35 Burst results for "Unesco"

"unesco" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

02:10 min | 3 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Was <Speech_Male> a huge <Speech_Male> row over. Something <Speech_Music_Male> like <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> stonehenge. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Josh <Speech_Music_Female> thank you so much. <Speech_Music_Male> thank you <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Telephony_Female> government. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Spokesperson <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> said <Speech_Female> the uk is a world <Speech_Female> leader in cultural heritage <Speech_Female> protection <Speech_Female> with thirty three unesco <Speech_Female> world heritage <Speech_Female> status sites on the <Speech_Female> list including <Speech_Female> the slate landscape <Speech_Female> of north west <Speech_Female> wales which was <Speech_Female> added this week. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> welcomed the confirmation <Speech_Female> that the world heritage <Speech_Female> committee does not recommend <Speech_Female> that stonehenge <Speech_Female> be added to the list <Speech_Female> of world heritage in <Speech_Female> danger this year. <Speech_Female> Protecting <Speech_Female> the heritage and archaeology <Speech_Female> of the stonehenge <Speech_Female> site is a priority <Speech_Female> and we will <Speech_Female> continue to work closely <Speech_Female> with unesco <Speech_Female> the international <Speech_Female> council on monuments <Speech_Female> and sites and the heritage <Speech_Female> and scientific community <Speech_Music_Female> on next steps <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> in a statement. Given <Speech_Female> to the guardian on the twenty <Speech_Female> first of july <Speech_Female> joe anderson <Speech_Female> codeine esco bullies. <Speech_Female> He <Speech_Female> said they <Speech_Female> wanted it their <Speech_Female> way. With no flexibility <Speech_Female> or room allow <Speech_Female> to maneuver <Speech_Female> and that under his <Speech_Female> morality liberal <Speech_Female> had spent over seven <Speech_Female> hundred million pounds <Speech_Female> on saving <SpeakerChange> and restoring <Speech_Female> heritage assets. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> That's it <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for today. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> You can read. Josh's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> coverage of the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> ongoing fallout <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> from unesco's decision <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> at the guardian dot com <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> including. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> What's next for stonehenge. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> My thanks to <Speech_Female> josh holiday <Speech_Female> and producer. Josh <Speech_Female> schneider villa in <Speech_Female> liverpool. <Speech_Female> This episode was produced <Speech_Female> by elizabeth <Speech_Female> casson and joshua <Speech_Female> kelly an exempt <Speech_Female> by lucy greenwell <Speech_Female> sound <Speech_Female> design was by <Speech_Music_Female> axel kukuchi. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The executive <Speech_Female> producers are nicole jackson <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> archie. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Bland and phil <Speech_Female> may not <Speech_Female> will be back <SpeakerChange> tomorrow. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Macy's big <Speech_Female> home sale is here <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and that means it's time <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to get everything <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you need to make your <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> home yours <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> from july twenty <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> eighth through august beth <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> checkout all their great <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> deals in store <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and online <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and a really screws <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> up your space take <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a peek at some new <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> furniture from the miranda <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> kerr collection <Speech_Music_Female> or the number one selling <Speech_Music_Female> radley sectional <Speech_Female> sofa. Whatever <Speech_Female> you need now <Speech_Female> is the time to get <Speech_Female> it. Learn more <Speech_Female> at <SpeakerChange> macys <Speech_Music_Female> dot com.

"unesco" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

02:10 min | 3 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Was <Speech_Male> a huge <Speech_Male> row over. Something <Speech_Music_Male> like <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> stonehenge. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Josh <Speech_Music_Female> thank you so much. <Speech_Music_Male> thank you <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Telephony_Female> government. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Spokesperson <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> said <Speech_Female> the uk is a world <Speech_Female> leader in cultural heritage <Speech_Female> protection <Speech_Female> with thirty three unesco <Speech_Female> world heritage <Speech_Female> status sites on the <Speech_Female> list including <Speech_Female> the slate landscape <Speech_Female> of north west <Speech_Female> wales which was <Speech_Female> added this week. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> welcomed the confirmation <Speech_Female> that the world heritage <Speech_Female> committee does not recommend <Speech_Female> that stonehenge <Speech_Female> be added to the list <Speech_Female> of world heritage in <Speech_Female> danger this year. <Speech_Female> Protecting <Speech_Female> the heritage and archaeology <Speech_Female> of the stonehenge <Speech_Female> site is a priority <Speech_Female> and we will <Speech_Female> continue to work closely <Speech_Female> with unesco <Speech_Female> the international <Speech_Female> council on monuments <Speech_Female> and sites and the heritage <Speech_Female> and scientific community <Speech_Music_Female> on next steps <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> in a statement. Given <Speech_Female> to the guardian on the twenty <Speech_Female> first of july <Speech_Female> joe anderson <Speech_Female> codeine esco bullies. <Speech_Female> He <Speech_Female> said they <Speech_Female> wanted it their <Speech_Female> way. With no flexibility <Speech_Female> or room allow <Speech_Female> to maneuver <Speech_Female> and that under his <Speech_Female> morality liberal <Speech_Female> had spent over seven <Speech_Female> hundred million pounds <Speech_Female> on saving <SpeakerChange> and restoring <Speech_Female> heritage assets. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> That's it <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for today. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> You can read. Josh's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> coverage of the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> ongoing fallout <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> from unesco's decision <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> at the guardian dot com <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> including. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> What's next for stonehenge. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> My thanks to <Speech_Female> josh holiday <Speech_Female> and producer. Josh <Speech_Female> schneider villa in <Speech_Female> liverpool. <Speech_Female> This episode was produced <Speech_Female> by elizabeth <Speech_Female> casson and joshua <Speech_Female> kelly an exempt <Speech_Female> by lucy greenwell <Speech_Female> sound <Speech_Female> design was by <Speech_Music_Female> axel kukuchi. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The executive <Speech_Female> producers are nicole jackson <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> archie. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Bland and phil <Speech_Female> may not <Speech_Female> will be back <SpeakerChange> tomorrow. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Macy's big <Speech_Female> home sale is here <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and that means it's time <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to get everything <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you need to make your <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> home yours <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> from july twenty <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> eighth through august beth <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> checkout all their great <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> deals in store <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and online <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and a really screws <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> up your space take <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a peek at some new <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> furniture from the miranda <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> kerr collection <Speech_Music_Female> or the number one selling <Speech_Music_Female> radley sectional <Speech_Female> sofa. Whatever <Speech_Female> you need now <Speech_Female> is the time to get <Speech_Female> it. Learn more <Speech_Female> at <SpeakerChange> macys <Speech_Music_Female> dot com.

"unesco" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

03:59 min | 3 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Josh halladay. You're on north of england correspondent. And you've done lots of reporting from the pool. Can you take us back to the beginning of the relationship between unesco and liverpool. When was the city. I awarded heritage status. Liverpool was first awarded world heritage status back in two thousand and four and it was a time when liverpool was seeking to turn a corner. You know the new millennium had just happened liverpool. That always struggled with its reputation. You know it had the economic doldrums of the seventies. It is held some terrible times in in recent decades and and applying for world heritage status was seen as another way to put liverpool on the map. That wasn't just about the basil's of football and it wasn't pretty decent company. Wasn't it so you've got on this list. The great wall of china the taj mahal vatican sissies really grand and famous places and then loophole does read this somewhere but it does have two and a half thousand listed buildings which is more than any other. Uk city outside of london is not part of this reason or the decision making from unesco designated as a heritage site cool. Yeah actually liverpool has an incredible number of important historic buildings if you walk along the waterfront. It's incompatible with almost anywhere else in the uk. Certainly. it's just incredibly beautiful and doesn't quite get credit that it deserves a beautiful city but absolutely livable stands up there with the best in the world and part with being awarded world heritage status was to recognize the sheer amount of these extraordinary beautiful historic buildings. But also how well they've been conserved the decades. There's been two world wars that's been a period of serious economic decline. So it was. It was to say well done to the city of liverpool for recognizing your heritage and looking after these buildings so well over the years through the gates. I was in port that nearly ninety ships waiting to be loaded or unloaded the other thing that will host each census recognize is livable place in the world in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. It was one of the most important parts in the world and forty percent of global trade pass through stocks britain doorways to and from the rest of the world and actually is also a fraught history. Isn't it like it's not all to be celebrated. I mean the full did pay a central role in the transatlantic slave trade and a lot of the city's wealth was bound up in it. Wasn't it huge amount of the traffic. That came through liverpool's pause walls connected to the slave trade. That's hugely uncomfortable for for leaders now leaders decades ago. The city has tried to address this. There's a slavery history museum right by the port in in liverpool so they have taken steps to not sweep this under the carpet but to try and educate people around what exactly happened and it's really not horrific slave trade when did it emerge that liverpool's place on unesco's list was looking shaky. The first warning for liverpool came in two thousand six. This was only two years after the was was placed on the world heritage list and this was about plans to bill liverpool museum and three of the buildings near the the three graces. On liverpool's waterfront unesco were originally concerned that the buildings will be so high that they would look out of character they sent a heritage mission to liverpool which means that they just basically sent a group of inspectors to walk around the city and they came away with the conclusion that that wasn't what they called imminent danger to the historic value. But it was essentially the first warning.

liverpool Josh halladay unesco taj mahal vatican Uk Liverpool england football china london britain bill liverpool
"unesco" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

01:40 min | 3 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Today in Focus

"If you've ever been to never pull you know how special it is the immigration buccaneers. You know there's a lot of poverty in enough growth growth the and you look at it now and it's it's such a replaced. Now you know people come from all over the world you know it's come over its musical. Legacy it's museums the world famous royal docks and the jewels in the crown the three graces the historic buildings that overlook the waterfront and defined liverpool skyline so small city. But it's it's it's it's above. Which ways full of history. Full of international history. I i'm seeing the three graces thought that's home to me and i me. Full applies and back in two thousand and four liverpool was recognized as a unesco world heritage site joining a coveted list of places including venice the pyramids and the grand canyon being on this list political on the cultural map it attracted a huge number of tourists from around the world. Liverpool also known as the pool of life has been described as having the most splendid setting of any english city is located on the liverpool bay. The irish sea but two weeks ago. There was devastating news unesco was dropping livable from that list only the third site in half a century to be deleted now. Unesco has warned that the uk government must do everything it can to protect its heritage for future generations. A wall sites could suffer. Livable's fate from the guardian. I'm oceanic ball.

