35 Burst results for "Uman"

"uman" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:00 min | 2 months ago

"uman" Discussed on AP News

" And this week's religion roundup. Jewish pilgrims gather in Ukraine despite the war. Brazil's president exhorts evangelicals to help keep him in office, and the Vatican imposes disciplinary sanctions on a Nobel Peace Prize winning bishop. Thousands of hasidic Jewish pilgrims ignore travel warnings and flock to central Ukraine to mark the Jewish new year. The pilgrims travel from Israel and other countries to the small city of Oman. The burial site of a respected hasidic rabbi who died in 1810. About 23,000 pilgrims were in Uman on Sunday. Brazil's president Bolsonaro waged an all out campaign to shore up the crucial evangelical vote ahead of the October 2nd elections. Evangelicals helped carry him to power in 2018 and he tapped members of their churches for important ministries and for a Supreme Court nomination. Influential pastors and politicians are warning their followers that the race's FrontRunner leftist former president Lula would close Christian churches. The Vatican says it imposed disciplinary sanctions on Nobel Peace Prize winning bishop Carlos Bello, following allegations that he sexually abused boys in East Timor in the 1990s. The Vatican spokesman says the office that handles sex abuse cases received allegations concerning the bishop's behavior in 2019, and within a year had imposed sanctions. AP Vatican correspondent Nicole Winfield says many questions remained about the bishop's role in the church over the past two decades. After 2002 though, when he retired, it seems like he almost fell off the map. It's as if he disappeared. If he was under some kind of Vatican sanction in those years, that would explain this very low profile that he had. The announced sanctions include limitations on bellows movements and ministry and prohibit him from having voluntary contact with minors or contact with East Timor. I'm Walter ratliff

Vatican Ukraine Uman president Bolsonaro Brazil Nobel Peace Prize Carlos Bello Oman AP Vatican Nicole Winfield Lula Israel Supreme Court East Timor bellows Walter ratliff
In this week's religion roundup, Jewish pilgrims gather in Ukraine despite the war, Brazil's president exhorts evangelicals to help keep him in office, and the Vatican imposes disciplinary sanctions on a Nobel Peace Prize-winning Bishop.

AP News Radio

02:00 min | 2 months ago

In this week's religion roundup, Jewish pilgrims gather in Ukraine despite the war, Brazil's president exhorts evangelicals to help keep him in office, and the Vatican imposes disciplinary sanctions on a Nobel Peace Prize-winning Bishop.

"And this week's religion roundup Jewish pilgrims gather in Ukraine despite the war Brazil's president exhorts evangelicals to help keep him in office and the Vatican imposes disciplinary sanctions on a Nobel Peace Prize winning bishop Thousands of hasidic Jewish pilgrims ignore travel warnings and flock to central Ukraine to mark the Jewish new year The pilgrims travel from Israel and other countries to the small city of Oman The burial site of a respected hasidic rabbi who died in 1810 About 23,000 pilgrims were in Uman on Sunday Brazil's president Bolsonaro waged an all out campaign to shore up the crucial evangelical vote ahead of the October 2nd elections Evangelicals helped carry him to power in 2018 and he tapped members of their churches for important ministries and for a Supreme Court nomination Influential pastors and politicians are warning their followers that the race's FrontRunner leftist former president Lula would close Christian churches The Vatican says it imposed disciplinary sanctions on Nobel Peace Prize winning bishop Carlos Bello following allegations that he sexually abused boys in East Timor in the 1990s The Vatican spokesman says the office that handles sex abuse cases received allegations concerning the bishop's behavior in 2019 and within a year had imposed sanctions AP Vatican correspondent Nicole Winfield says many questions remained about the bishop's role in the church over the past two decades After 2002 though when he retired it seems like he almost fell off the map It's as if he disappeared If he was under some kind of Vatican sanction in those years that would explain this very low profile that he had The announced sanctions include limitations on bellows movements and ministry and prohibit him from having voluntary contact with minors or contact with East Timor I'm Walter ratliff

Vatican Ukraine Uman President Bolsonaro Brazil Nobel Peace Prize Carlos Bello Oman Ap Vatican Nicole Winfield Lula Israel Supreme Court East Timor Bellows Walter Ratliff
"uman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"uman" Discussed on KOMO

"Sound has died more from ABC's Jason nathanson. Lamont Dozier was part of a songwriting team that wrote a dizzying amount of hits in the 60s. Starting at Motown records in 1962, Dozier and brothers Eddie and Brian Holland wrote scores of classic songs everyone knows and loves, including a dozen number ones for the supremes, the four tops and more. Dozier left the trio and struck out on his own in 1873 as a solo act, but cat penning songs for others, including Phil Collins. The trio are in the songwriters and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Lamont Dozier was 81. Jason nathanson, ABC News, Hollywood. Growing tensions between China and Taiwan. These are your world headlines from ABC News. Taiwan's foreign minister saying China's military exercises near Taiwan are part of a game plan for invasion. The drills were launched in apparent response to House speaker Nancy Pelosi's trip to the self governing island, which Beijing claims as its own. China accusing the U.S. of single handedly creating tensions across the Taiwan strait, a top Pentagon official saying China is trying to bait the U.S. and Taiwan with a manufactured crisis. Renewed fighting in Ukraine Russia's defense ministry saying that Russian forces have destroyed an ammunition depot near the central Ukrainian city of Uman storing U.S. made high Mars and howitzers. At least ten people are dead and 7 missing after heavy flooding in South Korea. And the truth in Gaza appears to be holding up the Palestinian health ministry, however, reports three Palestinian men were killed. The UN Security Council holding an emergency meeting over the fighting between Israel and Palestinian militants last weekend. The ABC News foreign desk in Paris. The news

Lamont Dozier Jason nathanson Dozier Brian Holland Roll Hall of Fame ABC News China House speaker Nancy Pelosi Phil Collins ABC Eddie U.S. Taiwan strait Uman Ukraine Hollywood Beijing Pentagon Palestinian health ministry South Korea
"uman" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

13:55 min | 10 months ago

"uman" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"And a shaker in 9 two 9 that remarkable project creating an inclusive pluralistic discussion of the Bible as a foundational cultural text for which he is the editor of the website of 9 two 9 in English. His first book is called the way into Judaism and the environment. It is wonderful. And it's most recent book is the beautiful Hebrew roots Jewish routes, a tribal language in a global world. Try pronouncing the word in the title routes. He also generally accepted pronunciation roots. And I think you'll have a delightful surprise. Jeremy, we are so happy you're here. How are you doing? Hi, it's great to be here. Good to see you all again. Well, it is really great to have you. I want to see you do the math of those of those bands using their ages. I think that that would get us back into medieval times. That is so true. As for me, my name is no Efron. And I don't mean to brag, but years ago, when we first moved to the country, took it to around the middle of the night one night, Susan and I found in our apartment on the kibbutz and akra bout, a spider that I think is called an English a solo fuge or a camel spider, which is common in the aravon, usually grows to 15 centimeters or 6 inches long. But this one was maybe the length of my arm, and I'm pretty sure that it was hissing at us. And we'd done nothing and we were all out of ideas, so we called Jeremy, who, a minute later, appeared at our door in the middle of the night, holding a broom and wearing, and this is God's truth, a pith helmet. In a minute, he had swept the spider. I swear it was the size of my leg out into the desert where it belonged. Peace was restored in Susan and I went back to sleep, and I'm not posting 'cause that is not the way that I was raised, but while like the cowardly Lion, I may be short on courage, the trait that makes the hot and hot so hot and puts the ape in the apricot, but also like the coward lie and I have good friends who have the stuff that makes the muskrat guard his Musk and for me that has made all the difference. I should say that I'm recording from the TLB one satellite studio in Silver Spring, Maryland, which I was just delighted to learn and you can imagine my pride is officially a CDP or census designated place. This because while Silver Spring is the 5th most populous spot in Maryland, it was never officially incorporated, so it is not a city. It is not a town. It is not a village. And is instead a quote concentration of population defined by the United States Census Bureau for statistical purposes only. And I would fight to the death for Silver Spring because it is my concentration of population defined by the United States Census Bureau for statistical purposes only of birth. When my ancestors came to this country from an inhospitable Eastern Europe seeking a better life, they dreamed that one day, they would find a concentration population defined by the United States Census Bureau for statistical purposes only that would accept them as equals and buy gum they did. Today we will discuss two topics of nonpareil importance, but first we have a matter that we're following with alert interest in great concern, greater concern over the last hours as part of an occasional series that we call the promised podcast ponders watchful and worried the winds of war, most of us, I guess, have watched over the past weeks with what worry disbelief, a kind of awe at how easy it turns out to be, to invade the country next door and the unbearable lightness of it all. If you want to get all European about it, as Russia blustered more and more of its armies to Ukraine's border for Israelis watching what's happening on that border, 1800 kilometers straight shot due north of us and all the more so at this particular moment just minutes after I heard first reports that a deadly full on attack is just now begun. The thing is complicated, one of former prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu's achievements in foreign policy was creating a strong real politic tie with Vladimir Putin, a ten story banner of the two men shaking hands and smiling broly hung on Likud headquarters in Tel Aviv during the last elections, which bonds are frankly what has made it possible for Israel to keep Iran from setting up its army or some proxy army in Syria. At Israel's border, it has saved lives. On the other hand, now there is also the United States to keep in mind, finding just where to stand is not a simple thing. For all that, you can just feel the sympathy that many Israelis most of us I am sure have for Ukraine, 12 years ago, the two countries signed an agreement that lets Israelis and Ukrainians go from one country to the other without the trouble of getting a Visa and each year hundreds of thousands of Israelis travel to the Ukraine among them tens of thousands of whom each year make a pilgrimage during the high holidays to the grave in Uman of the great hasidic master remnant of braslav, a great grandson of the balsam to the founder of hasidism, 48,000 Jews live in Ukraine all year round, and since Vladimir alexandrovich zelensky, a Jew of remarkable charm and charisma became president three years ago all the more so, a Ukrainian cultural center opened just down my block just before Christmas. And it was right away a focus of happy and warm curiosity in the neighborhood. People popping their heads in to see what the Ukrainians are up to. Still, it is complicated. It is true that just under a quarter of all Israeli prime ministers, three of the 13 of them were born in Ukraine. And Golda Meir, more than anywhere else, save Mandatory Palestine. But most of these great Israelis did not see their identity much as Ukrainian rather along the lines of what physicists Igor Sandra robic described recently. I go over to my father and ask, am I Ukrainian on my Russian? And he responds neither your Jew. Of the great wave of more than 900,000 immigrants from the former Soviet Union after the collapse of the Berlin Wall between a half and a third were from Ukraine with an only slightly bigger number coming from Russia and all the rest coming from Belarus, Uzbekistan, Georgia, and such. All of these people brought with them complicated identities and passed on to their kids identities that are more complicated still. Some are pro Russian, some are anti Russian, some are pro Ukrainian, some are anti Ukrainian, some are just Jewish, some are not Jewish at all. Many are cosmopolitan and universalists in a way that just screams Eastern Europe. Since Putin took power from Boris Yeltsin in 2000, lots of FSU Jews have admired his resoluteness. But at the same time, the past 22 years have seen the rise of what some call the Putin aliyah, a steady stream of people quitting Russia for Israel because they saw their under Putin no future for themselves. One social scientist estimates that of the now well over a million Israelis who came from the FSU or whose parents did, three and 5 don't much feel much Russian or much Ukrainian while for one in 5, Ukraine is a big part of how they see themselves and for one in 5 Russia is a big part of how they see themselves. All of which is why official Israel seemed paralyzed by this crisis, mostly laying low saying nothing. Finally, just yesterday as we record, Israel's foreign ministry put out a statement saying, among other things, quote, Israel shares international concerns about the steps in eastern Ukraine and the serious escalation there in hopes that a diplomatic solution will be found that will lead to deescalation and is willing to make efforts in the service of that goal if asked. Israel supports the territorial integrity and sovereignty of Ukraine. The State of Israel is also concerned for the welfare of thousands of Israeli citizens who live in Ukraine and for the large Jewish community there. End quote. The statement makes no mention at all of Russia, which to many made it seem little and late and lame. Still the real Israeli response to all that's happening in Luhansk and Donetsk Donetsk being where north anchors was born and went to school, by the way, has happened at a different register than carefully worded foreign ministry press releases. A month ago, and Israeli delegation arrived in Kyiv, headed by a woman named in balmas, the director of Israel's foreign workers administration to meet with the heads of the Ukraine Labor Department to arrange 850 emergency work permits for Ukrainian construction workers after years of refusing to grant these permits on the grounds that it is now time to open our doors to Ukrainians seeking somewhere safe. The week before last, the chief rabbi of Israel Ravi, Josef, published quote unquote, an open call to our Jewish brethren in Ukraine, in which he wrote, quote, at times like this when the trumpet blasts of war are heard, it is proper for every God fearing Jew to make haste to the land of Israel and to ascend to our Holy Land. And not to tarry at all and to hurry and arrange an airline ticket and may God may he be blasted two feeds and supports all give heavenly aid and finding for those who need good settled dwellings and food and livelihood. Joseph was attacked right away for hypocrisy. People said rightly that Josef had for years made life harder, not easier for the hundreds of thousands who had already come from the FSU who were not Jewish, were often not Jewish at all, but Orthodox Christian, but the attacks missed the point, I think, that what Josef was saying was now is the time to open the doors to whomever will come will sort them out later. In fact, over the past weeks, Israeli bureaucrats have been hard at work tabulating how many might come here from Ukraine. There are Ukraine's 48,000 Jews, sure, but experts estimate that there may be another 200,000 or quarter of a million Ukrainians who are not Jewish, but who can if they want get instance Israeli citizenship under the law of return. According to which, if they are the grandchild of a Jew, they have a right to be a citizen of Israel. Minister of immigrant absorption, panina tamano shata said, quote, we are prepared to take in thousands of immigrants from Ukraine who want to move to Israel. We are waiting with open arms. Tamano shata, who was born in wusa, village in gondar in northern Ethiopia and who was three when she and her father and 5 brothers were airlifted out of Sudan and operation Moses in 1984. She shows no interest in checking papers before welcoming immigrants from Ukraine. Last week, her ministry put out a quote call for proposals for hotels, hostels, guesthouses, boarding schools, whatever willing quote unquote, to host immigrant families from Ukraine for their first month here and maybe longer. The tender says each place must provide good kosher food, fresh towels and linens each week. Baby cribs and free Internet and TV, a decent start to a new life better still if it comes with HBO so far, only 200 or so Ukrainians have immigrated to Israel in the month or so since the crisis started. But as the ministry of absorption tender observes with what seems like hopeful and sweet anticipation at any moment, this trickle could become a torrent. Inevitably, there are those who buy humbugged about the idea of Israel throwing open its gates to Ukrainians. Your own London, a great journalist, television host and public intellectual, very much of the old school, went on channel 11 TV and said, quote, why am I responsible for them? Those people are not Jews, not in their affinity to the State of Israel to Zionism to herzl. End quote. I mentioned this to a friend who said, oh, your own London. It's a modern marvel, how much that brilliant man never learns. For all that, it may be foreign minister yet you're lapid who captured what most Israelis have been thinking most while worriedly watching Ukraine when he told the times of Israel in an interview quote I look at Ukraine and I say thank God for the IDF end quote. Now I have always been scornful of statements like this, like the ones that come year after year as one or another army chief of staff says in a speech at Auschwitz on Holocaust remembrance day, if only the IDF had existed back then. But this time, I think I know what your lapid means. It was 81 years ago that Germans occupied Ukraine and occupation that a million maybe a million and a half Ukrainian Jews did not survive. Nobody even knows the goddamn number for certain. Most everything about what's happening today is different than what happened then. And one of those many things, surely not the most important, but to my eyes still may be the most miraculous is that now we do have a place where as I say these words, people are clearing rooms and making beds so there'll be a place for people to come where they will be greeted with open arms. Today, two topics, topic one, left and gone as a new book by the one time head of the embattled anti occupation NGO breaking the silence Julie Novak and a big essay about her and our art. It's described how when she finished 5 hard, demoralizing years at the head of that organization. She had to go away to get out of the country for a time anyway, leading right-wing Marie journalist common lieber skinned to argue that there is something in the political attitudes of Israel's left these days. That is corrosive of our connection to the country, might he have a point and topic to the hills are alive with the sounds of lawsuits as sustainability activists here agitate to recognize the legal rights and standing of animals, plants, streams, springs, and other elements of nature, which, if they get their way, would allow rivers to sue power plants that dump direct into them, is this something we ought to want to do. And for our most unreasonably generous Patreon supporters in our extra special special extra discussion, the link to which you can find in our show notes on your podcast app, or at Patreon dot com slash promise podcast on the World Wide Web, we will talk about Miriam and zo vin, the talented talk of the town, TikTok, Tommy, about whom lately Alison wrote beautifully with special attention to how anzovin has been received in Israel, especially now that she's let be known her critical views of the orthodox rabbinate here. It's like my bubbies to say it's all fun and games until someone criticizes sexual predator rabbis..

