move the IDP's the refugees migrants UNICEF special group said hop during the Kobe. Nineteen response to make sure those vulnerable children are not forgotten. They are not stigmatized and they can. They are protected by the local systems on humanitarian faces here in terms of providing the materials and the DOD had a lot of things in stock. I THEY MAY HAVE PROBLEM. Bean delivered because of the travel ban because of the closure. How would you overcome this issue? And you have enough supplies stock at this moment. Alice dock. Pilings getting this week than last week. A lot to do with the resumption of Chinese manufacturers however to ship those products that it be gloves Kung's PP's or even oxygen concentrator 's and the essential drugs antibiotics for them to come out of China. We need to make sure that cargo planes available and the S. The airspace is open to allow the goods to reach where we want them to be. So the border closure and Closure of airlines certainly have impact for the reliability of basic commodities and dry. We have to continue to work with the government and Sororities as well as public and private sectors to make sure the productions available as well as transportation and distribution and the monitor views. I watched a video message from Miss Fall. As a matter of fact I was inspired by the kind of message. She wanted to convey to the people across the wall to the women and to the children and to the support community. The message that I got from pervy two messages that no matter what even though dunking challenges we have restraints at the moment but we are determined to deliver so I guess that is the message for all star from unison. So on this particular point what do you have to say L. I. E. D. is really passionate about our mandate to serve every woman every child in the world twenty four seven? She travelled allowed last year and today she did. Send the message. I'm working from home instead of traveling to where I should be for. Unicef is not just covert. Ninety-nine response their children in war their children in disease outbreaks affected by measles their children who are managed children born out immunize that they have measles and other diseases. We have a lot to do every every one of us is looking at our two thousand twenty plan and asking the question. What is Kobe Ninety Min to us because we have to delete a our donors and our partners want to do so. We're watching this space. While we prioritize the Kobe nineteen response. We are also mindful of our overall responsibilities in education in house in nutrition chopped protection in many other program areas. Have anything to add before we wrap up this interview. Thank you very much. And UNICEF is ready to walk with the United Nations agencies with donors with partners and Wisco- men men and woman every individual the world who make the world a safer and better place for every child..

China UNICEF Unicef west Africa United Nations Kobe America Eunice Ebola partner New York Africa Washington school Raleigh Primary House flu
"unicef" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"unicef" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Well. Yeah I mean it's no surprise to people to discover. There's a lot of administrative costs that go behind making these things happen but just because any non-profit has not done a good job job and I'm not referring to UNICEF and particulars no reason that we can't improve and I think it's a great point you know Travis if they can set an example for others than this'll be valuable beyond Some of you know just what UNICEF is doing. I know you guys are You're not alone alone. In accepting of virtual coin donations. The American Red Cross is doing at the U N world. Food Program is doing it. Are you seeing something in any of these other programs that you want to model after. I think one of the areas where we're still learning and were looking to the ecosystem to see what's going on is really to solve that last mile problem so while the project that I mentioned around Google. We're really fortunate because it's a completely digital. Oh process at the difficulty. We have is where we're going to use crypto to purchase a physical good. How do we actually verifiably proved to the donor that that purchase was made and so we still need to figure out as an ecosystem how we can best at address that issue and so we're collaborating with our counterparts To Look at Best Practices Rama. Do you feel like putting products on blockchain as you know. We're starting to see happen. Happen both for a physical goods of all kind is collaborating with a project. That's doing that could help solve that problem and could potentially I'm buried use case by use case but it also now hand in December last year. You guys said you were investing one hundred thousand dollars dollars in six different blockchain startups was at you guys donating one hundred grand each different start-up or one hundred grand total and and while we're some of those start ups That that blockchain related like how. How are those impacting? The overall UNISEM business are still being developed. Or what's going on with those with those blockchain startups and Kenya mentioned. They were so yes last year. We made six investments into early stage. Startups that we're focusing. On various blockchain applications each startup received up to one hundred thousand. US dollars and also received up to a year of mentorship with us so we're just in the final stages now with those startups and Finding funding for those startups the six startups themselves are Utah Pixar. Which is a Tunisian based company? WHO's looking at community? Currencies have stopped with which is an Indian based startup which is looking looking at vaccine trucking. We have w three which is a internet connectivity startup in Bangladesh. We have take labs which is impact funding based in Argentina prescrip- though which is digital prescriptions based in Mexico and OAS city which is a Mexico based certificates platform and so all of those platforms have been developed over the last year in conjunction with business. Mentors Open source mentors as well as our blockchain expertise year UNISOM We've learned a lot from them. I'm sure they've learned a lot from their mentors as well. How at their projects have really developed over the last year? And we're really excited to see where those projects go. After you know what stands out to me there is. I've not heard of any any of those projects. And in what that you know reveals. How much development is going on around the world in the block? Chain crypto space that we have no clue right. It's you know we hear about all the big news around Bitcoin and some of the larger projects and the ones with the big market orca calves. But there is so much development happening. And that's why blockchain's unstoppable. That's exciting to me. And it's really exciting particularly for us. We work in UNICEF program program countries in those are often countries who don't see the same. VC funding that companies in New York or San Francisco will see but those projects have so much the potential end so the projects that we've invested in were really excited about and in the future. We'll be launching future. Cohorts where companies can apply to food or funding and we look forward to seeing what comes next very very interesting. I think that's great stuff over there. So what's what's next for. The UNICEF crypto Currency Fund. It's been an exciting journey. So far for the CRYPTO funds. And we're looking to the future. We have made our initial investments so three investments aspirants to date with crypto currency. One bitcoin hundred ether at that was into three different startups and shortly will be opening a call for applications occasions for startups to applied for crypto funding. At we'll be working with different countries around the world that might be interested in accepting Crypto donations at UCF level. And how that works. Is that a country for example like UNICEF. USA might accept crypto donations and then those crypto donations are passed along to UNICEF headquarters at in cryptocurrency. We've and go through that application process with with those startups who are interested in getting funding and select a few actually received crypto in Crypto. At Enzo relieve the next that you're so is for us to learn more about digital currencies and the impact that digital currencies will have on UNICEF Zack and the ecosystem more widely in how we deliver our mission. And so yeah that's about it. For the the crypto funded the learning journey. And we're learning you. Call the CRYPTO funded. I call it Crypto Fun at love. What's developing in this Christina thanks so much for share with us today and we wish you the very best as you. Continue with these initiatives look forward to hearing about developments in the the future. Thank you very much China will.