buccaneers liverpool unesco liverpool bay grand canyon Liverpool uk
"unesco" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

01:40 min | 3 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Today in Focus

"If you've ever been to never pull you know how special it is the immigration buccaneers. You know there's a lot of poverty in enough growth growth the and you look at it now and it's it's such a replaced. Now you know people come from all over the world you know it's come over its musical. Legacy it's museums the world famous royal docks and the jewels in the crown the three graces the historic buildings that overlook the waterfront and defined liverpool skyline so small city. But it's it's it's it's above. Which ways full of history. Full of international history. I i'm seeing the three graces thought that's home to me and i me. Full applies and back in two thousand and four liverpool was recognized as a unesco world heritage site joining a coveted list of places including venice the pyramids and the grand canyon being on this list political on the cultural map it attracted a huge number of tourists from around the world. Liverpool also known as the pool of life has been described as having the most splendid setting of any english city is located on the liverpool bay. The irish sea but two weeks ago. There was devastating news unesco was dropping livable from that list only the third site in half a century to be deleted now. Unesco has warned that the uk government must do everything it can to protect its heritage for future generations. A wall sites could suffer. Livable's fate from the guardian. I'm oceanic ball.

buccaneers liverpool unesco liverpool bay grand canyon Liverpool uk
"unesco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:56 min | 3 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Finally on today's program. Think of a country jam packed with culture heritage history and landmarks. And you may well think of italy. It has as we all know. The highest number of unesco world heritage sites of any other nation until now because that's accolades has just been claimed by another country and that country is china or rodney. Harrison is professor of heritage studies at university college in. Good morning. rodney good morning. Tell us what happened. Yes so this It looks as if china will overtake italy as having the largest number of World heritage sites the meeting of the world heritage convention is taking place right now in china And the word convention was adopted in nineteen seventy-two at a general conference of the united nations. But the roots of this idea of an international convention to provide protection for cultural natural heritage goes back much further to the period between the two world wars and it really took off as an idea during the two quite important safeguarding campaigns that were run by the united nations in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties the first of them to do with the relocation of every simple temples during the construction of s one high dam in the late fifties and nineteen sixties and then the flooding venice in nineteen sixty six both of which drew very significant international attention to the vulnerability of cultural heritage so this convention was established in nineteen seventy two created this entity this world heritage list and a series of mechanisms by which sites could be considered for inscription on the list and signatories to the convention or states parties as known in the terminology of the list they have to agree to establish and maintain a national register of cultural and natural heritage sites and importantly attentive list for consideration for world heritage listing. What's sorry i interrupted you terribly rude. That what what's pushed china up to the top of the list. Yes so There is sort of question. Why china but In in a way one would ask why not so. The kind of original list was very focused on anglo european science and China only became a signet tree or a states party in nineteen five in its first heritage sites. Were into onto the world heritage list in nineteen eighty seven There's now a thousand sites in one hundred ninety countries or countries all over the world and obviously china is a very big country topic of the nascent. Which is set to overtake but the answer is actually more to do with politics and power and this sort of process of world. heritage listing is a kind of in in some ways it's a very open process. So if if one had the patience one could live stream the whole of the public parts of the meeting over the coming days and what the discussions but in many ways also about Sort of politicking and power and influence and for china the the past and this sort of idea of great chinese civilization really underpins its international economic and foreign policy in in a very significant way so Recently it's announced it's announced this huge initiative called the belton road initiative at massive international infrastructure development program across seventy different countries. It's it's sort of saint a piece of its economic policy. But it makes reference to this idea of the silkroad this network of ancient land and sea trading routes which connected china with both east and west so heritage is really fundamental to china's vision of itself as an international political and economic superpower. And the idea of the greatness of chinese historical civilization provides really sort of strong grounding. not only for. It's a foreign policy. But also for the way it treats its own ethnic minorities for example and its ability to kind of control and sort of dictate cultural policy Internally as well rodney harrison. Thank you so much for joining us on the line. That was rodney harrison professor of heritage studies at university college in london. That's all we have for today's program. Many thanks to our producers. Reese james page rentals alexis self daniel beach and charlie film studio manager christie evans with editing. Assistance from chris blackwell off to the headlines as more music on the way. The briefing is live at midday here in.

china rodney italy united nations university college unesco Harrison China rodney harrison Reese james daniel beach charlie film christie evans alexis london chris blackwell
"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

09:33 min | 3 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Johnny. That would eat is dining those doors. You'll see. I got now that they come up with us gutsy in australia. Komo guidance in. I'll tell you i city all of them has been told katie built wanted nothing lia lee down below. It'll be paid by. Google scholar us tahiliani. Various the north korea pakistan is not gonna stand power of which is on your case but followers. I wanna see if he can lamis more initial amass can scare me less bleak. Lewinsky vacuous party byron. Less companion. Hundred magnolia ramon. Maria cost partial. Give it another west. Coast did not get an e peloton. Don't necessarily going to diarrheal pashtoon et cetera et cetera. Beside who knows messaoud scares me. Now nigga bala shoot leave financial values who is a corner significantly dementia. She's been there is nothing moment. That's gotta again. He goes a one lows. Afghan no son does carried into the program and see stole. Eka stola scott as soon as you can see you know. Go out as mistletoe. God look i've got what i did not penalty along we are. They say he does timorese. People don't one of the boy till the combined zero to keep the south one hundred two scusi. Pardon me to capacity rocky that i one hundred dollars. But they're lucky they story The owner of this youtube mississippi at the imahara belleek will be to illuminate top. One yup andrea labrada lori. A particular moment minka anti-social glossy cover this wester cripple. This type polka the solution movie. Quander lois talk gender thinking and kotil for carrillo for a hero and baton harbor city. Yeah we have those though for a halo list. The boot custody. Some dusky k one. Also look heath luck. Will your tito worker. Who prefer dole. Somebody's university no Csi see as simple cumulus fairly promos. Of course lew. Top elite soldiers say to me see see la savage the target a cease. Howick a one. Okay okay for new money off law that you see them in the top league la kamala e kapit. Okay but the original preface. I'm interviewing not being in the in those pork. One implemental able the tool principal clarity. Mopus newman northbound alec. Claro you were k. Cayuga federal penal of paul new for inside. I can talk to gig per one in. Were in a poor newman. Total thorough alexia casino inside your financial at the prohibited within separable. Poco are say the komo sale thing almost four quite bill. The gordondeal rockefeller say wouldn't federal review memo elon. Musk diversity oklahoma have your home and auto through. Mingle oromo come on his happily meet. The guys like la la busey number on their rhymes. Ralph kiefer mayhem yano maceo. Reciprocity poll wanted was. This is that is at the third. Upper legalized is a medical super. Young is linda. The the new mum busy. Don't say hello or the by. No cezanne's is obviously you went off you know in the uk. See e unico newman. Latino cathedral labor day to the new their soviet embassy and a secret police found reorganise. He they might in louisville virtual dylan. Pero verte no kieslowski soil a career in ultimate of vinyl. we'll we'll adopt auto loan and A for steve alford the with one of the or put the in saudi sympathy provisioning and then number the sundance kid. E that mukasey little hollow giving him ice much alamar. Those don't annoy me up at all. No majority leader. Jose louise kelley paolini for me. Don't even get fifty elementary. Who study at the thirty. The me somewhere landlord lemmings. Don't want to look at to modernise. don't even say somewhere long term limits. The proposal with cpi so the. Okay willie are we there. Feroce on sunday then blair rented and rotor yellow bird liberal below mike murphy co workers the pasco india get uncle moderate climate moment of foreign lower their outdoor out of house when he goes real. Didn't actually what apparatus yesterday struggles which is news for say it's still radical. They palestra portland talking. Combat configure point for a foot below the kentucky us and the liberal political for another lobby mississippi in morocco they say not dominicans e went up on of course different from now possibly like real real real miracle kayla vio- ave matthew mccarthy joe but betas but often francis aside you love from this blur frontage full metal gilo colobus and your complete dominant in sushi. New feels a to to see them.

lia lee tahiliani lamis messaoud Eka stola scott andrea labrada lori Quander lois kotil baton harbor city Mopus newman Lewinsky alexia casino bala ramon north korea Ralph kiefer byron yano maceo katie
"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

05:16 min | 3 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Bad words. Can't say blanket plan this is. There's still have internal the with aware of the rash. Legless glitzier this odometer ya. Los antigua's cast dagnon them in dhaka. Replace abeille live on. Data's new orleans style theory. Neil gaiman giant shoppers. It does sadie study a core. Naturally his dog rookie. Casey's disability lemerre hill.

"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

02:06 min | 3 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Wins. He has enough. Yes baroness sodas. So i like. I say.

Pandemic Points to Need to Work Together as Italy Hosts G-20

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Pandemic Points to Need to Work Together as Italy Hosts G-20

"Ministers of the G. twenty group of nations have arrived in the UNESCO world heritage city of Madera southern Italy with the pandemic providing painful lessons on how interconnected the world is ministers from nations accounting for more than half of the world's population a meeting to explore how to better cooperate including on vaccines and climate change efforts Italian foreign minister Luigi di mile who has opened the gathering sites both as areas where it's imperative the country's pull together and secretary of state Antony Blinken built on the vaccine urgency issue in his opening remarks I'm Charles de Ledesma

G. Twenty Group Of Nations Madera Unesco Luigi Di Mile Italy Antony Blinken Charles De Ledesma
Setbacks: Girls' Exclusion From Education

Solvable

02:04 min | 6 months ago

Setbacks: Girls' Exclusion From Education

"And you. thanks so much for joining us today just to get started. Could you describe the gap in women's and girls' education in africa. Well the figures that we of got that our official so far and from unesco is died search for covid with over fifty two million gallons lit out of ood in africa. We're very focused on right now. On the question of problems that were getting better and that have gone into reverse because of the global pandemic and i wonder what impact covid nineteen has had on girls' education. I know that in africa in many countries the the numbers are much better than they've been in many places in the developed world. But i assume that they're all also different kinds of second order effects. So what impact has the pandemic had coffee has been very very brutal and yes. It's true that you know in africa. We did improvements in terms of access to primary education for most jinglin but what is covered. Dan is Started eroding the gains. That if you met in that space as feminine started losing income. We're not even talking. About in august closure the products to crozier so as much as online learning was introduced as as most governments. It was amazing. Awesome for the june. That could access it in afforded but it just mandate for the majority of the children that we work with as an organization where in the had distinguished communities they did not get support with online learning so as a result of it. I know for a fact that are supported me printed out materials social distance study groups in all that but it is the duty of the government to ensure that education is provided every child but covid actually exposed that we have issues of equity informed by technology access to various seminars.