Ukraine Israel United States Census Bureau fo Russia Census Bureau for statistical Putin Jeremy FSU Susan Uman braslav Vladimir alexandrovich zelensk Ukrainian cultural center Maryland Eastern Europe Igor Sandra robic Josef TLB
"uman" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

04:06 min | 10 months ago

"uman" Discussed on Unorthodox

"As pilgrims arrive, Jewish Uman goes from crowded to jam packed. I met people who credited rabbi nachman with getting them out of trouble at work. And lawyers and psychiatrists who became nahman heads later in life and now study his works together on Zoom. I keep it with satmar hostage and met a blissed out American hippie kid who came to Uman for Hanukkah 9 months earlier and just never got around to leaving. He said he'd never been happier. Even in sobieska park, a stunning 18th century landscape wilderness and the most famous non Jewish thing in town. It was possible to find groups of Jews breaking out into song. Like this one, which had just dove in the afternoon minska prayer on a cliff overlooking a winding artificial Lake. There is a festive atmosphere in Uman for a couple days before Russia's Shauna. But it doesn't really feel like a party exactly. Even with constant singing and dancing, the pilgrimage has a much more serious feel than any music festival I've been to. Seemingly a majority of the pilgrims are hasidic Jews from places like Williamsburg and bait schemes. Sephardim from Israel are probably the second largest demographic. The American modern orthodox pop up invisible numbers too. And then there's another smaller but still very significant group. The hasidic hippies. They're jewishly observant spiritual seekers, drawn to the interplay of joy and seriousness that permeates many of rabbi nachman's ideas. In Uman, they dove in a tent and hostile complex called naked tova, meaning positive point, a reference to rabbi nachman's instruction to find just one good attribute in everyone. Has been to Uman for over a dozen Russia Shana's, using naked tova as his usual base during the holiday. Today, he lives in spot, the historic center of Jewish mysticism in northern Israel, where he has a wife and young family and works as a commercial composer and music producer. Angle has the wild beard of a biker, the laid back attitude of a musician, and the outlook of a hostage of reby nose. You can talk to him. And then you can tell him anything you want. So it's like, you're really, you know, obviously you're not supposed to ask. It's sad that he's dead for, you know, things, but you're a lot of talk to him about what's going on in your life just like a regular cluster we go to his revenue who's alive today. You can go and talk to him about what's going on. And that's what I plan on doing after we finish this thing. I got to go to the good hour and talk to him about my whole life. Reby knock one's eclectic Ness is part of the appeal, especially for someone like angle. So it's a big thing in breast cancer every single day. Really? And yeah, yeah, maybe not going to dance every day. Yeah, rubbing us and says, who's having a student that you are supposed to dance every single day and that is a form of chuba. It's a form of repentance. So Firebase dancing and Briggs harsh judgments from heaven. So maybe even after before I go in and see what I'm going to probably do a little popping up and down, you know what I'm saying? Is that it's like, you're dancing for Schumer. You're not dancing for fun necessarily. It's not supposed to be like. It's like a real holy experience also, you know? You're building up like a holy sweat. At noon on the day before Russia Shana, pilgrim's cram into the tomb and into the surrounding streets. From a side room behind the grave, a hazen leads a massive reading of the tikkun Chloe, broadcast over loudspeakers. At the beginning of each of the psalms, people scream the first line, clap their hands and bellow to the heavens. The sounds of the ten psalms, echo through a city where Jews were nearly exterminated within living memory. Now, every single Jew who's come is in the same place,.

rabbi nachman Uman nahman sobieska park Russia Shauna Israel Shana tova breast cancer Briggs Schumer hazen
"uman" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

06:10 min | 10 months ago

"uman" Discussed on Unorthodox

"It's Friday, September 3rd, 2021, and I've just arrived in Oman. The pilgrims were eager to discuss why they'd made the long journey here. From Lakewood, New Jersey, summed it all up. I really spiritually asked me one of the reasons before, I just don't give a damn why I keep it coming back here. I literally feel my spiritual. And again, everyone has their own thing, but I literally feel that my lawyer for like, they have judgment, which is what Shauna, my lawyer is here. You look around. The group of like minded people coming for a similar purpose. Yeah. And I feel like that would give someone feel like a rest stop on a long journey through life. You have a rest stop once a year, Russian that you come here to refill with people and it helps you out the year. The pull of this place defies logical explanation. Nearly every Uman pilgrim has gotten on a plane and left their family behind during what's basically the Jewish version of Thanksgiving. These people think of a trip to a grimy Ukrainian city as an annual reset button. Crucial to their spiritual health and just to their lives in general. They've been going to extreme lengths to get to the tomb for years. It was made almost unreachable by the Soviet Union between the late 1930s and communism's fall in the early 1990s. In 2020, very few people actually made the pilgrimage because of COVID and tight travel restrictions. In 2021, the crowds are huge again, if not entirely back to their pre-pandemic size. The pilgrimage can feel like an exhaust and crush of people with long and intense days ending in dorms you share with 7 other people. My Russia Shana would still be a lot cushier than what Jewish visitors experienced in the early 90s. After the fall of the Soviet Union, when Uman had just opened back up. Rabbi mayor el kabos explains and of course it was like it was today. There were no showers. We heard for over a week with no showers. Food we had to bring everything we can to cancer sardines can this conduct matsa before the fish can, you know, glass jars, whatever, once my mayonnaise opened up on a Lufthansa flight and they had to put my whole bag in another bag because they spilled oh boy who had stuck, okay? And there was like a stench everywhere. So physically, there was nothing. But the light people felt, you know, there was such a light of holiness that can't be explained. The feeling of the yearning was unbelievably intense. People were getting dirty everywhere. There were dust everywhere, but people were extremely happy and they didn't feel anything. You felt you were on a real high. Was a real real spiritual high. So why this place and why this rabbi? The usual explanation is that rabbi nachman, founder of one of the most successful and influential sects of mystical orthodox Judaism, is the so called psychologist of the soul. He was someone whose ideas have a profundity and a straightforwardness that can make them resonate for nearly anyone. He told deep original stories and also wrote complex philosophical works. As a result, his followers span an unexpected range, ashkenazi and sephardi, lifelong devotees or people who became students of the revvy late in life. The spiritual seekers. Rabbi nachman died at the age of 38 and 1810. He wanted to be buried in Uman because its cemetery contained the graves of local Jews who had been massacred in a pogrom decades earlier. Shortly before his death, the rabbi made a promise to anyone who visited his tomb and recited the ten psalms from the tikun khali, a book whose title means full repair. I asked rabbi Al khabaz about this too. What's supposed to happen when you say you can call it the Remy's tune? A lot. What do you mean we're supposed to let you go? You take out the teeth. It's not magic. It's all like, okay, I'll do this. And that's it. Focus focus. It's on purpose. There's a webinar has a lot of depth and content in the TikTok. What's written by him as what it's supposed to do? What you see or not is not necessarily a proof. Just because you don't see the changes, it doesn't mean it was no changes. It doesn't work like that. It would be not promised. In front of two witnesses, he swore that he will do the maximum power that he has, and he shows an expression that he has this power to pull the person out of the lowest depths of hell. No matter what he may have done, the main thing is that he wants to change from now on. This person has what's unique about this is we don't find any Sunday con Jewish history that is made such a commitment to a promise in oath, such as that. I wasn't in Uman this past Russia Shauna because I believe the rabbi who died 222 years ago would plead my case to hash M in the afterlife. I was there because Uman Russia Shana is an event with no real parallel. And this would be the first full scale pilgrimage of the COVID era. This self contained bubble of tens of thousands of Jews is strange and unlikely and unequaled by anything else in Judaism. And it only lasts three or four days. Uman Russia Shana is supposed to be somewhere.

