30 Burst results for "Unger"

"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

05:59 min | 5 months ago

"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"So that's part of the fun, really. We've talked quite a bit about all this tech. But do you think it's possible at all? To have a cyberpunk narrative that doesn't go all dystopian honest that doesn't see the world as something really sinister when we get that much technology. Is it possible to still feel cyberpunk without that dystopian aspect? Or does it always have to be dystopian? And do we just think that like, I don't know, all this technology can only go that way. I think for cyberpunk and for noir. Dystopian is almost required. And it's maybe not the world itself is actually dystopian, but from the point of view of your protagonist. They're trapped in a dystopian scenario. And because that sets up your core conflict, I think if you take cyberpunk and you take the dystopia out of it, you end up with, you know, you end up with speculative fiction. It's a little difficult to get people to buy into the idea that technology as opposed to science fiction would like rocket ships and going to the moon. For some reason, it seems to be more difficult to get people to accept or embrace the idea that high-tech doesn't necessarily mean. Dystopian. Earlier version of the extraction list, the world tech is what if Apple built the matrix, right? It was supposed to be a more. Modern take on it. But the deeper I got into the story and the deeper I had to sort of dial up the conflict, the more dystopian, it started to get. And some of the reader feedback early on was this is cyberpunk. You can't have a bright world when you're writing like this. You can't have a thriller that's taking place in a place where technologies not constantly actively used to oppress people. So I think if it's going to be cyberpunk, I think that dystopia is almost required. You know, it's always interesting to me to look at trends and publishing and you see in recent years a little bit of push back against dystopian fiction and even sometimes like grimdark and the fantasy world. People want something with a bit more optimism. And yet at the same time, things like cyberpunk just keep coming back and people really want that. So yeah, it feels a bit you never know what's going to happen. Okay, so we also talked about tropes and noir and all of that. But in the abstractionist, you have a female main character, which is great. But I wondered if when you were writing the extraction list and wanting to explore these kinds of tropes with a female protagonist, if you felt like any of those classic tropes didn't work, if you wanted to subvert anything, engage with the discussion kind of with those noir or sexist tropes or anything like that. So one of the interesting things that I was kind of forced to examine. And I didn't particularly want to examine it. It just happened through the course of writing the story, is there's a lot of things that you can get away with with the male protagonist that are harder to do. Or they're harder to make believable with a female protagonist.

Apple
"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

03:45 min | 5 months ago

"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"Without having long descriptive passages. Because I would think about minority report and I just one reason I love that film is you've just got little snippets here and there like they scan his eyes and advertised to him personally as he's walking past shops and things like that and all these little touches. And I just also think in a book trying to describe that would take an awful lot longer than the split second it takes on TV to show it. So how do you address that as a writer? How do you make sure that you get across enough technological information while at the same time not having reams and reams of pages describing it all how it works? When I first started, I fell prey to the reims dreams of information. If you're trying to build a realistic high-tech world as sort of a mirror of the real world, it actually gets really complicated really fast. So I find that you can do it if you keep up the cadence throughout the entire work. So rather than doing, hey, here's info dump number one and info dump number two, you breadcrumb it through the entire story. Or at least I'd say the first half of the story. By the time you get to the second half of the story, you should have all of those pieces. Laid out and the reader should be familiar with the tech that's available. But by placing it sort of in the moment, you can bring a lot of these pieces together without needing the deep backstory for it. And then one of my favorite things to do is to find those metaphors. That describe what something does or, you know, the purpose of a piece of technology without having to get into reams of information, right? A contact lens that gives you a heads up display is really simple for people to understand. Because a lot of people are very familiar with contact lenses. And so just that description, despite the fact that the technology that goes into it involves printing little tiny circuit boards and how do you get the materials so that nobody's allergic to what you're using and so the metaphor is one of the key the key pieces is finding something that's super short and super fast that tells a reader everything they want to know without having to dive into the technology that drives something. And, you know, I suspect a lot of the time people don't really care how those cyberpunk contact lenses work. They just want to know that you put the contact lens in and all of a sudden you can see this whole new world. And that's, you know, that's as deep as it needs to go. I also really love that I find in cyberpunk stories, the names of the tech is so much more interesting than the names of tech. We actually end up getting whatever cyberpunk type story. The first touchscreen or whatever appeared in was certainly more interesting than calling it iPad. Oh yeah. Part of the naming of things is invoking a reaction, right? Like if you were trying to sell the iPad, you want something with a name that can appeal to as many people as possible. But if you're writing a cyberpunk story, you want to name that will tell people exactly what it's going to be used for later on in the story. It's almost like giving Chekhov's gun a name. You want to give your tech a name so that people know exactly further down the line what it's going to be abused for or used for in the story.

Chekhov
"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

03:22 min | 5 months ago

"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"And I think that, you know, if you're willing to allow the genre definition to relax a little bit and tie it a little less tightly to sort of noir specifically, I think there's a lot of room for reinvention. And there's a lot of room to build new, very tense, very thriller style stories without falling back. On some of those older tropes. It gets a little tricky though when you put the cyberpunk label on something. There's a handful of things that everybody expects. And some of those tropes are things that people expect that they, and if they're not in there, they don't believe it cyberpunk. So, you know, I would like very much to see the genre continue to evolve away from some of the earlier ideas. But I think there's always going to be a version of it that's like straight up ripped from Humphrey Bogart and the older vintage narrative stylings that people are, I would almost say like they're reading it as their comfort food, right? It's like if you're reading a reading one of the John D MacDonald Travis McGee stories. It follows a very specific sort of almost romance novel format. And you read it because you know what's going to come next. And you've got your favorite character and you know that this guy is going to be the bad guy and you know that this person over here is going to save the day and you know that this beautiful woman over here is going to walk off with all the gold at the end and actually be the winner and I think there's a group that reads cyberpunk with that in mind. Like they want to go back and reread Johnny mnemonic, but they want a new Johnny mnemonic. And I think I don't think it's going to be hard to get away from that as what people think of a cyberpunk, but there's so much room to move in this genre that I think that some of the stuff filmmakers have been doing with stuff like iRobot that just came out a few years ago that they've done they did a bunch of with the new Blade Runner film. A lot of those tropes kind of got scrambled up a bit with Robin as the police captain and with K or eventually Joe being a, you know, sort of a brick, right? But very dependently moving through his mystery to find the truth, even though maybe he didn't want to find the actual truth once he figured out what was going on. He sort of drove for any way, even though it was to his detriment. So I think there's bright spots and there's absolutely room to expand. That I think is going to be better for the genre as a whole, honestly. You mentioned about going back and rereading Johnny mnemonic and obviously a lot of my knowledge of cyberpunk comes from films. So I wondered asking you as an author, how easy is it to portray technology and a technology advanced world in the background?

Johnny mnemonic John D MacDonald Travis McGee Humphrey Bogart Robin Joe
"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

06:00 min | 5 months ago

"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"And you kind of think about Blade Runner being the obvious one where people, there were people on social media posting, like, oh, in the Blade Runner world, it is this date, and that day, as you get to the near future, because cyberpunk is in the near future. And we're going to get there at some point anyway. So I guess my question is, you might have new audiences for this. But does that mean that old cyberpunk begins to look a bit creaky? Because they're going to be quickly redundant. Like you say, there's going to be new things. It's like, well, obviously that's not a suitably good cyberpunk thing, because it's in the past now. And we've gone past that. Do you think that's a risk and that people won't be enjoying the matrix and say, like, 30 years time? Because it will look so dated. Or do you think there's still elements that can speak to a modern audience beyond the creaky tech? Well, I think that's where the narrative becomes the most important piece, right? The tech, while tech is a piece of the story, particularly in something like the matrix, it's the narrative of the characters. It's the neo's journey from being a programmer by day, cyberpunk by night, kind of character. To becoming a world changing hero, that's the piece that will be immortal. That's the piece that anybody who has done any level of reading can access, even if even if the tech gets creaky, even if we no longer have phone booths in the world. You can, you can still sort of hang your hat on that core narrative. And then everything else becomes style. You know, the same reason we go back and I was just watching cyro and the idea of traveling through town in a horse and carriage is decidedly vintage. But that doesn't mean that I can't connect to that, right? To those characters in that storyline. Because the surroundings are a little bit different. No longer what we might see in the world today. So I think if you're aware that a piece is older or if you're aware that a piece is dialed into a particular time period or a particular style, I think there's a lot of forgiveness for that kind of the world's moved on from here, right? And after a point, I think it'll become a selling point. Of looking back and saying, okay, here's the storyline itself still rings true, even if, you know, even if we no longer have that those kinds of cell phones and even if we no longer have phone booths and no longer need to access our computers by plugging a spike into the back of our head, you know, all of that stuff is really set dressing on the, you know, on the story of neo and Trinity's journey. So I think it'll I think it'll survive. I think a lot of this stuff does survive. It's rare that in science fiction, you know, people sort of throw out the baby with the bath water, right? If people go back and watch for a bit planet as an example. And the high-tech planet are the real ways. Which are driving this planet sized computer system.

"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

05:55 min | 5 months ago

"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"You know, I can have cameras in my sunglasses that are small enough where, you know, your average person really isn't going to see them unless they're looking for something unusual. So I think that all of these pieces in this modern intersection of human and our current form of technology is kind of driving new ideas in that space. One of the things that pops up, there's a role playing game called cyberpunk that came out a number of years ago. And it's the game that Cyberpunk 2077 is heavily based on. One of the ideas that pops up a lot is how much of your humanity do you give over to the technology? The more technology you integrate, the less human you become, or at least that's part of the idea. The idea there that people are communicating through their phones. People's, you know, some of their deepest relationships now take place with another person who is on the other side of the planet who you may never get to see and interact with in person is I think driving another look at this genre, which opens up a lot of opportunity because for a few good years there, cyberpunk was considered dead. But now that the technology is catching up with this, we have a chance to reexamine it. I really like what you said about humanity there and that being one of the core parts of it, because I think when you're saying about humanity and our current level of technology is driving another look at this genre. I was thinking back from films that I watched when I was younger, total recall with Arnold Schwarzenegger, which is not the best example of cyberpunk, but we're still a good film. An examined what makes you human, as in how much of your brain is actually you, how much of it is implanted, how much of it is changed. You get the same idea from the matrix. And we're getting Blade Runner like you say, but all these things. Who's a replicant who's not? Does it really matter? So do you think that another key element of cyberpunk? And the huge amount of technology is balanced out with going, well, do you know what? What makes us human? Absolutely. Science fiction in particular gets the opportunity to examine these kinds of questions. In a way that a lot of other genres can't. But, you know, cyberpunk has that particular lens of humanity versus the technology that we create. It's a question people don't tend to ask in the real world, right? If you have somebody who, you know, has a prosthetic limb. You don't really question their humanity, right? It's okay, you've lost an arm, you've lost a leg. We've done the best we can, replacing it with a prosthetic, that technology is moving forward, but we don't question whether that makes them less human. With cyberpunk because so often we're implanting this technology into somebody's actual brain, you know, that's where the question starts to come about, right? Is how much of your gray matter has to be removed. And how much of your intelligence being replaced with or supplemented by an artificial intelligence, how much of that actually makes a difference.