Africa Unesco Crozier DAN
Legends of the Nahanni Valley

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

01:54 min | 7 months ago

Legends of the Nahanni Valley

"Today and my month long search for strange places from around the world. Both man made and natural traveled. Canada's northwest territories and deadman's valley located a hani national park reserve in the whole region northwest territories canada surround miles west of yellow night. And it was eleven thousand square miles in area. Part of the mackenzie mountains reside. Within and the south nonni river flows through the center. It was named a national park. Nine thousand nine hundred seventy six and a unesco world heritage site nineteen seventy eight. The park is surrounded by huge peaks and features geysers sing. Kohl's deep canyons caves. Gorgeous and beautiful untouched. Forest within these stunning vistas lies. Virginia falls three hundred fifteen feet high or twice the height of niagara falls. This by the by is the last known. Location of the wahiawa abair dog and one ten thousand years ago woolly mammoth. The area is a true wilderness and has been largely unexplored as it is accessible. Only by air new hani's from the language of the indigenous dna people that have inhabited the region for thousands of years in means the people over there in reference to a tribe of mountain tooling people the naja who were once known to raid lowlands settlements before mysteriously vanishing there is speculation that they may have been ancestors of the modern day navajo over the years. There have been many mysterious stories that have emerged from the area. The names of park areas such as deadman's valley headless headless range and the funeral ranch relate to these strange stories and legends

Hani National Park Mackenzie Mountains South Nonni River Deadman Canada Kohl Niagara Falls Hani Virginia
Scores of schools ‘reportedly occupied’ by security forces in Myanmar:

UN News

01:01 min | 7 months ago

Scores of schools ‘reportedly occupied’ by security forces in Myanmar:

"Security forces in myanmar have reportedly occupied more than sixty schools and university campuses. the united nations children's fund unicef said on friday in at least one incident security forces reportedly beat to teachers and left several others injured. The agency said in a joint statement with the u n educational scientific and cultural organization unesco and the ngo save the children. These incidents mark a further escalation of the current crisis and represent a serious violation of the rights of children. Schools must not be used by security forces. Under any circumstances they said the development comes amid continuing violence linked to protests against the first of february coup by the country's military the agencies warned that the occupation will exacerbate the learning crisis for almost twelve million children and youth in myanmar which was already under tremendous pressure owing to the covid nineteen pandemic and the ensuing widespread closures. They urged security forces to vacate occupied premises immediately and ensure that they are not used by or security personnel

U N Educational Scientific And Myanmar Unicef United Nations NGO
Mysterious monolith pops up near Turkish World Heritage site

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 9 months ago

Mysterious monolith pops up near Turkish World Heritage site

"Turkish authorities are investing the appearance of a mysterious monolith in the southeast of the country the mental block was followed by a farmer well it was inscribed in old Turkic script look at the sky see the moon the moon is about ten feet high was discovered near a UNESCO world heritage site which has megalithic structures dating to the tenth millennium BC thousands of years before Stonehenge in England Turkish media reported on Sunday the gendarmes were looking through CCTV footage and investigating vehicles that may have transported to the monolith that other mysterious monoliths have popped up and some have disappeared in numerous countries in recent months I'm Charles the last month

Unesco England Charles
Jo Nesbo Talks About 'The Kingdom'

The Book Review

05:31 min | 11 months ago

Jo Nesbo Talks About 'The Kingdom'

"Joe joins us now from oslo. His new book is called the kingdom. Joe thanks for being here. Thanks for having me all right. I wanna say something up front to our listeners. Who come from around the world. Because i can hear some of you saying it's unesco and they're going to say that it's very hula but joe's dad actually grew up in brooklyn and an joe. Correct me if i'm wrong. You grew up being called joe at home correct. Yeah at least. He called majo- okay. So were pronouncing it. The american way with awareness. Even know. I i did practice. The norwegian will thank you all right. Let's talk about the book. And i want to talk about it if you could tell us a little bit about it. Without spoiling revealing anything at all the theme of the book is brothers. there's Two brothers roy. Who is the older brother who is more introvert. Character are not doing that. Well at school and his younger brother call is more the extrovert likable popular guy doing well at school. They grew up in this small town in the mountains of norway and their parents die when there are in their early teens for from what seems to be a car accident later on call moves to the united states to study business administration and fifteen years. Later he comes back to the small village and roy is at this time running the local gas station. Call coming back with a big plan for the whole village. Which is building a luxurious spa hotel. In which everyone in the village will participate as investors that this is his big plan and he's also bringing his new wife shannon. So the move in with roy us. This progresses with the plan for the for the hotel dog secrets from the past starts rising to the surface. All right and we're not revealing any of those secrets. Where do you start with a book like this. Does it begin for you with the characters with the idea of brothers with the feeling of like. I'm not writing. Hurry whole novel this time. Where do you begin. This novel definitely started with team of of brothers. I grew up with a with a brawler younger than meam. Newts which i was very close to be Like the brothers in the kingdom. We shared a room on the bunk bed and we played football together for many many years and later on when i moved back to oslo where we grew up he moved youtube when we started the band together. And we played in that ballentine. Pass away so we were always very close. And it's not like this is a novel by a keyhole looking into the rail relationship of me and But i definitely draw on the experiences and our emotional bombs in the in this novel. I think it's Also generally about family. it's In my previous novels. I've been subconsciously focusing on sung father relationships but here it's a it's brothers but also family in dreamt The loyalty the obligation. You feel toward a family and of course the dilemma of Following the rules of society and following the unwritten rules of the family which is sometimes especially in this case in conflict. It's interesting to hear you talk about that. Because i think most people when they think of your recurring main character harry hole probably don't think about family and relationships that's partly true yes youngest sister doors with which he feels responsible. But it doesn't have a brother. And i think maybe that's up constantly say was something i did to remove him more from my own person And my situation. I knew that at some point i would have to address the theme of brothers. Because it's it's been there my whole life. It's been such a big part of my life in an interview with the times in two thousand and twelve said that you were increasingly tired of harry hole and that sometimes you found your your books with hole to be very dark and i you know very dark is definitely how i would describe them. I'm curious what qualifies as very dark in your book because this book is is not lighthearted that the kingdom even without whole i guess. There's less physical brutality in In this book this this less violence. But the there's nothing may be more psychological abuse and psychological violence. But i mean hates is is the flip side of the coin to to love so i think is impossible to write about hate violence. Revenge without keeping one eye on love which is the case here. It's loss story. Turn bob dates up. i was asked to come up with a sort of a tagline for the novel and it was a two brothers and one woman.

Joe Joins Oslo Roy Us JOE ROY Brooklyn Norway Harry Hole Ballentine Shannon United States Youtube Football BOB
Jo Nesbo Talks About 'The Kingdom'

The Book Review

04:27 min | 11 months ago

Jo Nesbo Talks About 'The Kingdom'

"Joe joins us now from oslo. His new book is called the kingdom. Joe thanks for being here. Thanks for having me all right. I wanna say something up front to our listeners. Who come from around the world. Because i can hear some of you saying it's unesco and they're going to say that it's very hula but joe's dad actually grew up in brooklyn and an joe. Correct me if i'm wrong. You grew up being called joe at home correct. Yeah at least. He called majo- okay. So were pronouncing it. The american way with awareness. Even know. I i did practice. The norwegian will thank you all right. Let's talk about the book. And i want to talk about it if you could tell us a little bit about it. Without spoiling revealing anything at all the theme of the book is brothers. there's Two brothers roy. Who is the older brother who is more introvert. Character are not doing that. Well at school and his younger brother call is more the extrovert likable popular guy doing well at school. They grew up in this small town in the mountains of norway and their parents die when there are in their early teens for from what seems to be a car accident later on call moves to the united states to study business administration and fifteen years. Later he comes back to the small village and roy is at this time running the local gas station. Call coming back with a big plan for the whole village. Which is building a luxurious spa hotel. In which everyone in the village will participate as investors that this is his big plan and he's also bringing his new wife shannon. So the move in with roy us. This progresses with the plan for the for the hotel dog secrets from the past starts rising to the surface. All right and we're not revealing any of those secrets. Where do you start with a book like this. Does it begin for you with the characters with the idea of brothers with the feeling of like. I'm not writing. Hurry whole novel this time. Where do you begin. This novel definitely started with team of of brothers. I grew up with a with a brawler younger than meam. Newts which i was very close to be Like the brothers in the kingdom. We shared a room on the bunk bed and we played football together for many many years and later on when i moved back to oslo where we grew up he moved youtube when we started the band together. And we played in that ballentine. Pass away so we were always very close. And it's not like this is a novel by a keyhole looking into the rail relationship of me and But i definitely draw on the experiences and our emotional bombs in the in this novel. I think it's Also generally about family. it's In my previous novels. I've been subconsciously focusing on sung father relationships but here it's a it's brothers but also family in dreamt The loyalty the obligation. You feel toward a family and of course the dilemma of Following the rules of society and following the unwritten rules of the family which is sometimes especially in this case in conflict. It's interesting to hear you talk about that. Because i think most people when they think of your recurring main character harry hole probably don't think about family and relationships that's partly true yes youngest sister doors with which he feels responsible. But it doesn't have a brother. And i think maybe that's up constantly say was something i did to remove him more from my own person And my situation. I knew that at some point i would have to address the theme of brothers. Because it's it's been there my whole life. It's been such a big part of my life

Joe Joins Oslo JOE Roy Us ROY Brooklyn Norway Shannon Ballentine United States Harry Hole Football Youtube
The History of the Internet

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | 11 months ago

The History of the Internet

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

Paul Outlet Revilla Christopher Stray Wells Newman Inc Paul Baran Established Information Proces Donald Davies Oxford University Information Processing Techniq Unesco Derek Paris Baron Davies Bolt Beranek Defense Department Darpa Charlie Stanford Research Institute
"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

04:48 min | 11 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Found not the minor skating. Our last dante's epic the has done. This more standing saw s gumbo is from nevada. The asiya dna. We're not going on the lost. Your said to talk to you. Stimulus what made i got. Stop smoking six. Think that is me. You'll the famous ceiling let you go. You're gonna go borges do your my vet this evening. Yep i bid would give up is again onis to you style on a month guys gotta bring yard fiercer. I only give kiara so throws vine kantha miss a day on rama grotto globe. Simonis will be there are out. I'm just beyond scumbag. You don't even scratch. You can tell me. Just thank pretty important. Me me lack su- scheme ers. John thaddeus that outweigh skipped from book case. Who put as he got me Times food but these days judge thinks lately screen ross china..