Rabbi nachman Uman pilgrim Uman Rabbi mayor el kabos Soviet Union Shauna Oman Lakewood Shana New Jersey Lufthansa Russia rabbi Al khabaz sephardi ashkenazi cancer Remy
"uman" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"uman" Discussed on The Good Fight

"Flare. the is and it's very hard to recognize the perspective of somebody who disdains him. But that's both a sense of humor. A kind of alaska atmosphere and oddly joyous nece in his public persona is of bitterness and anger as well but but the is a sense of sort of the fund the joy of challenging the structures that be having one of the things that's missing and his imitators bat. it's sort of all of the nastiness without the sort of joy that he gives his supporters even as he ripe horrifies everybody else his rallies to me you're like you know professional wrestling event and it's not an accident because he comes from that kind of world of entertainment and has participated in a lot of world wrestling events. And so he's the perfect. He'll who fans still adore and that's halt trope in american professional wrestling and another podcast earlier. This year. I said you know there's no amount of pork rinds. That are gonna turn ted cruz. You know who went to princeton and harvard or josh foley who went to stanford and yale into authentic populace they themselves are elitists who are masquerading as populace. So i do think it makes a difference whether trump actually runs again in right. Now it's looking to me like he will run and so a lot will depend on legal system. Does he get indicted. How tied up in litigation as he in defending both criminal and civil cases and you know does that cause him to trim sale somewhat or not but if he runs you know the polling suggests he'll be formidable he'll win the nation wide you think about this prospects in general election and does bad depend on his sons in his appeal or does that depend in part on. The food is opponent with joe biden. Oh somebody else. And how many successes democrats have shown themselves will help me. Mistakes ago to make the news. Yeah what my fear is. Is that by twenty four There might be about inflation that could be very damaging president biden's prospects reelection or cameras man. I think effectively. it's either gonna be biden's harris. I don't think there's much chance at another democrat would emerge. If biden doesn't mind. It would be incredibly hot for anybody to win a primary election against come in the house. I agree and so. I've been having this debate with my son. Actually who's twenty seven and using i. It doesn't matter. And i said no. You only think that because you've never actually lived through a period of inflation and we've had very low inflation in the united states for forty years and it can be extremely corrosive. I think would be very corrosive that i would be very concerned about. Trump's chances right now. His polling nationally doesn't look very good minutes being like sixty six percent saying they don't want him to run again nationally not republicans obviously but a lot can change and when you're governing. You're alienating voters that's just the nature of the beast so my concern is it's not even whether trump could win the popular vote. I think he would almost certainly lose it but the question is by how much in in what states i mean that's one thing we've seen. Republicans ought to be very concerned by the fact that they haven't won the popular vote for president since nineteen eighty eight saved once in two thousand four when george w bush was reelected and then it was still pretty close. Think he went by three million votes. That's remarkable is somehow hadn't folded on the fact that they haven't won the popular would since nineteen eighty. Eight will be exception of two thousand four. That's remarkable about politics. I want to shift a little bit to some of the stakes for democracy. The united states around the world one thing. I'm still struggling to make sense of this. How much damage. Donald trump did ultimately do to democracy around the world. I think his actions were horrifying. The fact that he was clearly on the side of overtime popular psychic all bond in hungary is very close to render promoting india was damaging the certain circumstantial evidence bet democracy has been impacted by now the deepest democratic recession. Twenty twenty was worse than be as before. But i guess how much at this point doesn't matter who. The president of the united states is full. The fate of democracy around the world and how different would was four or five years have looked in countries like hungary like india or for that matter in turkey. We will embassador in the past. If we'd ended up with president clinton in two thousand sixteen so interesting counterfactual. I've not quite sure whether it would or wouldn't have been very different. I mean i think one thing would have been different. Which is there would have been at least somewhat. More of an emphasis on both uman rights violations in places will certainly like turkey but also more support in general for the rule of law and for institutions like central european university. A place like hungary which played an important role not just in hungary but in central europe more. Broadly is i think there would have been certainly some differences whether those differences would have only been marginal or whether they would have amounted to something that changed the trajectory of the democratic recession. As you were saying. I think is a much harder question to answer because i think the democratic recession is rooted in a lot of structural causes that it's not very easy for one president to reverse or change. I be interested in your reaction but to me this global democratic recession. There's some things that you and some of your co-authors of pointed to with regard to the general decline in appreciation globally of the importance of things like free speech and other formal elements of democracy. I'm not quite sure why that is. It may be the success of democracy which then gets taken for granted. I haven't been able to figure out how slain that. But i think there are other factors that run a little bit deeper. There are the unequal distribution of economic gains from globalization which is certainly occurred here in the united states but also in various other societies. It has fueled in some sense some understandable economic resentments. Although i think the economic resentments have not been the real driver of this. It's been more. I think the cultural elements here which have been brought to the fore by things like greater global immigration some of which has been brought about by in the eu different institutional changes were made to facilitate the at but also because of conflicts around the world and climate change which driven waves of immigration from sub saharan africa but also from conflict regions in the middle east from afghanistan all the.

wrestling biden ted cruz josh foley hungary united states joe biden princeton alaska stanford harvard george w bush Trump harris Donald trump turkey india central european university president clinton
"uman" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"uman" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

"Maybe it's a rather perverted understanding of doing good. You know it's based upon this false egoistic sense of their power and their own importance you know in the world. Somehow there was something about why they're so successful. They actually believing that their superior that the better than you and so they then years the limitations of power Whether it be government corporation over military to impose that will and others and they'd kill doing it benevolently now. This has caused most wars in history. It has certainly caused the two big wars of the twentieth century. The holocaust for spam ns depressions all a lot of horrendous. Uman problems that were really manufactured by people in power but today and by the way it has a lot to do satanic influence my latest book the the satanic conspiracy deals with this But lately now in our own time it's becoming particularly deadly dangerous because of modern technology you know now they have the ability to you know without official intelligence with trans humanism with the control of the scientific means of control surveillance control of you know with them holding those kinds of levers with dealing with a much more dangerous quote conspiracy and i use that we're loosely amount saying they were all sitting around in a smoker. It's just they have you know they. They are seeking to control others through means of force and deception. That's a conspiracy the sense it's a much more dangerous time. And we're dealing with much will lethal enemy and i would say they are enemies of individual freedom the individual sovereign right of the citizen and under god you to Created in the image of god to understand how to help other people to make up their own minds. Anyway took waxing here but no no. But you're you're correct and it's sort of in our face at this point. I mean Dame naser thing but social media. We've seen i mean this is just anybody can see this. This is a factual are censoring people. Because they think they have the better idea. What's good and what's wrong. They wanna strip choice from the individual a sort of in my way of looking at the world where here basically for one reason and that is to choose I think we have free will is of individual free will is almost what makes us human and combined with reason to use it and everything like that. The whole the whole problem is people use reason for the wrong reasons. Like i don't think these social media guys which are really just gossip rags if you think about it. They made billions of dollars off of social gossip and more than anything else. That's what they are. They're not there technologically geniuses at the right place at the right time but they're certainly not moral genius..

Uman Dame naser
"uman" Discussed on Plant Strong

Plant Strong

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"uman" Discussed on Plant Strong

"Your book. You talk about a carcinogenic microbiome. What what can we all do to make. Sure we do not have carcinogenic microbiome. That just sounds deathly. That sounds awful. Yeah so the human gut microbiome hundreds of trillions of microbes bacteria yeasts viruses are living within our digestive system. Ten times more cells than the rest of your body a hundred times more genetic material. The human microbiome has been with each one of us since the moment of our birth. The first human touch a little bit of breast milk a fresh the first breath of fresh air microbes found this microbial world find a home within our digestive system and within her body crucial to the development of a healthy gi tract immune system body. Not only that rip. Because look i'll try not to talk another hour but the gut microbiome okay. With those little critters those bacteria viruses and yeasts have been on this earth for two to three billion years. They are direct descendants of the earth's first living inhabitants. Uman's on the other hand only been around for two hundred thousand years. What that tells me is that when the first ever to cells got together that would ultimately form that the primitive creature that would ultimately give birth to the human race the bacteria and the yeast and the viruses were there. The microbiome was there right alongside them and it's still with us today and we on a daily basis we can take care of gut microbiome gut. Microbiome is incredibly important to our health. And why wouldn't it be. It's been with us since the dawn of human evolution. So i mean how i would put this is when you sit down to each you can think about what kind of microbiome a my building today. Because the foods that we provide us with calories and nutrients we absorb those in our small predominantly but they the foods which to consume define the residue that gets delivered to our gut microbes. So if you're eating a standard western diet which is full of red meat processed animal fash plants deficient processed food. Okay the bacteria that live in. Your large are getting a steady supply of animal protein. Hardly any fiber and bile. They're getting bio which is produced to help to digest the multiply that fast and that feeds certain types of gut bacteria causing them to flourish and become predominance an those are the bacteria the process that stuff and generate things secondary bile acids and ammonia hydrogen sulfide gas which is pro inflammatory and hardly any short chain fatty acids and that gives a microbial environment which creates barrier dysfunction inflammation..

Uman
"uman" Discussed on The Cities of Refuge Podcast

The Cities of Refuge Podcast

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"uman" Discussed on The Cities of Refuge Podcast

"Human rights has everything to do with human rights being very politically sensitive in hong kong because hong kong sickle insects in which human rights are very sensitive and is already the case. When i was doing research in the summer of two thousand eighteen and it has i suspect only intensify. Its considering the developments. That took place The summer all author into deicing nineteen were the moth protests at now the introduction of the national security law and in hong kong the the political spectrum can be divided in two main sites pro beijing side that is focused on the move towards china and the pro democracy sides that this trained to maintain the freedoms. That's hull has also within the this. Its status as a special administrative region with its own legal system in which human rights are embedded in. This defy human rights become associated with one site of the spectrum. Where the pro-democracy sites it. It were pro democracy. Legislators who have lobbied for international human rights treaties being made applicable to all and they have been in full in establishing the human rights legislation in hong kong itself and day are also today in enforcing in uman rights advocacy. But then what you see in practice is that i call it human rights advocacy but often human rights are not literally mentioned in these debates and this also accounts for the debates on foreign domestic workers so when discussing their rights you will see that ngos often reframed advocacy for instance to domestic worker safety or other terms that are considered to be more neutral so even when ngos work on domestic workers human rights they would not frame this search and this is the case because it has a strategic purpose If it was better to not mention human rights because explicit reference would make their interactions way to governments more difficult because the government is oriented to arch beijing or at least disciplines to be so so while you invites were not always visible. In britain products did not mean that they did not influence these ngos and these debates in the background. And it was trudy interviews that i did with these ngos that there was able to Discovered this because i would ask them. I noticed that you did not refer to human rights on your website but do you consider yourself to be a human rights organization and they would often say yes they do and the interesting contradiction is is that then hongkong being a special administrative region participates in the united nations human rights.

hong kong uman beijing china trudy britain united nations
"uman" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"uman" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"And Russia pulled out allowed prussia to survive when it looked as a ball was lost. He cited that history and that actually did happen. He uman being some of them. 'specially have an infinite capacity for self delusion and hitler was deluding himself. On any indication. Things might change grasp at delano. Roosevelt died on april forty five shortly. Before hitler and hitler took that as proof that history was gonna repeat it so and the allied alliance was willing to collapse and obviously didn't and who recorded. I'm just curious. Do you remember who it was. That heard him say these things. All there were many of but Paul joseph garbo's wrote extensively his diary about that which we have copies of most of it was lost rider. He always wrote down everything and but there were a tidal. The ceo marshall particular head of the armed forces high command. I wanted to believe it and He wrote about it as well. It's just it's just amazing. We just got a couple of minutes left. I'm enjoying this very much. We're talking to samuel mitchum. The book is the death of hitler's war machine. What is the main thing that people who are students of the war would learn from your book that they didn't know let's put it that way. Oh it really depends on the student. it gives an overview of the german armed forces at the end of the war was a western front eastern. Front italy wafa The german civilians it covers the waterfront.

samuel mitchum Roosevelt april forty five Paul joseph hitler Russia german delano couple of minutes italy wafa
"uman" Discussed on Fully Automated

