34 Burst results for "Uman"

"uman" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

Sports 600 ESPN

01:48 min | 6 months ago

"uman" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

"Uman coming up at 6 30 Eastern time. As for the Saints They have hit the over in every game this season. They're the only team in the NFL. With that distinction. SportsCenter all night, ESPN Radio Steelers Ravens. There's a divisional game. It was a physical game, a back and forth game for division rivals, and it would be decided in the 4th 1st and go with the eight. Ben stays empty. Baltimore shows Blitz Then back Pops first for the end zone Touchdown, Pittsburgh and on the out cut to the right is Chase Claypool W DVD with call that score Camping and 80 are Dr Midway through the fourth quarter. The defense's don't allow anything else. Steelers a 28 24 victory to remain the NFL's on Ly unbeaten team Pick six in the first quarter for the defense Mike Tomlin John Harbaugh. They have faced each other 25 times first pair of coaches in the Super Bowl era to face off more than two dozen times in the regular season. Tomlin gets the win on Sunday, but says There's room for improvement. We did not play well, today. We lacked detail in a lot of areas and when you play a good people, man, you gonna be up against it so you don't play good. We can't allow the emotions of the moment. Um, for us to miss that fact. Um, I am proud of these guys are probably fight. I'm proud of how they supported one another. But it's important to be that way. Don't lie to ourselves Way did not function well in a lot of ways today. Ravens, meanwhile, 30 straight games with at least 20 points, but it comes at a loss to the Steelers Lamar Jackson 208 yards, passing a couple of touchdowns, two interceptions. It's the first time in his career he's lost as a starter when leading by 10 points, he says, put it on him without fear or reason.

Steelers Mike Tomlin Saints NFL Ravens Uman ESPN Chase Claypool Dr Midway John Harbaugh Lamar Jackson Baltimore Ben Pittsburgh
Third virus vaccine reaches major hurdle: final US testing

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 9 months ago

Third virus vaccine reaches major hurdle: final US testing

"I handful of dozens of experimental covert nineteen vaccines in Uman testing have reached the last and biggest hurdle looking for the needed proof that they really work AstraZeneca announced Monday its vaccine candidate has entered the final testing stage in the United States the Cambridge England based company said the study will involve up to thirty thousand adults from various racial ethnic and geographic groups two other vaccine candidates began final testing this summer in tens of thousands of people in this country one was created by the national institutes of health and manufactured by mode during a the other was developed by Pfizer and a company in Germany actually after

Astrazeneca United States Cambridge England Pfizer Germany
Why Trinity Audio is sticking with mechanical voices over human

Inside VOICE

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Why Trinity Audio is sticking with mechanical voices over human

"Do you think that For Your company I was utilizing in your stuff on your website. That right now you have a lot of you know where it's kind of voice coming from like a computer sounding voice. Do you think that you will eventually eventually US real human voices or voiceovers or what kind of your thought or that going in the future. Great question and I contemplate about a lot I I think no first of all I think. No Ano- explain why when I started this journey about two and a half years ago the quality of text to speech solution and was nowhere near where we are today any just getting approved on a quarterly basis new releases new features. It is based on a I in no so we as we say union office we feed the machine with Roy Moore dead. I need getting improving. Will it be like human voice. Well no probably not but I think it's already good enough. It's only GonNa get better and I think that's another thing that is growing as well. The parallel channel Uman are interacting with machine on a daily basis more and more so the human years starting to be more tolerant from Canada. Voices so I flew the fast. I wouldn't say to Mitt Buddy to get definitely get close enough that the majority of the people will have tolerance. I gotta get used to end. They don't think about all that mechanical for me that would be fine and that stuck again about the benefits that they have communicating any kind the content. You want who you will have a using not there's advantages to both sides like you said there's the I is getting smarter. It's faster but then you've got the other side for maybe a specific skill. You want a real human being because it's going to give a different brand voice. I think there's benefits

United States Roy Moore Canada
Amazon lets Alexa users disable human voice recording review

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon lets Alexa users disable human voice recording review

"Which on Amazon dot com will let Alexa users opt out of Uman review of their voice recordings a move that follows criticism that the program violated customers privacy a new policy took effect Friday that allows customers through an option in the settings menu of the Alexis smartphone app to remove their recordings from a pool that could be analyzed by Amazon employees and contract workers it follows similar moves by apple and

Apple Amazon Alexa Uman
"uman" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Great on. Okay. So Bernie, thinks it's inappropriate to deport illegals shouldn't be here in the first place and continue to commit crimes. What about providing them insurance? You know, when they're not citizens in we're paying for this. What about that situation burn? We will all ill. Around the concept that all people in this country have the right to health care, and at the end of the day, we all win that struggle. Would you include the eleven million of the community? Talk. Being a human right? Uman last time I heard that undocumented people are human beings, as well. I'm trying to figure out what a Uman being is to begin with. Let's let's start there. What's uman? Well, when you're a socialist eventually run out of its supply and demand thing. And so, you run out of ages are the first to go in any society. Run by socialists. And I believe it's happened here while the sound ear that is really tragic. It's really tragic. Also, he he he's been calling out Joe Biden, because Joe Biden talked about the segregationists that were. Opposing him on certain bills in the past. Well, Biden, did it again over the weekend. It's amazing. He he talked about yet another well-known segregationist. And I mean does he just not care?.

Joe Biden Uman Bernie
Science News Briefs from Around the World

60-Second Science

02:17 min | 2 years ago

Science News Briefs from Around the World

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor, Steve Mirsky. And here's the short piece from the June two thousand nineteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is titled quick hits, and it's a rundown of some science and technology stories for round, the globe compiled by editorial contributor, Jim Daly from Canada. Archaeologists have now confirmed that Toronto service Rex skeleton found in the nineteen nineties at a fossil site in Saskatchewan is the biggest and heaviest on record at nearly forty two feet long almost twenty thousand pounds. Scotty as it's called surpassed the record set by the famous sued t Rex which was found in South Dakota in nineteen ninety from Argentina are gala GIS identified a site, where ancient humans killed and butchered giant ground sloths, mega theory, American. Madam in the pampas region in eastern Argentina, the find provides evidence that Uman's contributed to the sloths extinction from Kenya. A science teacher who won the two thousand nineteen global teacher prize announced he intends to donate, the one million dollar award to benefit society, Peter to Beechy a Franciscan friar mentors, a science club that came in, I in its category in the two thousand eighteen Kenya's science and engineering fair from the autonomous island of Anjouan in the union of the Cymru's, that's in the Indian Ocean between the east coast of Africa, and the northwest end of Madagascar geochemists at Columbia University, found a load of court site, a metamorphosed rock formed from sandstone on the island of Andrea on the island is volcanic, and had been thought to contain only Ignace rocks. And from North Korea physicists at Kimmel sung universe. City in Pyongyang have brokered a rare green to collaborate with Italy's international school for advanced studies in Trieste, the North Koreans will study, computational neuroscience with talion physicists that was quick hits by Jim Daly.

Jim Daly Argentina Kenya Steve Mirsky North Korea Pyongyang Editor T Rex Toronto Trieste Uman Ignace Rocks Kimmel Scotty South Dakota Canada Indian Ocean Saskatchewan Italy Columbia University
Has Trump broken the 'rules-based international order'?

Between The Lines

11:14 min | 2 years ago

Has Trump broken the 'rules-based international order'?