"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

06:07 min | 11 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Unit. Last the thing you're dot com seeing your because we go get well they don't. They were younger. Vetoes taking their gonna disappear so gray. Shot like mini yet then asked him on. Slapping.

"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

06:00 min | 11 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"The many big got me one thing. I moved known is built guy. A brush hours rusty now the end. I mean how brees service getting have collect your home at the.

"unesco" Discussed on Yah Lah BUT...

Yah Lah BUT...

07:59 min | 11 months ago

"unesco" Discussed on Yah Lah BUT...

"Cheaper michelin star dish has limited was tsipras michelin star dish. Two dollars eighty cents or chicken rice. Yeah but in some way. Also that whole thing did it. The cheap hawker food is is a problem osceola right because i i think there's one thing that people always point out that if you look at i will see these around the world where else in the and you get a meal for three dollars and is true lighting anywhere like everyone says you know to cure food. Expensive y'all London food experts expensive. But once you remove that. Lear from hawker food from singapore influencing upon isn't really that cheap and a quality you get for the kuban amounts you pay and other facilities is lola. So in some way having focus and today almost gives his false pretends that singapore is very cheap Off something along those lines. And i think the thing that cheap hawker food cheap hawker food is a is a perspective. That can be more harmful than anything she. The prices. don't keep inflation. Inflation of the price ingredients at stuff i did. 'cause you stuff goes out quite a bit lower. Yeah but also just the king was that actually do one good thing to compare michelin. Snyder unesco's different was michelin star is ultimately is a private organization. Who's who's watching. Who's watching over them right. Wrestling unesco's like think this is much more stringent in terms of like to remain list. Or even get on. The list is not as easy like you know. It's not just the how famous or how well known. Your thing is like a bulldozer. At went in mind saw the begun temples. The temples began right. One way you The the air balloon is your that the bulls. Yeah you do. Those only designated as a unesco world heritage site in two thousand nineteen ninety msrp thousands of years old. These like you know loved by visitors and tourism bottling nineteen finally. They knew it doesn't it is worth it in a why is because the the government apparently did a lot of restorations and an approved kind of like restorations to temples. And then fundamentally changed the the or what the temples originally were at the foundations. Everything so dead. I think the because audette unesco refusal for quite number years g give them that gift in day accreditation so having that kind of like Salvo will body overseeing halting helps me. See the okay. At least there there might be is more than just that singaporeans copying about on read it. Oh adver about about you know Every time we every time we lose something late the national library national library oriented decide to ten only Buildings all built a new bridge built new tunnel things in it. We always feel like one. We is screaming into a into a into a dopey lola. Nothing happens whereas if the school body that you can put this shin you can write to in ring noise about something that gives you another avenue to copy was so as a teacher complexity chevy's muster hit to though but the point it'd be about begun temples. I think honestly you know you. One reason could be right because the singapore train has to be good exams right. I guarantee you the people who submitted his application. I probably look for some ten years for applications to unesco before they just studied the fucking gulag hours in you know they want to restore temples and all. They didn't think about the saw things you need to understand game. It'd be good for your application. But in i mean it'll get so so on on the more optimistic side actually programs. Now which i just discovered that kind of encouraged younger people to to learn art of hawking later because okay i think any one thing that everyone is seeing everywhere is that yet as with hawker hawker caucus enters. Reach out foggy also But then as they move into malls and all yet condition comes in. And then i think everyone is really been to some food court where people queen. The food are not really hawkers. Just they just come in followed a steps land and you get better quality or fuller So whenever i see like some some younger people taking over the of their parents always feel at far. I want eat dead just to support them Because i think that is also in. And i think there are more and more examples around it in aleppo routes and third you chat and already whether younger people take on and the ad a bit of mortar a modern take on it while preserving the what meet their parents Ah families total. Google and i think that is fucking awesome and i will even go so is it. I think that's happening now. More now at least prequel villa then not do you feel you feel that as a as a growing trend of it off young people taking over the parents. Yeah yes but it's not enough to stem cells of stem. The tide of like the older generation of hawkers basically retiring all. I mean being for lack of better term like basically being bye by by time in a lot of people coming to the people you see a lot of the new yorkers coming a lot of them are just trying to be a quick button. I thought from some some people that yes on the these people they open centers just fully. They won't do it for six months and try to make a quick buck muslim and gallery. S like six months. in hawking. yeah. So i mean so i just want to let you you go to hawker's entered. It is has a lot of big lunchtime crowd or something at it that he you just sit up for a short while too late you know. Try try and on inland the lunchtime crowd. And if he doesn't look you just shut down within six months. Yellow orders was move on the other but the the always a question. We starting your dinner. I mean something to be said about influencers content. Creators righteous tried to youtube channel for six months. If nothing comes out for our first gig. Kim nor within six months earlier. But i mean the thing about it is that hawking is trying to think what was it do. Know what's the difference between going to restrict hawker and a hawker lot of Is the concept of being dick us very minimal resources very little space very little it kitchen equipment and everything and then having the you add your element of human skew and you're still able to produce something delicious to eat in mass and very short period of time so she can feet lobby for and and and get paid for all is quite different from a restaurant. We knew we invest in salva production. Line kind of england. Right where every element. This is is almost department dishwashing. Don't be armored preparing redesign department plating. Everything is own thing so it's a very different thing. Hockey is much more over is. I'm is meant to we stay as one to two percent operation like to to to be very fast and all us all yet is very big skill element with that. Cannot i feel like cannot be learned within six months to a year. I allow law this allowed. Yeah yeah. fb businesses that. I mean they started.

unesco hawker hawker singapore hawker michelin unesco world heritage Snyder unesco London Lear Hockey kuban chevy government Google hawking bulls youtube
UN: Child Malnutrition Soars in War-torn Yemen

UN News

03:34 min | 1 year ago

UN: Child Malnutrition Soars in War-torn Yemen

"The children of Yemen are suffering acute malnutrition president at rights as the world's worst humanitarian crisis grinds on UN agencies have warned in an alert based on new food security analysis in some areas more than one in four children is acutely malnourished. said the UN Children's fund UNICEF along with the World Food Programme, WFP and the Office for the Coordination of humanitarian, affairs or. They cited data from one hundred and thirty three districts in southern parts of Yemen which are home to one point four, million children under five. It revealed a ten percent increase in acute trish in so far this year even worse is the more than fifteen percent rise in children suffering from severe acute malnutrition meaning that at least ninety, eight, thousand under-fives are at high risk of dying without urgent medical treatment from Geneva. Here's UNICEF spokesperson Eczema. Kado. The most significant increase is among young children who suffer from inferior acute malnutrition. This is a condition that leaves children around ten times more likely to die. Z's as such as cholera, diarrhoea, malaria, or acute respiratory infections, all of which are common in Yemen. According to Wip by the of twenty, twenty, four in ten people in surveyed areas of Yemen about three point, two million people are likely to be severely food insecure data for the remaining districts. Northern Yemen has yet to be published, but the situation is expected to be equally concerning based on historical trends. Fighting between government on non-state actors has continued in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province where civilians have been killed thousands displaced the UN hazard an update from Austria, the UN Humanitarian Aid Office reported that more than two weeks since clashes began near Lashkar Gah city. The security situation remains volatile while talks between the Afghan government and Taliban representatives continue in Qatar fighting has also been reported along the road connecting Chicago with Kandahar city in the East with improvised explosive devices planted on main highways continuing to threaten those looking for shelter. Amid attacks affecting fifteen medical facilities, the World Health Organization W. H.. O.. Also reported that the closure of clinics has affected thousands of people although handful of partially reopened. Science needs to be more accessible, transparent, and in tune with people's needs if global threats like the covid nineteen pandemic ought to be overcome effectively, you agency heads said on Tuesday in a joint appeal for free access to scientific reviews, data tools, and software audrey. Azoulay. From yes. Go Ted Ross at an Gabri ACIS from the World Health Organization has. Michelle Bachelet High Commissioner for Human Rights called on the international community to take all necessary measures to make this happen with the additional support of Fabiola Gianotti who had Sunday European Laboratory for particle physics. The appeal also intends to promote trust in research and technology at a time when rumors and. False information I increasingly common in a statement UNESCO the UN agency for Education Science and Culture said that the recent response of the scientific community to the cave nineteen pandemic has demonstrated how well open science can accelerate the achievement of scientific solutions to global challenges. But the agency insisted that sustainable solutions to global threats require an efficient transparent and vibrant scientific effort from everyone in society not just scientists in line with the wishes of UN member states UNESCO is developing guidelines explaining how countries can implement open science policies to bring citizens closer to science and how they can commit to helping to share scientific knowledge around the World

Un Children Yemen UN Un Humanitarian Aid Office World Health Organization Unicef Coordination Of Humanitarian Education Science And Culture Unesco WFP Geneva Michelle Bachelet Fabiola Gianotti Ted Ross President Trump WIP Cholera
Extraordinary session of the Global Education Meeting (2020

UN News

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Extraordinary session of the Global Education Meeting (2020

"The covid pandemics highlighted the value, every society places on education as a public, good and essential public service that's according to Deputy Secretary General Mohammad speaking at UN Educational Scientific and Cultural Agency UNESCO's global education meeting in Paris on Thursday. She said it had demonstrated the vital link between education nutrition, gender, equality health, and social protection, and shown how quickly education systems can react in A. Crisis she praised governments, teachers, parents, and Keg is students themselves who persevered and adapted to new realities. But the coronavirus pandemic still left at least a third of the world's students out of school and close to half a billion students is still affected by school closures. The Deputy UN chief said the declaration from the UNESCO meeting endorsed by dozens of countries signalled the international community's intention to hold such negative impacts and avert a generational catastrophe.

