35 Burst results for "Ulysses"

Jim Hanson and Kash Patel Discuss Righting Election Wrongs for 2024

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Jim Hanson and Kash Patel Discuss Righting Election Wrongs for 2024

"Get down to how we're going to win in 2024 and we got somebody I'm pretty sure has some quality thoughts on that. Mister cash Patel, welcome to the show. Hey Jim, thanks so much for having me. Great to be with you. I obviously everything's crazy. Nothing works, you know, the entire Republican machine is broken and we're never going to win an election again, right? Is that what is that what I've been led to believe? That's what you've been led to believe by the mainstream media because that's what they want you to believe is us to accept an unyielding defeat, except we are the party of Ulysses grant. We accept unconditional surrender. We do not surrender. And what the rhinos want you to do is accept defeat so they can rise to power the Paul Ryan's latest Cheney's McConnell's of the world. But what we need to do is learn an absolute lesson from our setbacks on Tuesday night. And that is, look, if we couldn't win and places like Arizona, Nevada and Georgia, we can't win the house. Well, in the Senate and those places, we can't win the presidential election. But I'm not saying we can't win there. I'm saying our current operations don't allow us to win there because the Democrats are playing the mail in ballot game and the Democrats are playing better and get the independent votes early to break their way. We need to start playing in that game and under those rules because as much as we don't like those rules, they are the rules and they won't change unless we elect a Republican electorate in those states to fix it. And we

Mister Cash Patel Ulysses Grant Paul Ryan JIM Mcconnell Cheney Nevada Arizona Georgia Senate
Liz and the Beltway

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:47 min | 3 months ago

Liz and the Beltway

"Top story today is coming from Wyoming where Liz Cheney is now Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant all rolled up into one for losing a primary election. Wait a minute, let me check my notes on that. Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses grant for losing a primary election. Dwayne, these notes are terrible Dwayne. How is Liz Cheney Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant for losing a primary election? Well, as our friend Kurt schlichter said on Twitter last night, after she compared herself to grant, he said, well, at least grant served. You know, it just, I think we talked about it a little bit to go off air, which is that concession speech is largely a good example of why she lost. It really is. I mean, and this is part of the beltway obsession, lecture series. I guess that Liz Cheney has been on for the past year and a half. I mean, almost the entire term that she's been sort of focused on this, and it's because January 6th, of course, took place at the very start of the term. So that's part of what this is what's going on here. But this is a person who's clearly lost touch with Wyoming. She is fully invested in what's going on in the beltway, and Wyoming voters that got a chance to weigh in on it. Yeah, yesterday. The takeaway is Wyoming voters don't care about the one 6th committee. They want to know about inflation. They want to know about the same issues that everybody else cares about. And she doesn't seem to give any voice to normal issues. There's only one issue with her. And they just got tired of it. Now

Liz Cheney Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant Dwayne Kurt Schlichter Wyoming Ulysses Grant Twitter
Dinesh Discusses Emancipation in Britain vs. America

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:32 min | 7 months ago

Dinesh Discusses Emancipation in Britain vs. America

"Our next question is a video question. International's try again, God bless you and thank you for answering all my questions. I really appreciate it. Something that popped in my head today, I'm listening to the personal memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant, huge book. And something popped in my head. I remember that Larry elder said that he thought that the reason there wasn't a Civil War in England over the Emancipation of slaves was because the state actually gave reparations to the slave owner. To free the slave. I was curious if you think that this proposition was ever brought forth to the south if they would have accepted it, or if it was just something that was never on the table that they would have never accepted. I'd love to hear what you think. And I really, I'm getting a lot of respect for Ulysses S. Grant and all the union troops. They had to fight like hell to save our country. God bless you and thank you for all you do. I'm fascinating question that delves into history and the difference between the experience of America and the experience of Great Britain. Now it is true that when you had Emancipation in Britain, it was, well, it was compensated Emancipation, which meant you couldn't have slaves anymore, but the British government would in a sense pay you the value of your quote property. The free you of it, and so there was. I don't think was unjust in the case of Great Britain for the simple reason that British law classified slaves as property. So in that respect, prior to Emancipation, it was legal to own slaves. And by the way, there were a lot of slaves, also in the British Empire. They weren't that many slaves in Britain, not so this is an important difference between the British experience and the American that the economy of the south in the United States was heavily dependent. In fact, was defined by slavery, cotton was the predominant crop across the Deep South. But even in the rest of the south, there were slaves that were used in domestic labor onto a tobacco plantations, and so on. So the economy of the south is almost inconceivable without slavery. This was not true of Great Britain. And so I think the reason that there wasn't a Civil War in Britain is because the abolition of slavery in Great Britain was not as big a deal.