Fully Automated

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"uman" Discussed on Fully Automated

"Forward and of course. There is dan the side Argument here About silicon successions. The language i use We see this of course. In science fiction robotics artificial intelligence artificial super intelligence And all along a strong statement back in a clark mentioned earlier the sixties that look humans based on carbon Biology Are just knock robusta off not Resilience enough To conquer the hospital inhospitable vastness of states and so will evolve into computers digital computers silicon succession will be The inevitable path forward And while this will result in the extinction of humanity meow. That's just hard to the order of things that's just The way things happen and we should have grace this and so it is interesting. That silo coke in space. Expansionism starts with this extreme humanism Everything has to be subordinated to uman on this larger and larger scale but then as it develops further temporarily technologically spatially. The human gets dropped out Yemen's become the expandable predecessor and the Embrace of the Artificial Super intelligent life forms Is is is progress. So this is the apotheosis you see Humanity is is is a stepping stone to technological intelligence says that will have a god like many of the attributes of god Characteristics presumably not able to violate the laws of nature thus the speed of light but omniscient Affectively up the episodes Immortal you know you have apart breakdown you just replace it reproduce You know in an instant and of course they think what seven orders of magnitude faster than humans do And so there's a sector of people on this planet now not only want to do this in space but they wanna do what on earth you know. They don't see an artificial superintendence as a problem. They see it as this next step in evolution era variant patient of course with any wan Such as myself many others of who would say well. Maybe this isn't really a good idea about is maybe the earth and unanimity have a value which might be worth preserving. Yeah no. I think it's interesting the very very long range future projection going on there. You know like obviously in the nearer term Just sort of reminds me of You're talking there. About kim stanley robinson's novel aurora. Where you know. I think it's sort of a testament to the idea that you know despite our imagination of going to the to the stars and this is of course all part of this there is no planet..

uman dan clark Yemen kim stanley robinson
"uman" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

Sports 600 ESPN

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"uman" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

"With J rentals. Diversity in the coaching ranks may just be a no brainer. That's in two minutes. SportsCenter all night taking you up to Keyshawn J. Will and Zubin at the top of the hour. We have two teams to head coach is still standing in the NFL this season. Bruce Arians, Andy Reid. Incidently former Chiefs coach Todd Haley against this morning with Keyshawn J. Willens Uman over a couple hours from now just after eight o'clock eastern time. Meanwhile, there have been seven new head coaching hires in the NFL the past few weeks, including in Philly. The next bringing in Nick. Sorry, Annie. The consensus being. It's good for Nick for Carson Wentz, but They're the bad optics of the story. Not only that he was interviewed in casual vacation where, but the Eagles brass dress down so he'd feel comfortable. Then came his introductory press conference, which, if you missed it Didn't make him seem many more comfortable. Next thing that's very important to me is that we build a smart football team that we have a smart football team here, and I know we have the people in place to do that. The first part of that the first part of being smart is knowing what to do. We're gonna We're gonna know we're gonna have systems in place that Are easier to learn. Write complicated to the defense or offense that they're going against the special teams group. They're going as but easy for us to learn, because when we can put that because we when we can learn our system and we can get good at our system, then our talent can take over less thinking equals talent take over, But we need to have systems in place and we will have systems in place to do so. Couple of things at play on the heels of that, for the guys that highly questionable one The ongoing questions around NFL hirings, but also for the Eagles. Just getting books folks to buy into whatever the system is. Dominique Fox Worth is a former cornerback. That's that's hard to get behind. We talk about guys who can command a room like we always hear all this nonsense about all these Alfa male. Somebody come in there and be the Alfa of all Alphas. That ain't that dude, you know, like I feel sorry, because, like I understand being nervous and uncomfortable in front of the media, but them cameras ain't nearly as scary or as intimidating as a room full of grown men who are putting their health on the line every week to ball out for you and for them, So I'm gonna find it hard to believe that guy's going to get in there. And believe in him if he starts delivering these speeches or game plans like he just got it handed to him, like Clearly, those talking points were just handed to him. He would. They just gave those notes game I pull over and pushed him in front of cameras that read this, Eric, The enemy is at the crib. Furious right now that David Cully dude is like I'm 65 years old and I had to wait for a team to catch on fire to get my chance. His duty is hoarding. Hey, he couldn't even bother to wash.

NFL Nick Eagles Keyshawn J. Willens Uman Keyshawn J. Carson Wentz Bruce Arians Zubin Todd Haley Chiefs David Cully football Andy Reid Annie Dominique Fox Philly Eric
"uman" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"uman" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"When I glanced at it, I have it printed off here in front of me and let me say to its dairy free and gluten free, which I love because our family eats Dairy and gluten free. But of course, this recipe has chicken chicken is an immune builder. It might not surprise many of you that my mom still will make chicken soup. If Dad is under the weather, you know that. There is some science behind why the good cooks make chicken soup. When somebody's sick. The chicken has protein. It has ink it has glued. I mean, those all support our immune system. This particular recipe also has coconut milk and coconut milk contains something called Lorik acid. Laura get acid gets converted in our body to monologue, acid and monologue acid helps to fight off viruses. And then the spinach in this recipe. The spinach is great because it's high in vitamin C and other anti accidents. So so it's a good virus fighter, and I bet you could pick out some other ingredients in this stew recipe that are are great. Supporters of our immune system to Marianne. Yes, Absolutely. I love First of all. I love Curries and, uh, This is a delicious recipe, and there is something and we're almost swings us back to the liver and onions thing, But the lowly onion is in this recipe, and it's often the basis Most dishes. It's sort of the thing you start with his sauteing those onions. And they are loaded with immune boosting nutrients. Onions contain selenium they call it contains sulfur compounds, zinc and, of course, vitamin C. This chicken curry dish starts with onions so What other fabulous spices do we have in there? One that you probably all know, And that's tumeric, and it gives curry that beautiful rich color. And it is, UM, has a poly female compound called Kirk Uman, which is anti inflammatory, anti viral and anti fungal. And when it is paired with black pepper We were actually able to absorb that Kirk whom and even more so it's that little combination of tumeric and black pepper. That's sort of the magic here. And whenever you have spices always encourage you to buy them in small quantities. Because, boy, you know, time conflict by and and next thing you know, you're you're curry won't taste like it did when you first bought it so Trying by your spices and in small quantities, and but I hope you'll try this curry recipe. It is fantastic and the Brussels sprouts and sweet potatoes. And I'm also hoping that you will all.

Kirk Uman Brussels Laura
"uman" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Back and sexy And Here comes the double team following God again. LeBron has 46 when he hits a follow way to pointer from the right hand side and Michael, this is as good of a performance. LeBron is the Laker as we've seen yet. ESPN L A 7 10 Lakers with a seven point win. 1 15 Wanna wait in Cleveland over the Cavs Lakers improving to 10 and go on the road this season, LeBron season I 46 points. 73 pointers. Tied for fourth most points in NBA history by a player after turning 36 so What can we attribute this big night for LeBron? Home cooking, You know, you have to try to see your mom. Home cooked meal. So my uncle. You feel good to be back in my, you know. Mom my haven my rest a bit. You know that's being being home. So you know it also, obviously, you know, you're gonna spires watching the greats play and Seeing Brady see the things that you deal with that team. That's for me as well. But that's some pretty good. I just felt pretty good happened as I'll have the whole season. I begin better and better as the game goes on, and We'll go from the beginning. Just try to keep it going. Bron James, the oldest Laker with a 40 point games since Kobe Bryant in the final game of his career, And in fact, two day's gonna be a special day we remember the life of Kobe Bryant. Jump will be holding a special Tuesday afternoon. 2 to 4 P.m. eastern time and, of course, much more focused coming up on Keyshawn J. Willens Uman, ESPN. Ramona Shelburne joins the show 9 10 Eastern time here. On ESPN radio. SportsCenter all night. Nets back in action on Monday against Miami, Irving with six to shoot scenes of the elbow, back it out. Durant Durant with three to shoot. Gotta launch a three and it's going. He rattles and end 2013 d pits regained the lead with 6 42 remaining. A comfortable shot on a hands on the ball, but he still was able to get it off.

LeBron Durant Durant ESPN Lakers Kobe Bryant Keyshawn J. Willens Uman Ramona Shelburne NBA Cavs Cleveland Bron James Michael Brady Miami Irving
"uman" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"A show. Bye LeBron in his hometown. 1, 13 107 LeBron back and sexy And Here comes the double team following God again. LeBron has 46 when he hits a follow way to pointer from the right hand side and Michael, this is as good of a performance. LeBron is a Laker as we've seen yet. ESPN L A 7 10 Lakers with a seven point win. 1 15 Wanna wait in Cleveland over the Cavs Lakers improving to 10 and go on the road this season, LeBron season I 46 points. 73 pointers. Tied for fourth most points in NBA history by a player after turning 36 so What can we attribute this big night for LeBron? Home cooking, You know, you got opportunity. See your mama. Home cooked meal. So my uncle. I just felt good to be back in my, you know. My my, my haven my rest favor. You know, that's been being home. So you know it also, you know, obviously, you know, you're gonna spires watching the great play and Cm. Brady see the things that you deal with that team. That's why me as well, But I just felt pretty good. Just got pretty good at me as I will have the whole season. I begin better and better as the game goes on, and fell girl from the beginning and just try to keep it going. Bron James, the oldest Laker with a 40 point games since Kobe Bryant in the final game of his career, and in fact, two days would be a special day. We remember the life of Kobe Bryant Jump will be holding a special Tuesday afternoon. 2 to 4 P.m. eastern time and, of course, much more focused coming up on Keyshawn J. Willens Uman, ESPN. Ramona Shelburne joins the show 9 10 Eastern time here. On ESPN radio. SportsCenter all night. Nets back in action on Monday against Miami, Irving with six to shoot feeds in the elbow, back it out Durant Durant with three to shoot, Gonna launch a three and it's going. He rattles it in 2030 de pits, regained the.

LeBron ESPN Kobe Bryant Lakers Durant Durant Keyshawn J. Willens Uman Ramona Shelburne NBA Cavs Cleveland Bron James Brady Miami Michael Irving
"uman" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"God again. LeBron has 46 20 hits a fall away two pointer from the right hand side and Michael, this is as good of a performance. Why LeBron is a Laker as we've seen yet. ESPN L A 7 10 Lakers with a seven point win. 1 15 Wanna wait in Cleveland over the Cavs Lakers improving to 10 and go on the road this season, LeBron season I 46 points. 73 pointers. Tied for fourth most points in NBA history by a player after turning 36 so What can we attribute this big night for LeBron? Home cooking, You know? Good opportunity. See your mama. Home cooked meal. So my uncle. I just felt good to be back in my, you know. Mom my haven my recipe, You know, that's been being home. So you know it also, you know, obviously, you know, you're gonna spires watching the greats play and Was seeing Brady see the things that you deal with that team. No, that's for me as well. But I just felt pretty good. I just felt pretty good as I'll have the whole season. I begin better and better as the game goes on, and we'll go from the beginning and just try to keep it going. Bron James, the oldest Laker with a 40 point games since Kobe Bryant in the final game of his career, and in fact, two days would be a special day. We remember the life of Kobe Bryant Jump will be holding a special Tuesday afternoon. 2 to 4 P.m. eastern time and, of course, much more focused coming up on Keyshawn J. Willens Uman, ESPN. Ramona Shelburne joins the show 9 10 Eastern time here. On ESPN radio. SportsCenter all night. Nets back in action on Monday against Miami, Irving with 60 shoot themes of the elbow, back it out.