Deputy Secretary General Moham Cultural Agency Unesco UN KEG Unesco Paris A. Crisis
Politicians, Vigds Finnbogadttir

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:18 min | 1 year ago

Politicians, Vigds Finnbogadttir

"Meet Iceland's Fourth President Vigdis. Finnbogadottir. Victis was born into a wealthy family on April. Fifteenth Nineteen Thirty Vic the capital of Iceland. Her father was a civil engineer and a professor at the University of Iceland. Her mother was chair of the Icelandic Nurses Association for over three decades. Education and travel were highly valued invictus his family. Both of her parents studied in Europe before this was born and they often told tales of their travels. After graduating from junior college wreck you back in nineteen, forty, nine fifty has got the opportunity to travel through Europe and to pursue her many areas of academic interest. She studied French and took courses on literature and drama in Paris. She. Also studied at the University of Saleh in Sweden and continue to pursue her theatrical interest in Copenhagen where she studied theater history. Finally she returned to her home country to study English literature and Education at the University of Iceland. Becoming a teacher was a natural next step for victorious. She taught French drama and theater history at the University of Iceland for breaking away to develop the French department at a selective experimental school in the city. Also participated in many projects that brought her into the public eye. She taught French. Television example and later hosted programs about drama. During summers she gave official tours of the country for journalists and writers hoping to gather research material. In the nineteen seventies, victis also served as the director of the Reykjavik Peter Company. All of the public facing work helped grow popularity and name recognition. In addition to all the other things she had going on figures also adopted a daughter in nineteen, seventy two and raised her as a single mother. All while acting as a cultural ambassador for country. Just. remained relatively a political at first. I some experienced some turbulent politics including housing shortages in the sixties, an ongoing conflict between integrationist and isolationist political ideologies. This is early detachment from politics came in handy when she ran as a candidate for president in nineteen eighty. When asked is it fair to say that that you should be elected for being a woman fixes responded? No I shouldn't be elected because I'm a woman I should be elected because I am a human. She secured a narrow victory against three other opponents all men. Her focus on the cultural identity and history of the country rather than more polarizing issues served her well in the race. Just like that big became the first democratically elected woman president. The Icelandic constitution grants, the president only ceremonial power while the prime minister takes more typical leadership role. Still. took an active role in the development of her country both at home and abroad. She spent time advocating for reforestation. She also used her fluency in multiple languages to serve as an impactful ambassador. Educating about the culture and rich literary traditions of Iceland. She personified the unity of her country and gained massive popularity across the world. Victims was reelected three times until she decided to retire from her position in. Nineteen Ninety six. But her participation in politics didn't end there. The following year she went on to serve as president of the UNESCO World Commission on the ethics of scientific knowledge and technology. Thickness made history by becoming the first woman president, a glass ceiling she broke surprisingly and depressingly recently. Thickness encouraged women never to settle for less. She said get educated never accept shorter education than your brothers.

President Trump University Of Iceland Iceland Europe Victis Icelandic Nurses Association University Of Saleh Paris Engineer Unesco World Commission Reykjavik Peter Company Director Official Copenhagen Professor Sweden Prime Minister
Travel to Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:55 min | 1 year ago

Travel to Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy

"I'd like to welcome to the show, Audrey and Manlio Diamante from travels with AUDREY DOT COM and they've come to talk to us a better region of Italy you may or may not have heard of for Yuli. Venezia Giulia. Andrian manlio welcome to the show. Ain't you Chris and thank you for inviting us to be on your bucket today. Thank you Chris Thank goodness well, and we've picked a region of Italy that I couldn't have told you the name of I know where it is about. Where are we talking about? First of all, if we put this on a map Well. If we were to put it on poor looking at the most northerly and easterly region of Italy incense ranked. In the corner literally border the North would be Australia The you're on the right would be slow being young. Then we have the Adriana CCD so we're an also the region of vinet. Oh. So you're about a hundred and solid kilometers from Venice, if you were to be an Bene- some wanted to travel to live in his Julia. Along the highway that would be approximately about one hundred kilometers and. We'll get into his tryst. So that is actually, yes, that's correct Essentially up but would unit is the one that would be most typical the one that really represents reach enough. You're getting ahead of us. Before. We get there. Why are we talking about this region because I'm not going to try and say it every time we say this because you see it so much better than I do what is your connection to Fluey Valencia Julia Well. My husband is born and raised and in. So he actually also be Lionel which is a local language. I actually met my husband and he. Shot on location to Spain, and so a friend of mine asked me to stop in a visitor in Italy and when I did, I, actually met my husband for the first time in this was in ninety seven. And then he later on emigrated to Canada. Got Married. Will and why should someone go to really Well a food essential yet is one of those regions I mean most of us think that there are token room. Most. Now, there's nothing wrong with that. Unfortunately, the name as a reason, I'm right. I would probably say somebody if you're traveling for the first time to Italy to do the Venice. Florence, and the Rome but for anyone who's looking for a more authentic way of appreciating Italy, then you need to go into some of the regions that are less traveled and as you as one of those, and it is really in a very good location if you really think about it because. I so much to offer from the beaches by good idol. History going back to the Roman history, the lull of our history world or one history that is worse. The front was for World War One and some of the worst battles that were ever fought or along from the car so and these own so. which my husband can talk to you more about you have the Alps and will you can go skiing in the wintertime amazing wine the quiet you're y region is world famous. Now they produce some of Italy's best white wines and the photo of course is quite unique because. Latins. A mixture of different cultures the Australian. The. Italian. So it has for a traveler they can spend easily a week and this particular region. and. Enjoy it without rushing and seeing quite a bit and is not just about lying. It's about so much more and if they wanted to add a week. Of the Australia they ads Vania or they could advantage what did I do not doin? The. Bending on how they want to program their time. Excellent will in what kind of are you gonNA recommend for us. It was one week hurry and it would be centered around the fugitive and essentially in Rio. And some of the key points to keep places that I would recommend would be, of course, the as they would be the capital and then of course. We have also the cheated on the time of she that we have sunshine yearly, which is where my husband's mother comes from. And they're famous for the BUSHEL. And then of course, we do the mountain area could pop into Saudis for example, or we could go into van Saun name and Sony in. Leitch are two towns a really represent how he only that was devastating binary choice in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six in really showcases the people themselves how suffered this major earthquake? Literally As you experience that you were there, I did yesterday what about a thousand people who died back in nineteen seventy, six cents I would say a large portion of region was actually essentially destroyed in Seoul the two towns my wife is referring to there called been solely and Jim Malone and they're very they're close to each other right next to each other one of them is a UNESCO side and that's been. So it's a UNESCO side because it maintained. The original character prior to the earthquake even though it was completely built, but it's very touching in it's very characteristic of the regional freely. So we would definitely recommend it

Italy Australia Venice Lionel Venezia Giulia Audrey Dot Com Julia Well Audrey Chris Manlio Diamante Leitch Yuli Seoul Spain Fluey Valencia Canada Vinet Alps Florence Van Saun
What's the Largest Lake in the World?

BrainStuff

05:09 min | 1 year ago

What's the Largest Lake in the World?

"Siberia's Lake Cal is not your average. Lake. At forty, nine miles wide by three hundred and ninety, five miles long that seventy, nine by six, hundred and thirty, five kilometers. It's the world's largest freshwater lake and with history that dates back twenty, five, million years it's also Earth's oldest. But size and age aren't the only things that make this. Lake. Special. Lake by cow is also home to more than three thousand, seven, hundred different species, many of which are only found in the Baikal region. That's why by cows often considered the Galapagos of Russia. No in case it's bio-diversity doesn't dazzle you here's another but Julia fact. Lake by cow has its own version of the Loch ness monster. Its name translates to water dragon master and it's described as a giant sturgeon with a prominent stout, an armored plating along the back. The monsters history goes back centuries with ancient carvings depicting this terrifying creature. Interest peaked we thought. So here's a starter guide to this ancient beautiful and mysterious late, which is by the way a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Lake Baikal is located in southern Russia near the border of Mongolia, its depth of five thousand, three, hundred feet about one thousand, six, hundred meters makes it the world's deepest lake about five hundred feet or two hundred meters it's also famous for its clarity of water and ice. When the lake is frozen, you can see dozens of meters or hundreds of feet down. And as we said at the top, it's also the world's largest lake that size twelve, thousand, two, hundred, square miles, or thirty one, thousand, six, hundred square kilometers makes it comparable in volume to the entire Amazon Basin? A first scale? It reportedly takes about three hundred and thirty years for single water molecule to flow from inlet to inlet. So. How did like by cow get so massive About twenty, five, million ago lake by CAL formed through fractures and shifting within Earth's crust. It wasn't Lake Baikal as we know it. Now, though experts believe it was a series of lakes similar to the Great Lakes in the United States while scientists aren't positive how lake by CAL went for many lakes to the behemoth. It is today they do have theories. It could have been sinking earth erosion earthquakes or increased water from melting glaciers although it's likely a mix of these factors and more. That unifying change took place in the pleasing epoch about five point three to two point five million years ago. But this lake isn't finished growing. It's expanding at a rate of about point seven inches to centimeters every year at the same speed at which Africa in South America are drifting apart. At this speed, some scientists believe lake by Baikal is actually an ocean in the making. The lake boasts twenty-seven islands, the largest of which spans two, hundred, eighty square miles or seven, hundred, twenty, five square kilometers and has its own lake mountains and the population of fifteen hundred residents. The locals connected to power van underwater cable in two, thousand and five, and we're connected to the Internet shortly after. Some Call Lake by Cao, the Galapagos of Russia not only because it has an impressive array of those nearly four thousand species but also because eighty percent of those animals are found nowhere else. One reason for this unique biodiversity is the lakes. Array of hydrothermal vents which are commonly found in oceans but lake by cow is the only freshwater lake known to have them. Cold water from the lake enters cracks in the Earth's crust through these hydrothermal vents. When the water reaches magma, it heats up, then returns resurfacing with minerals and heat. These rich minerals are probably the reason some of the lakes most unusual species were able to develop including several unique fish and the nerpa seal species, which is the only exclusively freshwater seal species in the world and its evolution is mysterious and some scientists believe it arrived by a prehistoric river from the Arctic But beyond seals fish other common animals found in the forests and mountains surrounding Lake Baikal include. Elk. Reindeer links wild-boar, and of course, the lakes frequently reported water dragon master. And this ancient lake has another air of mystery about it. UFO sightings. Many locals have reported strange lights and alien spacecraft throughout the years and several Soviet era documents mention ufo instance in sightings around Earth's largest lake. However for all of its natural wonder, amazing wildlife end stranger sides for lake cows one hundred, thousand permanent residents it's simply home. Made, occupations are forestry agriculture, fisheries, hunting, and tourism though that's currently on hold due to covid nineteen. Here's hoping they opened back up soon.