"Today on the show discussion with a renowned expert about the so-called rules based international order. It's been grabbing headlines vs. Now, how often have you heard that term, the rose by store is not perfect. We are rallying the noble nations of the world to build a new liberal order, that prevents war achieves greater prosperity for all. I have never heard. I Chinese leader commit so explicitly to rule based international order. So what do you think it actually means now for many politicians and journalists the world in which we leave the institutions of governance, the rules norms, all that, that's largely inspired by the kind of allegedly but nine global leadership that the United States. Is exercise for decades. And yet, would you believe it? The rules based international order itself has become a popular expression, only in recent times, did effective research, such of the world's newspapers and news wise. And it shows these things that in the three decades from ninety five to twenty fifteen the expression was used on three hundred nineteen occasion. That's three hundred eight times in thirty. That's all, however, get a lot of this in the past four years since Donald Trump announces presidential campaign, the term has been used nearly six thousand times six thousand times in the past four years. And about three hundred and twenty in the previous thirties, extrordinary now to me, the logic is simple. Western journalists scholars politicians policy makers, they all too often refer to this Liberal International order rules. Based international order. Why? Because it's demise is primarily blamed on one Donald Trump from this day forward, it's going to be only America first America first. Now the conventional wisdom goes lock these ball rising tariffs weakening alliances withdrawing the US from international agreements and supping with the devil, from Kim Jong Hoon that Singapore to Ladimir Putin hill, stinky, the US president has lifted void in world leadership. This is the argument as a result, Trump has undermined Feith in the open free, international order of the post Cold War era. But Trump alone really, to blind for the unraveling of the Liberal International auto or was this rules based order. So beloved of the western elites was at bound to file will my guest today has spent a lot of time. Thinking about this issue, John Measham is no stranger to this program. He's professor of political science at the university of Chicago. He's the author most recently of the great delusion liberal, drains and international realities published by ya'll university, Chris. And he's article bound to file the and full of Liberal International order that appears in the current issue of the academic journal, International Security, John joins us today from a studio on campus. The university of Chicago. Get I John welcome to the program. Thank you, Tom. I'm glad to be here now. It seems that this rules base Liberal International order is in trouble is Trump to blind. No, I think it is the conventional wisdom among the foreign policies. Tablet meant here in the United States, and probably in Australia that Trump is responsible for wrecking the Liberal International order. And once he is disposed of in twenty twenty and we get a new president someone like Joe Biden, we'll go back to the old way of doing business in the Liberal International order will survive. I think this is a deeply flawed way of thinking about what's happening with regard to that order that order was in deep trouble before, Trump got elected, just think the Iraq war, the Afghans, STAN war, the fiasco and Libya defeat. Lasko in Syria to Gasco over Ukraine, to two thousand eight financial crisis, the euro zone crisis Brexit, just a name of few of the problems. What Trump did when he ran for president in two thousand sixteen was he pointed out all these failures. He said, the Liberal International order was bankrupt and he got away. Acted and he got elected because many voters, clearly understood that he was correct. So the argument that Trump is responsible for wrecking the Liberal International. Order is dead wrong by what distinguished Trump from a lot of the Republicans and Democrats in two thousand sixteen was he's belief that democracy was not an expo commodity, and you think about it, John thirty years ago. This she had the full of the Berlin Wall, the claps Ivy, communism and the consensus that ease ago, I roll friend Francis, Fukuyama democracy was the wife of the future, what happened. I think that would happened was that we came to find out that not everyone in the world likes democracy, you and I may think it is the best system. But the fact is that they're all sorts of other people world, especially if you go to a place like Russia today, who would prefer an alternative form of political system. And in this case, it soft the -tarian his, so if you're in the business of trying to spread democracy around the world as the United States was in its pursuit of liberal. Gemini, what you discover is an extremely difficult task and it's an especially difficult task. If you use military force to spread democracy. In other words, you try to spread democracy at the end of a sword. And this, of course, is what we tried to do in Afghanistan. And in Iraq, it was with the Bush doctrine was all about, and those ended up being close. Oh failures, you'll critics will say though. Not standing all these setbacks that isn't it inevitable that as human con progresses than the prospects for democratization, and universal peace are enhanced and that, you know it was seeing this right now. There's still talk that China will eventually become a liberal democracy in these protests in Hong Kong that we've witnessed in the past fortnight that shows that eventually, China will buck, and become more liberal, democratic signed thing for Russia. How'd you respond to that? I just don't think it's inevitable. I mean, I want to be very clear, I think democracy is the best political system, and I think it would be a good thing if every country on the planet was liberal democracy. But the idea that that is inevitable as simply wrong. The fact is that Uman beings find it very difficult to agree on questions of what is the best life? What is the best political system, and would Frank Fukuyama and others? Assumed when the Cold War came to a conclusion was that everybody in the world. Wanted to live in a state, that was a liberal democracy. And therefore, with fictive -ly had the winded our back in our endeavour to spread liberal democracy, all across the planet, but that assumption has proven to be wrong. The fact is that the spread of democracy is not inevitable. And by the way, if you go back to two thousand six fast forward to the present what you see is that the number of democracies in the world is decreasing not increase. I think the New York buys freedom house's documented that. It's come down something like ten percent in the last ten or so years. Raw joan. It has. And that is regrettable. But it just points out that this is not inevitable. And again, if you get into the business trying to sprint liberal democracy when it's not an edible. And there are viable, alternatives, you're going to run into a whole his just as a conventional wisdom's are often wrong guy back to that consensus at the end of the Cold War that democracy was the wife of the future. One orthodoxy, that's also Baynes smashed in the last that he is. John is argument that nationalism was a thing of the past on the eve of the European parliamentary elections as Jordan, Claude Juncker. He's a leading European bureaucrat. He was asked about the growing reactions about, you know, against Brussels and the AU and the rise of nationalist movements across Europe. This is from CNN in general with the with the EU elections coming up, the euro skeptical right-wing forces seemed to be very strong in many countries. How does how much does that concern? You why do you think that is what's wrong with the what's your? We'll just. And if that wasn't tone-deaf enough, he added these populous necessarily stupid necessarily his day, I love the country and they don't like the others. Join me Sharma. What do you make of comments? I think it's a remarkably foolish comment. The fact is that virtually every leader of a western democracy is a nationalist just take, Madeleine Albright, who was once secretary of state here in the United States and is viewed as a canonical liberal. She's also a nationalist at heart. She wants famously said that America is the indispensable nation. We stand taller and we see further if you think about her words, she is saying, America is the indispensable, and I underline the word nation. That's at the heart of nationalism virtually every leader, whether it's an Australian or. Japanese or German leader feels that his or her country is something very special in their deeply devoted to that country. That's what nationalism is all about. And what you had in the post Cold War, period up until very recently is a situation where liberalism and nationalism coexisted, but hardly anybody ever talked about nationalism. But once the Liberal International order began to crumble people began to talk more and more about nationalism. And they felt at a lot of those liberal policies in fringed on national policies and on nationalism and ways that they didn't like, and the end result is, you got Brexit and Britain, and you got Trump and the United States and you know what you have in places like Poland and Hungary as well. So in nineteen states clash with multilateral institutions, nationalism, always Trump's liberalism that show alone. My view is that liberalism and Nash. Nationalism can coexist. But when particular liberal policies begin to bump up against nationalism, nationalism will be liberalism, every time because we are all ultimately social animals. We are all alternately very tribal in our nation matters to us greatly. I think virtually every Australian cares greatly about Australian sovereignty just like every American cares about American sovereignty.

Donald Trump Liberal International United States John Measham Russia President Trump America Iraq Frank Fukuyama International Security University Of Chicago Berlin Wall Professor Of Political Science CNN Syria Joe Biden China Ladimir Putin Hill Chris
Munazza

Tell Them, I Am

06:24 min | 2 years ago

Munazza

"Hello. This is me. She yousef. And this is tell them I am. In twenty fifteen I went on a road trip from Chicago to Wisconsin. And we went like really far north. Like I think the nearest people to us were a hundred miles away, which now that I think about it was probably a dangerous situation. Anyway, it was stunning if you haven't been to Wisconsin, you're seriously missing out. So it was late summer like early fall. And as we get deeper into the night, it starts to get really chilly, kind of Chris, and in the middle of the night, I go out into the backyard of the house. We're staying and the night is so block that I had to just stand there for a second. Try to find my way. And after a while my eyes start to adjust and there's this brightness remember looking up at the sky, the stars were clear and more crowded than I had ever seen before. It was honestly like the stars where the crowd at a concert, and I was. Onset or something? And I swear I could see the curve of the sky, it was like I was wrapped in almost. It was so literally beyond my reach like forget figuratively. I felt so small in a good way. So the next morning, I'm sitting inside on the couch with my breakfast. The sun is, like, especially bright, the kind of right? That even if it's cold to kind of just warms you up. And there's the dust in the air and for a second. The sunlight, set this crowd of dust dancing. And I felt so small. My name is Vanessa all in the end. I am an astronomer. I think that is the primary way that identify myself when I, meet new people. Astronauts are on a lot of times ex military and engineers like they have survival skills versus strana mors are fabulous nerds. It's Uman to gaze up at the stars and contemplate the cosmos. There's a there's a Carl Sagan, quote, I'm probably paraphrasing at this point. It's not explaining science. Seems to me perverse, when you're in love, you want to tell the world. I grew up with my parents may data's from Pakistan. He moved to the US in the eighties. Horrible up getting. Okay. And my mom is from India, Mark from our message. Good. There. I have two sisters. We're very close knit family. We love hang out with each other like going home. It was always like the highlight of my day. My parents had this interesting parenting style, which I have started to now be more aware of I didn't have a bed time. I didn't have occurred few. I never had any like rules about how long it could stay on the computer or the or the TV or, or the phone, but it was kind of will lose things where if I wanted to do something by parents would be like that doesn't seem like such a good idea. And then I would kind of be like, oh, but I think it is. So they like, they'd say, well, go ahead, try it, and then I would try it, and it wouldn't be a good idea. And they come back like see. I feel like I'm humble Ryan about my parents really amazing people. When is engineers? I was a sophomore in college. My dad got extremely sick. So he was taking a medication for a rheumatoid arthritis treatment, the medicine was I N, H, I, E so Nisaan and it's known to be extremely toxic. We were not told that my dad was prescribed his medications, so he was told to take this six month course of I h and when he was done with the six months course than he could come back to start his Arthur treatment, well, five months in my dad's sorta getting extremely sick. I is getting very confused. And then one day he woke up and was just completely yellow like completely jaundiced. His is really his skin was yellow. And we took him to the to his primary didn't it turned out. He was having liver failure. Annan ver- when I heard that he was having liver failure. I didn't know what that meant, and I remember being scared, but not being sure why I was scared. A couple days after he started to get a lot worse. And there is one to remember it was the Saturday we were all home, and we had to do like basic errands, like grocery shopping. And we're all going to Costco, my favorite thing ever. And my dad was my dad was feed be used completely out of him. We started to get really concerned. So my mom colds, my dad's primary, who is also one of our good family friends. So he came by the evening, putting I remember who's putting on my dad's shoes for him. Like getting him ready to go to the hospital. And my dad was like kicking him in the face. And he eventually got my dad dressed enough to hospital. And like put him in the front seat of his car with a lot of struggle for my dad and drove him himself to to the hospital. NYU langone. Turned out that his liver was ninety eight percent necrosis, which means that ninety eight percent of his liver had died. It became very clear that he needed a new liver, and he needed a liver transplant.