LeBron ESPN Kobe Bryant Lakers Keyshawn J. Willens Uman Ramona Shelburne NBA Cavs Bron James Cleveland Michael Brady Miami Irving
"uman" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

Sports 600 ESPN

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"uman" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

"Rivers no rings. Former Chargers coach North Turner the reality of it is, you know, there's only one team that's gonna that's gonna win it. And, you know Philip was in an era where there was a team that won six of them over the over his 17 year career. You know, they kind of knowing it's kind of dominated, and there's a lot of things that go into it. I think till it through most of his career has played in the championship level, and sometimes it doesn't end the way you want it to. But there's no question his production and everything he's done. He's played a championship level and you can't deny you know, he spits in all time yardage. All the things the number of starts in a row. Second toe barb in that area. There's too many things that are a change of level and I know being with them 06 years and Washington compete and you know he's he's the reason we want a lot of those games. You know, he's very, very deserving of venue. Acknowledgments he gets and I see him as a Hall of Fame quarterback. Former Chargers coach nor Turner earlier on Keyshawn J. Willens Uman weekdays 6 to 10 Eastern on ESPN Radio SportsCenter all night UFC 2 57 coming up Saturday available on ESPN plus McGregor Poor EA in Abu Dhabi. Former champ ESPN analyst Daniel Cormier, he says Ricana McGregor. The quicker the better. I think everybody wants to go in. Go out and go home. You know, I think, Connor, you know, he's a fantastic promoter first off, but he also is willing to go through the fire. We saw him in the ideas in an extended fight. We saw that he was willing and able to go into the fifth round and beaten a D. As in it was a very close fight. I think he's willing to accept a long drawn out war. But Every single fighter. On this planet wants to get in and out economy. Gregor is no different. Much more on UFC 2 57 coming up on Keyshawn J will then Zubin Daniel Cormier joins the show at 7 30 Eastern. He considers the future a beautiful mystery. You'll hear him talk about it next SportsCenter all night. It's ESPN radio..

North Turner Daniel Cormier ESPN Chargers Connor Philip UFC Keyshawn J. Willens Uman Keyshawn J Ricana McGregor Abu Dhabi Gregor analyst Washington
Third virus vaccine reaches major hurdle: final US testing

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

Third virus vaccine reaches major hurdle: final US testing

"I handful of dozens of experimental covert nineteen vaccines in Uman testing have reached the last and biggest hurdle looking for the needed proof that they really work AstraZeneca announced Monday its vaccine candidate has entered the final testing stage in the United States the Cambridge England based company said the study will involve up to thirty thousand adults from various racial ethnic and geographic groups two other vaccine candidates began final testing this summer in tens of thousands of people in this country one was created by the national institutes of health and manufactured by mode during a the other was developed by Pfizer and a company in Germany actually after

Astrazeneca United States Cambridge England Pfizer Germany
Why Trinity Audio is sticking with mechanical voices over human

Inside VOICE

01:51 min | 3 years ago

Why Trinity Audio is sticking with mechanical voices over human

"Do you think that For Your company I was utilizing in your stuff on your website. That right now you have a lot of you know where it's kind of voice coming from like a computer sounding voice. Do you think that you will eventually eventually US real human voices or voiceovers or what kind of your thought or that going in the future. Great question and I contemplate about a lot I I think no first of all I think. No Ano- explain why when I started this journey about two and a half years ago the quality of text to speech solution and was nowhere near where we are today any just getting approved on a quarterly basis new releases new features. It is based on a I in no so we as we say union office we feed the machine with Roy Moore dead. I need getting improving. Will it be like human voice. Well no probably not but I think it's already good enough. It's only GonNa get better and I think that's another thing that is growing as well. The parallel channel Uman are interacting with machine on a daily basis more and more so the human years starting to be more tolerant from Canada. Voices so I flew the fast. I wouldn't say to Mitt Buddy to get definitely get close enough that the majority of the people will have tolerance. I gotta get used to end. They don't think about all that mechanical for me that would be fine and that stuck again about the benefits that they have communicating any kind the content. You want who you will have a using not there's advantages to both sides like you said there's the I is getting smarter. It's faster but then you've got the other side for maybe a specific skill. You want a real human being because it's going to give a different brand voice. I think there's benefits

United States Roy Moore Canada
Amazon lets Alexa users disable human voice recording review

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:25 sec | 3 years ago

Amazon lets Alexa users disable human voice recording review

"Which on Amazon dot com will let Alexa users opt out of Uman review of their voice recordings a move that follows criticism that the program violated customers privacy a new policy took effect Friday that allows customers through an option in the settings menu of the Alexis smartphone app to remove their recordings from a pool that could be analyzed by Amazon employees and contract workers it follows similar moves by apple and

Apple Amazon Alexa Uman
Science News Briefs from Around the World

60-Second Science

02:17 min | 3 years ago

Science News Briefs from Around the World

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor, Steve Mirsky. And here's the short piece from the June two thousand nineteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is titled quick hits, and it's a rundown of some science and technology stories for round, the globe compiled by editorial contributor, Jim Daly from Canada. Archaeologists have now confirmed that Toronto service Rex skeleton found in the nineteen nineties at a fossil site in Saskatchewan is the biggest and heaviest on record at nearly forty two feet long almost twenty thousand pounds. Scotty as it's called surpassed the record set by the famous sued t Rex which was found in South Dakota in nineteen ninety from Argentina are gala GIS identified a site, where ancient humans killed and butchered giant ground sloths, mega theory, American. Madam in the pampas region in eastern Argentina, the find provides evidence that Uman's contributed to the sloths extinction from Kenya. A science teacher who won the two thousand nineteen global teacher prize announced he intends to donate, the one million dollar award to benefit society, Peter to Beechy a Franciscan friar mentors, a science club that came in, I in its category in the two thousand eighteen Kenya's science and engineering fair from the autonomous island of Anjouan in the union of the Cymru's, that's in the Indian Ocean between the east coast of Africa, and the northwest end of Madagascar geochemists at Columbia University, found a load of court site, a metamorphosed rock formed from sandstone on the island of Andrea on the island is volcanic, and had been thought to contain only Ignace rocks. And from North Korea physicists at Kimmel sung universe. City in Pyongyang have brokered a rare green to collaborate with Italy's international school for advanced studies in Trieste, the North Koreans will study, computational neuroscience with talion physicists that was quick hits by Jim Daly.

Jim Daly Argentina Kenya Steve Mirsky North Korea Pyongyang Editor T Rex Toronto Trieste Uman Ignace Rocks Kimmel Scotty South Dakota Canada Indian Ocean Saskatchewan Italy Columbia University
Has Trump broken the 'rules-based international order'?

Between The Lines

11:14 min | 3 years ago

Has Trump broken the 'rules-based international order'?

"Today on the show discussion with a renowned expert about the so-called rules based international order. It's been grabbing headlines vs. Now, how often have you heard that term, the rose by store is not perfect. We are rallying the noble nations of the world to build a new liberal order, that prevents war achieves greater prosperity for all. I have never heard. I Chinese leader commit so explicitly to rule based international order. So what do you think it actually means now for many politicians and journalists the world in which we leave the institutions of governance, the rules norms, all that, that's largely inspired by the kind of allegedly but nine global leadership that the United States. Is exercise for decades. And yet, would you believe it? The rules based international order itself has become a popular expression, only in recent times, did effective research, such of the world's newspapers and news wise. And it shows these things that in the three decades from ninety five to twenty fifteen the expression was used on three hundred nineteen occasion. That's three hundred eight times in thirty. That's all, however, get a lot of this in the past four years since Donald Trump announces presidential campaign, the term has been used nearly six thousand times six thousand times in the past four years. And about three hundred and twenty in the previous thirties, extrordinary now to me, the logic is simple. Western journalists scholars politicians policy makers, they all too often refer to this Liberal International order rules. Based international order. Why? Because it's demise is primarily blamed on one Donald Trump from this day forward, it's going to be only America first America first. Now the conventional wisdom goes lock these ball rising tariffs weakening alliances withdrawing the US from international agreements and supping with the devil, from Kim Jong Hoon that Singapore to Ladimir Putin hill, stinky, the US president has lifted void in world leadership. This is the argument as a result, Trump has undermined Feith in the open free, international order of the post Cold War era. But Trump alone really, to blind for the unraveling of the Liberal International auto or was this rules based order. So beloved of the western elites was at bound to file will my guest today has spent a lot of time. Thinking about this issue, John Measham is no stranger to this program. He's professor of political science at the university of Chicago. He's the author most recently of the great delusion liberal, drains and international realities published by ya'll university, Chris. And he's article bound to file the and full of Liberal International order that appears in the current issue of the academic journal, International Security, John joins us today from a studio on campus. The university of Chicago. Get I John welcome to the program. Thank you, Tom. I'm glad to be here now. It seems that this rules base Liberal International order is in trouble is Trump to blind. No, I think it is the conventional wisdom among the foreign policies. Tablet meant here in the United States, and probably in Australia that Trump is responsible for wrecking the Liberal International order. And once he is disposed of in twenty twenty and we get a new president someone like Joe Biden, we'll go back to the old way of doing business in the Liberal International order will survive. I think this is a deeply flawed way of thinking about what's happening with regard to that order that order was in deep trouble before, Trump got elected, just think the Iraq war, the Afghans, STAN war, the fiasco and Libya defeat. Lasko in Syria to Gasco over Ukraine, to two thousand eight financial crisis, the euro zone crisis Brexit, just a name of few of the problems. What Trump did when he ran for president in two thousand sixteen was he pointed out all these failures. He said, the Liberal International order was bankrupt and he got away. Acted and he got elected because many voters, clearly understood that he was correct. So the argument that Trump is responsible for wrecking the Liberal International. Order is dead wrong by what distinguished Trump from a lot of the Republicans and Democrats in two thousand sixteen was he's belief that democracy was not an expo commodity, and you think about it, John thirty years ago. This she had the full of the Berlin Wall, the claps Ivy, communism and the consensus that ease ago, I roll friend Francis, Fukuyama democracy was the wife of the future, what happened. I think that would happened was that we came to find out that not everyone in the world likes democracy, you and I may think it is the best system. But the fact is that they're all sorts of other people world, especially if you go to a place like Russia today, who would prefer an alternative form of political system. And in this case, it soft the -tarian his, so if you're in the business of trying to spread democracy around the world as the United States was in its pursuit of liberal. Gemini, what you discover is an extremely difficult task and it's an especially difficult task. If you use military force to spread democracy. In other words, you try to spread democracy at the end of a sword. And this, of course, is what we tried to do in Afghanistan. And in Iraq, it was with the Bush doctrine was all about, and those ended up being close. Oh failures, you'll critics will say though. Not standing all these setbacks that isn't it inevitable that as human con progresses than the prospects for democratization, and universal peace are enhanced and that, you know it was seeing this right now. There's still talk that China will eventually become a liberal democracy in these protests in Hong Kong that we've witnessed in the past fortnight that shows that eventually, China will buck, and become more liberal, democratic signed thing for Russia. How'd you respond to that? I just don't think it's inevitable. I mean, I want to be very clear, I think democracy is the best political system, and I think it would be a good thing if every country on the planet was liberal democracy. But the idea that that is inevitable as simply wrong. The fact is that Uman beings find it very difficult to agree on questions of what is the best life? What is the best political system, and would Frank Fukuyama and others? Assumed when the Cold War came to a conclusion was that everybody in the world. Wanted to live in a state, that was a liberal democracy. And therefore, with fictive -ly had the winded our back in our endeavour to spread liberal democracy, all across the planet, but that assumption has proven to be wrong. The fact is that the spread of democracy is not inevitable. And by the way, if you go back to two thousand six fast forward to the present what you see is that the number of democracies in the world is decreasing not increase. I think the New York buys freedom house's documented that. It's come down something like ten percent in the last ten or so years. Raw joan. It has. And that is regrettable. But it just points out that this is not inevitable. And again, if you get into the business trying to sprint liberal democracy when it's not an edible. And there are viable, alternatives, you're going to run into a whole his just as a conventional wisdom's are often wrong guy back to that consensus at the end of the Cold War that democracy was the wife of the future. One orthodoxy, that's also Baynes smashed in the last that he is. John is argument that nationalism was a thing of the past on the eve of the European parliamentary elections as Jordan, Claude Juncker. He's a leading European bureaucrat. He was asked about the growing reactions about, you know, against Brussels and the AU and the rise of nationalist movements across Europe. This is from CNN in general with the with the EU elections coming up, the euro skeptical right-wing forces seemed to be very strong in many countries. How does how much does that concern? You why do you think that is what's wrong with the what's your? We'll just. And if that wasn't tone-deaf enough, he added these populous necessarily stupid necessarily his day, I love the country and they don't like the others. Join me Sharma. What do you make of comments? I think it's a remarkably foolish comment. The fact is that virtually every leader of a western democracy is a nationalist just take, Madeleine Albright, who was once secretary of state here in the United States and is viewed as a canonical liberal. She's also a nationalist at heart. She wants famously said that America is the indispensable nation. We stand taller and we see further if you think about her words, she is saying, America is the indispensable, and I underline the word nation. That's at the heart of nationalism virtually every leader, whether it's an Australian or. Japanese or German leader feels that his or her country is something very special in their deeply devoted to that country. That's what nationalism is all about. And what you had in the post Cold War, period up until very recently is a situation where liberalism and nationalism coexisted, but hardly anybody ever talked about nationalism. But once the Liberal International order began to crumble people began to talk more and more about nationalism. And they felt at a lot of those liberal policies in fringed on national policies and on nationalism and ways that they didn't like, and the end result is, you got Brexit and Britain, and you got Trump and the United States and you know what you have in places like Poland and Hungary as well. So in nineteen states clash with multilateral institutions, nationalism, always Trump's liberalism that show alone. My view is that liberalism and Nash. Nationalism can coexist. But when particular liberal policies begin to bump up against nationalism, nationalism will be liberalism, every time because we are all ultimately social animals. We are all alternately very tribal in our nation matters to us greatly. I think virtually every Australian cares greatly about Australian sovereignty just like every American cares about American sovereignty.