UNICEF UNICEF crypto Currency Fund UNICEF Zack USA American Red Cross Mexico blockchain Kenya Travis Google Bangladesh Christina China Utah UCF Pixar Argentina
"unicef" Discussed on Women at Work

Women at Work

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"unicef" Discussed on Women at Work

"Right. I mean, I hope one of the takeaways, we all need to stop beating ourselves up. So number one, I just think some self compassion. We're not always going to get this right. I think with anything, when you think of self-awareness, there's always retrospective awareness. I where we're catching it after the fact which I think is a great step in self-awareness. And then I think we move from self-awareness to saying, okay, I don't want that to become a trend or pattern. How do I get in front of it? How do I change the way I prepare, you know, for another situation down the road that looks like this. So that doesn't happen again. And then over time I think we move from retrospective awareness to prospective awareness to being able to then in the moment, just find that right, perfect moment and put it out there. So one of our listeners told us that she's reached a point as a manager where it's more important for her to see her direct reports get recognition than it is for her to get herself. She wrote to us. I like to see my team UNICEF, spotlight where I sit proud in the back of the room at what point can we shift from worrying about getting credit to focusing more on making sure the people around us get credit? Yeah. I mean, I, I love that listener sentiment, right? Don't we all wish we had a boss like that. Good advice. Yeah, a great boss. And so I think in the course of a career, it the answer's probably in and there are probably as your advancing arenas where you've reached your level of comfort where you really aren't proving yourself anymore. And everybody knows you're good in those arenas where we can shift to paying it forward for our teams and making sure that others get those opportunities and others get the spotlight and that we are celebrating the we. But I think for all of us, there's always the next arena a next room next table, even when I work with sea level, women executives, well, perhaps they don't longer feel like they need to claim credit in their role or even in their company. I then start to see those patterns show up again in the board room or in their efforts for greater external visibility. So for non managers, if someone on your.

UNICEF
"unicef" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"unicef" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Is in line with the work, which is a really free thing. And I think because you don't have to do what I do in a Sunday or pray to the God, I pray to work at the organization or give to the organization. In fact, most people don't. That's almost give me a freedom to say, well, this is what I believe, and this is my story, and it's been funny, just reading the reviews on Amazon of the book. So many people are like, I would never read religious book and I'm Jewish or I'm an atheist, but it was okay. He didn't try and convert me. He didn't try and religious, but it isn't at all it is. But for anybody, like I mean, talk about prayer and some of these, some of these moments of answer to prayer or or how I tried to reeks -perience faith and some people like anything having to do with faith is just completely tip, but it was. People like it was. Okay. Getting a pass because he didn't pre normally and no. No. I'm telling you if you're either of us, it's funny. It's like normally I would never read anything with any religious overtone, but if there's a big butts that speaks to in the same way that we, we have this crisis around giving and charity. The same can be said for our religious institutions. If you were to say, oh, you need to give back or UNICEF is knocking on the door. You're like, really? Similarly, for a lot of people just saying the word religion or Christianity or GIO d. or any of these things. Current. Provokes. An emotional reaction that's wed to some childhood experience or something like that. And, and in many ways, you know the best of what faith based organizations have to offer could use a little Scott Harrison rebranding in certain respects, you know. Well, certainly the transparency would before for a lot of them. Right? Yeah, yeah. So. Where are we at right now? We we're at six hundred sixty three still in the still need us grown to your community. Since since that started there. Now thirty twenty nine thousand people from one hundred four countries including countries in Africa, which makes me so happy. There are people that are giving monthly to the spring.