Carl Sagan Nyu Langone Wisconsin Annan Chicago Yousef Vanessa Costco Onset Pakistan India Chris United States Nisaan Ryan Arthur Mark
Munazza

Tell Them, I Am

05:24 min | 2 years ago

Munazza

"My name is Vanessa all in the end. I am an astronomer. I think that is the primary way that identify myself when I, meet new people. Astronauts are on a lot of times ex military and engineers like they have survival skills versus strana mors are fabulous nerds. It's Uman to gaze up at the stars and contemplate the cosmos. There's a there's a Carl Sagan, quote, I'm probably paraphrasing at this point. It's not explaining science. Seems to me perverse, when you're in love, you want to tell the world. I grew up with my parents may data's from Pakistan. He moved to the US in the eighties. Horrible up getting. Okay. And my mom is from India, Mark from our message. Good. There. I have two sisters. We're very close knit family. We love hang out with each other like going home. It was always like the highlight of my day. My parents had this interesting parenting style, which I have started to now be more aware of I didn't have a bed time. I didn't have occurred few. I never had any like rules about how long it could stay on the computer or the or the TV or, or the phone, but it was kind of will lose things where if I wanted to do something by parents would be like that doesn't seem like such a good idea. And then I would kind of be like, oh, but I think it is. So they like, they'd say, well, go ahead, try it, and then I would try it, and it wouldn't be a good idea. And they come back like see. I feel like I'm humble Ryan about my parents really amazing people. When is engineers? I was a sophomore in college. My dad got extremely sick. So he was taking a medication for a rheumatoid arthritis treatment, the medicine was I N, H, I, E so Nisaan and it's known to be extremely toxic. We were not told that my dad was prescribed his medications, so he was told to take this six month course of I h and when he was done with the six months course than he could come back to start his Arthur treatment, well, five months in my dad's sorta getting extremely sick. I is getting very confused. And then one day he woke up and was just completely yellow like completely jaundiced. His is really his skin was yellow. And we took him to the to his primary didn't it turned out. He was having liver failure. Annan ver- when I heard that he was having liver failure. I didn't know what that meant, and I remember being scared, but not being sure why I was scared. A couple days after he started to get a lot worse. And there is one to remember it was the Saturday we were all home, and we had to do like basic errands, like grocery shopping. And we're all going to Costco, my favorite thing ever. And my dad was my dad was feed be used completely out of him. We started to get really concerned. So my mom colds, my dad's primary, who is also one of our good family friends. So he came by the evening, putting I remember who's putting on my dad's shoes for him. Like getting him ready to go to the hospital. And my dad was like kicking him in the face. And he eventually got my dad dressed enough to hospital. And like put him in the front seat of his car with a lot of struggle for my dad and drove him himself to to the hospital. NYU langone. Turned out that his liver was ninety eight percent necrosis, which means that ninety eight percent of his liver had died. It became very clear that he needed a new liver, and he needed a liver transplant. I just felt like as soon as, as soon as my dad was admitted hospital and this need for a transplant became a reality things kind of just felt completely different. And a couple of days into being in the hospital he fell into a coma. Apparently before my dad's slipped into the coma. He told the head transplant surgeon. Please help me get better because I have to take care of my family. I really was not processing like what was happening. Still going to all my classes I still hanging. All my problems, that's just kind of working on this autopilot mode, where I was going about my days, doing everything that I normally would going to my classes in the mornings, and they would take the six train down to NYU Langone and spend the rest of my day. There.

Nyu Langone Carl Sagan Coma Annan Vanessa Costco Pakistan India United States Nisaan Ryan Arthur Mark
Social Robots: The New Face of AI

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:05 min | 2 years ago

Social Robots: The New Face of AI

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Deloitte, a global leader in digital transformation helping clients apply. Technologies like cloud an AI to their unique business challenges Deloitte got com slash look again. This is tech news briefing im Tanya boost does reporting from the newsroom in New York. And the journal learns that blending robots artificial intelligence and voice tech is the secret formula that actually makes humans comfortable with talking with chat bots, because as you know, we are not there's help it's from robot. Introducing you to her it him after these tech headlines. Walt Disney has a bet that in order to stay on top. It needs to come to you by streaming entertainment directly to TV's and phones, it is preparing to launch a service called Disney. Plus that will for a monthly fee stream new and old shows built around its most popular franchises, thus breaking off a lucrative relationship with Netflix and instead competing against it Thursday. Disney is expected to reveal the details in a major presentation to investors laying out the company's streaming strategy in a cloud enabled a I push Google targets. CIO's enterprise technology executives are at the center of Google's new strategy to drive business to its cloud based artificial intelligence services, the company cloud, a division looking to carve out a larger slice of the enterprise market announced tools this week aimed at helping chief information and technology officers addressed common business problems. The tools include prepackaged AI services that can understand invoice. And contracts and offer supply chain recommendations and predictions. The competition remains stiff as Google fights for bigger stake in the cloud market. Microsoft had thirteen percent of the worldwide market in two thousand seventeen and according to Gartner's most recent data, Amazon which pioneered the business held nearly fifty two percent Google share three point three. The journal says AI has been a critical component of the cloud business for Google and it intends to dramatically boost the sales and support staff for its cloud services division and for quick market. Check in the journal says investors hunger for growth are pushing stocks to record highs a group of the largest technology companies. Just hidden all time, high highlighting investors renewed faith in software and chip companies after a fourth quarter route this week the S and P five hundred information technology sector, logged its first record close since early October following a seventh advance in previous eight sessions, apple and Microsoft have helped power the tech sector higher while fighting for the title of world's largest company. But the journal says. Because many tech stocks are associated with market momentum some analysts cautioned that a setback on trade or downbeat economic data gettin the group tumbling once again coming up why giving machine learning a face is about to take a I to the next level support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Deloitte, a global leader in digital transformation helping clients apply. Technologies like cloud and AI to their unique business challenges Deloitte got com slash look again. In the podcast special coverage of the WSJ pro artificial intelligence, deep dive, we get to meet a robot with a human like face. That's trying to take talking to our machine friends like Siri and Alexa to the next level. One company for hat. Robotics is already there. Gabriel Skansi the co founder of the company says we're ready for new machine assistance. The first step a face for fixes developing this Roble, it's both the hardware around the software running it, and the ideas religious sort of revolutionized the way we interact with machines. So if we look back interacting with machines with graphical user, interfaces or smartphones. And so on we believe that the Uman face is really sort of the way we are using direct with other people, and we can use that to interact with machines. We think that the face has been neglected in like, voice assistance, and so on. And we think that the face Carrizo much important information that we already know how to interpret all so we don't have to invent a new set of signals for the system to show them to use for these robots by this point is fairly clear. So the ideas that we develop in this platform with the tools for developers to develop applications on top of it. Without further ado, the robot would like to introduce it self this is for hat. Go ahead. My name is for hat, and I am a socially intelligent robot in a near future. You might meet me at airports, hotel, receptions, bangs schools, and hospitals. I can't wait to see what interesting applications people will come up with. Can you have different demotions? Sure, my voice and facial animation. Allows me to express all kinds of emotions I can't be very happy. And cheerful. But sometimes I can feel a bit sad other times, perhaps even be angry. Unlike other. Robots? I can have many different personalities and there are big plans in development. So get comfortable. We have a lot of different partners working in different verticals. So we have for example, working with Chaban as they are putting the robots in airports and train stations. So actually, it's it's they're working on it. Now, we had it at the Frankfurt airport last year as a test pilot. It worked really well, we have a collaboration with Swedish recruitment firm having the robot. Doing job interviews in order to reduce bias in the recruitment process. So these are two examples we also have. Collaboration with Mark from a surgical or the robot is doing asking questions in order to to sort of do an assessment diagnosed you for Debbie and so them for more on for hat, robotics, and the latest on all things artificial intelligence head to wsJcom that does it for the tech news briefing, im Tanya Bustos reporting from the newsroom at the Wall Street Journal.

Google Deloitte AI Tanya Bustos Disney Microsoft Walt Disney Netflix Wall Street Journal New York Frankfurt Gartner Alexa CIO
"uman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Benign only Uman's beliefs such stories. Into what you're saying. Is that these these stories are what allowed us to organize and spread out. Because if you think about any religion and economic system any political system at the basis you will find some fictional story about God's about money about human rights about the nation. All these things are fictional stories. They are not biological reality. But it's a very powerful and convincing and benign fiction. That helps us organize our political and legal systems in the modern world. Take for example, the legal field most legal systems today in the world of based on a belief in Uman rights, but what are you? Thank you mean being cutting open look inside, you'll find the heart the kidneys Nauru ones hormones DNA, but you won't find any rights, the only place, you find rights is the stories that we have invented and spread around over the last few centuries. They may be very positive stories. Very good stories, but they're still just fictional stories. The tweet invented the same is true of the canonic field. I can take this. Worthless piece of paper go to the supermarket give it to a complete stranger whom I've never met before and get inex- change real bananas, which can actually eat money. In fact, is the most successful story ever invented untold humans.

Uman canonic field
"uman" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I was told actually for reconciliation to use post conflict mouth to mouth contact because the kiss each are after fights. So they didn't want me to use the word reconciliation because it sounds to Uman like, and I think for for species that are close to us like the primates anthropomorphic. Adam is really not a big problem because we are primates. And so we should use the same terminology. We don't call the hands of chimpanzee a front paw. No, we call it a hands because of this the same form the same structure, the same bones as our hand. And so we should use the same terminology for structures that are similar, but also for behaviors that are similar, and if you let's say, you're tickly chimpanzee, and they produce laughing sounds like type laughing sounds you have to call it laughing. It is laughing at it's not vocalized panting. As people would want me to say. So I think. Anthropomorphic is not such a big deal with species that are close to isn't. That's why I invented the word enter potenial, which is the opposite. Is that you denied to our connections between humans and other species and actually entire areas in the university like philosophy anthropology parts of psychology day are enter oppo denial. They live in in a way, the saying that the human mind and the human spirit are so totally different. We cannot compare them because what a monkey or dolphin or which are the animal is doing. And so they they are denying that connection, which I think is detrimental actually much more dangerous, in my opinion because anthropoid denial has a lot of negative side effects in my mind. It's much more dangerous than anthropomorphic them. What are some of the other side effects? Well, one of them is we live at the moment in time where we destroying the planet. We unions are an ecological disaster. An entire species large numbers of animals are disappearing for us. Is disappearing to the globe is warming. And that is all of Solta think of our attitudes is that we can do whatever we want with nature because we not really part of nature, we sort of outside nature, and since we're outside, we can do whatever we want. An and I think that attitude is also reflected in how we look at our animals, and I think it's a very dangerous attitude. Not to sing that we are part of it. And and we we have to act responsibly within that framework. So your your new book is all about, you know, primates chimps bonobos capturing monkeys and how they express emotion when you started doing this orcas very controversial like do primates, really express emotion. And that's been controversial. I think in a lot of animal research. Do you think that we should not be debating anymore of their animals have emotions we should just accept that? They do. Well, I even take a more radical position, of course, in the book is that I think we have no uniquely human emotions that are no emotions that we have that you don't find one way or another. They may be very the maybe variations that we have are different circumstances in which we we feel these emotions, but I think all Uman emotions can be found in other species. And and we live at the moment in psychology is the most popular theory in psychology is that are only six basic, emotions the six emotions that we like anger and fear that that we humans express interface, and that we recognize interface all over the world, and is expressed the same way all over the world, the six basic, emotions and all the other emotions are secondary. Meaning that they are creation of our culture and ourselves and not found necessarily another species. And I disagree strongly. Was that for example, the secondary emotions includes something like Lavin attack? Now love and attachment. We find in so many species, we know actually the dopamine system that's behind it. You know, the oxytocin that's behind it. And so why is love and attachment not a basic emotion. So I think there's many emotions that don't have a face that don't have a specific face that is that never nevertheless fountain. Lots of other species. And I am now at appointed..