Donald Trump Liberal International United States John Measham Russia President Trump America Iraq Frank Fukuyama International Security University Of Chicago Berlin Wall Professor Of Political Science CNN Syria Joe Biden China Ladimir Putin Hill Chris
Munazza

Tell Them, I Am

06:24 min | 3 years ago

Munazza

"Hello. This is me. She yousef. And this is tell them I am. In twenty fifteen I went on a road trip from Chicago to Wisconsin. And we went like really far north. Like I think the nearest people to us were a hundred miles away, which now that I think about it was probably a dangerous situation. Anyway, it was stunning if you haven't been to Wisconsin, you're seriously missing out. So it was late summer like early fall. And as we get deeper into the night, it starts to get really chilly, kind of Chris, and in the middle of the night, I go out into the backyard of the house. We're staying and the night is so block that I had to just stand there for a second. Try to find my way. And after a while my eyes start to adjust and there's this brightness remember looking up at the sky, the stars were clear and more crowded than I had ever seen before. It was honestly like the stars where the crowd at a concert, and I was. Onset or something? And I swear I could see the curve of the sky, it was like I was wrapped in almost. It was so literally beyond my reach like forget figuratively. I felt so small in a good way. So the next morning, I'm sitting inside on the couch with my breakfast. The sun is, like, especially bright, the kind of right? That even if it's cold to kind of just warms you up. And there's the dust in the air and for a second. The sunlight, set this crowd of dust dancing. And I felt so small. My name is Vanessa all in the end. I am an astronomer. I think that is the primary way that identify myself when I, meet new people. Astronauts are on a lot of times ex military and engineers like they have survival skills versus strana mors are fabulous nerds. It's Uman to gaze up at the stars and contemplate the cosmos. There's a there's a Carl Sagan, quote, I'm probably paraphrasing at this point. It's not explaining science. Seems to me perverse, when you're in love, you want to tell the world. I grew up with my parents may data's from Pakistan. He moved to the US in the eighties. Horrible up getting. Okay. And my mom is from India, Mark from our message. Good. There. I have two sisters. We're very close knit family. We love hang out with each other like going home. It was always like the highlight of my day. My parents had this interesting parenting style, which I have started to now be more aware of I didn't have a bed time. I didn't have occurred few. I never had any like rules about how long it could stay on the computer or the or the TV or, or the phone, but it was kind of will lose things where if I wanted to do something by parents would be like that doesn't seem like such a good idea. And then I would kind of be like, oh, but I think it is. So they like, they'd say, well, go ahead, try it, and then I would try it, and it wouldn't be a good idea. And they come back like see. I feel like I'm humble Ryan about my parents really amazing people. When is engineers? I was a sophomore in college. My dad got extremely sick. So he was taking a medication for a rheumatoid arthritis treatment, the medicine was I N, H, I, E so Nisaan and it's known to be extremely toxic. We were not told that my dad was prescribed his medications, so he was told to take this six month course of I h and when he was done with the six months course than he could come back to start his Arthur treatment, well, five months in my dad's sorta getting extremely sick. I is getting very confused. And then one day he woke up and was just completely yellow like completely jaundiced. His is really his skin was yellow. And we took him to the to his primary didn't it turned out. He was having liver failure. Annan ver- when I heard that he was having liver failure. I didn't know what that meant, and I remember being scared, but not being sure why I was scared. A couple days after he started to get a lot worse. And there is one to remember it was the Saturday we were all home, and we had to do like basic errands, like grocery shopping. And we're all going to Costco, my favorite thing ever. And my dad was my dad was feed be used completely out of him. We started to get really concerned. So my mom colds, my dad's primary, who is also one of our good family friends. So he came by the evening, putting I remember who's putting on my dad's shoes for him. Like getting him ready to go to the hospital. And my dad was like kicking him in the face. And he eventually got my dad dressed enough to hospital. And like put him in the front seat of his car with a lot of struggle for my dad and drove him himself to to the hospital. NYU langone. Turned out that his liver was ninety eight percent necrosis, which means that ninety eight percent of his liver had died. It became very clear that he needed a new liver, and he needed a liver transplant.

Carl Sagan Nyu Langone Wisconsin Annan Chicago Yousef Vanessa Costco Onset Pakistan India Chris United States Nisaan Ryan Arthur Mark
Munazza

Tell Them, I Am

05:24 min | 3 years ago

Munazza

"My name is Vanessa all in the end. I am an astronomer. I think that is the primary way that identify myself when I, meet new people. Astronauts are on a lot of times ex military and engineers like they have survival skills versus strana mors are fabulous nerds. It's Uman to gaze up at the stars and contemplate the cosmos. There's a there's a Carl Sagan, quote, I'm probably paraphrasing at this point. It's not explaining science. Seems to me perverse, when you're in love, you want to tell the world. I grew up with my parents may data's from Pakistan. He moved to the US in the eighties. Horrible up getting. Okay. And my mom is from India, Mark from our message. Good. There. I have two sisters. We're very close knit family. We love hang out with each other like going home. It was always like the highlight of my day. My parents had this interesting parenting style, which I have started to now be more aware of I didn't have a bed time. I didn't have occurred few. I never had any like rules about how long it could stay on the computer or the or the TV or, or the phone, but it was kind of will lose things where if I wanted to do something by parents would be like that doesn't seem like such a good idea. And then I would kind of be like, oh, but I think it is. So they like, they'd say, well, go ahead, try it, and then I would try it, and it wouldn't be a good idea. And they come back like see. I feel like I'm humble Ryan about my parents really amazing people. When is engineers? I was a sophomore in college. My dad got extremely sick. So he was taking a medication for a rheumatoid arthritis treatment, the medicine was I N, H, I, E so Nisaan and it's known to be extremely toxic. We were not told that my dad was prescribed his medications, so he was told to take this six month course of I h and when he was done with the six months course than he could come back to start his Arthur treatment, well, five months in my dad's sorta getting extremely sick. I is getting very confused. And then one day he woke up and was just completely yellow like completely jaundiced. His is really his skin was yellow. And we took him to the to his primary didn't it turned out. He was having liver failure. Annan ver- when I heard that he was having liver failure. I didn't know what that meant, and I remember being scared, but not being sure why I was scared. A couple days after he started to get a lot worse. And there is one to remember it was the Saturday we were all home, and we had to do like basic errands, like grocery shopping. And we're all going to Costco, my favorite thing ever. And my dad was my dad was feed be used completely out of him. We started to get really concerned. So my mom colds, my dad's primary, who is also one of our good family friends. So he came by the evening, putting I remember who's putting on my dad's shoes for him. Like getting him ready to go to the hospital. And my dad was like kicking him in the face. And he eventually got my dad dressed enough to hospital. And like put him in the front seat of his car with a lot of struggle for my dad and drove him himself to to the hospital. NYU langone. Turned out that his liver was ninety eight percent necrosis, which means that ninety eight percent of his liver had died. It became very clear that he needed a new liver, and he needed a liver transplant. I just felt like as soon as, as soon as my dad was admitted hospital and this need for a transplant became a reality things kind of just felt completely different. And a couple of days into being in the hospital he fell into a coma. Apparently before my dad's slipped into the coma. He told the head transplant surgeon. Please help me get better because I have to take care of my family. I really was not processing like what was happening. Still going to all my classes I still hanging. All my problems, that's just kind of working on this autopilot mode, where I was going about my days, doing everything that I normally would going to my classes in the mornings, and they would take the six train down to NYU Langone and spend the rest of my day. There.

Nyu Langone Carl Sagan Coma Annan Vanessa Costco Pakistan India United States Nisaan Ryan Arthur Mark
Social Robots: The New Face of AI

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:05 min | 3 years ago

Social Robots: The New Face of AI

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Deloitte, a global leader in digital transformation helping clients apply. Technologies like cloud an AI to their unique business challenges Deloitte got com slash look again. This is tech news briefing im Tanya boost does reporting from the newsroom in New York. And the journal learns that blending robots artificial intelligence and voice tech is the secret formula that actually makes humans comfortable with talking with chat bots, because as you know, we are not there's help it's from robot. Introducing you to her it him after these tech headlines. Walt Disney has a bet that in order to stay on top. It needs to come to you by streaming entertainment directly to TV's and phones, it is preparing to launch a service called Disney. Plus that will for a monthly fee stream new and old shows built around its most popular franchises, thus breaking off a lucrative relationship with Netflix and instead competing against it Thursday. Disney is expected to reveal the details in a major presentation to investors laying out the company's streaming strategy in a cloud enabled a I push Google targets. CIO's enterprise technology executives are at the center of Google's new strategy to drive business to its cloud based artificial intelligence services, the company cloud, a division looking to carve out a larger slice of the enterprise market announced tools this week aimed at helping chief information and technology officers addressed common business problems. The tools include prepackaged AI services that can understand invoice. And contracts and offer supply chain recommendations and predictions. The competition remains stiff as Google fights for bigger stake in the cloud market. Microsoft had thirteen percent of the worldwide market in two thousand seventeen and according to Gartner's most recent data, Amazon which pioneered the business held nearly fifty two percent Google share three point three. The journal says AI has been a critical component of the cloud business for Google and it intends to dramatically boost the sales and support staff for its cloud services division and for quick market. Check in the journal says investors hunger for growth are pushing stocks to record highs a group of the largest technology companies. Just hidden all time, high highlighting investors renewed faith in software and chip companies after a fourth quarter route this week the S and P five hundred information technology sector, logged its first record close since early October following a seventh advance in previous eight sessions, apple and Microsoft have helped power the tech sector higher while fighting for the title of world's largest company. But the journal says. Because many tech stocks are associated with market momentum some analysts cautioned that a setback on trade or downbeat economic data gettin the group tumbling once again coming up why giving machine learning a face is about to take a I to the next level support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Deloitte, a global leader in digital transformation helping clients apply. Technologies like cloud and AI to their unique business challenges Deloitte got com slash look again. In the podcast special coverage of the WSJ pro artificial intelligence, deep dive, we get to meet a robot with a human like face. That's trying to take talking to our machine friends like Siri and Alexa to the next level. One company for hat. Robotics is already there. Gabriel Skansi the co founder of the company says we're ready for new machine assistance. The first step a face for fixes developing this Roble, it's both the hardware around the software running it, and the ideas religious sort of revolutionized the way we interact with machines. So if we look back interacting with machines with graphical user, interfaces or smartphones. And so on we believe that the Uman face is really sort of the way we are using direct with other people, and we can use that to interact with machines. We think that the face has been neglected in like, voice assistance, and so on. And we think that the face Carrizo much important information that we already know how to interpret all so we don't have to invent a new set of signals for the system to show them to use for these robots by this point is fairly clear. So the ideas that we develop in this platform with the tools for developers to develop applications on top of it. Without further ado, the robot would like to introduce it self this is for hat. Go ahead. My name is for hat, and I am a socially intelligent robot in a near future. You might meet me at airports, hotel, receptions, bangs schools, and hospitals. I can't wait to see what interesting applications people will come up with. Can you have different demotions? Sure, my voice and facial animation. Allows me to express all kinds of emotions I can't be very happy. And cheerful. But sometimes I can feel a bit sad other times, perhaps even be angry. Unlike other. Robots? I can have many different personalities and there are big plans in development. So get comfortable. We have a lot of different partners working in different verticals. So we have for example, working with Chaban as they are putting the robots in airports and train stations. So actually, it's it's they're working on it. Now, we had it at the Frankfurt airport last year as a test pilot. It worked really well, we have a collaboration with Swedish recruitment firm having the robot. Doing job interviews in order to reduce bias in the recruitment process. So these are two examples we also have. Collaboration with Mark from a surgical or the robot is doing asking questions in order to to sort of do an assessment diagnosed you for Debbie and so them for more on for hat, robotics, and the latest on all things artificial intelligence head to wsJcom that does it for the tech news briefing, im Tanya Bustos reporting from the newsroom at the Wall Street Journal.