Arnold Schwarzenegger
"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

05:58 min | 5 months ago

"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"I'm going to have a look at that. It is a broader genre than you'd expect. Most of the time when people think of cyberpunk, they dial in really tightly on stuff like Johnny mnemonic. But it's bigger and it's broader. And there's a lot of things that once you dig into them a little bit, you suddenly discover that there's like, there's cyberpunk underneath the underneath the surface there, which is a lot of fun actually. There's a lot more to it than people might expect. Okay. So now that you've said that, how do you know if you are writing or reading cyberpunk? Key features, key tropes that a book or a film or something can have to have in order for someone to say, yep, that's cyberpunk. I see it, that's like the funk. Absolutely. So for cyberpunk, the high concept you always goal against is high-tech and low life, right? Extreme, almost improbable levels of technology being available to people who in many cases are homeless or who are down on their luck or don't have another option. And so it's a weird sort of convergence of stuff that really ought to be super high priced and super expensive. Being utilized by people who are sort of the masters of the craft, but how fallen from the upper echelons of where this technology might have been used. And that conflict between sort of a tech, like almost like at some levels, even a theology, sort of this super upper level tech meritocracy and then the people who are utilizing that tech for their own purposes, even though they've fallen from that upper layer is almost the core source of the conflict every time. So I was kind of thinking about this and the movies that I've seen. And I had a big long conversation with my husband about whether ex Machina is cyberpunk because there's obviously a lot of technology in that and whatever, but there's no obscene decaying society and you've got the very elite society you don't see the sort of the underworld of it. I wondered where does something like Mad Max fit? Is that cyberpunk? There's like high society in low life. There's a lot of tech. What do we think about that? I think it's the use of the tech that defines it as cyberpunk. Less the world building itself. The presence of tech in the presence of a stratified society isn't enough for it to be cyberpunk. It's got to be the use of that tech actionable to sort of go after the creators of that tech. And which then gets us into stuff like Blade Runner is cyberpunk, you know, the way I always look at it is the replicants are fighting their creators, right? It's the tech in conflict with its creator that kind of pulls that into cyberpunk for me. And you know, originally, like if you're looking at Gibson's cyberpunk, a lot of that is style. A lot of that is visual impression. I think that's why Blade Runner originally got pulled in as cyberpunk because you've got it's raining in the future and everything's neo Tokyo and there's flying cars and there's bright colors on a gray background.

Johnny mnemonic Gibson Tokyo
"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

02:45 min | 5 months ago

"unger" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"At breaking the glass slipper, we believe it is important to have conversations about women and issues of intersectional feminism within science fiction fantasy and horror. To continue to do so, we need your help. Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Join the conversation by following us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Welcome to breaking the glass slipper. I'm Megan Lee, and I'm Charlotte Bond. These days, punk is added to a whole host of different genres sub genres and words never before used to indicate a book genre before. But there was once only one punk, and that was cyberpunk. Pioneered in the 1980s by authors like pat cadigan, William Gibson, and Bruce Sterling. Cyberpunk imagined a dystopian world of advanced technology and crime. In the face of unprecedented levels of corruption on an incredible scale. Cyberpunk stories were populated with down on their luck rebels and tent on overthrowing the ruling classes. Usually by way of their expert tech skills. Borrowing heavily from tropes in film noir. Cyberpunk tends to be Gritty dark and pessimistic. But has it changed at all since it first came on the scene? Are we finding more optimism in feminist cyberpunk narratives? And why is thriller cyberpunk's natural genre companion? Well, we are excited to have Kimberly unger with us today to explore all the cyberpunk and thriller. So Kimberly, if you would like to introduce yourself to our listeners. Sure. Hey folks, I am Kimberly unger. By day I work for reality labs on their virtual reality platform. Formerly known as Oculus, and the rest of the time I write science fiction about where all of these app driven superpowers are going to take us. And cyberpunk seems to be the genre in which I end up the most often, and so I'm delighted to delighted to have the chance to dive in on it. And we are very excited to have you here. Talk to us about it. And I think Charlotte will acknowledge that she's not the biggest cyberpunk person in the world. But I have long loved the genre and also a few years ago we got to interview pat cardigan and was amazing and I was like bowing down pat catechin is amazing. Do you know you're right. I don't read a lot of cyberpunk when I researched it. But apparently I've watched an incredible amount and I really enjoyed that. So I'm looking forward to speaking to Kimberly this evening and talking about all the different authors out there, because I'm already like going, oh, Margaret Atwood's got some cyberpunk.

Kimberly unger Megan Lee pat cadigan Bruce Sterling William Gibson Instagram Charlotte Twitter Facebook Kimberly pat cardigan pat catechin Margaret Atwood
"unger" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"unger" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The way you submit things now is you quote unquote marble them. So you pick a URL that you like and then you paste it on the sides and marble. And then it goes unchained. So a collectible card is created for it. That is put on chain and then starts to get indexed looking at things like social media shares, web traffic, and also it will go into a voting system where other people vote on it. And if it gets enough vote, it also gets a high rank based on that. But what you will then get is one, a basically points within the meme that you contribute it to. That's the primary thing. And the secondary thing is you will get a fairly small but still a stream of income in mem token, which is our coin. If it turns out that people like it. But obviously it's not yet that you will post one URL and you will get rich on that or get a bunch of rare collectibles. But you need to the main thing is that you want to contribute to this meme because you think it's something cool. You think that the contributions you do now if it's the Wikipedia page or an important piece of news or something, those things will be round and be there for as long as that page is up, and you are sort of contribution. History will be public if it later turns out that it becomes bigger and bigger. And then along this whole journey, there will be these keys essentially where you unlock new rewards, both monetarily and in the form of NFTs. It's a bit hard to explain without having the actual visuals in front of you. It's almost like a think of it, I don't know if you played any MMOs like World of Warcraft or similar, but where you contribute to quests or similar, and then you get some coin, but you also get XP and some items and stuff. We want to almost make it like an MMO, but for memes or trends and how you contribute in the form of URLs. And are the types of content like meme art or similar. And then I think you said I get if I'm successful in posting things and they get a lot of shares, traffics and upvotes. I'm going to earn points and tokens. How do I leverage both of those assets? So if we start with the points, you need to have enough points during say a month, for example, to unlock the ability to buy these rare items that the market produces. It could be a piece of meme art, or also working again art and January looks at the computer looks at images all day and try to create art out of that. But you need enough points of given a period of time to be able to buy these things. Very cheaply, but you buy them from the store sort of the membership store for being part of that meme. And also as a contributor when having these points, you will get air drops from time to time. From the community around that meme, just for being a part of it. So it's essentially it's almost like a tool to form communities around trends on the Internet where those community members work together to unlock value, both in the form of quality information, but also in the form of these crypto incentives. Coins and NFTs. So think of it almost as you have Wikipedia of sites like know your meme or similar. There are people are contributing some are contributing a lot. And the thing they get back on me may have your profile score and ready to have karma. But these things are all centralized and have no incentives. It's only on the actual side that you can show them off as a form of status. So it's essentially a content platform, like a Wikipedia meets doge coin. We have the information aspect. We also tie it into these crypto incentives in the form of tokens and entities..

"unger" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"unger" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"That's a good question. Technically a meme is any idea that spreads among people well enough. So it could be anything really and anything is a meme, something we communicate in other person understands. That is a meme. But popular memes are things that are easy to relate to easy to understand and just people like and want to share in general. But the real answer is, and anything is a meme that people spread amongst each other. Yeah, I think in the very academic sense, meme has a sort of abstract philosophical reason. What I think of it in the context of the Internet, though I'm thinking of sort of a single image or maybe two or three tiles with something, you know, witty, your caption, usually the caption being added later, is there like a more narrow version of meme that you're thinking of in that regard? I'm thinking about it much more broadly. You're totally correct. That's obviously a meme. It's a meme format, where you have one or a couple of images with text. And it tells the story, but to me, a meme, again, it's anything that sort of catches on with people. And you see it especially in crypto like all NFTs, for example, I don't know if you follow along with the NFT space, but you have crypto toads and punks and cats and dogs and everything. And those are just memes. Like their stories that people choose to buy into or not, depending on how easily approachable or how easily people can relate to them. So to me, a meme, it is anything that spreads not only these sort of images. That's a subset of memes in my opinion. Memes seem to have a certain life cycle to them. I guess some do have longevity, but others seem to burn themselves out after a while or go out of fashion. If that's the trend, and maybe you may tell me it's not the trend, but that makes me wary of trying to have some ownership in a meme. If it feels like it's about to expire all the time, what's your take on it? That's a good question. I definitely agree that some memes have longevity, some don't. And so the way we're structuring meme dot com is when a meme comes like a new meme take Bernie Sanders in mittens, for example, that was popular for like a week and then it died out. And so the way we'll be structured is once it comes out, somebody submits the first piece of content with that hashtag. Then the page is created. People can start contributing. They can add an image, text, links, and then as you contribute to build up this score for that meme, and as it grows big enough, which that meme did, it will be able to generate say a piece of meme art or another type of collectible, just because it grew that big and then those items are rewarded to its contributors. And even if it dives out, the process that happened that it grew in popularity and it grew as much as it did to be able to unlock one of these types of items that were then distributed to the contributors. That item, even though the meme is dead or sleeping, you never know if it can come back that item is still valuable. Both emotionally to the ones who contributed as a sort of memorabilia, but also it could be have a monetary value because it was a result of this very high growth meme over a short period of time. Makes sense. Well, I'd love to do a deep dive into the reward process. Let's say I went to meme dot com and I post something and it just happens to be lightning in a bottle. And it's a great idea and people are catching on. What's my user experience from the time I posted as it's blowing up? So meme dot com is still in very much development. And so we're experimenting with different ways..