Uman Adam dopamine oxytocin Solta Lavin
Snail Insulin Faster Than Human Insulin

The Naked Scientists

03:35 min | 2 years ago

Snail Insulin Faster Than Human Insulin

"Why doesn't the cone snail end up with very low blood sugars will all doesn't insulin work in a cone snail to how does the insulin get out of the water and into the fish? It turns out that the insulin. The cones name makes us very different to its own insulin. So this name makes its own insulin to regulate sugar levels in its own body. But the insulin that it sprays into the water. It's extremely similar to the insulin produced by fish. So it wouldn't be active at its own target receptor in terms of how it gets into the fish. We think that it rapidly enters the body through the gills thing is though if you did this with the kinds of insulin that we have in the clinic to give to humans, the quite slow acting only whereas venom has to work really fast in order to immobilize prey really fast because these things are shellfish. They wouldn't be able to pursue a fos moving fish. So this stuff must be quick. How's it do it? This name has to make sure that the fish is very rapidly mobilized and the incident acts very rapidly compared to the incident that we make and it does that by being a single compound. So our Uman insulin is very sticky so an individual insulin would stick. Very rapidly to another insulin into another insulin and formed so-called hacks Zimmer's the snail insulin because it has to act very rapidly never formed heck simmer. So it can act much faster than our own insulin, Stu, so we're no insolence go into the body. Do they have to unstick before they can work then? Whereas what the smells are doing is. There's never stick in the first place. So they're immediately available fraction. Yes. That's exactly. Right. So when we inject or a diabetic patient injects, insulin into the body the heck summer has to I dissociate into a compound that then can then be active, whereas the snare never made the heck summer in the first place. So it's immediately active now, if you know, this the obvious question to ask is why don't we just make with our biotechnology how a form of human insulin which can't stick together. Like that. That's a very interesting question. So we have actually tried to do this for over twenty years now, and we have not solved this problem because the moment you try to make the human insulin. Not stick. It's not active anymore. So you strip it off its activities. So you could still injected, but it won't do anything in your body anymore. So somehow the snails have solved this longstanding problem by making this insulin in its venom. So put me out of my misery. What does the snow when over to do the human industry over the last couple of decades? Couldn't it must. It must have discovered some kind of clever trick that we hadn't thought of. Yes. So we think that it the snail insulin binds to the human incident receptor or the fish, insulin receptor in a different fashion. So it uses a slightly different surface on the receptor. So the area that it uses to bind to the receptor is a little different to our human insulin. And this is how this nature has solved this but critically. What that means is that if you can copy what the snail does you could potentially make a human insulin. That's very fast acting and not sticky in that way. So when it went into the human it would very quickly gained control of their blood sugar. Yes. And that's. Exactly what we're currently trying to do. And we have made very good progress on this that we're planning to hopefully, publish soon in the future. So what we've done this to try to learn as much as we can from the snail insulin's, the different ones that we have found and then go back to Uman insulin and make it non sticky and yet active, and we have the first compound that we're hoping to put into the clinic sometime in the future.

Unstick STU Zimmer Twenty Years
News in Brief 4 March 2019

UN News

03:13 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 4 March 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations each day more than six billion people one third of them children in air, so polluted that it puts their lives health and wellbeing at risk. The UN expert on Uman rights in the environment said on Monday, David Boyd described air pollution, both in and outside the home as a silent killer responsible for the premature death of seven million people each year, including six hundred thousand children he stressed that failing to ensure clean air constitutes a violation of the fundamental right to a healthy environment. A right that is legally recognized by one hundred fifty five states, noting that air pollutants are everywhere, he urged all states to recognize that right while air pollution is largely caused by burning fossil fuels for electric city, transportation and heating. It also comes. From industrial activities poor waste management and agriculture practices said the independent expert staying with the environment. The acting chief of the UN Environment Program. Joyce Masuda said on Monday that although twenty eighteen was a challenging year. There was a growing global commitment to tackle the tasks ahead. The UN agencies new annual report released online ahead of the UN environment assembly, which will take place in Kenya. From eleven to fifteen March shows that the pace of action on many interlinked environmental issues is accelerating. The report highlights units impact over the past year from making the cooling industry. More climate-friendly to training thirties to better enforce environmental laws. Our role in highlighting best practices advocating action, and bringing together government, civil society and business. Ios once again proved critical mismatch Zulia said turning to Uman rights states cannot call themselves rights leaders while leaving increasing numbers of their residents to live and die on the street. A United Nations rights experts said on Monday Lee, Lonnie far, ha the special rapid tour on the right to housing said that governments must be held accountable in a report presented to the UN. Human Rights Council in Geneva. She spelled out that the time for excuses justifications. And looking the other way has long passed in the report, she suggests that the global housing predicament is rooted in a crisis over access to Justice without that. She said housing is not properly recognised understood or addressed as a human right as long as states deny access to Justice for the right to housing the special rapporteur explained they prepare. An unfair hierarchy of human rights, exposing discriminatory positions that some rights, and thus some rightsholders matter more than others. Liska Fiji U N news.

UN Un Environment Program Human Rights Council United Nations Joyce Masuda David Boyd Acting Chief Kenya Geneva Zulia Lonnie Far LEE
Science-Based Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Eye on Washington with Marilee Joyce

02:18 min | 2 years ago

Science-Based Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

"Other we call it the mega three super pill. Jason let's break it down. Let's go through these different items one at a time omega threes all over the. Big headlines major research articles, why are fish oil? So doggone hot these days. Well, fifteen thousand published studies on the role of omega threes and Uman nutrition, and it grows by the day just about every single dimension of our health is now shown to be positively impacted by omega threes, basically everything, but as I said cholesterol, but it will manage triglycerides will support blood pressure. It will help keep your veins flexible and functioning, well, it'll keep the blood flowing. It's great to maintain a healthy heart rhythm. Fish oil is now being shown to have an incredible role in cognitive functioning. We're talking about memory mood, brain ageing, infant development, held a cell communication focused. Fish oils will enhance or increase performance in the brain actually been shown to increase gray matter, and it goes to work and only minutes when taken a supplement new study showing immediate benefits. Studies showing long-term. Cognitive benefits. They're looking at fish oil in just about every area of health joint health, weight management prostate health skin health, the list goes on and on nine out of ten of you out there right now are clinically deficient in EFA's EFA's are called essential fatty acids, and the two most essential fatty acids are the two that are found in fish oil DHA and EPA Purity's fish oil products, have three times more concentration of these two key fatty acids than standard fish oil. These are called pharmaceutical grade fish oil, meaning they're manufactured in one of only a handful of pharmaceutically, licensed facilities, right out, Norway. They make the best fish oil in the world ninety percent concentrations completely pure, no mercury issues. No fish tastes, no, fish, odors, nothing like that. Just the incredible concentrated DHA and EPA, and if you're deficient in those two key fatty acids. There's a long list of symptoms that you could suffer from fatigue poor memory, poor immunity, certainly poor skin health, dry skin.

EFA Dry Skin Jason EPA Epa Purity Norway Ninety Percent
Unravelling the ties between fashion and politics