Ulysses S. Grant Larry Elder Great Britain Britain England British Government United States Deep South
Bret Baier Takes Another Look at Ulysses S. Grant's Presidency in New Book

Mark Levin

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Bret Baier Takes Another Look at Ulysses S. Grant's Presidency in New Book

"You have a fantastic book to rescue the republic Ulysses S. Grant the fragile union and the crisis of 1876 The book has done fantastically well It would make a great stocking stuff for a great Christmas gift people and get it at Amazon.com Any retail stores a matter of fact And Ulysses S. Grant has been long misunderstood living in the shadows of Abraham Lincoln When you agree with that I really think that's what the book did And his list on the historian's vote and however you take that historians voting on presidents He's gone up about 13 spots just in recent years But I do think that this book is another look at this presidency And you know this from your amazing book that congratulations on all the success I mean holy cow Record breaking But you read those reviews and just people who read the book on Amazon or wherever Barnes and noble And you put on in there and you just click on some of the people that take time to type And what I got out of that is that people's eyes were opened to really an American hero not just in the union general position but in the presidency trying to hold the country together as the country was really tipping towards a second Civil War

Ulysses S. Grant Amazon Abraham Lincoln Barnes
"ulysses" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Into the union which in the years that followed other presidents didn't take grants torch there He really was way ahead of his time and you know it's very interesting as you also point out in the book he married a woman whose father was pro slave and he married into this family and there was a slave that his wife brought along into the marriage And then eventually he goes down wherever it is to the courthouse or anything or wherever it is To specifically free the slave correct You better handle it Early on He's kind of gifted this slave by colonel dent Julia dense Father And he is a real problem with it His father is an abolitionist and he grows to be that And he frees the slave right away legally And the book ends and I've talked about this before with you but it ends in real time And San Francisco as this statue of Ulysses S. Grant has been pulled down after the George Floyd protests and a reporter is reporting as this thing is toppling at almost looks like the Saddam Hussein's to hedge you falling down And they go interview the people and they say why are you doing this And they say he and a slave and he was part of the Civil War This needs to change And I put that in the book because it really incensed me because I think we as a country have so much to do when it comes to history to know where we've been how far we've come and how far we have yet to go But those folks who pulled that statue down didn't realize that Ulysses S. Grant was honestly one of our best leaders in fighting for black equality Citizenship voting and everything else As you write these books and they are very very superb books as you write these books over time and look what's happening in the country and our schools and all And I don't want us to be a pollyanna about this Are you optimistic about what kids are being taught are you optimistic That American history can actually survive truth telling So I'm realistic And I think that it takes an active adult class of people who.

colonel dent Julia dense George Floyd Ulysses S. Grant Saddam Hussein San Francisco
"ulysses" Discussed on She Podcasts

She Podcasts

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on She Podcasts

"That one is $30 a year. There's another one that I subscribe to as well. That's also X amount of year. And mind you, I've already paid for these. So I've already bought these and I'm also paying a subscription for them. So what happens with setup is you get the latest. So if the developer decides to release a new update with new functionality, you get the full app. You don't have to be nickel and diming and like, I don't know if I want to go with a pro, I want to stick with the free. You get the pro. You get the pro. You get the updates. You don't have to. The whole thing. And so you get access to all of these incredible apps for 9 9 9 a month. Now, obviously, if you don't use any of these apps, maybe you can test out a couple of them, but even for me looking at what they have to offer just with Ulysses and clean my Mac. I'm essentially almost paid for the entire year. With just those two, Ulysses is my favorite. I have Ulysses in there. Oh my God, it's all laid out like notion, too. It is amazing. So Ulysses I've been a fan on forever. There's so many. I could talk about all of these in adults. I thought, is another one that I use all the time. It's a beautiful app to be able to do all the things with. They are the stuff. And so and let me tell you one of the reasons that they're doing this as well. And this is something that is really powerful for developers of apps is that being or paying setups this way gives the developers a bigger cut, I may be wrong about this, but I don't think I am. A bigger cut of their apps than what Apple gives them, because as you know, this is a huge fight whenever Apple does anything. They take a massive cut. So if somebody's subscribing to Ulysses, let's say it's $30 a month or whatever, they still get a cut out of that. I think it's what is it? 30%, they get 30% of that sale. I don't know. That part I don't know, but it makes sense that they would do that. Yeah, and so they are all of these independent developers have banded together to provide as much value so that you subscribe in one essentially for one payment, but you are, but they're getting the majority of the money for that..