Call Lake Lake Baikal Lake Cal Russia Galapagos Unesco World Heritage Site Siberia CAL Julia Great Lakes Loch Ness Monster Amazon Basin Mongolia South America United States Africa
"unesco" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:28 min | 1 year ago

"unesco" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Buildings in the neighborhood. That's 2500 years old old city of Sana has thousands of residential towers made almost entirely Of mud brick. The ancient neighborhood is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and Paolini is an architect and leads the UNESCO program that preserves Sana's buildings from her base in Doha in Qatar, Polina described these mud towers to me. Well, they are very told buildings. You know, this house is a tried 67 stores, height and this beautiful decoration on the facade done with this special line that is called Haddad. To decorate the window. So the lower stories there without window or with small window for ventilation, so people could not be seen so that the house maintained also a certain intimacy I would say and then the houses and especially in the last floor where you have the public space where you receive your guests, and their has all this beautiful light Windows very well decorated with this. Why finishing from the outside? And originally they had also colored glass. I mean, these are homes for Yemenis. I know some people had to leave because their homes were damaged. But what is life like in these buildings? The house developed as I said, Vertical, so you have the lower floor. The storage is the kitchen and so on. And two or three rooms per floor, where the family or the extended family lives in. So off course. Now they have more modern services. The toilets and so on are more modern than the old one. But still they live in the same way. Yes, so if you have company over, they have to walk up nine stories If you're on the top floor Absolutely. And not only that, but you are. 2200 M high, is one of the highest capital. In the world so that this quite an effort, but the habitants are used to that. I mean, I've been in mud brick structures before some two stories high, but it's hard to imagine anything in mudbrick taller than that. As an architect. What in your training prepared you to appreciate this construction. These are the highest building in mud brick in the world. The fact that they are one a decent to the others, off course help with height, but they are all individual houses with different plan and layout. Built around a staircase is Stones fair case that goes from the lower throw to the upper floor, and the rooms opens around this staircase, so people move all the time from one floor to another, and some floors are dedicated as a said to the kitchen, some other toe women and as you move up You know, there are more open space and the public space for the house and the community. So who's repairing the buildings? Now? What's it going to maintain them going forward? Well, we have started a large project, which is aiming at employing youth. We are now on the favorable 2500 use. We're aiming at reaching for 1000 youth or reach a good percentage ofthe women as well. To provide restoration and maintenance to maintain roofing and shelters to make sure that this family do not get displaced and actually continue to live in the building where they have leaved for many decades, if not centuries as a family. And so maintainer their own family, but at the same time to learn from the master builder, how to make maintenance and restore this building. Yeah. I mean, it seems like a really smart scheme and I gather those young workers are getting paid in cash in a country where fighting soldiers has been the only work recently and Paolini, the director of the UNESCO office in Doha, thank you very much for telling us about the old city of sun on. We hope the towers can get rebuilt. It has been a pleasure. Thank you very much for the opportunity. The streets of Belarus today remain in upheaval. Protesters are packing public spaces demanding the president Alexander Lukashenko has got to go. Those demonstrators say Lukashenko rigged the presidential election in his favor. 10 days ago, the European Union is keeping a close watch on the situation. Charles Michelle, the president of the European Council, held a press conference today the European instant in solidarity with the people ofthe betters, and we don't accept impunity. The EU has said it does not accept the results of the August 9th election in Belarus. You leaders also announced plans to sanction Belarussian officials. Charles Grant is the director of the Centre for European Reform and joins us from London. What do you think of the U. S response was to send a strong message of support to Belarussians, who, frankly, are furious about this vote. It is very worried that if it is seen to intervene, too Directly into vociferously. That'll give Alexander Lukashenko would excuse to say the Russians look outside interference in what's going on in our political system. Please come and help. So the Vatican is quite cautious about getting involved, and it has decided today to go ahead with plans to sanction those individuals most guilty of human rights abuses and electoral fraud. And I think the message he's trying to send to Moscow is look. This is not about grabbing hold of Belarus and putting it in the evil NATO. This's about making sure the Belarusian people can choose their own government, so we don't intend to From cool Belarus away from Russia's sphere of influence of there's no reason why Moscow shit into intervene and interfere in what's going on in Belarus. So the U. Seems to want look a shank out to start at least engaging in talks with the opposition. If he does not seem willing to do that, what are the options for the you and how much leverage do they actually have? The sun has very little real leverage is better because it doesn't give a lot of money to the government is very small amounts of aid to the Belarusian government, Therefore, various programs Well, it can really do is sanctioned divisions, which is not too swift because of the Belarusian really love to go shopping in Vilnius, Lithuania, and take their wives there for weekends belonged to have foreign bank accounts as well. So if The sanctions against target individuals prevent you getting a visa to go to your country's prevent you having a bank account in the country? That is quite significant. Some people think the sanctions should not be slipped up of these, quite keen not to be seen to hurt. The Belarusian economy is hope that would hurt people, so that's why they will focus on so called targeted sanctions on particular individuals rather than blocking trade with the whole country. So Charles just a big picture of this point in time for leaders in the EU. What is their ideal outcome with Lukashenko think the ideal outcome would be that the regime of Mr Lukashenko starts negotiating with the opposition. Something transitional arrangement whereby perhaps I think they're from the establishment. But who's who's relatively soft and moderate, such as Mr Rumors, the former prime minister comes forward to lead an interim government would lead to a transition of new elections, which there would be free elections of the prisoners would be Liberated and love to compete in those elections in this stinking would be given a safe passage out of the country into retirement somewhere else. That's the ideal solution, But I have to say today, things don't look too good did a new crackdown today The authorities have got much tougher with demonstrators, ultimately because they use isn't capable of intervening to directly to influence events. If the government wants to behave very Bruce Lee may have lost the support of the people in the Los tradition is in the eyes of most federation's, but it can purchase for staying for some time. Longer. I hope that's not the case that is beginning to look a little bit like that, Steve Charles Grant is a director of the centre for European Reform has been speaking with us from London, Charles Thank you for your time. Thanks very much. You're listening to the world and you're listening on sweetie Public radio. It's too 20.

Alexander Lukashenko Belarus European Union director UNESCO Doha Paolini Moscow UNESCO World Heritage Site London Steve Charles Grant Sana Qatar Belarusian government Haddad president Polina
Firsties Denied

Your Brain on Facts

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Firsties Denied

"What was so big about movable type. Well movable type meant that each letter had its own little block and they could be arranged in any format that was needed to make any text. Prior to that, the entire page of text had to be carved in one single block of wood like an enormous stamp. Now, consider the amount of time it would take to carve one such block then multiply that by the number of pages in even the shortest book. Any printing press was an improvement over hand-lettered manuscripts but the Gutenberg press could print over two hundred pages per minute which gave the world what would be called the Gutenberg forty two line, Bible. Books and the ideas that they contained were no longer the exclusive purview of the very wealthy. Greater access to ideas and information was a causative force behind such things as the renaissance, the Protestant reformation and the industrial revolution. But Gutenberg did not create the first movable type press. A printing press with movable metal type was developed in Korea during the Goria Dynasty, which ran from eight nineteen to thirteen ninety, two in a desperate attempt to preserve religious texts in the face of a Mongol invasion. The effort was successful but only just barely. A single copy of a single volume of one book remains. It's called the G, which is the abbreviated title of a Korean Buddhist and policy whose title can be translated as in theology of great Buddhist priests Zen teachings. GDP is easier to say. The key is a collection of experts from the teachings of the most revered Buddhist monks throughout successive generations collated by a monk named Kyogon. It was published in two volumes in thirteen, seventy two though the first volume has been lost completely. Further weakening the Gutenberg was first position. The Korean press wasn't even the first press that had movable type. The earliest known non-metallic movable type press was developed in China in the tenth. Century. That press used clay blocks which would prove to be too fragile. Though, it was thought to have directly influenced the Korean. design. There's also evidence that Gutenberg's press may not be an example of simultaneous invention. A record in the Swiss Museum of paper indicates a papal delegation to `gorio brought printing technology back to Europe. Korea's claim to origination carries some serious bone fee days in the form of two thousand one edition to the memory of the world program by UNESCO the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization. Three years later, the Jiechi memory of the world prize was created, which quote recognizes instiutions that have contributed to the preservation and accessibility of documentary heritage to safeguard against collective amnesia neglect the ravages of time and climate conditions and willful and deliberate destruction. If the listener would like to see the Jixian person they might want to bone up on their French. Rather than reposing rightfully in Korea, the G. has been kept in La Bibliotheque Nationale France in Paris. It was acquired under let's call them unclear circumstances by the first French Console to Korea and past Tula Bibliotheque upon his death. The consensus in Korea is unsurprisingly that they would like it to be returned that cultural artifacts belong in their country of origin. La Bibliotheque adamantly refuses arguing that the Jiechi is out of humanity's common heritage and therefore doesn't belong to anyone. Which raises the question at least in this reporters mind. If it belongs to everyone and therefore no one. What would it matter if they gave it back? On a brighter note, a wood carving print of the cheeky is currently kept in the National Library of Korea. Sometimes a person we remember as the first to do something wasn't preempted by someone else. They merely failed to complete the thing they're credited with. Such as the case with Ferdinand Magellan the name long attached to the first circumnavigation of the earth.