"unger" Discussed on POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"unger" Discussed on POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

"So we're here. Forty third street and second avenue where the vaccine apartheid purchased have blocked the intersection and lay down onto the pedestrian crossing. I'm trying to pull aside. One of the organizers so we can find out what's the plan for. Can i have you for a second. What what's the plan now in terms of where you take the message to unger.

unger
Ex-Wrestler Daffney Unger, AKA Scream Queen, Dies at 46

The Masked Man Show

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Ex-Wrestler Daffney Unger, AKA Scream Queen, Dies at 46

"Tragedy i'm talking about is the passing of shannon spro. Scream queen she. She passed away at the age of forty six and just to give her a little love. Man debut in in professional wrestling in nineteen ninety nine. She made an immediate impact in. Wcw as daphne she. She did that gothic and de energetic and she was maniacal and she was most known for that that high piercing high pitch screen in after leaving w in two thousand one spro continued on into the business briefly work in early in tna as well xp w in ring of honor and may two thousand three. She signed a developmental deal with wwe but was released. By year's end later appearances for shimmer in other independent promotions and briefly left the business in the mid two thousands role was an icon. She was treasure. She was loved. She will be missed.

Shannon Spro WCW Daphne Wrestling
"unger" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"unger" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Continue with the Rick Unger show on this Wednesday edition. We are joined by somebody I really wanted to speak to For quite some time. Now we have yet to be able to get our schedules to work out. But we did succeed in doing it today. I'm talking about Charlie Sykes. Now I think that almost all of you are by this time. Familiar with Charlie. You see him on MSNBC. You see him on NBC. Many of you read of the ball work. Many of you listen to the bulwark podcast. Charlie Sykes is the founder and the editor of at large of the ball work. He is also the author of nine books, including most recently how the right lost his mind. Now. That is a fascinating title coming from Charlie because until he stepped down in December of 2016, he spent 23 years as one of Wisconsin's top rated and most influential conservative talk show hosts. Charlie. It's really great to have you here on the program. Richard. Thank you so much. You can't call me Richard. That's the first violation. See that you one time Republicans, man. I can always count on this happening. It's Rick. Rick Richard is just way too. Should I have to call you, Charles? No, no, no, Charlie's fine. Alright. So, listen, I can't be proud You are. You are a fascinating case to me. I got and I'm going to tell you why I have been familiar with your radio show for a very long time I became more familiar during the Scott Walker era. I was I was writing a great deal about Scott Walker when I was doing my column at Forbes and Scott Walker did not like me very much. And I remember One day he was on your show, which he frequently was, and you asked him a question about something that I had written. And and Governor Walker called me a liar. Well, I wasn't a liar. I had told the truth. But nevertheless, I found it fascinating because I always found your show to be on what I used to call the edge of reason. For a conservative talk show. I didn't think it was in you to to be a purveyor of just stark gross red meat, and I think we have found that to be the case. Is that how you would have sized up your performance in the radio days? I would like to think so. I would like to think that I was on the right side of the edge of reason. Um, but, um, brick regrets. I have a few. You know, I look back on that on that era and I have to ask myself what did I miss? Um, what did I not understand? Um, you know, I thought I understood what the conservative movement was about. Obviously, I was quite wrong. I thought I understood what Republicans stood for. And clearly, um, that doesn't hold up very well does it? So, um, I have to go back and think about a lot of those things. You know, There were things that that I still agree with. That I would do again. But there are a lot of things that I really honestly have to look back on and go. What was I thinking? Did I change or did they change and it's a complicated question. And I'm not sure I fully know what the answer is. Well, it's interesting that you're struggling with the question It is. Um, as as just an outsider watching the process. I would say that they probably change more than you changed. I've listened to your show for years. As I say. You know, you are certainly through the right of me, but I never found you to be nonsensically. So you always did have that that edge of reason. As I say. So I I suspect that it was more of a case where the Republican philosophy If there is one any longer, probably left you. Don't you think that's more likely? Well, I think that that's certainly part of it. There's no question about it. Um and you know, I was aware at the time that there was another branch of the right wing media. That was More conspiracy theory or oriented. There was more red meat oriented that would demagogue the issues and and I'm planning and I, and they tried to differentiate myself from that. But having said that, uh, you mentioned people like Scott Walker on my show a lot. Paul Ryan was on my show. Um, a great deal and talked about the national the debt and the deficit and the need to, you know, you know, deal with that that looming crisis and I believed a lot of acid. I believe that you know the deficit and the debt with this massive issue. You that conservatives cared about very, very deeply. And then it turned out they didn't so, um yes, they left me. But also I've had to sit back and go. Okay. I need to rethink these things as well. Um, What's interesting in the Republican party is that if you are loyal to Donald Trump, you are given a permanent hall pass. To abandon every principle you ever had. But if you have been anti Trump were never trump and you deviate from conservative orthodoxy. Ha ha! I see That's a sign that you become a traitor that you've gone over to the other side. So, basically, Rick, I didn't screw that. You know, I think that you're never too old to say. Maybe I was wrong about that. Maybe I missed that. Maybe the the depth, you know, all of the rhetoric about the debt. The deficit was about something else other than the debt and the deficit. Who knew? Well, you know, I wonder. You know, Paul Ryan is an interesting figure in this regard, and I do know that he was a frequent guest on your program. And I think somebody who you felt a lot of a tree Action to because the things that he said, which did not necessarily turn out to be what the real policy of the Republican Party was. But again, Isn't that a situation? Do you find that you feel any differently about debt and deficit? Today? We've been talking about this quite a bit. There's the whole new monetary theory out there, which suggests that maybe debts and deficits are not as grave As some people think they should be. Are you rethinking that? Or you simply saying, you know what the Republicans left these important arguments behind and went in a different direction. I think a little bit of both of those things you know, part of it is and I'll be really honest with you here. Um, a lot of the issues that I felt very strongly about. I just don't care about as much anymore. I think that the challenges facing the country the existential challenges to democracy, for example, are so much more important than the green eye shade approach to the issues. I I do think that We need to figure out how did things go wrong?.

Richard Charles Donald Trump Rick December of 2016 Trump 23 years Charlie Sykes trump nine books Rick Richard Republican Party Rick Unger NBC Paul Ryan Republicans Today Wisconsin Charlie Scott Walker
"unger" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"unger" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"If it's G on the way it was done today. I want to just play this officer. Harry done. Okay. This was pretty moving. I told him to just leave the capital and the response. They yelled. No man this is our house President Trump invited us here. We're here to stop the steel. Joe Biden is not the president. Nobody voted for Joe Biden. I'm a law enforcement officer and I do my best to keep politics out of my job. But in this circumstance, I responded. Well, I voted for Joe Biden change. My vote. Not count and my nobody, That prompted a torrent of racial epithets one woman in a pink Maga shirt. Yelled you hear that? Guy's his Niger wage it for Joe Biden. Then the crowd wrapped around. Twenty people. Joined in screaming. Boo, fucking Niger. No one had ever ever called me in Niger, while wearing the uniform of a capitol police officer? In the days, following the attempted Insurrection, other black officer shared with me, their own stories of racial abuse on January sixth. One officer told me he had never in his entire forty years of life, been called a Niger to his face and that streak ended on January 6th. Yet another black officer, later told me he had been confronted by interactions in the capital who told him put your gun down and we'll show you what kind of Niger naturally are. To be candid rest of the afternoon as a blurb. Unbelievable. You know what I mean? It's really sad. That those words are now basically, cemented into the Congressional Record wage. You know, the fact that here we are, you're twenty Twenty-One and this man is having to testify that that is what was told to him by Trump supporters Club this year. That's, that's, that's sickening. I mean, it's hard to come up with a reaction. When you hear things like this, you know, it literally brings tears to my eyes. When I mean, I can't believe people would do that and and just twenty people I mean and nobody opposing that kind of rhetoric. I mean, we haven't, we haven't come a long way. We haven't come anywhere since the Civil War. I mean, you still have these white supremacists wage. I was just saying to my other guest author, Craig Unger..

Joe Biden Niger President Trump Harry Trump supporters Club Guy Craig Unger
"unger" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"unger" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"Great to see you. How emotional is that hearing from that officer? Well, it's just amazing and, you know, you were same thing, how history repeats itself. And I I've been reading recently about the events leading up to the Civil War. One of the biography of Abraham Lincoln by Sidney Blumenthal, and off, when you look at the events, leading up to it, they were very much like what happened on January 6th, and in 1856, for example, Senator Senator, Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, was beaten nearly to death by people who later became part of the Confederacy. And it was so much like what we're seeing now that I I see the the Republican party which of course, once was the party of Lincoln, that's how it started out. Has now become very much like the Confederacy wage. The traders who attacked and killed more Americans than any foreign military force in history. I know, you know, yet if I take their covid-19 spawns trump-pence and then you take Ron DeSantis and all these other GQ P, lunatics, take out all the deaths from the Insurrection and the people dying of covid-19. We came to terms with that. We have an acknowledged it, I grew up in, in, in Dallas in Texas, which was part of the Confederacy, of course, but it never occurred to me that when, you know, she could watch the blue gray football game, not thinking, I mean, it was effectively a football game in in Germany, you don't see soccer players wearing swastikas on their jerseys, but we went ahead with it and the Confederacy was disneyfied. It was never taken seriously people's Tales theme, Dixie Old Times, They Are Not Forgotten. Wage was a period of slavery, it. So this is a country that that really has not acknowledged our dirty little secrets and kind of sweets them under the rug and here you see what happens when that's the case yet. And that's so interesting. Craig, I never, I was a kid when when the blue-gray game used to be played and I never thought What it meant and now you just pointed it out. That's amazing to me, right? Well, you know, when I was a kid, my father took me at my first trip to Europe when I was thirteen. And no, I'm not some come from a very secular family. I was not permit, but but on that first trip, I went to Germany and took me to Dachau and I thought he was saying in a way. Well, this was not an attitude, you know, and you saw the horrors of the Holocaust were laid out, and Germany acknowledge that eventually, and if you grew up in Germany, you were taught about Thursday. But growing up in the in, what was the Confederacy, we were not taught about it. We were not taught about the horrors of slavery and, you know, I think, in fact and we we see it going on right now with people. Like whether it's Josh Hawley or Jim Jeffords those people off, On in the old Confederacy to me? Yeah, I know and just watching these offices of a sudden office of Throne officer, Hodges testify. I mean it is so sad. And you know what, look I'm not a fan of Liz Cheney Craig at. All right, Laura by a fan of Adam, kinzinger kinzinger, but at least on, you know, in the great scheme of things, they are the normal. Adults in the I mean they understand what transpired and they know who's responsible. I mean let's Cheney told M now I'm forgetting his name. He said you you effing did this..