Ulysses Apple
"ulysses" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

The Addicted Mind Podcast

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

"Go to bed at night, I set my alarm for 7 o'clock in the morning because I want to wake up early. But when it's 7 p.m. the next day, I keep hitting the snooze button because I want to sleep. The emotional brain controls the immediate behavior the night before I really am motivated to wake up early. And that's important to keep in mind. Right. And to understand how that works so we can make better decisions. We can strategize if we understand our emotional brain a little bit better. In fact, rather than fight our emotional brain, it's just important to understand how it works. And what we can do, for example, if I want to wake up the 7 o'clock in the morning and I know my lizard brain is going to want to hit the surface button, I make other precautions like I said the alarm across the room. So I have to get up out of bed by the time I get over there, then it's like, well, I'm up anyway. I might as well stay up. So you can do things that if you know how your emotional brain works, your logical brain can take necessary steps to prevent you from being sabotaged by your emotional brain. I reminded the story of Ulysses who, when he was returning back from the war, wanted to go past the island where the sirens were singing. And he knew that the sailors would wreck their boats when they heard the siren sing. So his emotional brain wanted to steer the boat toward the rocks. But he knew this was going to happen ahead of time. So he had his crew put wax in their ears and the crew tied him to the mast of the ship and he told the crew, don't listen to any of my orders until we're well past the island. So he's able to go past the island here the sirens are saying, and he didn't relapse. He didn't crash. But because he knew ahead of time, how his emotional brain was going to react. So he took steps ahead of time to help prevent that. So one of the things that helps you is that you can use medicines to help you. So the sirens don't cause you to crash your boat..

Ulysses
"ulysses" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Thunder on the right Calling now 8 7 7 three 8 one three 8 one one The book is To rescue the republic Ulysses S. Grant the fragile union and the crisis of 1876 it's a spectacular book By Bret baier so just to recap Brett with respect to grant he defeats laid defeats the confederacy He pushes through the post Civil War moments He insists that the free slaves have a right to vote He sends the army into the south to defeat the clan And he's he always opposed slavery in this kind of this kind of an attitude toward the towards the slaves at the time and then the freed slaves I mean he doesn't get credit for this does he He really doesn't I mean obviously in the shadow of Lincoln But you know it does matter who's writing your history as Hamilton song goes And the musical And I think in reconstruction over the years the instinct by historians was to put the negative side of post reconstruction on grant Whereas there were many presidents after that that had the opportunity to change the dynamic But didn't you know grant he also didn't count himself he writes his memoir at the end of his life He trusted first of all a lot of people and he did that in his administration and there was corruption Several different kinds But he also trust people after his presidency And he invest money where he loses it all And he is actually really struggling money was after the presidency which is hard to believe in this day and age He starts writing articles for a magazine and he's getting $500 to write about his Civil War memories and Mark Twain as a friend And he finds out how much he's making And Twain goes ballistic And says to the magazine publisher how can you do this He should be making tons more money So Twain says you write a memoir I will publish it And we will sell it around the country to make money for your family During that time he has throat cancer It's diagnosed So he fights through the pain of throat cancer He can barely swallow over the weeks And he finishes the memoir days before he dies Publishes the memoir It's the bestselling book of that time by far And Julia his wife makes roughly $300,000 which is about 14 million in today's day and age But he was determined to write that memoir I wish he had kept writing and wasn't sick and we could get his thoughts about his time as president But we have a lot of his thoughts from his early days He preferred being a general I think to being president didn't he 100% 100% But he also because he'd like to be with the soldiers There are great stories about his humility Lincoln requests grants presence in Washington so we could be sworn as in as commander of union armies So grant goes to Washington with his son Fred and they put him up at the Willard hotel And he's again like he usually dresses kind of shabby and an old uniform muddy boots They walk in and not knowing who he was the clerk said that all the rooms were full And they didn't have any space form except for a tiny space on the top floor And he says fine he's kind of indifferent to it And he signs the register and the clerk glances down and reads U.S. grants and son from Galena Illinois And the guy freaks out goes gets the manager and they are escorted to the bridal suite of the lavish accomplishments at the Willard hotel But it's just nuggets like that show you that he was unpretentious even as the most popular American figure at the time And these battles that he was involved in these were brutal brutal battles I mean the casualties and every one of these battles today it's almost unimaginable And Shiloh Charlie is horrible Horrific And the first night they the rebels had captured or killed entire divisions you know fields running red with blood of the fallen And you know he's with Sherman who's very close to grant is really his best friend And Sherman wants to retreat and he doesn't think there's any way they could win this battle But he doesn't say that to grant because he sees grant's determination And Sherman says well grant we've had a devil of day of it haven't we And grant says yes We'll let them tomorrow though And it turned out that grant had a strategy where eventually he winds Shiloh and changes the dynamic in the war They said he could read a battlefield like no other general Is that what you found to I found him to be everyone who talked about him thought that he was kind of a savant with military strategy Again he was not an outward guy He was not a guy that you're just palling around with everybody He was very inward Sort of like Lincoln in a way But that his military strategy was better than anybody Even Lee who was considered very one of the best at the time Ladies and gentlemen your hearing Bret bear and I'm gonna say this Brett you're very likeable You're very accessible You're a real journalist People don't always have to agree with you but you're a straight shooter I think you're a contribution of Fox has been enormous given how many of my listeners view journalists but you're just terrific I consider your friend you write these beautiful books about history and I hope folks that you go out and get your copy to rescue the republic Ulysses S. Grant the fragile union and the crisis of 1876 and go to Amazon.com It's right there It's well discounted You can have it delivered to you in the next day or two They're still doing that And I want to encourage you to get a copy and we talk about history lessons in school and so forth if you're homeschooling or even if you're not This is a critical subject Ulysses S. Grant It doesn't get the amount of attention it deserves He doesn't get the praise that he deserves And I think Brett you've done a great thing here in writing this book Thank you very much Mark And you know after your book success and all that you wrote about I take away in that vein from this book is that to keep our republic really requires constant vigilance you know our freedoms are not automatically given And it has to be pursued in lawn repeatedly And grant was one of those guys who believed keeping the union together was the most important thing And here you wrote a book on history And most of your contemporaries are writing books about gossip and Trump I want to congratulate you from breaking away from that mindset because people are sick of reading that stuff All right Well thanks Brett This is a terrific book It's my pleasure God bless I'm telling you this is a fantastic book I have a right in front of me to rescue the republic Ulysses S. Grant the fragile union and the crisis of 1876 Not enough has set a value lacy's S. Grant He was a great great man He truly was.