Jim Bohannon

07:50 min | 2 years ago

Unravelling the ties between fashion and politics

"I was intrigued by the suggestion that there are links between fashion and the political process, which has pretty much been our purview over the years. And so we're joined by Vicki is a -til TI L is that -til. Teal teal, very good, and you are a fashion designer, and you are of the opinion, I gather that fashion and politics do intersect is that right? Yes. Absolutely. I'm from Washington, by the way, I live in Paris. And I've been a French designer for fifty five years, but I'm from Washington DC actually Chevy Chase. So very good. Pretty good to know about politics. Well, I would dare say, so of course, the most obvious example of such in recent memory would be the state of the union evening in which so many of the the women mostly I guess Democrats wore white they said that that was a show of solidarity with the feminist movement in general, and and women's issues before this congress had particular I must confess that it did strike me at the time that I hope it was not to show solidarity with the governor of Virginia. But. Generally, wearing white is a sign of being virgin brides. But they also wore black when they were doing the metoo movement and using color, you know, using all black for the put when the movie stars at the Golden Globes were wearing all black. So I think the idea of promoting an issue fashion using fashion to promote political opinions is a brand new thing it has not really been done very often. So it's it's kind of interesting also these t shirts now, the fashion is to where skintight pants a loose jacket. And then had a saying very large printed saying on your chest both for men and for women. So that people can walk around with their statements using fashion to prove on your chest to promote a statement where where would you wear something like that? I mean that doesn't sound like something. Former party. If you check the papers. Now, the look of fashion is to wear a fabulous jacket like Chanel jacket, if you're a woman beautiful jacket pants, which were all wearing pants now. And then you say a statement and very sick big letters on your chest. And that's probably the newest looking fashion right now. So. Politics, fashion or absolutely happening. I don't mean to be dismissive at all. But I must confess that when it was pointed out to me, and I did notice. Well, a lot of lot of white and black there in some parts of the of the house chamber. Oh, they're they're promoting women's issues. By response was okay now, let's get back to the substance of it. So I guess in a way I was rather dismissive. There's a certain level of symbolism here that that goes right past me. I must confess suspect. I it again. I don't say that makes me superior or inferior. Isis suspected it probably makes me to a certain extent, typically male. And I'm just wondering I think that that there's no male or female. We're all just you know, humans and we're trying to figure out what's happening right now. The Uman this changing, we're we're changing the idea that people are gonna walk around with a t shirt and a big thing on the front is something that wouldn't happen in the fifties. The sixties. On the beach backyard barbecues. It happens. But you're talking about formal formal occasions in which might be wearing a suit and tie. And I would be looking at some woman who's got a slogan emblazoned across her chest. Yes, it's a brand new thing. And it's it's interesting, except if you have giant breasts, I suppose, you can't read it. Yeah. Exactly, I suppose, you're not. But that that does raise another interesting issue in this day and age of hashtag metoo reading the message. They went to such trouble to to to to make evident, regardless of of breast size. The strikes me as a dangerous activity. I would think that that maintaining I contact would be first and foremost, and we would have to be sneaking furtive glances at whatever it is. They're trying to promote. Yes. Well, I have to say that I am very friendly with a woman who's a swank. And I asked her once what the people come to you for what's main reason, I thought it was marriages, you know, and and as love, of course, you know, family issues. It was not the number one reason people go to see a shrink is how they are perceived how they are perceived which means it was a good thing for me because I may close so you can be perceived to way because I'm going to design it for you you see. So the how we look is everything in the world. Isn't that amazing? How we look how we are perceived. Okay. Go ahead. I really was. I was shocked. And so I got I wrote my new book, the absolute woman, and I go into all of these things about how we are perceived in what fashion means what we look like what we smell like, I make perfume all of these matter more to people than their marriages. Well, that's interesting, obviously that would be true of some people, I suppose of my own crystal thought. I don't know. I guess on most. I mean, I've never for example, felt the desire to seek out a shrink not to say that I'm I'm totally thought of every way, shape or form. I just doubt that I'm two hundred dollars an hour dysfunctional will be a cost effective exercise. But if you know my perception other than you know, I I meet the the the the bare minimum. Okay. It's a formal gathering, but not super form. Oh, I got the suit. I got the tie. I got the button collar, and if somebody perceives that as being let's say, oh, I don't know out of touch, or whatever my view is. Well, big deal. I don't care about your opinion. Again. I I I'm not trying to be dismissive. But I'm wondering the extent to which I am that atypical really. I mean, I'm not running for public office. I I'm presentable, and if somebody wants to have an opinion beyond that, I don't care. I think that you are not typical. And I'm not typical not everybody is a fashion designer for fifty years and not everybody's doing radio. We're not. You're not typical. The typical person is concerned about what other people think of them. That's the number one thing how am I perceived? It's interesting, and I don't think about it at all I go out with a pink thing and a blue thing all mixed together because I'm a fashion designer I can and you can be confident inner confident you're able to talk not not everybody can talk like you do. So no, we're not typical. But the typical person is concerned about what do you think of me? What do I look like, how do I present myself, and in going into government and politics that goes even further what political party, you're for how how you are perceived is a very is connected to fashion is connected to everything how we look how we smell interesting. Well, it is I we're gonna come back and explore some more of this here. Just a moment at one eight six six five O, JIMBO one eight six six five zero five four six two six. I had not thought of it in this context, quite frankly. But then again, I think that probably in matters such as this. I have always been just a wee bit

Democrats Washington Virgin Brides Chevy Chase Vicki Paris Congress Virginia Golden Globes Jimbo Isis Two Hundred Dollars Fifty Five Years Fifty Years
"uman" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on Bookworm

"But African I don't know how the art of all on that continent. But genius flourishes everywhere. It has always been. So and will always be so, and there will always be people who believe otherwise as I said, a shrunken head is as close to a real doll as one could ever come. And in this sense. It is both a child's toy. And in adult toys, it's another person after all, and I was not then nor am I now immune to the charms of having someone else to play with. He was dangling from an invisible thread much as spider does from the top of glass case taller than I was. He was the size of an orange. He was particular and unique and human and utterly real a man with eyes and eyelashes and hair. Apparently, the Africans do not close the eyes of their dolls. It was. Only later that I learned that the hair and eyelashes do not shrink with the flesh of the face. And so the shrunken often have the luxurious eyelashes of a child and the hair is much longer than the face though, often cut so great as the human impulse toward proportion. But my man had long uncut hair, and as it was nineteen sixty-nine. I didn't think anything of it all the men. I liked had long uncut hair his skin had the sheen of an egg plant in must have been oiled. And all the purples of that fruit were in it his nose was broad and flapped his is deeply set a naturally so and beautifully shining. But so many years of past. I cannot be sure of what was there. And what was not though, I returned to look at him countless times he was after awhile what I came to look at and at some point I began to commune with him. Yes. I. I gave life to an inanimate object. But can I you mean head ever really be said to be an inanimate object. He was not a skull. He was not decomposing. He was not mangled in any way. He had been and was a person. I don't remember what it was we communed about, but he possessed me as I possessed him and to possess the head of a beloved no less than the head of an enemy is the greatest sickness on earth. My could enter the museum blindfolded and turn exactly the right corners one. After another to find myself standing before him at I level. I shall never forget his expression. He looked startled. No other words, come to mind. And though, I could not see myself. I must have looked startled to we stood facing each other the way when you come upon dear unexpectedly you both freeze for a moment. Mutually startled and in that exchange there. Seems to be but one glance as if you and the other are sharing the same. Pair of is the years past I left the city. I never returned the sign in the museum changed that. I am sure. But the impression left upon me by the shrunken head has never changed. So that I now wonder why Uman beings do not incorporate the art of shrinking head into their burial rights. I am serious. What prevents us from saving the heads of the dead. We bury since we can make them the size of oranges or apples and keeping them out of the deepest love and respect for our descendants. For whom the heads will become ancestors for what our ancestors, but the loved ones of our loved one since a single act of love down through the ages has procured what we call the future. I am presuming. Of course that procreation involves love. Which very often does not. And so I hesitate to say love is the greatest traveler, I could just as easily say sex, perhaps love is but symbolic behavior towards sex. It is certainly symbolic behavior toward the living and the dead. I am most interested in shrunken heads as symbolic behavior toward the dead marks of being a human involve symbolic behavior toward the dead. No other animal does it to the extent. Humans. Do don't. We carry photographs of the heads of those. We love who've died don't we frame their heads and keep them on the mantle as reminders of all that is precious and binds us to this life, and before there were photographs that rage of the well to do at sign of commerce and culture there were hand painted miniatures if you could afford them exquisitely detailed renditions of the head kept in protective lock it or box that could be carried inside..

Uman
News in Brief 7 January 2019

UN News

03:35 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 7 January 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations drawing on information from one hundred forty two countries. A new report by the UN office on drugs and crime U N ODBC revealed on Monday that Uman trafficking is on the rise, especially when it comes to children U N O D C executive director Yuri Fedotov, presented the report, which examined trafficking, trends and patterns worldwide child soldiers forced labor, sexual slavery, human trafficking has taken on horrific. Dimensions said Mr. Fedotov, adding that armed groups and terrorists use the elicit trade to spread fear and gain victims to offer as incentives to recruit new fighters. The global report on trafficking in persons spelled out that there is an increase in the number of children being trafficked who now account for thirty percent of all victims, mostly girl. Calls. Some fifty nine percent of trafficking also involve sexual exploitation, the Thai authorities have granted the UN refugee agency UNHCR access to Rehoboth Mohammed, Al Conan, an eighteen year old Saudi woman who fled her family in Kuwait hoping to seek asylum in Australia, miss, Al Kanoun, told human rights groups, and the media that she was stopped at Bangkok airport in transit from Kuwait where her passport was confiscated UNHCR consistently advocates that refugees and asylum seekers who have been confirmed or claim to need international protection cannot be returned to their countries of origin. According to the principle of nonrefoulement, an international principle that prevents states from returning people to territories where they are under threat. According to Cecil Palae, you win HCR global spokesperson. On gender issues who spoke to you n news miss connection has now reached safety. I'm piece to confirm that we've been granted access to has Mohammed Al Quran Saudi national. She's now in a state of emotional distress. When she needs to be given a little bit of breathing space. But in the coming days, we keep on meeting with hurts tried to assess protection he also on migration the UN Environment Program pointed on Monday to a new category of involuntary migrants that has been emerging in recent years environmentally displaced people. These are people who have been forced to move because climate change has caused natural disasters or degraded resources that have rented their livelihoods unsustainable. According to a study co founded by UNHCR, the university of Oxford and the governments of Norway and Switzerland. Climate change is expected to display. Case between fifty and two hundred million people by twenty fifty while the New York declaration for refugees and migrants states. That migration should be a choice. Not an assessing. There are countless groups of involuntary migrants, including refugees stateless persons people who are trafficked and those internally displaced by disasters and conflict, and now environmental change threatens to become one of the most potentially significant generators of new displacement Liska, Fiji, U N news.