Sidney Blumenthal Senator Senator Ron DeSantis Charles Sumner Dixie Old Times Germany Abraham Lincoln football Republican party Massachusetts Lincoln Dallas soccer Texas Josh Hawley Craig Jim Jeffords Europe Liz Cheney Craig Hodges
"unger" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"unger" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"They seem to be shifting to an opt out option for it. As opposed to opt in. I you know i think this is pretty benign and i think there's going to be some very good things. Come from the ability to spread this wireless capability beyond what you have with bluetooth devices in the thing i always think about is some kind of a little tag that sophie could wear if she ever escaped in the neighborhood the sidewalk network would be there to sort of track her and you know lots of other things could happen too but Anyway i my my paranoia level regarding amazon expanding ways to do things that i'm going to benefit from is is pretty low and and if you think i'm missing something on the dangers of sidewalk please let me know pod. Chronicles jameel dot com. I'm not In in this sprint. I'll do a homemade bumper and then we'll get to the interview. Did editor edited okay. Lisa unger is a best selling novelist. Who's twenty novels and twenty six languages. really create suspense based on psychological insights into the human condition. You'll hear her talk about that. Our conversation Book list named her. Most recent thriller titled confessions on the seven. Forty five as one of its top. Ten crime picks for twenty twenty one and house of crows. Which is how i heard about. Her is her four part serial released last week by hamsun original series and it's receiving four and a half stars thousands of reviews and top two hundred ranking in the entire kindle store so it's off to a strong start. I reach lisa on wednesday june second by zoom at her home as she happens to live on the gulf coast of florida. Just probably two hours. North of santa delilah where darlene niner sister spent the winter as we were getting ready for this interviews as setup with someone helpful from from amazon Each of our calendars play tricks with us. Regarding the date of the interview. I had originally thought it was tuesday and she had thought it was thursday so by the time we finally landed on the correct day. It seems if we had overcome a kind of haunting of our calendars and that's kind of an appropriate image given the dark topics of fiction. This she joked as we get started..

amazon two hours twenty six languages thursday tuesday Lisa unger twenty novels seven last week thousands of reviews house of crows Each one four and a half stars kindle Forty five lisa two hundred santa delilah darlene niner
"unger" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"unger" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"Leisurely and the kindle. Chronicles podcast on june third. No june fourth twenty twenty one from cambridge massachusetts on a sprint to get the show too early because darlene and i will be leaving in a couple of hours to babysit our grandsons. Jake and ryan seven and five all weekend We haven't done this for since before the pandemic and i don't want to put things off to the last minute so that we're prepared to have a great time with an opportunity to spend two full days with boys this age and they're just terrific kids. I think i might see if they have any interest in recording the morning journal tomorrow usually don't do morning journal on saturday and sunday but We might do something from their housing and If that works out so this episode is going to be primarily my interview with lisa unger and she's a writer of psychological thrillers. They'll tell you about that. When i introduced her and i'm just going to mention a few other things before we get started. First of all there will be a clubhouse room. Monday one pm eastern daylight time Unfortunately that coincides with apple's worldwide developers conference which is always fun to see. But i think it's better just to keep that room mondays at one so that Anyway there were six of us. Last week had creek conversation. I really look forward to these times to talk to regular listeners of the podcast about the interview. And even if you haven't haven't had a chance to listen to the interview we we just sort of follow what each of us is interested in and make sure a good time. Monday on Let's see i think that's the seventh june seventh. The other thing. I want to mention is i've i don't know what to do with my grandfather's clock Now that it's set up here in cambridge. I love having it here and it just. It's it's a pretty loud ticking. And then the banging wonderful on the hour on the half hour..

Jake ryan saturday Last week Monday lisa unger darlene sunday six apple mondays Leisurely and the tomorrow cambridge massachusetts cambridge each five two full days june third seventh june seventh
"unger" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

06:39 min | 1 year ago

"unger" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"And now without further Ado author of controversy here is in Halperin. Nice to be here John. How are you doing? Very good knock would still standing. We're living in different times but got to adapt and hopefully we'll all get through. This is so weird. I went from Craig Unger who was talking about the KGB and now I have an who looks like a KGB agent. Well, I've actually been there and I've met a lot of people he was talking about unfortunately because I was doing a TV show in Moscow a few years ago. And to be honest with you what's going on in Moscow right now. I mean where the hell is the human rights organizations, you know, you have the opposition leader. You have everybody, you know, you have them in jail. You have one kid. Where is everybody wears all the opposition? You know, where's the human rights Advocates around the world people are dying left Center and right and wage. Regions bank account is going through the ceiling. Yep, and and any attempts to kill navalny and now he's in jail probably for the rest of his life and and nothing is being done. Nothing. Everybody's turning a blind eye Vladimir Putin is getting more Bush than Hugh Hefner and this guy's rotting in jail. And what is everybody anybody who protests in front of the Kremlin or you know in Red Square they're being arrested detained. They're disappearing and I have a question for you Stuttering John. Do you think Putin is the most powerful person in the world right now? I don't have an answer for that. But why don't you tell me obviously he may Trump look like a peanut he had him in, you know in his pocket and the bottom line is off line Amir Putin. I mean, he makes El Chapo look like a nun. This guy's a hardcore criminal man. Yeah killing people and shame on the world for letting him get away with it. I you know, I agree and so you have a new book out. Yeah. What do you have it on you so you can hold it up. I actually doomed it was sold out. So I gave my final copy. Could you not yesterday to a homeless guy gave the guy twenty bucks and I said, hey, why don't you read this and he gladly took it and you know, where is it available is available on Amazon off. It's called controversy Sex Lies by the world's most powerful Elites and dirty money. And yeah, it was a best seller on Amazon when it came out. And it's all about it's volume one, which is all about Jeffrey Epstein procuring young girls for the likes of prince Andrew Bill Clinton, Donald Trump and a host of others. Now are you from Canada? Yes, I can tell by the about lived in the states for many years and I've produced many documentary whenever I do the voice-over. They have a voice coach with me and I say what the fuk what I need a voice coach for you got it right away. So I guess I do. Well actually somebody else in the chatrooms home from Canada. So somebody else noticed before me and I should have noticed it cuz I because my moderator is from Canada and and you know, so oh really? Yeah, so he has the same accident a party. Let's jump right into this. It was I was totally just like what So you had a bunch of lunches with Jeffrey Epstein? Yeah back in two thousand and one I wrote a book called bad and beautiful. I specialize in undercover investigations as you can tell and you know, I I've gone undercover in my movies and my books I posed as Michael Jackson's hair dresser off the Church of Scientology trying to kill me before anybody took them on I went under covers and alleged gay actor and they tried to deprogram me and my lunch and homosexuality and back in two thousand one. I want undercover is a male model to infiltrate the Seedy side of the modeling industry and one of my key sources for a mutual friends who begrudgingly agreed to give me an interview was not other than Jeffrey Epstein because he was a key player in the modeling industry was all he knew all the powerful agents like John Casablanca, so the leads wage Gerald Marie all the sleaze buckets and Epstein knew everything. So begrudgingly. He agreed to meet me and what was supposed to be a half hour job interview turned into about a 6-7 our luncheon and been Ash in New York and you know, you know been a she used to be across from the Carnegie Deli and he gave me all the dirt's and talked about a lot of things everything. You know, the first thing he told me was which set off alarm bells ringing said, you know again, I'm living in the wrong era. I wish I would have lived a hundred years ago back then you could date anybody you could they twelve years old there were no laws. Oh God, that's it off alarm Bells John all healthy now and I just felt there and listen, he was no no good. He was obviously eloquence smarts, but obviously a con man and I I didn't really see through it sure. He said outrageous things. I took it with a grain of salt. I didn't really think he was serious because back then I had no idea. He turned out to be the world's most notorious sex trafficker and sociopath and I had really no idea that Jeffrey Epstein it turned out to be who he he turned out to be but we went into everything we discussed this his upbringing we discussed, you know, he was grew up in Coney Island. And you know middle-class family, but he said clearly he was a music Prodigy a.

Hugh Hefner Vladimir Putin John Casablanca Jeffrey Epstein Putin Coney Island John Amir Putin Donald Trump New York Trump Craig Unger El Chapo Epstein Michael Jackson Moscow Canada navalny Gerald Marie twenty bucks
"unger" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"unger" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"Off off off off off. Off off off off off. off off off off off off Yes, baby, welcome to the world famous stuttering John podcast. Oh, I am so excited for them. I can't tell you but first let me say hi to some of the people we have here..