Willard hotel throat cancer Ulysses S. Grant Lincoln Bret baier Brett Sherman Shiloh Charlie Thunder grant Mark Twain Washington Twain Hamilton army Galena Bret bear
"ulysses" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Ulysses S. Grant You know he was actually a not only a great general but a great president He really was There was a great book out on the topic now to rescue the republic Ulysses S. Grant the fragile union and the crisis of 1876 by Bret baier Brett how are you sir Hey Mark Thanks for having me on Well it's always a pleasure You write very very smart and very compelling books about history and so forth What caused you to write a book about Ulysses S. Grant I think he's one of the least understood presidents And yet one of the greatest presidents am I right I agree I mean and that's what I really found You know and we've talked before about the previous books I did about Eisenhower and Reagan and FDR Churchill installing and moments in history where I thought history they're kind of brushed it over or didn't focus on those moments That was the beginning middle and end of the Cold War And I was looking for another one of those historical kind of overshot something that wasn't that focused on And I looked at grant's presidency You know his 8 year presidency whenever you hear about it it is always about the difficulties and the petty corruption and scandals And there were some And there were people that grant trusted as a non politician who took advantage of them Make money But his most important role was really to win the peace After the Civil War and most importantly the process of reconstruction in the south to make sure it was successful And as you dig in here there are really consequential things that happen

Ulysses S. Grant Rutherford B Hayes Samuel tilden Bret baier Brett sir Hey Mark Thanks FDR Churchill Louisiana KKK Eisenhower South Carolina Reagan U.S. Senate army Lincoln grant Congress Ford theater Florida Victoria
Bret Baier's 'Rescue the Republic' Digs Deep Into Ulysses S. Grant's Legacy

Mark Levin

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Bret Baier's 'Rescue the Republic' Digs Deep Into Ulysses S. Grant's Legacy