Unhcr UN Yuri Fedotov Cecil Palae Mohammed Al Kuwait United Nations Al Kanoun Al Conan Executive Director Bangkok Fiji New York Australia Norway University Of Oxford Switzerland
"uman" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"Their way of doing things for hundreds of years. Some people say that I was. Founded? To the Rift Valley where Uman evolution and it helped catapult us condition of of self awareness. Thousands of years ago. It was brought from the eastern part of Africa to west central Africa. You know, we don't know. I remember ten Terence McKenna. Speaking about mushrooms in a similar way. It does seem rather accurate that it can can do all these things that it can address both chemically and. Psycho spiritually all of these issues and in a human being do you have? So that you explained that to yourself. Yeah. Just an Abel's people to go so deep deep deep inside themselves. That's where the healing takes place, and it and some people have said it's like ten years of therapy rolled into a couple of days. It's it's it has this has its miracle component. It's very profound. But to me intention is everything. And you know, you could do I began a half dozen times and s hall. Yeah. So it's not it's never the method is always the person. And actually if a person's intention is so pure. That don't meet a method that could be walking across the street showing a piece to govern. And they'll be transformed. So that's you know, that's another way of of looking at it. But there are so methods in the world from deep tissue from Ralph ING too tropic breath work to begin. There are some very very powerful methodologies that I that I do really respect. Now, Richie have have you have you has any Iowa experiences personally? Now, I haven't 'cause I was wondering how you know. Basically what what you describe is like a three day. I watched experience, you know. And what I'm wondering. Because you said that that the the first what four to six hours are the really eight. You know, kind of exciting part does. Now, the now, it's it's forty to fifty hours. I mean, if the change is very the intensity of the. Yeah. The first four hours are on. Just completely had a logical. On the Pretorial archetypal vignettes are coming through. So so fast. I mean, one woman single space or four pages, documenting sixteen and a half hours of visions. But then on the other hand another woman at the session with experience. Absolutely, no, Piff news. No insights, and yet she went into a state of consciousness for ten and a half months. She went home after being frustrating because she didn't have the visuals that she wanted to have with I begin. And then then there I began to realize for myself because I wanted a so attached for people to receive what they wanted and then I began to realize. Wow. People receiving exactly what the quiz. She had experienced in her life. Everything that she ever wanted. She successfully received until I became didn't give her what she wanted. And as a result of that she access to level of frustration within herself that enabled her to kick into place where she was choose witnessing her sleep ten and a half is really an very deep state of of waking. And and I always tune that. I begin gave when she needed. Now what you wanted. So there's no prescriptions truth. You know, there's no it's like a lot of even I became providers at a very attached to people having these, you know, lights and cameras these really deep experience, I'm much more interested in the effect energetically can still get so much out of it. Even though you're not having like some deep deep if MS. You know, I've I've talked to dozens of people who have had I will gain experiences, and I've never talked to anyone who's been disappointed..

Terence McKenna Africa Rift Valley Ralph ING Richie Iowa fifty hours four hours six hours ten years three day
Mysterious polio-like virus also causes neurological symptoms

Made in America

01:15 min | 2 years ago

Mysterious polio-like virus also causes neurological symptoms

"The causes of this. Mysterious mysterious polio, like illness spreading around the country are ninety confirmed cases any last time we talked about this. They were twenty twenty seven different states. Most of them are children between the ages of two and eight that are getting and they say, they're maybe now the two hundred fifty possible cases of this the neurological condition that targets the spinal cord causes weakness in your limbs paralysis and death. So the question is why now what's come kind of new virus floating around. What is that? That's my best guess seems to be a virus similar to the poliovirus. Unfortunately, we don't have any vaccine for it. And vacs and viruses are smart they will evolve. And they will evolve defenses against whatever's being thrown at them and in time there are new viruses. Just think about aids all these. You know, they may have been around in other forms, but they do a Volvo and then become. Harmful disease causing in Uman. So they've been around, but they

Uman Volvo
"uman" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Destroy the lives and kill much more than seventy thousand Americans every single year. And the number goes up goes up because we are so foolish with a loss that we allow this to happen. Death toll quivalent of the size of an entire American city every year. The current influx. If not halted threatens to overwhelm our immigration system in our communities and poses unacceptable. Dangers to the entire nation. Have to have our borders. Can't let drugs coming not just not just people people drugs human, traffickers, human trafficking is now at the highest level in the world. That it's ever been that's because of the internet think of it human trafficking, you think back two hundred years five hundred years Uman draft where they steal children in many cases, women, unfortunately, they steal women the human traffickers the lowest gum on earth. The lowest scum on earth. And it's at a level that has ever been worldwide never been at a level like this. If these caravans are allowed into our country, only, bigger and more emboldened caravans will follow and you see. That's what's happening. Now, we have one that's coming up. And it's being somewhat dissipated as a March. But then other people joining it and then against bigger. And Dow if you look back at Honduras, and if you look at El Salvador other ones are solving and if they're forming. There for me. You have new ones that are forming. And we call it caravan number two is unbelievably rough people very very hard for the military to stop at our military will have no problem. But very very hard. Mexico's having a very very hard time with it..

Uman El Salvador Dow Mexico Honduras five hundred years two hundred years
"uman" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Maybe they were Uman's may be re they really were literally wild men out there. Well, unusually and occasionally even nowadays you hear about Bigfoot wearing clothing and kind of goes unexplainable because why would they do that? But. You know, maybe it's some association, maybe they're trying to break a barrier if they're seen maybe they think they'll be accepted more if they're seeing maybe people won't be so scared. You know, we could all in our conjecture about why that may be happening. But it happens too often for people to be fabricating a heretic Asian, but not very often. If you were to communicate with the tribe these days at a modern tribe. That would still perhaps be in contact other than the hookah says are there any other tribes? It would say people that have a relationship ongoing with whatever these things are. I would say it's almost everyone. I mean, there's there's famous stories out of Arizona and New Mexico in the high plains out there where they have these and there's many times in association between and this is where. Bickford people start their head starts spinning. But fact. Where there's this association between Bigfoot in UFO's, even in the Hoopoe book. I wrote that many of the tribal people said that they saw a UFO in time and space to the point where they saw big foot and they regularly saw UFO's on many of the tribal grounds. And when you talk to these tribal members the elders they believe they came from the stars. And they're they're not once they have your trust. They will tell you. Hey, you know, there's this association between us and them, and there are different kinds of tribe and different kinds of people, but they came from the same place we did. And when you start to go back, and you look at the history of these certain areas, there's a lot of tribal people that will tell you we've had visitations for hundreds and hundreds of years going back in time, and almost all of them believe that they came from the stars. Well, there are an awful lot of associations between these creatures being cited in proximity to UFO's. And it makes everyone uncomfortable the Bigfoot people the die hards don't like it, the UFO diehards like it, even less. They're not comfortable with that at all. But you have to follow it where it leads. And you know, I I don't have a conviction on it either. I don't know what these things are you off os are where they're from. But there's enough cases over the centuries and a lot more of them. Now. Thanks to this new book, you can't ignore it. I thought the there was a couple of stories clippings where there are reputable witnesses who say they saw these creatures. Engaging with cals milking cows. So this is the part that really really is unusual several years ago. One of my best friends their parents on a dairy farm. And I started talking to him about this. And I said, you know, I I keep reading that. They may be milking cows. You know, what do you think about that? Because you know, I'm gonna talk to my parents. So they own a huge dairy farm anyone out there and talk to them and this all this. I think he's eighty years old. This guy's dad and he looked at him. And he said, you know, every once in a while Mike Cal will come back from nowhere completely milked. He goes, I don't understand it. The same man told him he says, you know, every once in a while I'm on the far quarter my property and something tells me don't turn around get back on the horse or get back on my ATV and leave and he does. And then the man said, well, you know, every once in a while I found a bucket way out in the corner of the property. I don't know how it got there. Dogs. I think when you get the trust of some of these dairy farmers way out in the middle. They're going to tell you the same thing because I've heard it many times. There are some funny stories they're not in this book. But recalled I think you, and I have talked about before about Bigfoot what they eat, and they'll had a particular this image of a Bigfoot milking a cow sticks in my head. But I mean, they've been known to eat a lot of berries and different kinds of fruit. Do they eat meat as far as you know? According to the tribal people who have seen him, take dear cetera there, an omnivore and many times when the natives are in the middle of the woods hunting themselves. They'll come across a deer stuck up in a tree. And I two hundred and fifty pound dear. Native guy couldn't have done it. They don't know how it got way up in the tree and its NATO or hurricane zones. So how did it get their day Politis Bigfoot while Ben and giants is the book in a moment will open up the phone lines with your calls and.

UFO Mike Cal Uman Bickford Hoopoe Arizona Ben New Mexico eighty years fifty pound
"uman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Uman beings have a novelty bias. We will look at whatever's new, but especially children, they don't have the same inhibitory system so they will be having what is often called continuous partial attention will continuous partial attention is a different quality of attention than what Rick is describing that he possesses. And that allows him to because of his whole background to select those details know which ones are important and actually allocate time to it. So he consolidates it kids and our youth do not have either the same inhibitory system to deal with the glut in the distractions. So they miss out on the allocation of time to consider those details important to the overall analysis of the text. This is getting us to your plan, your your, your idea of how to to raise a deep readers here. And we got a minute here to go before the break, so, but I wonder if you could just start unfolding it. I mean, it sounds to me like you're saying, what is it between the ages of zero and five that we ought to create a precious protected space for a young person's brain to develop so that it's. You know, gets the bills, those the structure so that it can ignore distraction. What a beautiful physician pediatrician in Boston is Berry's Zakum and he and Jenny Radetsky. Another pediatrician are really, I'm working with them as well or with berry. We really try to think about the zero to five period as a time of introduction in which digital technology is basically never used as either a pacify or or a babysitter, but rather as one of the great wonderful things in in the in the nursery, but never the one that's used most. So it's very gradual. I'll return to five to ten. And we'll get to some calls to hear because people have a lot of good questions for you speaking with Maryanne wolf. She's author of reader come home the reading brain in a digital world, and if you're out there listening in your, say the parents of kids and you have you watched them interact with those digital devices. Do you wonder how it's affecting or enhancing their ability to read? Let us know by Meghna trucker. Bardy. This is on point..