Ballot bonanza: Latin Americas year of elections

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Ballot bonanza: Latin Americas year of elections

"Ecuadorians will head to the polls to elect a new president and legislature. It's the start of what will be a busy political year across latin america chile honduras peru nicaragua all due to hold national elections argentina. El salvador mexico will have legislative and regional votes. This frenetic year comes at a delicate moment in two thousand nine thousand nine hundred and twenty twenty. Last protests erupted in several of these countries over corruption inequality and price rises since then. The pandemic might have quieted the streets. But it's also realized. The stress economies in poverty. Rose this year. All those strains may come to bear on the region's political systems. Latin is about to have a bumper year of elections brooke. Unger are america's editor and these are taking place in a region that's been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic if not the hardest hit in terms of cases and deaths per million people and in terms of the economic impact. It's had latin. America's going to shrink more than pretty much any other region in the world and a bunch of these countries in the midst of this chaos and trauma are going to be choosing new leaders to help them find a way through at a time. When you're seeing across the world a lot of democratic backsliding including in latin america these elections are going to test the strength of democracies in those countries. So it looks like the count is nine. Latin american countries that will be holding elections this year. But i mean it's a diverse region. They they must have as many differences as commonalities well. It is a very diverse group of countries. That will be voting. I mean you have on the one hand for example chile which is one of the richest economies in the region and one of the best established democracies and you also have haiti which is pretty much the poorest country in the hemisphere and has a very dysfunctional democracy. And there's everything in

Latin America Chile El Salvador Honduras Nicaragua Peru Legislature Argentina Unger America Mexico Brooke Haiti
Interview with Kristin Musselman about Reactive Balance

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

05:47 min | 2 years ago

Interview with Kristin Musselman about Reactive Balance

"Welcome to discuss. Discussions and spinal cord injury sci where we bring you interviews with researchers and clinical leaders in spinal cord injury rehabilitation. I'm rachel tappin. today. I'll be speaking with dr kristen muscleman who is last author on a recent paper in the journal spinal cord along with co co-authors. Catherine chan jaywalking less journal. Unger angela you and k musani the papers titled reactive stepping after a forward fall in people living with incomplete spinal cord injury or disease. Dr muscleman is a physical therapist and scientists with the neural engineering and therapeutics team at the cato institute which is the research arm of the toronto rehabilitation institute. She's assistant professor in the department of physical therapy and rehabilitation sciences institute at university of toronto. She's active in the canadian physiotherapy association and now of course and the american physical therapy association with this very podcast. And she's academic lead of the walking measures group and the canadian community of practice for the practice spinal cord institute so welcome. Kristen muscleman. thanks rachel so much for having me. It's a pleasure to be here. I'm so happy to have you so. Let's start by talking about balance after spinal cord injury and i wanna talk about reactive balance in particular where the person needs to recover from a loss of balance. Can you just describe for us in general. What do we know. Or i guess. More specifically what did we know prior to this to this study in this area. Sure well react to balance. It's a key part of our posture control system. And as you kind of mentioned it really is our last line of defense against a fall so to try to recover balance that's been lost and so refers to our ability to reduce control of The movement of our center of mass where or to pull our center of mass back within our basis support and we we can do this through movement at the ankles hips. You know which we've Often called the ankle hit strategies or you can do it by taking Rapid reactive steps to try to increase our base of support. And it's this Rapid reactor stepping that. We've focused on in our research and you know surprisingly we actually don't know that much about reactive balance control after spinal cord injury We do know that. In other neurological populations like individuals living with the effects of stroke. The inability to take a reactive step is associated with the occurrence of falls And as many of those listening are aware people cred injury. Do you have a lot of falls as well. So a recent meta analysis found that seventy eight percent of the ambulance chasers with spinal cord. Injury will fall each year so it's definitely reasonable to expect that reactive balance control is impaired after injury but specifically what aspects are impaired wasn't known for example are there deficits related to the timing of the movements and muscle activation or insider their spatial deficits. So you know for example. Maybe they can't take a big enough react to step to appropriately reposition their center of mass. So those are some of the questions that we had. I'm going into doing this research. Great boy and i can certainly point to as a clinician. You're supporting things that i felt like. I knew already as i would experience that in the clinic of people having lots of difficulty with reactive balance after spinal cord injury and looking to the research literature and really having a hard time understanding how to proceed so for reinforcing or validating. The experience that i've had at least you study your your group did the study. And so what did you do. And what were the results. Yes what we wanted to do was to characterize reactive stepping in and people who are living with incomplete spinal cord injury so as a first step We compared their to stepping ability to out of age and sex matched individuals who have a spinal cord injury and what we decided to do in this for study is focus on two aspects of reactor stepping so i is is a behavioral response which just simply looks at. How are the participants recovering their balance after appreciation. So can they take a single step like most people who haven't neurological damage do or do they need to take several steps to reposition that center of mass in their basis support or are they unable to recover their balanced. So that's the behavioral piece that we looked at And then the second piece we looked at were these temporal parameters of reactive stepping so this includes things like the onset of muscle activity and legs And also the reaction time so you know. How quickly can they respond for that. We look at the length of time. Between the onset of the nation and then the actual movement That's elicited so in this case you know lifting off the switch a reactive step but what we needed to figure out how to look at this behavior in a standardized way and so we use a lot based assessment That's called the released test And this has been used with the stroke population it's also been used previously in older adults And basically what it does it simulates a forward fall of course in a safe way so if you just try to picture yourself standing and you're in a safety harness that's gonna prevent us from from hitting the ground if you were to lose your balance That saves you harnesses around your trunk. And then what we do. Is we attach a horizontal cable to the back of the safety harness right around the level of your lower back and then not cable which is about a meter long. It's attached to the wall behind you and you get asked to lean forward from your ankles as best as you can until about. Ten percent of your body weight is supported by that cable.

Spinal Cord Injury Rachel Tappin Dr Kristen Muscleman Spinal Cord Along With Co Co Catherine Chan Jaywalking Less Journal Unger Angela K Musani Spinal Cord Injury Or Disease Dr Muscleman Toronto Rehabilitation Institu Department Of Physical Therapy Canadian Physiotherapy Associa Practice Spinal Cord Institute Kristen Muscleman American Physical Therapy Asso Cato Institute University Of Toronto Rachel
Lisa Raymond on setting her own agenda

The Tennis.com Podcast

05:58 min | 2 years ago

Lisa Raymond on setting her own agenda

"All right lisa. Raymond welcomed tennis dot com podcasts. It is awesome to have you. Thank you guys for having me so much. Where in the world are you. Let's let's start with that hotel room. I know that shocking to people but Actually in baton rouge louisiana right now been working for the past year with alec and My old coach Andy brandy is the head men's tennis co-chair lsu and kinda long story but We're actually bringing them on To be part of the team so we're here Doing some training with him and he he's going to be a part of our team moving forward and It's been awesome. Been here almost two weeks now. And it's going to be one of our training bases now rally which is going to be great so So yeah that's why we're in baton rouge andy brandy the andy brandy as andy brandy. Yes very familiar to me names. There's only one. Andy randy will ever be one handy brandy so you love them or hate him and i've always loved them. It's true you either have these. Andy it's either. You have this unreal relationship with andy or you. Don't you know and he'd be the first to admit that he. Andy me the iranian. You know he'd be the first to be like you know. It just isn't working or at works and andy. I hit it off from the time. I was seventeen when i went to school. Went to florida and You know if there's one person in my career that i have. I owe pretty much everything to because of that foundation he built. It's handy so yeah absolutely. Oh that's amazing. You don't really hear very often. I guess sometimes you can hear about a player that can just have a very. That's i mean that's a lifelong relationship. Lifelong yeah but yeah. I mean he Again i mean he. I coached he coach me throughout my pro career on and off the end And then like. I said i mean he's family. I mean him and his wife and his son i mean we were just over there the other night for dinner and and hadn't seen them forever haven't seen as whites and it was just like yesterday. I mean they're just near and dear and Just really really special people. Were you always gonna jump into coaching. I think he finished up in two thousand fifteen th us open with madison keys as your last partner and then she would have been your first pupil in a way is that was that. Always the plan when you're playing. No it wasn't at all. I'm just kinda just happened Very good friends with lindsay davenport. And so lindsey was coaching mass in at the time and lindsay still playing two thousand fifteen and lindsay was just like look. I just. I can't really do this fulltime. Would you be interested in of coming on You know traveling with her some weeks if it didn't interfere with your doubles. Maybe you guys could place in doubles. It'd be great for her. And and so i was like yeah sure like you know it just. I hadn't really ever really thought about it. And then i did. I did think about it. And and i loved it. I love I love coaching. And i love just kind of Being part of a team in our party why. I probably did so well in doubles because i love being out there with somebody but So for me it was like a great segue from retiring. Because i literally went from the us open finishing my last match to five days later. I was in quebec city with madison. So it was like. I never really like had to put my rackets down and sit and be like oh my god. I'm retired here so see us do. That's kind of how just kinda leads dad. And and then. I took a break from coaching. And then allie. Approach me with this opportunity and jumped out. I mean least technically. You're not retired. You played last year. This is true this is true. This is true. Technically twenty thirteen was not your last match to good point and i plan on the i. I've got a few goals out there. That i still wanna possibly achieve so i So yeah so. I just to get in better shape. Get my butt out there and hitting a little bit more and But yeah no. I'm not totally retired. I guess you could say the one thing. I do want to bring to light. You said that you wanna get in better shape You went through a phenomenal transformation last year. And you still looked incredible. So thank you. Tell us about that. Because i remember kind of last year in colorado was the first time that being you kind of really got to know each other news mean from the last time i had seen. It's a different person. Well thank you. Thank you for saying that and Know it was. Just i have to i truly i hate to say it but i so much. Unit to allie. You know what. When i got to the upper take with her just kind of really took a look in the mirror and realize that you know i was just not happy with me how i was feeling and what i was doing and And as a coach. I just felt like too. It's like i need. I wanted her to be able to look at me and be like okay. We'll look what she's doing or look how good she looks. You know as far as fitness. And she's working her butt off you know and and I basically said you know. Look my fitness. 'cause she's a man you know i mean she's a she's unreal shape and under athlete and she loves her fitness. I was like help me with my fitness in my eating and unger out take care of your tennis and she was on raw the program she put me on. You know she was tough on me too. And i needed i needed to be pushed. I needed to know somebody to kind of guide me a little bit with my eating and and whatnot. And i mean she just she'd Her support was everything. And and then you know it was like i like how you just you see like little changes and you want more you want more and you start feeling good and i had goals and yeah i mean it was just one of the best things i've ever done and i just feel that still healthier and she'll good about myself you know so. So yeah i mean. I allies boot camp

Andy Brandy Andy Randy Tennis Andy Lindsay Baton Rouge Alec LSU Raymond Madison Baton Lindsay Davenport Lisa Louisiana Allie Lindsey Florida Quebec City
Coming write-up: Chile votes to overhaul its constitution