"Ulysses S. Grant You know he was actually a not only a great general but a great president He really was There was a great book out on the topic now to rescue the republic Ulysses S. Grant the fragile union and the crisis of 1876 by Bret baier Brett how are you sir Hey Mark Thanks for having me on Well it's always a pleasure You write very very smart and very compelling books about history and so forth What caused you to write a book about Ulysses S. Grant I think he's one of the least understood presidents And yet one of the greatest presidents am I right I agree I mean and that's what I really found You know and we've talked before about the previous books I did about Eisenhower and Reagan and FDR Churchill installing and moments in history where I thought history they're kind of brushed it over or didn't focus on those moments That was the beginning middle and end of the Cold War And I was looking for another one of those historical kind of overshot something that wasn't that focused on And I looked at grant's presidency You know his 8 year presidency whenever you hear about it it is always about the difficulties and the petty corruption and scandals And there were some And there were people that grant trusted as a non politician who took advantage of them Make money But his most important role was really to win the peace After the Civil War and most importantly the process of reconstruction in the south to make sure it was successful And as you dig in here there are really consequential things that happen

Ulysses S. Grant Bret Baier Brett Sir Hey Mark Thanks Fdr Churchill Eisenhower Reagan Grant
"ulysses" Discussed on Neon Shadows: An American Noir Tale

Neon Shadows: An American Noir Tale

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on Neon Shadows: An American Noir Tale

"Who needs chefs jackie. When you've got a two hundred dollar soon key to the penthouse phantom. Oh wow where did you find the time for wardrobe. Change that the key. Yes sir good because we have ten minutes before the north face. The building is exploding. Let's wait in the lobby for frank. The anticipation was building. I was finally going to get what i came for waited in the lobby. But no frank. What now was there. Another hiccup was there. The lobby filled with people screaming and running in a flood towards the exit. Panic was heard throughout the entire lobbying. Even the floors above. I saw the back of the elevator that security went to levels two and three. Hey sorry i'm late. i didn't wanna be on the side of the building where the things were blowing up. So i found a back door. Sir madam here are your scattered guns. Let's get to it. Sirens pulsed in the distance and i saw cruisers fill the lot and establishing a perimeter so far we were still holding the plan together by a hair. All of a sudden security now filed out of the elevator onto the first floor. We opted to use the stairs for a few floors i to avoid the bulk of traffic when we made it to the fourth floor. We exited the stairwell in randomly elevator. We had to utilize every second that joke by us. I put the key into the console and hit the button for the penthouse. Nothing happened after a few tries in vain. The doors shut in the elevator went down. Instead of up someone had called it two four three doors open and five armed guards under the elevator. then push the button for the executive's office. One floor shy of a penthouse. You're going to the offices right play. We got a long ride. Yeah you look your key in here. Oh yeah thanks. Seven senior guys up there before. I'm guessing you're working on project aries. Yeah we are Lots of groundbreaking stuff all the civilians evacuated by now. There's no structural damage. But i'm surprised you're still working after that explosion phantoms are real slave-driver. Yeah burning the candle both ends you. It is frank polish shock on out from behind his coat and grip the handle tight. I felt a sweat down my face. The tension in this tight metal and glass box was heavy in the air. It weighed down on my chest. Only allowing short labor breaths. I didn't have the room to use the wolf here. If there was a fight. I wouldn't be of much help. I put my hand on the pistol in my pocket. Project areas is special. Yeah this could change. The world. best thing is about project areas. What's that there is no project. Aries ship dr. Turn to face of frank. Put a whole thrown the other four scrambled to pull their guns ulysses grab scrapped from it's sheath on frank's belt stabbed it into an officer cordelia shot. Her soccer guardsmen before he could clear his holster. Bullets ricocheted in