Korea Gutenberg National Library Of Korea Tula Bibliotheque United Nations Educational Sci Ferdinand Magellan La Bibliotheque Nationale Fran China Goria Dynasty Swiss Museum Of Paper Paris Europe Instiutions
Seattle Storm release 2020 WNBA schedule; play No. 1 pick Ionescu, New York Liberty in season opener

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Seattle Storm release 2020 WNBA schedule; play No. 1 pick Ionescu, New York Liberty in season opener

"Season tomorrow inside a Florida bubble. It's a 22 game schedule for the WN BA with all teams living training and playing at the AMG Academy. Seattle Storm guard Sue Bird, Unbelievable now aged 39 asked on ESPN radio whether she thought about not playing in the middle of a pandemic and racial equality protests, So there are major concerns about house. There are many major concerns about like the social justice, the uprising that's occurring right now they're our major concern, even about being ready to play a season. What That means. Mentally Physically, Bird and Seattle facing Sabrina UNESCO you on the New York Liberty and tomorrow's season opener. The Mariners baseball opener

Sue Bird Sabrina Unesco Amg Academy Seattle Mariners Florida Espn New York
Istanbul landmark Hagia Sophia reopens as mosque

The Takeaway

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Istanbul landmark Hagia Sophia reopens as mosque

"Muslims in Turkey today. For the first time in 86 years. Friday prayers were held inside the Haga Sofia. A gorgeous dome structure and UNESCO site in Istanbul. Politicians in suits, ties and surgical masks kneeling in front. Istanbul's most famous landmark, has been a museum since 1934. Last week, Turkey's president, wretched type, Erdogan ordered the 1500 year old building to be converted back into a mosque. Not

Istanbul Turkey Haga Sofia President Trump Erdogan
Turkey reconverts Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:08 min | 1 year ago

Turkey reconverts Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque

"Eight acres court is expected to announce today that the conversion of Istanbul's world-famous argue severe into a museum almost ninety years ago, it was awful. The decision would pave the way for the building's Restoration Mosque and we'll represent a victory of sorts for president recipe type one, but it may cause anger elsewhere, including in the Kremlin and UNESCO HQ, joining us on the line now is Hannah Lucinda Smith is stumble correspondent of the. Times Hello Hannigan off new thanks for being with US I. Guess this was what we had perhaps predicted nevertheless. Oh, that's not gonNA. Stop a number of people being pretty disappointed with the outcome. Yeah well. Absolutely I mean affair is such a symbol, not just in Turkey or not just in the region in the whole world at points it was built in the sixth century. It was the biggest cathedral in the world. It was the seat of eastern Crescenzi for more than a Millennium and then it's really been kind of the symbol of the struggle for the soul of Istanbul. I guess when the autumns took control of the city in fourteen, fifty three, they converse into a mosque, and then when Kemal Ataturk the first president of the secular republic. Took over the country he then. Signed an order basically deconsecrated intending into museum in nine, hundred thirty four, and that's the status it. It's hard since then, but it is such a powerful symbol for Muslims. Christians and also for the Turks who are really bondage this idea of a second second they sit. It's kind of one of the ultimate symbols of their secular country. Just when you're out, and about as it sounds like you are indeed right now, is this one of these things where people are talking about it, and it's upsetting people, or is it one of these strange things? Actually seems to be much more stark much more controversial through the prism of I'm in London or etc. People looking on from Moscow which maybe we'll come to in a in a minute it does it excise people out in about. March she stood in the courtyard. Safia right now. It is a few Tori style. It's actually quite quite mean that's mostly because of the current virus pandemic coming normally at this time of year that would be crowded with tourists actually took his most visited tourist attraction, but I think the interesting thing. Is that inside Turkey this debate? That's not new. It's been going on for a couple. Couple, of decades, it's a question that sort of comes around quite six. In fact, you know I've I've been in Turkey for seven years. Now is the ton. This is come up in my time here and so there is this of feeling of fatigue I you know this is just the same policy policy again but I think it's undeniable, the for certain positive the Paul is. Very, much behind prison on the move is part of the society would be seen as. A big victory pick symbolic victory, but I think in terms of the kind of. The opposition to it. A lot of that comes from outside country. As you mentioned that the star obviously the Greek government's in holy. They still see Istanbul Constantinople. This is the as the center of Greek Orthodox also the Russian Orthodox Patriarch earlier this week, voiced his objection and of course UNESCO Ted. This is a world heritage sites listed by UNESCO. That's partly because of the The mosaics that were uncovered once this was ten years. In the nineteen th that is. On. The big questions is of course. If this is ten back into a mosque, what will happen to those mosaics depict Christ pizza version married picked him of the apostles. You know seen in, Islam, FIT Is is not allowed inside mosques. So this is the kind of places where the real objections are coming from, but it's quite interesting I'm you know it's? Really doesn't feel like much. Is happening at the moment here high? Sophie, let's see. We got the announcement in June a couple of hours. That's what we're expecting so. Possibly something will happen after that, but it's kind of. Yeah. It's still the same very peaceful, very unique. Is indeed sort of an eerie call just on some of those other international stakeholders. And he'll be watching on. We mentioned already you mentioned the Russian. Orthodox Patriarch of course. What about the relationship mean does this tell us anything about the relationship between assemble in Moscow more broadly, maybe more politically because there's various other sort of proxy disagreements agreements. There's other places Libya that seemed to sort of muddy. The waters is this. Does this need to be to be viewed in that context in your view? Show, I think the relationship with Russia is actually the one thing that might give president or pause for thought on this now what we see as I said before the Greeks are. Very opposed to this the US. State Department might POMPEII stems as well, but you know that's kind of old hat fred when he doesn't really care about. Stoking rows with Greece and with the US. Because he's got huge amounts of disagreements with those countries anyway, but when it comes to Russia, it's been quite an interesting situation in Russia. Turkey for the past five years on one level as you say in Libya also in Syria they're. Backing opposing forces, but at the same time, the personal relationship between two President Putin has gone incredibly close, and in other ways. Russia has been backing sick. I guess trying to woo. Tick to a certain extent away from its more traditional allies in the West, so we've seen for example side of the one hundred defense system. From Russia Turkey we've seen many many pets meetings in about trade and defense mutual security between. One impeach him now. The question is if this. Decision goes ahead and the conversion goes ahead then how much opposition will come from from the Kremlin? Clearly, the Patriarch Russian Orthodox Patriarch. Expressed his opposition. That's to be expected, but we also know that religion plays a big part in Russian. Politics today, so would it. Would it carry on further? The featured does it were? Would President Putin be the next person's kind of expresses displeasure, and how would that affect the relationship Tweeden's? I stopped really great to speak to you and thanks for reporting for us right from the scene of this Hannah Lucinda Smith In estan standard joining us on the briefing Monaco Twenty Four.

Turkey Russia President Trump President Putin Istanbul Hannah Lucinda Smith United States Patriarch Russian Orthodox Pat Russian Orthodox Patriarch Moscow Libya Restoration Mosque Kemal Ataturk Unesco Hq Crescenzi Istanbul Constantinople London Tori State Department Paul
Trump WHO funding cut prompts criticism as virus spreads

All Things Considered

04:19 min | 1 year ago

Trump WHO funding cut prompts criticism as virus spreads

"This afternoon president trump said he is severing U. S. ties with the World Health Organization over the U. N. agencies handling of the corona virus pandemic we will be today terminating our relationship with the World Health Organization and redirecting those funds to other worldwide and deserving urgent global public health needs the president did not take questions during the roughly ten minutes long rose garden address which focused on China and here's global health correspondent Jason Beaubien was listening and he joins us now hi Jason hi Mary Louise prison trip has been threatening for months now to pull the US out what exactly did he say today about his reasons his primary complaint is that he says China's been covering up this outbreak and that that allowed it to spread all over the world he says the W. H. O. went along with these Chinese efforts to mislead the world and he says China has total control of the World Health Organization the speech blames China for the pandemic and accused the W. H. O. of being China's accomplice and that and do we know why now is there something he referred to that he says forced his hand to announce this today you know that's really unclear A. on may nineteenth he gave the WHO's thirty days to reformers said he was going to cut off funding to them entirely that was in the middle of the world health organization's main annual meeting well now it's only been ten days it was never clear exactly what the reforms were that he was asking for WHO's even expressed that they aren't clear on what are the reforms that he's looking for from them it has been on my mind is does the president actually have the authority to unilaterally decide I am terminating this relationship with the world health organization that also isn't entirely clear I you know he has pulled out of several other U. N. agencies he pulled out of UNESCO the cultural arm of the U. N. in twenty seventeen he pulled out of UNHCR the UN human rights council in twenty eighteen the WHO's somewhat different it's a member organization it's sort of like the U. N. itself Congress authorized the west to join the World Health Organization back in nineteen forty six after World War two and the WHO's charter it actually doesn't have an exit clause most governments are trying to get in rather than get out Taiwan for instance has been lobbying very hard and that has been something that the trump administration has really argued for is Taiwan's involvement in the WHL but trump however certainly can terminate U. S. funding to W. H. O. U. S. is the largest funder of the World Health Organization he can tell scientists at the CDC to stop working with the agency he can pull out of any trials that might be going on for for vaccines are testing of pharmaceuticals to to potentially treat Kovin yes he absolutely has the authority to do that just to step back for a second I mention this was during a big ten minute event that was mostly focused on China what more do we know about this disagreement with the World Health Organization is it is it coincidence that he made this announcement while he was talking about China yeah it is I don't think it's a coincidence at all the speech in the rose garden listed a lot of trump's grievances with China at the World Trade Organization was one of them Hong Kong trade the coronavirus and regarding the covert pandemic he blames China why is it that China shut off infected people from Wuhan to all other parts of China it went no where else it didn't go to Beijing it went nowhere else but they allow them to freely travel throughout the world including Europe and the United States I have to point out that this is simply not true China had cases that spread to every province and territory in China including Beijing yeah and fact check another thing is there a idents that the W. H. O. was working with China to cover up the severity of the outbreak there really is no evidence of that this seems to get at the trump administration's misunderstanding of the WHO's role they have no authority to go into another country and tell that country what to do or force them to disclose anything the W. H. O. simply reports what China or any other member station reports to them and the W. H. O. says they have raised the alarm early and often about this