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:08 min | 2 years ago

Coming write-up: Chile votes to overhaul its constitution

"The votes are in. Yesterday Chileans decided by an overwhelming majority to scrap and replace their dictatorship. Eric. Constitution. Bluesy Thomas. WHO Come in. Give President Sebastian. Benita said it was the beginning of a new path for the country. Wants to soon peretti Chile's constitution was introduced under Augusto. Pinochet the dictator who ruled by terror for nearly two decades he lost power after a plebiscite in nineteen eighty eight. United in opposition to the regime of General Pinochet was the biggest political rally yet seen in the capital, but the constitution remained. Later governments amended it dozens of times but for many Chileans, the constitution's most fundamental provisions to blame for the inequality and poor public services that plague one of America's wealthiest countries. Year ago mass protests erupted. At least thirty people died and thousands were injured. There were yet distractions in the run-up to yesterday's vote. Now the country will get a chance to recast its national charter quietening some concerns but perhaps raising new ones. Chileans blame the constitution of nine hundred for lot. That's wrong with the country Brooke Unger is our America editor in many ways looking from the outside there's not a lot wrong with Chile. It's got one of the highest per capita incomes in the region. It's reduced poverty very dramatically. It's had political stability for the past thirty years but there are also big problems and people who have been growing increasingly unhappy with those problems over the past decade decade and a half. So what were the issues with it if the outcome has seen? So stable in the meantime, several things inequality remain relatively high and I think most important really was a feeling that large because of the constitution the way. The public services were delivered resulted in low quality and great unfairness the constitution kind of privileges, the private sector in Chile, and the reason for that is that Pinochet had kind of an intellectual alliance with the so-called University of Chicago economists who were very pro free market and they wrote into the constitution lots of guarantees to protect the private sector and to give the private sector a pretty substantial role in providing public services like health care pensions, education and people have looked at that and become increasingly unhappy with the results of that system has brought. So how do you think it is that a rewriting of the constitution will will address all of these concerns I, think that the new Constitution will probably end up making Chile more social democratic than it is, for example, the constitution now says that people have a right to contribute either to a privately run or a publicly run healthcare system, which has resulted in a kind of a two tier system where the richer in the private system and most people are in the public system and the bulk of people feel that they're not very well served by that kind of two tier system. So I would expect some language that would allow the state to play a greater role in the health system that would allow taxation to play a role in funding a public health system and one of the things that reformers wants to. Do is to insert this idea of equality of opportunity into the constitution which doesn't have the American meaning. It basically means that they want the state to be in a position to ensure that all Chilean's are treated equally, and so that will I think lessen the role of the private sector in the provision of public services, and that's the real crux of it. What voters most want changed other things that probably will change some people say that the Chilean system is sort of hyper presidential. The president has a lot of power in Chile only the president can initiate tax and spending bills. For example Congress can do that. The president can determine which issues congress prioritizes the regions in Chile don't. have their own tax-raising powers. So all of these things tend to concentrate power in the capital and in the hands of the presidency and I would expect to see that being changed. It'll be interesting to see whether the constitution's ban on abortion is upheld. Imagine that will be a very controversial issue. So Chile is at a point where it could change in lots of pretty profound ways but I mean how even to go about that to start from scratch on kind of the working document of a whole country one of the choices that voters made yesterday was on how to rewrite the new constitution and what they decided was that there would be a newly elected assembly consisting entirely of. New Representatives which under the law will be half female and an election that new body will be held in April and that body will then I believe have a year to write a new constitution. So it really will in theory start with a blank piece of paper. One of the complicating issues will be that as this assembly is sitting and arguing and drafting chilly, we'll be moving into a political season. There are presidential elections, national elections to be held in November of next year. So it's pretty foreseeable that you know the politics of the presidential election will feed into the thinking of the drafters and vice versa it's going to be a very fraud I suspect and controversial process so. The potential gains seem fairly clear here, but is there some risk when starting from scratch like this? I think there is a risk Chile has in many ways been a pretty successful country and you can imagine that you know taken to extremes chilly ends up moving not so much in the direction of social democracy. But in the direction of populism being one of the things that probably will happen is that you'll have new rights inserted into the constitution like a right to housing for example now, that doesn't sound like a bad thing but the question will be is the government than on the hook for kind of bottomless spending on all these new rights spending that will either result in. Enormous deficits or crushing taxation I think the danger of that is limited to some extent by the fact that each clause of the new constitutional have to be approved by a two-thirds majority of this assembly. So I think the risks are limited to some extent. It was interesting to see that the very richest districts voted against the idea of a new constitution and after the results of the vote were clear you we had celebrations in the middle of Santiago. So instead of protests, there was a great sense of celebration. So I think that's a sense of national consensus process needs to happen, and it'll be very interesting to see if that national consensus hold up as the process actually gets underway. Brooke. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you, Jason.

Chile General Pinochet President Trump Brooke Unger America President Sebastian Eric Santiago Congress Benita University Of Chicago Jason Editor Fraud
Building a Daily Immune Boosting Routine | Jennifer Shaw

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

09:24 min | 2 years ago

Building a Daily Immune Boosting Routine | Jennifer Shaw

"And low everyone. Dr Denver Shock to you today from San Diego. I just want to give you a quick introduction to myself seeing away chatting with each day about keeping your immune system strong. I am a doctor. Physical therapy I have been a deter wellness advocate for just over five years really passionate about essential oils as they've changed every element of my life And I'm super excited about this topic because for me. What I find is arm. Unity is really what we do on a consistent daily basis how we take care of our bodies day in day out is really what means this. The difference between our museum be strong and weak and we can really manage that by some simple consistent habits. We're GONNA talk about four habits today in some of my favorite hair products that use along those habits. The four habits are sleeping. Are Eating our water intake and the movement of our body so some of the oils. I love for supporting my immune system in these four key habits. I for that. I may talk about force. My favorite numbers fairly so lemon is the first one. We're going to talk a deadly about water intake. Inputting lemon in your water throughout the day really just helps support your body energizing. It helps you feel lifted him. Just keep everything moving throughout your digestive system and it really just can't gives you a little bit of backup end for me making you drink a little bit more water so when we talk about water take we wanNA make sure that we're drinking hardaway mouses armour in wire that's just to keep our bodies functioning optimally so when we're talking bookkeeping immune system strong were not consuming enough water. Our body is going to have more fights to fight and we WANNA keep it real simple and give everything. It needs to consume water throughout the day. In just one two drops in a twelve to fourteen out to water model. You can do that. A couple Doomsday Andrew. Lemon using your water and drink water throughout the day. The next one I really love is are on guard protective lead. When we're talking about supporting our immune system. We have talked about this essential oil in Ireland. To just use it preventatively I hauled the backup for my immune system. I like it to come and just be there to help. Give my support so you can take a job of on guard under your tongue at it to your oatmeal in the morning. Maybe put it into water drink yet if you had small ones at home it's really great to have the Ongart touch and you could just roll it. Onto the bottom of their feet. Being consistent with this product is absolutely key to giving us the support that weedy so using that unger turning to daily absolutely powerful. Unscrewing arming system. Another one that I love is Frankincense. In the reason being is this essential oil just supports our body in optimal function. I it it can help to lower stress level manager move. Just really help us kind of feel more. Even Keel in stress is really one of the worst things for our body when we're talking about immunity if we have a high stress level. Our Body has more battles to fight in. It's just it's really not optimal situation. I find taking a job break-ins in the morning when I take On Guard really just helped lower that stress level in just helps me feel ha more relaxed so grand that brecon sense when you're feeling the emotions rise you're feeling a little all over the place in just helped bring everything back down so that our our body can be a little more prepared to debate last oil. I want to talk about his serenity. Mentioned sleep being one of the four key habits that we need to focus on sleep tends to be the first thing loss for people and people are like. I don't mean that much sleep. I'm okay off five hours. Some sleep will research shows quite the opposite. We all need at adults need seven to nine hours of sleep. Kids need more sleep than that. There is research out there ladies that we need on average in our more sleep than men. So if you're at banner significant other give you a hard time even pull it out but really seriously when we're talking about keeping our museum strong we absolutely to give our mind to sleep. This is when our body recovers. This is when we allow our digestive system to get a break. It's when our body does its own healing and one of the best thing that we do to support. Our Body is give it that time to do that. Work so using your serenity. Essential oil in your diffuser making sure you're applying to your feet between thirty minutes before you go too bad if you wake up in the middle of the night and you're struggling to fall back asleep grabbing random putting a little bit more on the bottom of your feet really does the trick to settle your mind. That sleep is so important when we talk about our meeting so grabner serenity. Use It as much as you need you so those would be my top four essential oil that I incorporate in my daily routine in how these them. Let's talk about some supplements and how incorporate We cannot talk about though Tara or out without talking about lifelong vitality lifelong. Ray Tally is the foundation to our house. When we have our lifelong vitality. We're taking it warning evening. We are fueling our body with the tools that it needs to take your missile. We're giving it hope. Vitamins and minerals. We're giving it plant oils fish oils any oxidants Omega everything. Our Body needs to function Oxley. These AB absolutely changed my life in. I can't even express how many ways if I were to have to take one product with me. At all times it would always be my lifelong vitality But when we do not fuel our bodies with what what needs the vitamins minerals. Maga's our bodies struggles in match-winner `twin-arm immune system is weakened. And we need to give the bunny wet needs of communes assume CONSTRUC- so taking your leg on Taliban is absolutely key now if you have children two-tier has some really incredible supplements that you can give the Kiddos to make sure that they are getting the nutrients that so getting. The foundation is absolutely key so when we talk about eating that's one of the habits it so important for us right. We need to make sure that we are eating as much. Fresh as we can roots in veggies We're we're consuming real product shopping. The outside of the grocery store trying not to see me from the processed foods but even if we're eating organic eating high quality foods were not getting the nutrients that we need from the process today so ensuring that you have something like tear supplements for adults and for children for your family is absolutely key. And if you're in a time where you're having trouble getting fresh fruits and vegetables Tear Greens absolute wonderful options. Make sure that you're still getting the benefit of this region becky's without the fresh in veggies so eating real high quality foods real foods and limiting. Your body is absolutely key. Then I want to also talk about a couple other supplements. The probiotics are so important when we talk about immune. There's a lot of research out there now. To see the providing those products for our bodies really can help with overall health. So what I know is that if I keep my gut strong and what I can do to keep my gut strong is I can give it a Provi and by keeping my gut strong Mike Gut can do. Its job to participate in the immune system so maintenance sure that I have that probiotic and taking it. You have kiddos. They're lucky enough. They take the PBS. This it's delicious. It's kind of like Pixie stick. I wish I am take that everyday Version but providing that support for my gut is a way for me to support my own immune system through hell ended in the favorite garp. These are incredible. This is a combination of different essential oils designed to just help give you back your your immune system a little bit more backups. So I take these daily because I am around a lot of people teaching Van Yoga events. I have a little niece who I kindly referred to as Kuti Monster. Because that's just what kids I I WANNA make sure that I have. The support remind body that I need these every single day with my travel and everything to just keep me feeling healthy and strong so not a great option to just keep your immune system support it. And lastly in this upper limit department. We're GONNA talk about Serambi Complex and serenity is key because this is going to help support again your sleep so you have this. This essential oil complex. It's all natural You have lavender Albanian. Lemon Balm Passion Lower German. Kamya you soft gel or two before bed and again if you wake up in the middle of night you can grab that to help you sleep so really important