casings. Drop to the ground. Two men were left with guns drawn. They both went to fire. But lock arms with frankie lists. He's pushing them into a corner. Incidentally trapping cordelia as well light shown up a gun hill by the staff guard. He fired a shot into frank shoulder. And i shot dead. I didn't have a shot on the other. Two without hitting one of my friends and they were too big and too strong to pull off. Kid use your hands. I like when you were matt earlier. What remember oh yeah. They took sam away. Nothing could make me angrier. My nails elongated. My fingers followed dark bristled haired jutted from my pores guard. Contending with frank turned his barrel demand shot. I covered my face and my hands flinch instinctively or grew on the officers face. I opened my closed. Palm to reveal a bullet. The one he fired at me. I can catch bullets now. At through my calls into the guard's throat and ripped out the flesh and chunks of something else franken ulysses push the last standing officer back. He went to fire his gun. But i grabbed it with my claws and crushed it under my oppressive strength. I pulled scrap from the dead man's body through to frank. He caught it and ran the blade into the guards chin and up through the soft palate. Kilian him instantly. We all sat out of breath and covered in blood amaze that we escaped with our lives. The elevator reached the executive suites. I tried using the key to go to the penthouse but it seemed to different key was required. Looks like we need another key. I snatched the keys off of all the security guards. Four or five didn't work but the leader who discovered we were impostors. His key was different. There was an inscription of an s encircled by olive branches on it. maybe some kind of s- family crest. I put it in and press the button for the penthouse again. Finally it lit up. It was time for our final leg. Ready your weapons everyone. We don't know what's waiting for us. We did just that. The door opened and there was a hall that split into two divergent paths. Guards could be heard coming from the right. Okay let's go left. Not so fast kid. Look we're leaving a trail bloody footprints lead from the elevator right to us dusty. Mula sees you go ahead franken. I got this right. You're we'll handle these guys and catch up with you. I let me put this body in the door of the elevator so that it can be called down for reinforcements like the way you think. Okay guys don't go getting yourself killed. I would try to persuade you against this. But that is a fool's errands for either of you. Come on ulysses to on our men but there's maybe at the end of the hall opened the doors. Good day gift away to you on the roof. There went the surprise factor. He was waiting on us after letting us in the doors were shut and locked behind us. I'm fairly confident. I could get back through the door if i wanted to. But that will have to wait. We walked into the master bedroom with a balcony that gave access to the roof. A man burst from the closet and ran it ulysses with a knife knocking him onto the bed. The assassin put two hands on his dagger and bear down. Ulysses held him back with one arm placed under the man's hands. Before i could even help ulysses used his freehand fire a bolt into the assailants chess from his crossbow. The man tumbled back crashing into the closet. Door came then died. Full of tricks ought they. Are you surprised. They don't fight fair not in the slightest. We continued onto the metal staircase leading to the roof climbing. Its top revealed a small army of goons and gareth in the center of the rooftop furnished. To look like a lounge. In ancient greece and elaborate fountain sculpted in marble women holding jars was grand focal point. Rows of stone columns held up laddis canopies of ivy and grapevine. The one saving grace of this being arena was the ample cover which we would need being outnumbered ten to one. You finally might despite your attempts to keep us from arriving at all. You'll have to excuse me. I can get very anxious waiting around on the other. Connick guy who seeks twins thumbs old. I is this whole and you have left. Dooby kill everyone else. You sent her way. You know you guys. I'm the one who's been tearing through your ranks one by one. It seems your little stunt dance. Day is prevented reinforcements and these cowards shitting they britches however all i need is me a few his subordinates. Drop their guns ran. Gareth shot some of them as they did. Just a few men remained at aside but hardly out of loyalty he smirked. That pastored was smiling. Enough come a little puppy l. put you. Dan snapped face. I.