Rick Berry Maryanne wolf Zakum Meghna Jenny Radetsky Boston
Smart bots: China's sex doll makers jump on AI drive

Michael Medved

04:55 min | 3 years ago

Smart bots: China's sex doll makers jump on AI drive

"The new movie from the national Sousa death of a nation deals with many many. Many, many many controversial issues of the current moment and in recent, history as well it does not deal with anything about the rise of sexual bots or machines in general but the, new, movie, is, opening August third, you, can, find. Out all about it at death of a, nation, movie, dot, com and you, can, watch the. Trailer for yourself it really is about the phony charge that is constantly labelled leveled, and, conservatives, that, somehow conservatives a, Nazis, have, some. Kind of tie well not so go to death of a nation The movie dot com Meanwhile, speaking with Jay Richards he's the author, of the human advantage the future of American work in. Age of smart machines it's posted right, up at our website the the son over in Great Britain for the British for some reason or completely obsessed and fascinated with his idea. Of, of sex robots they they have featured, sex robots on TV which are really very creepy looking and extremely extremely non alluring the. Opposite of lorraine's Dr Johnson one said it is the antidote to desire and. That's kind of it but here's the headline on the son of. From July twenty four so it's, right now silicon, lovers rise of sex robots blamed for turning Japanese people into endangered species as more and more men turn. To Randy romping androids is there any hope for the survival? Of human on you Even Bonking I. Can I don't know if we say bonking we just did Jay What? Do, you think. Is is, there such a thing as, a Randy romping Android oh absolutely not I mean at least at the moment, these are really, expensive sex dolls that do some things kind of like humans the very expensive. And here's American company that's doing them in, the head is ten thousand. Dollars if you want the whole head and body it's about sixty thousand dollars and so I mean, the. Reality. Is that. This is a fairly well off men playing with them boy okay, let's, here but the point is when you get to a Randy romping Android, yes? Randy, implies that this. Is, a machine that is. Going to, want pleasures right candy, machine feel pleasure no and certainly these can't I mean this is the thing. Even even the most speculative question these, new exactly what's happening with these, things, now they are participating in machine learning so they're. Going to gather data alas from the users and. Probably get slightly more realistic but this is essentially a three Dimensional or really four, dimensional form of pornography in. So far as you can rewire your brain by spending time with pornography now men mostly men will, not. Only. Be doing. Now whatever that does to your mind they'll be embedding it in. Their, muscle memory so I really do think these things are widely used I. Think? That, you could at. Least, in some cultures end. Up with, the cultural catastrophe I, do think that cultures that really do this honestly may end up not reproducing. Themselves so the maybe a selective disadvantage, to cultures that use these things, one, eight hundred nine five five seventeen seventy six is. Our phone number if you were Raising children and you are what what should kids expect how should parents prepare their kids for some of the changes, that are going to, impact our. Lives regarding artificial intelligence I would say. Make them maximally flexible so if you imagine in your own case you might think well I went to college for four years in, done born less the same. Job for forty years that's going to be much harder to pull. Off because things are so disruptive things I mean you just think about the. Change, from LP's when I was a very little kid long playing records to now we, don't even have a physical medium we stream. Music now just think about that and even think about. It's speeding up so that if you do something that's hyper specialized your job what you've. Trained for maybe obsolete and so I had vise my children I be do the basic. Things do basic liberal arts where you become numerate and literate and. Articulate and then also confer on yourself a. Specialty of some sort so. Maybe learned finding In accounting and, philosophy do both of, those things. And that's what I advise you when. That's just graduated from high school and going to college do something like that Jay Richards the author of the Uman advantage the future of American work in an. Age of smart machines A quick word from relief factor Michael from Connecticut writes. In,.

Jay Richards Randy Jay What Sousa Uman Great Britain Lorraine Dr Johnson Connecticut Michael Sixty Thousand Dollars Forty Years Four Years
"uman" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:52 min | 3 years ago

"uman" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"In the sky mystery helicopters you of those things of that sort but what's most amazing to me is that not one of, these cases has ever been, solved at least in the US. Anyway if they're Uman's doing it not one Uman has been caught Certainly doesn't seem like predators that we understand could be doing it that may be the most amazing fact of all isn't, it that nobody's ever been, caught well this this was officially The? Case, in, northern later on Oh it's it's Feser it scavengers Oh come. On, you, know and. These injuries Listener no blood, and if if coaches in. Your, Royal dog, it was. A big cash You'll be a gore, fest to be Wolman everywhere It's it's surgery again If Was the seriousness nowhere. Mutilations, yeah that's that's. Crazy they're. Doing it's. Wild animals are doing. Predators it's too precise and there's no hurt Hurt these can. Cope, whatever they just. Turn away. And tried. To ignore him and. Think seeds feed the media loin becomes Okay Public domain is it gets I appreciated that you end up referencing skin Walker ranch and the team from nibs and my colleague column Kelleher because they worked really hard at trying to figure this out and. Really ended, up getting nowhere I mean these are hardcore scientists who were trying to find an answer and figure out who might be responsible and it seemed like whatever was responsible was purposely trying, to confound things, and column as you know eventually developed a theory that you might be doing some of this under the umbrella sort of operating under the umbrella of aliens and knowing that they could get, away with it simulate what what we've ascribed to aliens or you up and get away with it and could track something moving through the for the food chain and and other researchers have. Taken on that as well do you think is that similar to the kinds of things that might be going? On outside of the US do you give that any kind of Credence outside of here well I if being tested food chains is being investigators? Checking for affects of nuclear tests okay The, US, propose elsewhere it's hard it's hard to see I mean there's no whim history. Apparently Linhares Is that this is going on, possibly you, know hundreds of. Years so do you know what was known each test on animals? New you, know hollow from previous Tests and stuff like. That and also. And, BSE good mix just you know going back you, know say like checkers fillet you know he's talking about, the UK and the eighty nineties how, a cow yeah it was actually been, pulled up, on 'em gosh h. Cam at your fall crops to forty feet up which asks him away the next day. They found that data by legal cases late, dash and, we're talking about. If you want to go back to go back to the times? At the, Old Testament so These days and just be always a need and to find some other reason at rawdon. And Sedation and on again like to repay deductive ward and beautification shields, because, they give an. Open to the, likes of, and the media to be able to say well okay to utilize so you know they're like you know the cows And does, she do, that's not, the case I'm the. King of evidence yes it's been gone along I'm so so long and over. Two hundred years and even for the back and. I'm so these teams give me just. Stand, so it's looking out some somewhere. Else I we feel has always seen here and one of the main reasons why we took him interested in going as deep as we head into just and is because an Oscar de m deal Casablanca in relation to? Those who created those Engaged to dad like this note and we may talk about if like I am yes I am it seems that that. Was being celebrity rather creators today and going to same. Teams with animals they had the please, take a specific parts to each maybe whatever's in, the eyes tongues director sexual m m Etcetera whatever You know and, vision Detroit assuming and but we find that the same teams will happen downtown's, years ago hockey out on equipping Sam being so, to to to state that it's humans doing this under the guise fat your phones, essential accessory and it's just one dollars excuse for the moment in natural, sexual Mottaki your if you, read Georgia does this tremendous amount of cases, and If the surveys have been found on your phone have seen previously Indiana.

US Cope Uman Linhares gore Oscar Sedation Walker ranch Kelleher Casablanca director UK Indiana hockey Sam Detroit Georgia
Scientist Clay Routledge says we love our animals too much

Animal Radio

03:06 min | 3 years ago

Scientist Clay Routledge says we love our animals too much

"Ranging from the economic costs associated with children to people being too busy but there is some interesting research relating issues like loneliness to pet ownership and also trends related to the delaying of marriage and i'm having children and these things seem to correspond with increased pet ownership and not just people having pets but the more they there's term in psychology called anthropomorphic zim which is when you treat things or animals that aren't you men's as if they have uman cognitive qualities and so we're seeing more of this i've seen people you know maybe you as well i've seen people walking down trails with their dogs and baby strollers when presumably be much assuming the dogs aren't you know injured in any way would be better for them to be walking at seen people trying to feed their dogs human food that's not necessarily the best for their nutritional needs i saw this really insane story i think it was on slate of this trend for millennial hipsters to not vaccinate their dogs which speaks to two different two different crazy beliefs which is one they believe in the the false idea of the vaccinations cause artisan and two they think that their dogs can get autism and so there's these kinds of trends that i don't think it's just necessarily bad shows that some you know some kind of bad state that were as the social species but also there some real risks to animals you know there's some real risks to neglect and abuse of treating animals not like animals but like they're fully part of the human species where do you draw the line and i know it's it's not the line that's easy to see but where do you draw the line between beat over the top with your pet and just being a regular head owner yeah a good question to be clear i don't think it's the case that most pet owners are doing this you know what you know what we you know i'm sure most pet owners have a perfectly healthy relationship with with their pets but what you know i don't know where the line is but you know i think people need to be educated about what they can expect from an animal so when i wrote this article the you know that has you guys divided i can't even tell you the amount of hate mail that i received that was fascinating to me because so much of it was humans are trash humans are garbage your garbage and in a way it just spoke to my point right that people don't have a lot of faith in humanity that people don't you know there's poll numbers supporting this people are less likely across urban rural and suburban areas of our country there are less likely to feel strongly attached to their community they're less likely to fill there's people that they can confide in and so i think what we're seeing is some level we have to be clear that there's plenty of people that have perfectly healthy relationships pets and these are the people that i'm talking about here but some level there's something going on in which people are so desperate for that mean connection that they're elevating their dogs to be to expect more from them than they really can paint type for one second we're gonna take a quick break we're with dr clay rutledge telling us that maybe we love our animals too much just some of the some of

Scientist Clay Rutledge Klay Rutledge Guinness Twenty Five Pound Two Pounds
Gene editing embryonic stem cells might increase risk of cancer

Pat Thurston

02:34 min | 3 years ago

Gene editing embryonic stem cells might increase risk of cancer

"And not be lonely as long as you have a social network that you're connecting with this case it's like yeah you need to be connecting with other uman beings you men's connect with one another important that's what the data says all right so go ahead do that connect with another person by the way speaking of connecting with another person you know we we talked about like gene editing brat help cure diseases and that kind of stuff crisper gene editor you've heard me say that before right well you know how i always talk about the idea that we move way too fast with new technology because new technology has called and by the way politicians do this everybody else says yeah unintended consequences right unintended crisper jeanette her check out these two new studies that the crisper caz nine gene editing as apparently potentially causing cancer that's right two new studies published today are warning i saw this stat news the studies published in nature medicine scientists found that sells whose genomes were successfully edited by crisper this potential to cede tumors inside a patient that's right so chris byrd cells can be a ticking time bomb according to researchers from both well these are separate reasons research studies by the way one is sweden's karolinska institute and the other was the gigantic drug coming novartis crisper is already apparently there was a claim in two thousand seventeen that it caused guy high numbers of off target effects that was retracted in march there was a report of human immunity to cows nine that was currently solvable but experts are apparently taking this new cancer risk finding very seriously the ceo of crisper therapeutic samco carney told stat the results are quote plausible plausible plausibility standard we although they likely only apply to one of the ways that chris genomes replacing disease causing dna with healthy versions and not to the other simply where they excised dna but he said quote it's something we need to pay attention to especially as crisper expands more diseases we need to do the work and make sure edited cells return to patients don't become cancerous yeah you cared disease now i have a giant tumor and i die from that that seems like a problematic outcome doesn't it.