Dr Denver Shock San Diego Taliban Ongart Ireland Kuti Monster Serambi Complex Unger Mike Gut Ray Tally VAN Tara Oxley Maga
Locusts could rob millions in an already-vulnerable region of food

BBC Newshour

05:47 min | 3 years ago

Locusts could rob millions in an already-vulnerable region of food

"Time to head to East Africa now in the huge swarms of locusts that have been devastating crops and grasslands that the U. N. is warning today of the danger of famine in the region if the insects aren't brought under control Ethiopia Somalia Kenya Tanzania and Uganda will be affected and food shortages were were even before the locusts arrive the U. N.'s food and agriculture organization says it needs more money to pay for an aerial spraying to kill the locus and stop them breeding Dominick Cruz is director of emergencies at the FAA we have huge locust presence in Kenya in the it chokes out as well as in Somalia the latest developments being that since the beginning of this week northern Tanzania in the the Cayman general and region as well as north eastern Uganda also affected by the locust situation we have thirteen million people that thought a cute of food insecurity and another twenty million that are on the verge of acute food insecurity so it means that people are already facing Unger I understand yeah but Bhatia's head of agriculture the charity farm Africa she's based in the Kenyan capital Nairobi and she's been telling me what it's like when a swarm arrives it does take bees and but when you look up in the era it's so make millions and millions over black insects that just deterring the sky is so these do these buzz and you know hello to vote these more flies which are quite high the movie informs it doesn't move or live ones it's I suppose because of the wind so they move in waves and you could see the fuss with coming and then they're not really far apart and then you can see just a small distance just maybe even less than a meter and then you see the next form very close by when you look up you can't really see anything other than not just black insects and it is scary all we want expecting them and though I think what drew my attention mostly was the noise from the chip and I wondered where the kids were screaming sold looking up and seeing the locusts I think the local communities having been informed and shown hollow deluca scum is that the door quite free because images the peoples that making noise and but we will grow old and die does a lot of noise who do you and don't you well I think there was no time for panicking or getting worried so it was screening truck should immediately and what happens when they arrive in an area they had to they won't land on the trees all the shrubs all the crops and start eating straight away yes one woman no one from a walk up and down her phone was right where they just invaded on the whole farm so basically what she could see was just she didn't understand what the carpet was about but no on venturing Klose concede that it towards the insects so that's a show can these nothing you can do then when they've watched on to the crow the challenge with the farmers old what farmers have been advised is that make sure they do not touch on their crops the U. N.'s warning of a possible famine if there the Lakers are allowed to continue to devastate crops did did do you agree with that I do agree especially for the livestock yeah I stocks are going to be the primary question keys over the locust invasion eve they do not have any forward any posture they're not it's going to be a challenge for the livestock farmers the challenge I think could no with the feminist thinking that that this is occurring very close to the next season the next season is supposed to be starting in much X. and that's the long green season which most of the phone must rely on soul endo if the low cost I laying eggs on the ground then he means when that crop will be my team the second or third generation over the low costs will be at a very good state you know will be adjusted when the they feed their lot and the adult stage there lately to damage the young crops and that would mean busy carried the from us would go it's it's due for the phone lines because then they're able to get anything out of the crop so I agree with you that yeah you've action is not taken in the very near short term in the next maybe six eight months when yeah you're going to have a lot of challenges with though food is well I'm I'm when you say action that means what I a campaign of spraying pesticides it could be yes but also on the ground as well because I and I think it has to be timely because at this point we don't even need to worry much about that and that's the key thing we need to worry more about the second generation the eggs that are being made on the ground end up it's expected that the the seas on during this is on the ring so going to be here and it's also been predicted that we are going to experience quite good grateful is the soul this is going to be the best growing environment and for crops as well as breeding environment for the low cost as well so the next season is one which is going to be a challenge and they confirm that may be for me to get to making sure that all the hot spots a trees people and they are doing some variants doing sculpting so that we can be able to get to the low cost of the most critical thing at the mall but states once their eggs have been able to hatch endo they're interested where you the two have become be able to fly the flow developed that links yet then we can try to order yeah they they can be controlled at

East Africa
Lakers vs. Rockets score and highlights

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

03:26 min | 3 years ago

Lakers vs. Rockets score and highlights

"For socks seven ninety in Houston you get rockets rap after this one Michael Connor we'll have that for you scuffs things going on with the rockets is they've now made it halfway through this and be a seasonal that'll do it for us tonight here from Toyota center our onsite engineer David over our statistician Peter Unger producer on the network is Bob Ellie production assistant BT do a great job as always were broadcast partner Craig Akron I'm out of what's your final score tonight Lakers one twenty four rockets one fifteen rockets back at it Monday afternoon four o'clock tip with the thunder will join along the network at three thirty good night everybody it's Houston Rockets basketball has been presented by Toyota let's go places by AT and T. TV without NBA league pass is just kind of TV don't just guided TV direct TV call one eight hundred direct TV call one eight hundred direct TV be here all season long as your rockets take on the best in the NBA on the Houston Rockets radio network twenty twenty National Basketball Association all rights reserved Houston this is a network control signing off we now return to your regularly scheduled programming off be sure to take care of yours I personally recommend going to the low key center to get all of your levels checked that's where I got my levels checked they make it quick and easy no T. center offers a comprehensive health assessment exclusively for men most health insurance is accepted and even verified for you call today to a one seven eight nine six one one seven two a one seven eight nine six one one seven four go to low T. center dot com low key center reinventing men's health care equal opportunity is the cornerstone of the American dream being employed gives us the confidence to be financially independent we feel useful and respected but what if you were one of the eighty one percent of adults with developmental differences who do not have a paid job join the centrist foundation and supporting autism speaks best buddies and Special Olympics and creating pathways to one million employment and leadership opportunities for this talented community visit delivering jobs dot org to learn more Hey I got noticed lack of energy motivation and drive I'm talking to you guys it could be low tea or something else like sleep apnea or even low thyroid start your new year healthier with the quick and easy health assessment at low T. center they treat more than low T. including sleep apnea low thyroid and more it's covered by most health insurance and if you've been feeling tired grumpy have weight gain and loss of muscle column to a one seven eight nine six one one seven or go to low key center dot com low key center reinventing men's health care diabetes high blood pressure anxiety meds everyone's on them if your a fifty year old male maybe a bit Porky and you may even have type two diabetes a million dollars of term insurance may only cost you about two hundred Bucks a month called term provider speak with big blue at eight hundred four four four twenty thirteen big little find a term life policy for you even if you have type two diabetes are overweight or have high blood pressure term providers helped thousands of people like you would think they can't afford term life insurance to buy a million dollars of affordable term life for you all you need to do is call Beyglu an eight hundred four four four twenty thirteen who will

Houston Michael Connor Rockets
World War II veterans return to Normandy for 75th D-Day anniversary

World News Tonight with David Muir

04:55 min | 3 years ago

World War II veterans return to Normandy for 75th D-Day anniversary

"Have followed several day veterans from every corner of America who made the journey back today. We saw them up on that stage and one of them had remarkable moment with the French president. What happened on that stage and we were waiting for ninety six year old stand Friday. Right. Afterward. They were determined to make the journey back the American World War Two veterans who were here on d day returning to the beaches, hand-in-hand perfect strangers saying, thank you. Thank you, big, baby. Thank you. Today that gratitude king for world leaders the president of France, Emmanuel Macron, the first lady Bridget, mccrone landing here to thank the Americans, the allied troops for liberating, France. Reading President Trump and first lady Melania Trump. The two world leaders were take to the stage with those World War, Two veterans among them. So many of the veterans we have followed president mccrone walking up to stand freiden from Pennsylvania. President Trump, we've Vincent Unger from Florida. Later. It was the French president shaking Vinnie's hand. President Trump greeting jet Claiborne from Tennessee. There was Hemos back on the left based in Yakima, Washington and win the crowd gathered here. Saw the veterans faces on those big screens, the swelling applause, and then the standing ovation. President book grow and saying, France is not forgotten. We know what we owe. Do you've the runs all freedom on behalf of my nation is useful to say thank you. The President Trump seeded up, so many of the World War, Two heroes on hand telling them this. You're the pride of our nation. You are the glory of our Republic, and we thank you from the bottom of our hearts. Then that rare honor the legion of honor the highest distinction from France for five Americans, including stand Friday, who we have followed all the way from Pennsylvania who after d day went far out ahead of the rest. The scope out the danger. He was a scout. We distinct to concentration camps before they were liberated stunningly Friday Stanley Friday on behalf of the French Republic. I would you the distinction of night of the beach in of onum? We were waiting for STAN right after. Congratulations. You didn't tell us yesterday. Didn't tell me either the French had reached out to him. But STAN had no idea honor this grant. What was it like up there on that stage? Thrilling. Dream, they're only about three hundred foreigners in the world who ever been given that French honor that you were given as a. Which in honor is at ninety six MRs stands first time back to Normandy for years. He would not talk about what he saw partly because of the friend. He lost my best buddy isn't it was Monday, then we relate this tighter in brothers would give our life through each other without a worded. Then. And we did everything together but out on separate patrols, he would lose that friend, manic paternity tilles trae died. He wanted to know if I was while he was dying at some his. Liz. Stan remembering the brother, he lost honoring the fallen. Looking out over all Maha beach, the two presidents and the first lady's. The flyer. In for STAN this day and his new metal is for all of the brothers. They lost meadow of part is for the guys head. They're, they're the era. I'm the standard there to here, everyone in these men, right? I represent. Stand telling me it's about the brothers who did not come home, the more than nine thousand who are buried right here behind me. And when you walk through the cemetery you see so many crosses with that date, June sixth, nineteen forty

President Trump French Republic Stan America Pennsylvania MRS Maha Beach Emmanuel Macron Yakima Vinnie Hemos Normandy Onum Bridget LIZ Vincent Unger
Venezuela's Maduro Shuts Down Border with Brazil to Stop Aid