frank Sir madam cordelia franken jackie Aries frankie Kilian soccer Mula sam matt Palm Ulysses ulysses chess gareth greece Connick
Steelers Rally to Beat Bills 23-16 to Open Season

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Steelers Rally to Beat Bills 23-16 to Open Season

"Defense and special teams helping Pittsburgh to an opening day win in buffalo twenty three sixteen was the final Pittsburgh over coming at ten halftime deficit Ulysses Gilbert scoring on a blocked punt defensive end T. J. watt had two sacks in the bills offense could only muster one touchdown Pittsburgh other touchdown came off a Ben Roethlisberger to Deonte Johnson touchdown pass a longtime Steeler quarterback says everyone had a hand in this this was a team win offense defense special teams and that's one thing I'm most proud about Steelers home the week two against Las Vegas well buffalo will be heading to Miami G. Matanga orchard park New York

Pittsburgh Ulysses Gilbert T. J. Watt Deonte Johnson Buffalo Ben Roethlisberger Bills Steelers Las Vegas Miami G. Matanga Orchard Park New York
"ulysses" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Football team. Ulysses Norris was a tight end who also played for the Bills in the eighties. He scored touchdowns for the Lions and maybe the Saints. And Ulysses, Come here. Was the first Ulysses to play in the NFL. He played for Guys got this one, you know? Time's up the Buffalo Bisons. Okay, who went 17 and one in 1929 tough. One tough year that we had to feel good. Now is that the least amount of touchdowns for any presidential first name. Rock. How many rock I'm pretty sure the rougher for rock how many Rutherford have scored a touchdown? No one named George has ever scored a touchdown in the NFL. Very interesting, Little stat there. Was because George Kittle first name isn't actually Georges Jean. Nobody knows. No, he never scores. Actually, it's funny. You mentioned George can he never scores? He's great. He just never scores. All right. Some levity. Pittsburgh 23 Buffalo, 16 Mike shop and the bulldog here with Sneaky Joe. Let's get back to your calls. We have Mike with us. Hi, Mike. Hey, guys. Uh, listen Not like most of us in western New York. I mean, I'm as big as Josh Ellis fan as anybody, but let's just face it. He just wasn't very good today. Raffles Burgers, stats weren't all that great, but he was the better quarterback on the field. You know, I'm just curious driving back from the stadium, you know? Listen to Sean McDermott, Not not. One reporter in the press conference asked him about the play of the quarterback. I mean, the wins and losses of this team comes down to how Josh plays and nobody asked him, Bob. Hm? Well, in a roundabout way, maybe, But okay. He She'd say something good about Allen in the press conference. I guess it's not really a story, but he did say something about How he played with fans back. How he kept his cool something like that. Right. But, you know, I don't really have anything to say about the media part. But as far as the other stuff you said, Sure, yeah. Yeah, he did not. He was not sharp. I mean, he wasn't you know, horrendous, And I think you know the the high level of play that he put on the field last year Might have had you just sort of waiting all day. For like that one play like maybe a little bit like the Pittsburgh game last year. I mean, that was a close game. Alan even referenced at the year before that against duck Hodges or wherever Was also a tight game that came down to try devious white. I think made to fourth quarter interceptions in the game in Pittsburgh, back in 2000 and 19 to to help them get that thing to the garage. Um, Alan just was off. You know that. Just he just wasn't quite there today. Accuracy wise, maybe decision making wise and yes, you know, the caliber of the opponent plays into that. And the Steelers, I think did a good job of getting hands up on him and harrying him to the point where maybe he was unsettled, even on plays where he wasn't really all that harried. And you know that can happen. Um, so you know, it was not to me. Um, you know to me, uh, something that I'm going to really worry about. At this point, but it was not was not a great A real good day for Allen. He was not. He was not Didn't play like the second high speed quarterback in the league today. Here we go, You know, like that's that's go. That's what comes with it. You've got to deliver and he didn't deliver. It. Was it not on an M V p level? Is that what you're saying? That's what I'm here We go. It's a new season, isn't it? Now It is for real. It is definitely a new season now. Yeah. I don't think Roethlisberger was better, really myself. I wouldn't even care to compare them. Uh, Jason is next. Hello, Jason. But I was going guys. I just got a couple quick points. My point is, um, knows how the offensive line was obviously destroyed today. Well. Is that a lack of preseason play? No. So, um McDermott didn't do that. And if I'm definitely a Buffalo Bills fan book If I was a Steelers fan, my hero is Dion Dawkins. He did a great job holding constantly. Thank you. Bulldog. Well, the holding penalties are I think, an indication that you're having a tough time up front. So, um, you know that there were I think three call. There was another one that got that got declined. Um, so they had, you know, ahead of the tough time up there. There's no question about it. There's a lot of talent there, uh, on Pittsburgh. Um you know what made a big play to force a turnover. On a play where you know he didn't as much Et beat Darryl Williams around the edge, But Alan moved to a spot where that worked for what, more so than it was. You know, it was more good fortune, I'd say, but you know there's talent there. That's a that's a strong defensive team. I think we knew that going in The question was whether Pittsburgh would be able to do enough on offense. And really, they barely did. You know they needed they needed the passenger fear like those plays count. Okay, you get credit for throwing the ball downfield. And they did that. And Levi Wallace got caught and, you know, we could argue for a generation or more about whether that should have been a penalty or could could have been ignored or whatever, but you got your flag. They got themselves set up and they got in the end zone on a great play by Johnson there. I mean, that was Wallace had good coverage on the touchdown. And great concentration by the receiver, But they needed help to get their points. Pittsburgh today they weren't going to move the ball on you. Um so, you know, um I don't know where I started there. That was supposed to be about Ellen. I think I don't even know where I am. Well, the caller wanted to take a crack at Dawkins, which you know. Oh, right. Okay. It's not like he's not good. That is maybe the toughest matchup out there. For An offensive line in Pittsburgh. Right. So you got what you probably should have about expected in that area. Which he didn't get was You know, Wide open digs and Beasley all day all day for 15 20 yards Anytime you wanted it, That's what you didn't get in this game. So you know, some of that is, uh, they're connected, right? I mean, more time to throw you get more. You know more of that, but Right. The difference in the game is a blocked punt touchdown. That's it. That is the difference here. 23 16 Steelers. In the end, we'll take a break might show up in the.