Scott Harrison UNICEF Amazon Africa
"unicef" Discussed on Photofocus Podcast

Photofocus Podcast

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"unicef" Discussed on Photofocus Podcast

"Image is because I've heard horror stories of even a local photographer here who was shooting for a well known positive newspaper. They were at a park taking candid images of children playing and the photographer ended up getting screened at by the parents because for some reason, I don't know if the parents felt threatened, but that photographer was not welcomed in all this to say, it's really an art interacting with people taking images of people that have never met you before. And especially you when you're not from their country. It's it's really quite amazing. How comfortable they look in these images. Yeah. So I I wouldn't I wouldn't be happy. If I walked to from a situation having made someone uncomfortable in. I think that there's a lot of people in the if someone doesn't want to be photographed just he's just won't call to the next one. It's funny people that want to be funny too much announce not helpful either. But I I think the difficult is our is in in difficult circumstances when people suspicious for the reasons why you might be taking those photographs that site that might be the case in the company just mentioned, I think, you know, the work. I did with UNICEF was probably a good training in that respect because they often difficult circumstances in In a. a. Victims of conflict toll or natural disasters end. I think you develop slightly, but you develop a way of working knows rations shit in a hopefully, not not intrusive on his sympathetic to to everybody around..

UNICEF
"unicef" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"unicef" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"And you may find it less expensively with someone who has bonded but will come into your house for example our we'll take your animal to their house you have to be careful because of limits on numbers of animals and stuff like that but that may be a less expensive option for people it might it might very well be and it's one to consider because again having somebody come into your home and take care of your pet in your home or they take it to their home that is you need to make sure that all the pets that are going to be with your pet or compatible because the same thing can happen in private care that can happen in a boarding facility so we want to make sure that they've measures they're taking taken and that that pet care service provider really understands your pets and can provide that for unicef safe environment do we still have neighborhood kids doing this like i did when i was many years ago a neighborhood kid we do we still have those wonderful opportunities where the person next door takes care of the dog while we go away for the day or for the week and it's it's sort of fun at teaches children responsibility and it helps the especially if they know the patch it's easier for the pet to make that adjustment sometimes but again in today's today's society when you do that all i caution to the pet parents is that make sure you have all the emergency numbers everything that that person's gonna need to reach you something should go wrong at the house or with the pet because.

unicef
"unicef" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"unicef" Discussed on The Changelog

"And an her i probably will build signs of her while she looks at like uh plato's ideas of poetics which is like theater and the way we present stories to each other and she took she compares out to like what is a bought on well by is an algorithm with the eyes on so it's it's this this computer algorithms thing the we give a personality cheered um and i love that notion starting to think about why it's not just like the the functionality of the application balance the way that we experience it in some way that's the way that we experience theater um so sorry love by what you'd you'd think i would be tempted to call it ought now out i there's also this are in line between like like a lot of these things actually earn intended to be s learn tendency just be algorithms or software um and going back to my idea but i don't want to converse with a robot i want robot to just do the thing that i don with his minimal interaction from you as possible so so between hide cycle in that notion of white i think about does have a personality in some of these things don't there's important distinction there because there's an aspect of scale there and i want us i wanna know you tell me if i'm keen into it from being misled but and with a by and even with a lot of the existing apps you as have with stale with welcome with a sentiment bought i'll with an app called bought naming as hard these things all are kinda like the unicef philosophy like one thing well write the very small and scope of what they try to accomplish um but then when you go to like get marketplace were apps exist and you have like circle see eye and yes all these other things and like business level integrations with get hub.

unicef
"unicef" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

Post Show Recaps

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"unicef" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

"Real madrid had to pay unicef to where unicef jerseys hm like they paid for the sponsorship wto i dunno but unisem i guess it was like prestigious the like a charity working to charge the charity i don't know why that it wasn't just like a okay we don't charge you but we're also like not gonna pay you but no they had to pay for like the honor of against like you seem classy i guess new wearing when i go it's like a roger federer thing on your big sky earth like we wanna seem super classic but when i was a you know in elementary school and it you know i i would i remember was further unisem like they'd send you at loo with like a cardboard box and you need to go like collect like paper money from people do they still do that they send kids out with like iphone in like a square icicle question i'm not sure i haven't i've never really seen them around uh since like the ninety so i dunno mmhmm so not sure i thought that that was also they were pushing kids still i go door to door and collect for unicef and i feel like that there's not a lot of pushing small ads to go door to door for such a good call that's a good call there might be a couple of you know yet like they will launch asked that right yes okay so here's sally weaver played by kathy griffin keiv can you give us a reset on sally weaver's character yes so shoes in the dow she susan ross's old college roommate in the dollar she was most notable for us she lived in i think it was memphis were jerry went to do a set and jerry really wanted a bottle of barbecue sauce that had charles groden lookalike on it because he was going on the charles groden show and so she was flying to new york.

unicef iphone dow charles groden new york unicef roger federer sally weaver kathy griffin susan ross jerry charles groden