Google Deloitte AI Tanya Bustos Disney Microsoft Walt Disney Netflix Wall Street Journal New York Frankfurt Gartner Alexa CIO
Snail Insulin Faster Than Human Insulin

The Naked Scientists

03:35 min | 4 years ago

Snail Insulin Faster Than Human Insulin

"Why doesn't the cone snail end up with very low blood sugars will all doesn't insulin work in a cone snail to how does the insulin get out of the water and into the fish? It turns out that the insulin. The cones name makes us very different to its own insulin. So this name makes its own insulin to regulate sugar levels in its own body. But the insulin that it sprays into the water. It's extremely similar to the insulin produced by fish. So it wouldn't be active at its own target receptor in terms of how it gets into the fish. We think that it rapidly enters the body through the gills thing is though if you did this with the kinds of insulin that we have in the clinic to give to humans, the quite slow acting only whereas venom has to work really fast in order to immobilize prey really fast because these things are shellfish. They wouldn't be able to pursue a fos moving fish. So this stuff must be quick. How's it do it? This name has to make sure that the fish is very rapidly mobilized and the incident acts very rapidly compared to the incident that we make and it does that by being a single compound. So our Uman insulin is very sticky so an individual insulin would stick. Very rapidly to another insulin into another insulin and formed so-called hacks Zimmer's the snail insulin because it has to act very rapidly never formed heck simmer. So it can act much faster than our own insulin, Stu, so we're no insolence go into the body. Do they have to unstick before they can work then? Whereas what the smells are doing is. There's never stick in the first place. So they're immediately available fraction. Yes. That's exactly. Right. So when we inject or a diabetic patient injects, insulin into the body the heck summer has to I dissociate into a compound that then can then be active, whereas the snare never made the heck summer in the first place. So it's immediately active now, if you know, this the obvious question to ask is why don't we just make with our biotechnology how a form of human insulin which can't stick together. Like that. That's a very interesting question. So we have actually tried to do this for over twenty years now, and we have not solved this problem because the moment you try to make the human insulin. Not stick. It's not active anymore. So you strip it off its activities. So you could still injected, but it won't do anything in your body anymore. So somehow the snails have solved this longstanding problem by making this insulin in its venom. So put me out of my misery. What does the snow when over to do the human industry over the last couple of decades? Couldn't it must. It must have discovered some kind of clever trick that we hadn't thought of. Yes. So we think that it the snail insulin binds to the human incident receptor or the fish, insulin receptor in a different fashion. So it uses a slightly different surface on the receptor. So the area that it uses to bind to the receptor is a little different to our human insulin. And this is how this nature has solved this but critically. What that means is that if you can copy what the snail does you could potentially make a human insulin. That's very fast acting and not sticky in that way. So when it went into the human it would very quickly gained control of their blood sugar. Yes. And that's. Exactly what we're currently trying to do. And we have made very good progress on this that we're planning to hopefully, publish soon in the future. So what we've done this to try to learn as much as we can from the snail insulin's, the different ones that we have found and then go back to Uman insulin and make it non sticky and yet active, and we have the first compound that we're hoping to put into the clinic sometime in the future.

Unstick STU Zimmer Twenty Years
News in Brief 4 March 2019

UN News

03:13 min | 4 years ago

News in Brief 4 March 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations each day more than six billion people one third of them children in air, so polluted that it puts their lives health and wellbeing at risk. The UN expert on Uman rights in the environment said on Monday, David Boyd described air pollution, both in and outside the home as a silent killer responsible for the premature death of seven million people each year, including six hundred thousand children he stressed that failing to ensure clean air constitutes a violation of the fundamental right to a healthy environment. A right that is legally recognized by one hundred fifty five states, noting that air pollutants are everywhere, he urged all states to recognize that right while air pollution is largely caused by burning fossil fuels for electric city, transportation and heating. It also comes. From industrial activities poor waste management and agriculture practices said the independent expert staying with the environment. The acting chief of the UN Environment Program. Joyce Masuda said on Monday that although twenty eighteen was a challenging year. There was a growing global commitment to tackle the tasks ahead. The UN agencies new annual report released online ahead of the UN environment assembly, which will take place in Kenya. From eleven to fifteen March shows that the pace of action on many interlinked environmental issues is accelerating. The report highlights units impact over the past year from making the cooling industry. More climate-friendly to training thirties to better enforce environmental laws. Our role in highlighting best practices advocating action, and bringing together government, civil society and business. Ios once again proved critical mismatch Zulia said turning to Uman rights states cannot call themselves rights leaders while leaving increasing numbers of their residents to live and die on the street. A United Nations rights experts said on Monday Lee, Lonnie far, ha the special rapid tour on the right to housing said that governments must be held accountable in a report presented to the UN. Human Rights Council in Geneva. She spelled out that the time for excuses justifications. And looking the other way has long passed in the report, she suggests that the global housing predicament is rooted in a crisis over access to Justice without that. She said housing is not properly recognised understood or addressed as a human right as long as states deny access to Justice for the right to housing the special rapporteur explained they prepare. An unfair hierarchy of human rights, exposing discriminatory positions that some rights, and thus some rightsholders matter more than others. Liska Fiji U N news.

UN Un Environment Program Human Rights Council United Nations Joyce Masuda David Boyd Acting Chief Kenya Geneva Zulia Lonnie Far LEE
Science-Based Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Eye on Washington with Marilee Joyce

02:18 min | 4 years ago

Science-Based Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

"Other we call it the mega three super pill. Jason let's break it down. Let's go through these different items one at a time omega threes all over the. Big headlines major research articles, why are fish oil? So doggone hot these days. Well, fifteen thousand published studies on the role of omega threes and Uman nutrition, and it grows by the day just about every single dimension of our health is now shown to be positively impacted by omega threes, basically everything, but as I said cholesterol, but it will manage triglycerides will support blood pressure. It will help keep your veins flexible and functioning, well, it'll keep the blood flowing. It's great to maintain a healthy heart rhythm. Fish oil is now being shown to have an incredible role in cognitive functioning. We're talking about memory mood, brain ageing, infant development, held a cell communication focused. Fish oils will enhance or increase performance in the brain actually been shown to increase gray matter, and it goes to work and only minutes when taken a supplement new study showing immediate benefits. Studies showing long-term. Cognitive benefits. They're looking at fish oil in just about every area of health joint health, weight management prostate health skin health, the list goes on and on nine out of ten of you out there right now are clinically deficient in EFA's EFA's are called essential fatty acids, and the two most essential fatty acids are the two that are found in fish oil DHA and EPA Purity's fish oil products, have three times more concentration of these two key fatty acids than standard fish oil. These are called pharmaceutical grade fish oil, meaning they're manufactured in one of only a handful of pharmaceutically, licensed facilities, right out, Norway. They make the best fish oil in the world ninety percent concentrations completely pure, no mercury issues. No fish tastes, no, fish, odors, nothing like that. Just the incredible concentrated DHA and EPA, and if you're deficient in those two key fatty acids. There's a long list of symptoms that you could suffer from fatigue poor memory, poor immunity, certainly poor skin health, dry skin.

EFA Dry Skin Jason EPA Epa Purity Norway Ninety Percent
Unravelling the ties between fashion and politics

Jim Bohannon

07:50 min | 4 years ago

Unravelling the ties between fashion and politics

"I was intrigued by the suggestion that there are links between fashion and the political process, which has pretty much been our purview over the years. And so we're joined by Vicki is a -til TI L is that -til. Teal teal, very good, and you are a fashion designer, and you are of the opinion, I gather that fashion and politics do intersect is that right? Yes. Absolutely. I'm from Washington, by the way, I live in Paris. And I've been a French designer for fifty five years, but I'm from Washington DC actually Chevy Chase. So very good. Pretty good to know about politics. Well, I would dare say, so of course, the most obvious example of such in recent memory would be the state of the union evening in which so many of the the women mostly I guess Democrats wore white they said that that was a show of solidarity with the feminist movement in general, and and women's issues before this congress had particular I must confess that it did strike me at the time that I hope it was not to show solidarity with the governor of Virginia. But. Generally, wearing white is a sign of being virgin brides. But they also wore black when they were doing the metoo movement and using color, you know, using all black for the put when the movie stars at the Golden Globes were wearing all black. So I think the idea of promoting an issue fashion using fashion to promote political opinions is a brand new thing it has not really been done very often. So it's it's kind of interesting also these t shirts now, the fashion is to where skintight pants a loose jacket. And then had a saying very large printed saying on your chest both for men and for women. So that people can walk around with their statements using fashion to prove on your chest to promote a statement where where would you wear something like that? I mean that doesn't sound like something. Former party. If you check the papers. Now, the look of fashion is to wear a fabulous jacket like Chanel jacket, if you're a woman beautiful jacket pants, which were all wearing pants now. And then you say a statement and very sick big letters on your chest. And that's probably the newest looking fashion right now. So. Politics, fashion or absolutely happening. I don't mean to be dismissive at all. But I must confess that when it was pointed out to me, and I did notice. Well, a lot of lot of white and black there in some parts of the of the house chamber. Oh, they're they're promoting women's issues. By response was okay now, let's get back to the substance of it. So I guess in a way I was rather dismissive. There's a certain level of symbolism here that that goes right past me. I must confess suspect. I it again. I don't say that makes me superior or inferior. Isis suspected it probably makes me to a certain extent, typically male. And I'm just wondering I think that that there's no male or female. We're all just you know, humans and we're trying to figure out what's happening right now. The Uman this changing, we're we're changing the idea that people are gonna walk around with a t shirt and a big thing on the front is something that wouldn't happen in the fifties. The sixties. On the beach backyard barbecues. It happens. But you're talking about formal formal occasions in which might be wearing a suit and tie. And I would be looking at some woman who's got a slogan emblazoned across her chest. Yes, it's a brand new thing. And it's it's interesting, except if you have giant breasts, I suppose, you can't read it. Yeah. Exactly, I suppose, you're not. But that that does raise another interesting issue in this day and age of hashtag metoo reading the message. They went to such trouble to to to to make evident, regardless of of breast size. The strikes me as a dangerous activity. I would think that that maintaining I contact would be first and foremost, and we would have to be sneaking furtive glances at whatever it is. They're trying to promote. Yes. Well, I have to say that I am very friendly with a woman who's a swank. And I asked her once what the people come to you for what's main reason, I thought it was marriages, you know, and and as love, of course, you know, family issues. It was not the number one reason people go to see a shrink is how they are perceived how they are perceived which means it was a good thing for me because I may close so you can be perceived to way because I'm going to design it for you you see. So the how we look is everything in the world. Isn't that amazing? How we look how we are perceived. Okay. Go ahead. I really was. I was shocked. And so I got I wrote my new book, the absolute woman, and I go into all of these things about how we are perceived in what fashion means what we look like what we smell like, I make perfume all of these matter more to people than their marriages. Well, that's interesting, obviously that would be true of some people, I suppose of my own crystal thought. I don't know. I guess on most. I mean, I've never for example, felt the desire to seek out a shrink not to say that I'm I'm totally thought of every way, shape or form. I just doubt that I'm two hundred dollars an hour dysfunctional will be a cost effective exercise. But if you know my perception other than you know, I I meet the the the the bare minimum. Okay. It's a formal gathering, but not super form. Oh, I got the suit. I got the tie. I got the button collar, and if somebody perceives that as being let's say, oh, I don't know out of touch, or whatever my view is. Well, big deal. I don't care about your opinion. Again. I I I'm not trying to be dismissive. But I'm wondering the extent to which I am that atypical really. I mean, I'm not running for public office. I I'm presentable, and if somebody wants to have an opinion beyond that, I don't care. I think that you are not typical. And I'm not typical not everybody is a fashion designer for fifty years and not everybody's doing radio. We're not. You're not typical. The typical person is concerned about what other people think of them. That's the number one thing how am I perceived? It's interesting, and I don't think about it at all I go out with a pink thing and a blue thing all mixed together because I'm a fashion designer I can and you can be confident inner confident you're able to talk not not everybody can talk like you do. So no, we're not typical. But the typical person is concerned about what do you think of me? What do I look like, how do I present myself, and in going into government and politics that goes even further what political party, you're for how how you are perceived is a very is connected to fashion is connected to everything how we look how we smell interesting. Well, it is I we're gonna come back and explore some more of this here. Just a moment at one eight six six five O, JIMBO one eight six six five zero five four six two six. I had not thought of it in this context, quite frankly. But then again, I think that probably in matters such as this. I have always been just a wee bit