Donald Trump World Health Organization President Trump U. N.
"unesco" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"unesco" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"The United Nations, the United Nations education, scientific and Cultural Organization. Unesco. Unesco has a problem with Alexa, and Siri. Now, would you care to? Take a guess. Why the United Nations has a problem with Alexa, and Siri spying on everybody that certainly could be true, but that's not the particular issue that they have anybody else any other guesses. They have an issue with Alexa, and Siri because both Alexa and Siri us women's voices. It's bad that they use women's voices, because they say that those, those computerized assistance using women's voices. Hang on mine, just turned on computer. Stop. Oh, for Pete's sake. Stop. Okay. So because it uses women's voices. It allows men like me to yell at women like that. And in fact, there Joe wrap it, it says it says the assistance, enable the notion that quote women are obliging docile, and eager to please helpers available at the touch of a button or with a blunt voice command. So it is sexist. If you will to have a woman's voice, so now, ours turns on not with a word Alexa, but with the word computer, can you do a man's voice? I can't change my voice, I'm surprised. They don't have that, yet me to one of the early because like you own your GPS change. It's whatever you can add accents, you do what you cannot do it with your, your computer device, computer. Gimme a beat. Really? See, but, but, but this is an example. So now, I now I'm raising my voice that I'm getting angry at the woman who didn't give me a beat computer. Gimme a beat. We disabled that feature on Alexa, maybe they don't want you to have it there drawing. So many hot beats on Orlando's morning news. Commando. Okay. Last last try here, computer, tell me a joke. Why is it so hard to surprise Darth Vader with gifts? He can always your presence. Next time I'll have to specify. Tell me a funny joke. Exactly. All right. So there you go. You can share your thoughts with us as to the, the United Nations, that great governing body in New York City, the United Nations says that it's bad that Alexa and Siri have women's voices. You know, and they probably thought they were doing something good. You know, for for women for quality by by empowering them with women's voices. But now the United Nations blasts that you can hit us up on the open, Mike with your deep Manley voices right now in the news ninety six point five WDBO app. It's seven twelve on Orlando's morning news. I'm Kevin refuse. Marsha taylor. And Obama era plan to put Harriet Tubman on the twenty dollar Bill is falling apart. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin says the twenty twenty unveiling of the note time to coincide with the one hundredth anniversary of women being given the right to vote has been canceled. He says they have to look into. Again, because of counterfeiting with our consumer warrior Clark Howard. It's got a warning for anyone who uses pay pal then MO in the cash shop. Now, I don't want to terrify you here. I wanna make you aware that if you're a regular user of, let's say, ven MO you would be wise, to set up a separate account separate checking account, a fee free one and Thai in your Ben MO or pay power. Whatever to it where you only have enough money in there to serve those cash needs, so that your main money, isn't it risk if a criminal hacks into your count and new this morning. China's foreign ministry says the country's open opened resuming trade talks with the US mutt sincerity and mutual respect are needed, and that could be what the markets are reacting to right now. Lots of red and stock futures do have breaking news this morning. John Walker Lindh the American Taliban who pleaded guilty to terror related charges after the nine eleven attacks has now been sprung from. In prison. He is now out. Just moments ago walking out of the federal prison in Tara, Indiana. Seven fourteen.

Alexa United Nations Siri Orlando Unesco John Walker Lindh Darth Vader Pete Cultural Organization Harriet Tubman Taliban Clark Howard Steve Mnuchin Indiana China Obama Joe Marsha taylor
"unesco" Discussed on This Week in Travel

This Week in Travel

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"unesco" Discussed on This Week in Travel

"And it's gotten to a point now where no one ever votes against anything. No one ever has the gumption to say, you know, what this does not have any outstanding universal value, which is really the criteria. That's used for selecting world heritage sites that that's that's what it's supposed to be. They call it. You know? Oh, you the ending universal value in more and more. It's just kind of marginal stop in into be fair. Outstanding universal values of very vigorous thing, you know. If you right down to it. Do the pyramids really have that they're well known? But you know, what value is it to someone in Peru now, it's the pile rocks. But there's definitely things being listed now which are in in. You know, there's also this notion like well every country gets one. So you know, that's become a thing. They're still countries that don't have any. So when they submit one they almost always get accepted. So yeah. And there's a Lashley all on uses book as my pick of the week. But there's a book that I'm actually kind of going through now written by a woman, who's a professor at Stanford really goes into UNESCO. And a lot of the problems in in really how this organization was founded before the world heritage stuff ever happened. You know, UNESCO. They're big claim to fame with saving the temples of Abba symbol, and a lot of the other temples in Egypt right ever going to put underwater when Lake Nasser was created from the ask one High Dam, and they basically recovered these temples was kind of a big race to save them before the. Waters got there. So they disassembled them and move them to hired round. And it's just really become more and more politicised over the years. And you know, there's a community of people like myself that visit a lot of these sites. I've almost been four hundred now, and I wait, can you just can you? Tell us the most ridiculous disappointing almost joke of UNESCO site. You've ever visited you must know give us the best example. There's a couple of come to mind the White City of Tel Aviv. I've been there twice. Oh, yes. Time once I was with a guide, and now Israel is full historical places. Right. No question. No doubt. These places are should be real could sites. But. Yeah. They're like modernist buildings, but none of them are really preserve people are just living there. You have no idea which ones are which I was even with a guy the second time, and we were kind of scratching our heads. There's one you know, and the Czech Republic there too. They have a lot of great sights on. But there's one of each of which hours there, and I'm like, okay. This is on a prototypical Bavarian like millage, unlike okay, if that's true. Why does that make the list lots of smaller? Medieval cities in Europe, western Europe. They're kind of like a diamond. There's ever more cathedral being stuck on the list the exhibition hall in Melbourne. I didn't really understand a lot of the sites like that are alien tolliday sites. There's nothing to see because the what makes that site special has been dug out of the ground and put it in museum. So the site itself is is just really nothing the place where they found Java man on the island of Java, Indonesia visited there there's just nothing there. Really? There's just a very poor museum. And this is the place where they once found a thing..

Waters UNESCO Europe Israel Tel Aviv Lashley Lake Nasser Indonesia Czech Republic Egypt Peru professor Melbourne High Dam Stanford
"unesco" Discussed on This Week in Travel

This Week in Travel

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"unesco" Discussed on This Week in Travel

"And I still get people that comment about Saint John his articles is still up on going on that. But I'd love to get a hold of that list with you all split it with you. I love to buy one of those whole web. I don't even know there's a lot of them. I don't know who the owner is there's nothing listed. They've been passed around. So many times there were so many sites that were created that tried to like social travel sharing tros, you know, sorta stuff now failed. So it's hard to even know who to contact for a lot of those things and there's a couple of sites. I know that that weren't ever big sites. They were just well done by people, and they looked like the haven't been updated in ten years, they haven't and they still have ads on it. So there's still probably at least bring in some money. It's amazing to me. You know, how hard it is for some people to do what me and many other people do everyday just we take it for granted. But it's hard to keep doing this. And we do this. Something about each other on the back. It's frigging hard. Yeah. Yeah. I just want to say now that we have Gary on here. We did have a news article. If you wanna talk about it. Enescu related. We were saving that one for you, Gary. Yeah. So basically UNESCO and world heritage are actually two separate things. So the world heritage convention is the it's not an organization, it's a treaty. And so the US is still a signatory to the world heritage convention, and there are countries, which are in UNESCO, but are not signatories to the convention, and there are countries, which are signatories, but not members of UNESCO. So they are technically two separate things didn't know the world. Yeah. The world. Heritage program is run by UNESCO. But every year the world heritage convention needs. And it's it's a separate thing. So that's the heritage convention convention. Right. It's the world. Well, yeah, they're they're annual get. Yeah. I don't know. Okay. I can the US. Let me get let me try to clarify this to get clear on it. So the US withdrawing from UNESCO has nothing to do with canceling US world heritage sites. Correct. And in fact, the United States was not in UNESCO. The entire decade of the nineties. We left in the late eighties and came back in the early two thousands. And so this has happened before and we had world could sites created during that time period? We did not lose any world heritage sites. So. Yeah. Gary one of the things I wanted to ask you what I read this long story about this in several different sources that talk about the incredible political BS that goes into making these sites, and how these people lobby so hard, and how political it is. And how it's gotten to be where it's less about the importance of the site and more about the influence of the people that want to become world haired sites at which your comment on that Gary about the ridiculous influence and people have on this. Definitely true in it's gotten far worse over the last decade. I would say. It's it used to be like, you know, the very first. Ones that were placed on the list. And this was back in the first world heritage convention took place in nineteen seventy eight Washington DC, there were twelve sites put on the list, and these are sites that you know. Yosemite. You know, the early ones or the pyramids obvious sites. Yeah. Yeah. The obvious sites. But this has kind of become the best example, I can think of this FIFA, you know, in all the stuff that you recall what the World Cup were International Olympic Committee. But the differences is that instead of one country getting the Olympics before years for the World Cup in sure you've all heard all the stuff that went on behind the scenes for like Connor getting the World Cup rent. I mean, take us ideas one hundred forty playing soccer Jesus. So it's like that except everybody can get a world heritage site..

UNESCO United States Gary Saint John soccer Yosemite International Olympic Committe Olympics Connor ten years