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:59 min | 4 years ago

Venezuela's Maduro Shuts Down Border with Brazil to Stop Aid

"Tomorrow is the deadline set by one Guido widely viewed as the interim president of Venezuela for humanitarian aid to be delivered to the impoverished country. Then his way has been facing rampant, hyper inflation and shortages of food and medicine after years of misrule by President Nicolas Maduro who still clings to power. Mr. muddle won the presidency again last year in elections that were widely viewed as fraudulent now Venezuela's opposition and more than fifty countries recognize Mr. Widodo as the president. He's been organizing stockpiles of food and medicine in Colombia, and Brazil and will be traveling to the Colombian border from Caracas to meet the deliveries. He's also called for volunteers to come to the border and help distribute it more. No single thin guarantee. Ah mister Modesto says he'll block any aid deliveries yesterday. He closed the border between Venezuela and Brazil and has threatened to close the border also with Colombia. Nicholas maduro. The president basically deny is that there's a humanitarian crisis going on in Venezuela part of the pace that the opposition is making is we're the guys who can relieve these shortages and begin to feed you properly and begin to provide medicines in the hospitals. So we'll any of Mr. guidos humanitarian aid make it into the country. Brooke Unger is our America's editor what is Mr. Guido planning this weekend. He said February twenty third is the day when all the say that's piling up in Columbia and other countries around. Venezuela will begin to move into Venezuela. To relieve the humanitarian crisis there and the big question is going to be can you make that happen? And what will the government do to stop it? Where's this aid coming from a lot of it's coming from the US? They're awesome European countries that are contributing aid to this effort. So it's coming from quite a number of places. But yeah, mainly from outside the region, and why this deadline what's special about the twenty third Guido and a rally. Week or so ago said, you know, kind of name the twenty third is being the day when this would begin to happen. So it's kind of self imposed deadline, but they needed to start at some point. And you know, obviously in addition to being a day when hopes that aid begins to flow into Venezuela. You know, there's there's a lot of politics and symbolism surrounding this day. So he not only wants food medicine to get the people, but he wants the world to sort of rally around the idea that, you know, his interim government is going to is going to provide support for for Hungary Venezuelans so about that crucial. Question of Ken, Mr. Guido, get this eight through do you think he can what is what's the plan? What he does have what he's trying to have is he's signed up hundreds of thousands of volunteers who were supposedly going to try and begin to bring this aid from the border with Colombia into something like twelve cities inside Venezuela. And how that actually is going to play out will be very interesting to see, you know, we don't know exactly what his tactics are going to be you know, one thing to to point out is that the the border between. Colombia and Venezuela was pretty porous you know, you could have all in tears crossing the border on guarded points. And attempting to bring aid in that way. There's also speculation that you know, they might be airdrops of aid from from US planes a could come in that way or by or by boat. So, you know, we don't know exactly what Ruthie eight is going to take. And what we really don't know is what the reaction of Venezuela's armed forces are going is going to be what might they do it. Why can they be seem to stop aid coming in the government portrays this essentially as sort of invasion of Venezuela? I mean, they they regard the delivery of American aid as being kind of a cover for an attempt to in American attempt to topple the government in American invasion of swords. And you know, they would see stopping the aid as being away of defending their sovereignty. President Trump has come out clearly in support of Guido. Except president widens generous offer of amnesty deliver your life in peace with your families, and your countrymen what's America's interest in this whole question. Don't Trump has taken a very firm and consistent line against the Madero regime, which is not entirely consistent with his line on other repressive dictators in the rest of the world their various explanations for that. I mean, one reason may be that they're quite a lot of Americans Venezuelan and Cuban origin in Florida, which is an important swing state. And so, you know, it it it Trump wants to appear to be on the side of those people who are who are certainly against the Venezuelan regime. You know, it's also true that, you know, some prominent Republicans in particular Marco Rubio, who's from Florida has kind of made it his his 'cause right? What about the effect that might have been in in the country? It could it be that the Venezuelan people like meddling American administration even less than they like the situation. They've got. There's a big risk here at the moment, the US and the opposition in Venezuela are kind of working hand in glove, and the opposition of gone along with very very tough American sanctions, which the hope is that the sanctions are going to dislodge the regime by denying the cash basically needs to survive, but you know, in doing that it's also going to worsen the the plight of the Venezuelan people. So you have this rather ironic situation where in order to push the regime out the opposition to starting with measures that that will hurt their own people. You know at the moment, there's an alliance there. But it certainly, you know, it's certainly true that if the US follows through with its threat to begin to use military force to push the regime out, then the the the equation could change. I I think it's very important that this process and Venezuela be seen as you know, Venezuelans getting rid of victory will regime rather than as Americans coming in. And imposing a government that suits them will this work for. I do you think that? He he will be able to sort of assume power in in full or will Mr. Madero hang on in the long run. I think that's very very difficult to say it's clear that the pillars of support for this regime are crumbling. They've lost public support. They've lost international support except for a few few isolated countries. Like Russia and Turkey, even China is is kind of wavering. They're running out of cash, but unless you you begin to see real signs of defection within the armed forces. You know, this regime can this regime can go on. And there's no further indication that support for him within this sort of the higher echelons of the military is is crumbling at the moment. There's no such indication. You had the the defense minister saying a couple of days ago that the coalition arranged against the government would have to topple it over his dead body. The the army high command seems to be pretty solidly with Madero. So there's no real indication except for a few isolated cases of defense. Action that the army is going to desert the gene,

Venezuela Mr. Guido United States President Trump Colombia Nicolas Maduro Interim President America Mister Modesto Brazil Caracas Nicholas Maduro Mr. Muddle Columbia Donald Trump Hungary Army
Better access to quality cancer care may reduce rural and urban disparities

News, Traffic and Weather

00:50 sec | 4 years ago

Better access to quality cancer care may reduce rural and urban disparities

"Better access. To cancer treatment could help reduce the disparity between cancer patient survival rates those who live in rural area Versus urban areas Komatsu Romero has the story decades of data from the centers for disease. Control and prevention show that people with, cancer in rural areas. Don't live as long as those in urban settings researcher Joseph Unger with Fred Hutchinson cancer research center? Says one statistic highlights how, hard it is for rural cancer patients to get? Access to quality treatment although twenty percent of cancer patients are from rural areas only three percent of oncologists treat in rural areas, he realizes that addressing the problem of limited rural access is. A huge undertaking it requires, policy, changes requires better access to afford -able healthcare insurance for instance. Unger says he. Hopes their study gives policy makers a

Komo Brennan Brian CIA Komatsu Romero Joseph Unger Ryan Harris Kim Schreier Director Skagit County White House John Brennan John Jeffries Bob Ferguson Washington Barack Obama EPA Josh Gordon Dino Rossi Intel
French president 'never meant to offend' Italy with criticism over migrants

Good Day USA

02:26 min | 4 years ago

French president 'never meant to offend' Italy with criticism over migrants

"Christina keno bloomberg's eka reporter james maker who joins us live in tokyo right let's get the latest in global news is good bugs markus thanks very much indeed mark now the leaders of france and italy will hold eight tenths meeting today after president d'amoto mccall accused rome of being irresponsible and cynical for not granting access to the migrant rescue ship aquarius bloomberg's counting conan reports after apologizing on the phone imminent mccain promised giuseppi come to discuss new solutions for sharing the migrants burden at the eu level after peres the italian prime minister will travel to germany on monday the issue threatens the heart of the eu unger merkel's own coalition in danger in paris counting kernen bloomberg daybreak europe senior eu officials have informally discussed whether the uk might need to stay in the block post march twenty thousand nineteen if brexit negotiations don't accelerate talks are stalled on the border and the future trade deal bloomberg understands that officials in brussels have privately questioned whether they can finish on time in the meantime here in london theresa may is facing further problems when it comes to e he withdrawal bill and an amendment on a meaningful vote in parliament on the final deal with the eu and the and the un meanwhile is warning that a saudi led assault to seize the strategic city of houdaida from who the rebels could shut down vital age root for food food and humanitarian aid un human coordinator for yemen lisa grandes says all of their operations depend on the port nations right now has dozens of people on the ground in her data we're providing food providing water her providing healthcare we have to bring those commodities through who data we've done everything we can to use other ports and we're continuing to expand our operations there but there's no substitute for her data global news twenty four hours a day on air now take talk on twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries i'm markus karlsson this is bloomberg guy it was the result russia was looking for let's find out what's happening in the world of sport is callum russia funds might be pinching themselves this morning to make sure the opening game of the whole world cup wasn't a.

Conan Twitter Markus Karlsson Russia Reporter Tokyo Italy D'amoto Mccall Lisa Grandes Germany Europe London UN Yemen Merkel James Maker France
Trump administration ending Hondurans' special immigration status

02:21 min | 4 years ago

Trump administration ending Hondurans' special immigration status

"Nine hundred ninety nine after hurricane mitch many have since fled to the us to escape violence mark unger a political science professor at brooklyn college says deporting hondurans now would be in the stake sending back there would be disaster for them because the high rates of poverty violence and this will add to the pressure on the country and the conditions which lead to instability and people flying again the trump administration has already ended tps designations for thousands of salvadoran nicaraguan nepalese and haitian nationals windsor johnston npr news washington palestinian authority president mahmoud abbas apologized today for remarks he made earlier this week in speaking to the palestine liberation parliament on monday abbass said jews in europe face persecution before the holocaust because of their function in society including what he described as unfair money london lending in a statement released today a boss said if people were offended especially people of the jewish faith i apologize to them on wall street at this hour the dow is up three hundred seventy eight points this is npr news from news i'm jeremy siegel uc berkeley officials have officially unveiled player plans to build student housing on people's park a long contested piece of land and site for activism the new housing would accommodate about a thousand students and as many as one hundred twenty five homeless people some who currently live in the area a quarter of the park will remain open while opponents to the plan say the park remains relevant uc berkeley spokesman dan mogul off says the space had become rife with crime based on what we're hearing it seems pretty clear that the community now in twenty eight team understands that the status quo really doesn't serve anyone's interest mogul off says the park is among nine sites that will be developed in an effort to alleviate the most severe student housing shortage in the uc system the two year construction effort is expected to begin in twenty twenty oakland city council is set to spend nearly four hundred thousand dollars to install new refillable water bottle stations at more than one hundred district schools the money comes from the city is one cent per ounce tax on sugar sweetened drinks that voters approved in two thousand sixteen and it comes.

Hurricane Mitch United States Professor Brooklyn College Abbass Dan Mogul Oakland City Council President Trump Mahmoud Abbas Europe NPR Jeremy Siegel Berkeley Four Hundred Thousand Dollars Two Year