Democrats Washington Virgin Brides Chevy Chase Vicki Paris Congress Virginia Golden Globes Jimbo Isis Two Hundred Dollars Fifty Five Years Fifty Years
News in Brief 7 January 2019

UN News

03:35 min | 4 years ago

News in Brief 7 January 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations drawing on information from one hundred forty two countries. A new report by the UN office on drugs and crime U N ODBC revealed on Monday that Uman trafficking is on the rise, especially when it comes to children U N O D C executive director Yuri Fedotov, presented the report, which examined trafficking, trends and patterns worldwide child soldiers forced labor, sexual slavery, human trafficking has taken on horrific. Dimensions said Mr. Fedotov, adding that armed groups and terrorists use the elicit trade to spread fear and gain victims to offer as incentives to recruit new fighters. The global report on trafficking in persons spelled out that there is an increase in the number of children being trafficked who now account for thirty percent of all victims, mostly girl. Calls. Some fifty nine percent of trafficking also involve sexual exploitation, the Thai authorities have granted the UN refugee agency UNHCR access to Rehoboth Mohammed, Al Conan, an eighteen year old Saudi woman who fled her family in Kuwait hoping to seek asylum in Australia, miss, Al Kanoun, told human rights groups, and the media that she was stopped at Bangkok airport in transit from Kuwait where her passport was confiscated UNHCR consistently advocates that refugees and asylum seekers who have been confirmed or claim to need international protection cannot be returned to their countries of origin. According to the principle of nonrefoulement, an international principle that prevents states from returning people to territories where they are under threat. According to Cecil Palae, you win HCR global spokesperson. On gender issues who spoke to you n news miss connection has now reached safety. I'm piece to confirm that we've been granted access to has Mohammed Al Quran Saudi national. She's now in a state of emotional distress. When she needs to be given a little bit of breathing space. But in the coming days, we keep on meeting with hurts tried to assess protection he also on migration the UN Environment Program pointed on Monday to a new category of involuntary migrants that has been emerging in recent years environmentally displaced people. These are people who have been forced to move because climate change has caused natural disasters or degraded resources that have rented their livelihoods unsustainable. According to a study co founded by UNHCR, the university of Oxford and the governments of Norway and Switzerland. Climate change is expected to display. Case between fifty and two hundred million people by twenty fifty while the New York declaration for refugees and migrants states. That migration should be a choice. Not an assessing. There are countless groups of involuntary migrants, including refugees stateless persons people who are trafficked and those internally displaced by disasters and conflict, and now environmental change threatens to become one of the most potentially significant generators of new displacement Liska, Fiji, U N news.

Unhcr UN Yuri Fedotov Cecil Palae Mohammed Al Kuwait United Nations Al Kanoun Al Conan Executive Director Bangkok Fiji New York Australia Norway University Of Oxford Switzerland
Mysterious polio-like virus also causes neurological symptoms

Made in America

01:15 min | 4 years ago

Mysterious polio-like virus also causes neurological symptoms

"The causes of this. Mysterious mysterious polio, like illness spreading around the country are ninety confirmed cases any last time we talked about this. They were twenty twenty seven different states. Most of them are children between the ages of two and eight that are getting and they say, they're maybe now the two hundred fifty possible cases of this the neurological condition that targets the spinal cord causes weakness in your limbs paralysis and death. So the question is why now what's come kind of new virus floating around. What is that? That's my best guess seems to be a virus similar to the poliovirus. Unfortunately, we don't have any vaccine for it. And vacs and viruses are smart they will evolve. And they will evolve defenses against whatever's being thrown at them and in time there are new viruses. Just think about aids all these. You know, they may have been around in other forms, but they do a Volvo and then become. Harmful disease causing in Uman. So they've been around, but they

Uman Volvo
Smart bots: China's sex doll makers jump on AI drive

Michael Medved

04:55 min | 4 years ago

Smart bots: China's sex doll makers jump on AI drive

"The new movie from the national Sousa death of a nation deals with many many. Many, many many controversial issues of the current moment and in recent, history as well it does not deal with anything about the rise of sexual bots or machines in general but the, new, movie, is, opening August third, you, can, find. Out all about it at death of a, nation, movie, dot, com and you, can, watch the. Trailer for yourself it really is about the phony charge that is constantly labelled leveled, and, conservatives, that, somehow conservatives a, Nazis, have, some. Kind of tie well not so go to death of a nation The movie dot com Meanwhile, speaking with Jay Richards he's the author, of the human advantage the future of American work in. Age of smart machines it's posted right, up at our website the the son over in Great Britain for the British for some reason or completely obsessed and fascinated with his idea. Of, of sex robots they they have featured, sex robots on TV which are really very creepy looking and extremely extremely non alluring the. Opposite of lorraine's Dr Johnson one said it is the antidote to desire and. That's kind of it but here's the headline on the son of. From July twenty four so it's, right now silicon, lovers rise of sex robots blamed for turning Japanese people into endangered species as more and more men turn. To Randy romping androids is there any hope for the survival? Of human on you Even Bonking I. Can I don't know if we say bonking we just did Jay What? Do, you think. Is is, there such a thing as, a Randy romping Android oh absolutely not I mean at least at the moment, these are really, expensive sex dolls that do some things kind of like humans the very expensive. And here's American company that's doing them in, the head is ten thousand. Dollars if you want the whole head and body it's about sixty thousand dollars and so I mean, the. Reality. Is that. This is a fairly well off men playing with them boy okay, let's, here but the point is when you get to a Randy romping Android, yes? Randy, implies that this. Is, a machine that is. Going to, want pleasures right candy, machine feel pleasure no and certainly these can't I mean this is the thing. Even even the most speculative question these, new exactly what's happening with these, things, now they are participating in machine learning so they're. Going to gather data alas from the users and. Probably get slightly more realistic but this is essentially a three Dimensional or really four, dimensional form of pornography in. So far as you can rewire your brain by spending time with pornography now men mostly men will, not. Only. Be doing. Now whatever that does to your mind they'll be embedding it in. Their, muscle memory so I really do think these things are widely used I. Think? That, you could at. Least, in some cultures end. Up with, the cultural catastrophe I, do think that cultures that really do this honestly may end up not reproducing. Themselves so the maybe a selective disadvantage, to cultures that use these things, one, eight hundred nine five five seventeen seventy six is. Our phone number if you were Raising children and you are what what should kids expect how should parents prepare their kids for some of the changes, that are going to, impact our. Lives regarding artificial intelligence I would say. Make them maximally flexible so if you imagine in your own case you might think well I went to college for four years in, done born less the same. Job for forty years that's going to be much harder to pull. Off because things are so disruptive things I mean you just think about the. Change, from LP's when I was a very little kid long playing records to now we, don't even have a physical medium we stream. Music now just think about that and even think about. It's speeding up so that if you do something that's hyper specialized your job what you've. Trained for maybe obsolete and so I had vise my children I be do the basic. Things do basic liberal arts where you become numerate and literate and. Articulate and then also confer on yourself a. Specialty of some sort so. Maybe learned finding In accounting and, philosophy do both of, those things. And that's what I advise you when. That's just graduated from high school and going to college do something like that Jay Richards the author of the Uman advantage the future of American work in an. Age of smart machines A quick word from relief factor Michael from Connecticut writes. In,.

Jay Richards Randy Jay What Sousa Uman Great Britain Lorraine Dr Johnson Connecticut Michael Sixty Thousand Dollars Forty Years Four Years
Scientist Clay Routledge says we love our animals too much

Animal Radio

03:06 min | 4 years ago

Scientist Clay Routledge says we love our animals too much

"Ranging from the economic costs associated with children to people being too busy but there is some interesting research relating issues like loneliness to pet ownership and also trends related to the delaying of marriage and i'm having children and these things seem to correspond with increased pet ownership and not just people having pets but the more they there's term in psychology called anthropomorphic zim which is when you treat things or animals that aren't you men's as if they have uman cognitive qualities and so we're seeing more of this i've seen people you know maybe you as well i've seen people walking down trails with their dogs and baby strollers when presumably be much assuming the dogs aren't you know injured in any way would be better for them to be walking at seen people trying to feed their dogs human food that's not necessarily the best for their nutritional needs i saw this really insane story i think it was on slate of this trend for millennial hipsters to not vaccinate their dogs which speaks to two different two different crazy beliefs which is one they believe in the the false idea of the vaccinations cause artisan and two they think that their dogs can get autism and so there's these kinds of trends that i don't think it's just necessarily bad shows that some you know some kind of bad state that were as the social species but also there some real risks to animals you know there's some real risks to neglect and abuse of treating animals not like animals but like they're fully part of the human species where do you draw the line and i know it's it's not the line that's easy to see but where do you draw the line between beat over the top with your pet and just being a regular head owner yeah a good question to be clear i don't think it's the case that most pet owners are doing this you know what you know what we you know i'm sure most pet owners have a perfectly healthy relationship with with their pets but what you know i don't know where the line is but you know i think people need to be educated about what they can expect from an animal so when i wrote this article the you know that has you guys divided i can't even tell you the amount of hate mail that i received that was fascinating to me because so much of it was humans are trash humans are garbage your garbage and in a way it just spoke to my point right that people don't have a lot of faith in humanity that people don't you know there's poll numbers supporting this people are less likely across urban rural and suburban areas of our country there are less likely to feel strongly attached to their community they're less likely to fill there's people that they can confide in and so i think what we're seeing is some level we have to be clear that there's plenty of people that have perfectly healthy relationships pets and these are the people that i'm talking about here but some level there's something going on in which people are so desperate for that mean connection that they're elevating their dogs to be to expect more from them than they really can paint type for one second we're gonna take a quick break we're with dr clay rutledge telling us that maybe we love our animals too much just some of the some of

Scientist Clay Rutledge Klay Rutledge Guinness Twenty Five Pound Two Pounds
Gene editing embryonic stem cells might increase risk of cancer

Pat Thurston

02:34 min | 4 years ago

Gene editing embryonic stem cells might increase risk of cancer

"And not be lonely as long as you have a social network that you're connecting with this case it's like yeah you need to be connecting with other uman beings you men's connect with one another important that's what the data says all right so go ahead do that connect with another person by the way speaking of connecting with another person you know we we talked about like gene editing brat help cure diseases and that kind of stuff crisper gene editor you've heard me say that before right well you know how i always talk about the idea that we move way too fast with new technology because new technology has called and by the way politicians do this everybody else says yeah unintended consequences right unintended crisper jeanette her check out these two new studies that the crisper caz nine gene editing as apparently potentially causing cancer that's right two new studies published today are warning i saw this stat news the studies published in nature medicine scientists found that sells whose genomes were successfully edited by crisper this potential to cede tumors inside a patient that's right so chris byrd cells can be a ticking time bomb according to researchers from both well these are separate reasons research studies by the way one is sweden's karolinska institute and the other was the gigantic drug coming novartis crisper is already apparently there was a claim in two thousand seventeen that it caused guy high numbers of off target effects that was retracted in march there was a report of human immunity to cows nine that was currently solvable but experts are apparently taking this new cancer risk finding very seriously the ceo of crisper therapeutic samco carney told stat the results are quote plausible plausible plausibility standard we although they likely only apply to one of the ways that chris genomes replacing disease causing dna with healthy versions and not to the other simply where they excised dna but he said quote it's something we need to pay attention to especially as crisper expands more diseases we need to do the work and make sure edited cells return to patients don't become cancerous yeah you cared disease now i have a giant tumor and i die from that that seems like a problematic outcome doesn't it.

Editor Cancer Nature Medicine Karolinska Institute CEO Carney Chris Byrd Sweden