Editor Cancer Nature Medicine Karolinska Institute CEO Carney Chris Byrd Sweden
"uman" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"uman" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"And right here at the fred hutchinson institute in in seattle they are making real progress and this idea that uman beings are going to be unable to solve problems is convert indicated by all of the history of that has gone on in the fifty years since the population bomb was published let's go to your calls to david in sacramento david you're on the michael medved show michael may you go from strength to strength i just want to say real quick you're going to hear you mentioned the cdc there's rumblings that the cdc is going to be releasing its last year's suicide reports which are gonna show an age range in young people as doubling and i just want to say that i have three kids in their twenties i can tell you right now when i was in my twenties my high school days i don't remember one person that committed suicide mike kids know between two and five each that have committed suicide there's a war against masculinity underway there's a war against meaning underway boys are looking at at at the future and going if i get married and have a kid the the wealth transferred that the democrat party loves to see happen to goes from women to men in the case of divorce a lot of these boys in fermented whitman yes they're saying there's no way in hell i'm going to get involved with that i'm just going to have fun and that's meaningless and i'm getting a just play around and that's meaningless and they're not getting married and they're not having children.

fred hutchinson institute seattle democrat party whitman david sacramento michael medved fifty years
"uman" Discussed on 3D Printing Today

3D Printing Today

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"uman" Discussed on 3D Printing Today

"Yeah kind of flocked kind of tan greenish flock to own as a binomial microphone it wasn't very good because it it doesn't doesn't take into accounts the elements of your of uman hearing that depend upon how sound flows through your head so you can't get the with this this approach whereas sticking microphones in your ears does capture it and scary three d quality one day we might we might try any can hear just what it sounds like to be inside andy cones head well no you don't hear like minded you get hear the voices in your head you hear what i hear basically and you hear the way i hear it and so you'll know when something's coming from behind me in front of me or of me or underneath it gets actually kind of interesting disney got into it there for a while to when they they had some sample binary stuff it's fascinating it it it it can't really be used for recorded music because recall gordon music is not binomial the only time it would work as if it's a bunch of folks with acoustic instruments sitting around you or an orchestra than it would work well the the best the best binomial gag i ever heard was actually acoustics demo that the cousteau society america did a demo cd and there were all these kind of obscure acoustic phenomenon that you could theoretically here but then the best one of them was they had it was it was a sound of it was just a like a hand would saul.

disney gordon music america cousteau society one day
"uman" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

The Cracked Podcast

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"uman" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

"I don't think that this is something that this technology caused but they've got another episode we're spoiling all black mirror but they've got another episode where it's like in a future video games like online multiplayer role playing games we'll be so advanced that the npc's will be fully sent uman's and interact they can take your dna in repr reproduce your entire being entire mind body soul all of your thoughts and personality in game as an npc yet it's the star trek yeah when incredibly sadistic sociopaths own in run that entire technology they will use it to torture people forever creating a hell in which these sin humans are tortured in unimaginable ways it's like okay again that guy would have been associated path without that technology i i don't think the technology is your issue there because he's willing to put himself in a situation where the world feels real to him and then he uses it to torture and kill people all the time they're person has always existed the technology did not invent that guy in reality they can i probably would not thrive as a software engineer he would he would probably have been caught torturing animals as a child and hopefully someone would have gotten him help in the course of trying to build like we'll what if the future is horrible it's almost presented like it's supposed to be cautionary commentary about our world but in order for it to be horror the horror genre everyone has to be a serial killer like everyone you run into and i don't know if people who watch it because i keep seeing comments when people watch those episodes it's like man that's chilling like you know you just think twenty years from now they could have that it's like yeah but people like him are not going to be more common twenty years from now like if your premise is that technology is making us more evil and turning us into sociopaths i'm gonna.

uman software engineer twenty years
"uman" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"uman" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"A song tomorrow that somebody record it yesterday or minutes earlier in the same place or somewhere completely different so only we have that fundamental technology of recording all age and sharing it and so that is the thing that makes us human and to be able to participate that in whatever form you know whether it is that you make music or you listen to music or you critique music or you ride or you listen to podcasts or you make podcast all of those various forms of contributing to the knowledge loop i think that's the most human thing that humans do anything that will persist sort of that's future proof that will persist regardless of changes in technology i do believe that we will have both transhumance at neo human so transhumance are minted humans and we're actively working on that and then we i think likely will have neo humans these are machines in silly co that will be able to participate meaningfully in that knowledge loop in the both the creation and the dissemination and sharing of knowledge now i think we can then talk about what does it mean to be uman in a future where we have machines that are also at some level uman in that definition that i just provided which is the knowledge definition i think at that point the thing that we still have the makes you humans and it's a thing that we don't understand very well and it's what philosophers called kuala which is when i look at this orange chair over there i have a feeling of what it feels like to be looking at an orange chair and we don't know where that feeling comes from we don't really know how to explain it we don't know what the physicality is that physical phenomena that underlie this i think we have a very good understanding of the brain at its constituent level we have a very poor understanding of the brain at its emergent phenomena level and the most intriguing emergent phenomena is the quality of thing so i think in a future where machines neil uman's exist that can participate in the knowledge loop we're.

neil uman
"uman" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"uman" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"A song tomorrow that somebody record it yesterday or minutes earlier in the same place or somewhere completely different so only we have that fundamental technology of recording all age and sharing it and so that is the thing that makes us human and to be able to participate that in whatever form you know whether it is that you make music or you listen to music or you critique music or you ride or you listen to podcasts or you make podcast all of those various forms of contributing to the knowledge loop i think that's the most human thing that humans do anything that will persist sort of that's future proof that will persist regardless of changes in technology i do believe that we will have both transhumance at neo human so transhumance are minted humans and we're actively working on that and then we i think likely will have neo humans these are machines in silly co that will be able to participate meaningfully in that knowledge loop in the both the creation and the dissemination and sharing of knowledge now i think we can then talk about what does it mean to be uman in a future where we have machines that are also at some level uman in that definition that i just provided which is the knowledge definition i think at that point the thing that we still have the makes you humans and it's a thing that we don't understand very well and it's what philosophers called kuala which is when i look at this orange chair over there i have a feeling of what it feels like to be looking at an orange chair and we don't know where that feeling comes from we don't really know how to explain it we don't know what the physicality is that physical phenomena that underlie this i think we have a very good understanding of the brain at its constituent level we have a very poor understanding of the brain at its emergent phenomena level and the most intriguing emergent phenomena is the quality of thing so i think in a future where machines neil uman's exist that can participate in the knowledge loop we're.

neil uman
"uman" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"uman" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"As as a quick example again exactly what what andhra sad when i'm working with him right i let's say i'm in one part of the system and an object that he's gonna use i need to express in the code and letting him know that those are the public things that he can use methods some instance variables and those others are private he cannot and should should not and cannot touch him um i guess it was a little statements and i think they have a lot of answers uh or counter statements so when it comes to do your last statement with like referring to private public and having clear interfaces gyroscope dozen force them but there is a convention than the convention i think is is start a method with an underscore it is private don't users use entirely the same with fields um but to see that a little bit more holistically when i now look at coded a wrote a year ago i think it's shitty and if i will look at code a right now in a year i will think that quotas shitty we all learn software is in perfect we have not mastered software at all i would say that suffers probably the most complex thing that uman's create it and we we're in a way above our heads on you said that we now we're in above our heads and um i think part of the x part of the learning process is to make mistakes and make miss that make aross and if you want like learn to ride a bike you get on a bike and you fall and that's how you like learn to balance its you don't get on a steady bike and learn how to like pushed to peddle steps not biking biking is being balanced and pushing the paddles in the same with developing right so with that analogy.

uman andhra
"uman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"uman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Peered appear conversations and francis collins director of the national institute of health let me talk a little bit about something that you did that brought you to national fame and attention and that's the human genome project what was the human genome project and why do we care about europe having codiscovered it well good question so what is the genome any it's basically the entire instruction book which is written in the language of dna for an organism so we uman's have a genome all other league living organism animals plants bacteria they all have a gino ours is pretty big if you think of dna as a language it's an interesting one that has just four letters in its alphabet which we call a cgmt 'cause they're abbreviations for chemical basis and our genomes are six billion of those letters you get three billion from mom and 3 billion from death that's a lot although it's pretty amazing to contemplate that that's abounded set of information and that seems to be sufficient to build a human being from a single cell and win the gino project was started in 1990 we knew very little of that information we had little snippets here and there of dna information but the whole thing loomed in front of us almost like an impossible task because our technology was nowhere near up to the ability to read that number of letters in any kind of measurable time so why air seek human being better off because we now have mapped shooter in gino well there are many questions about that the whole thing got finished in two thousand three and there were some silly comments about okayed medicine will be transformed in the next two weeks because of this of.

director human genome project gino francis collins national institute of health europe uman two weeks