Sean McDermott Levi Wallace Dion Dawkins George Kittle Ulysses Norris Wallace Josh Ellis Ellen Johnson Josh George Jason Allen Darryl Williams McDermott Roethlisberger 2000 Alan last year Steelers
Millions Miss President Trump and His Leadership

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Millions Miss President Trump and His Leadership

"Sure Millions of us Miss President Trump very, very much and his policies. And, uh, when you listen to what he says, and you'll notice, I conduct my interviews. I want my guests to speak, particularly a former president, United States. And, um How sensible he is. How rationally is and how, of course, the media try and create A monster out of the man. But when you listen to how he thinks Through what he says. Whether it's Afghanistan, the border, the Middle East, the election and so forth, and so on. Makes an enormous amount of sense, even at the end when he's talking about generals Very few of the guts to mention Robert E. Lee. He's not supporting Robert E. Lee. He's not supporting the Confederacy. The mental midgets around America. This is what they want you to think they'll twist What? Look, They do it with me. And I'm on here three hours a day, five days a week, explaining myself over and over and over again, but they want to twist what you said, because they don't want to argue against what you believe. And who you are. They want to create strawman and foils. To create hysteria. Because their arguments are losing arguments. They're not appealing to the American people unless you can turn somebody into a boogeyman. Which is what they try to do to President Trump. And so you hear them talking about Robert E. Lee that many people think he was a great general. Many people think he was a great general that the Confederacy would have lost a lot faster. Among those was Abraham Lincoln, who thought Robert E. Lee was a great general. Ulysses asked Grant, who thought Robert E. Lee was a great general. He was running circles around the union generals until Ulysse says Grant finally showed up. Which is President Trump's point. Lincoln had to fired general after general till he found Grant and he was advised not to take Grant. But he took him anyway. He took

President Trump Robert E. Lee America Afghanistan Middle East Grant Abraham Lincoln Ulysses Ulysse Lincoln
"ulysses" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"That's it our long journey. That in many ways started back in episode. Ten is at its end. Helped you enjoy these episodes adapting them has been challenging emotional frustrating at times and inspiring. And whatever you thought of our work. It's easy to see how these stories have lasted throughout the centuries and how their deep humanity echoes even to the modern day. Today's title comes from a poem entitled ulysses by alfred lord tennyson if he didn't know ulysses is the roman name fro dizziness. That poem offers a different but no less profound depiction of the post odyssey odysseus. And it's one of my favorites. If you're interested. I posted a link to it and the donuts the creatures this week our bacchus and ukwa and the kwaku coudl people in the pacific northwest. The back was is a skeleton guy who wears warpaint i mean. I think you could argue that. If you're a skeleton you probably don't need warpaint to be scary. But don't tell the back was that i mean. Do tell him that if you find him. But you're probably not gonna find him because he's very sneaky. It said that he uses the sound of rushing water to mask his movements through the forest and that he uses it to sneak up on fishermen to try to drown them. Why well i'm guessing it's because he's lonely because the drowned all come to live with him in his invisible house and yeah. I'm also wondering if the house is like a regular house but outsiders can't see it or if it's an invisible house where everyone can see in in all the drowned roommate's can see each other if he can't sneak up on you. He'll kill you with kindness literally. He has a cockleshell out of which he eats ghost food. If you're wondering what ghost food is its bark. That looks like dried salmon and he uses the tent loss travelers. Who don't have any other options. If you eat that bark you'll die and be stuck as the roommate of the was. The buck was in some traditions as a girlfriend. The new kwa. She's another force creature with children with a backless. She's a giant who's naked elderly embroiled and her life revolves around her children. In fact she's supposed to be extremely rich. So if you want to risk angriness skeleton with ghost food and his girlfriend that can't die just kidnap a magical child. Because that's how you can get your hands on some of the new quiz wealth. Just you know be aware that in doing so you're pretty much the most evil creature in that forest. That's it for this week. Myths and legends is by. Jason and chris wiser our theme songs by broke for free and the creature that week. Music is by steve combs their links to even more music in the show notes. Thank you so much for listening and we'll see you next week..

alfred lord tennyson ulysses pacific northwest steve combs Jason chris
Would Any Other Great President Have Left Afghanistan?

Mark Levin

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Would Any Other Great President Have Left Afghanistan?

"Because what's happened here? Ladies and gentlemen will go down in history hundreds of years from now. Hundreds of years from now. Is one of the most Preposterous, appalling. Surrenders. By any superpower in history of mankind. We surrendered. I'm tired of these people who write to go on TV and so forth, and we never should have been there. We never should have been there. Really? We never should have been there. Almost 3000 of our people slaughtered. The Taliban. Give Al Qaeda safe haven Can you think of any president any great president who would have tolerated that from George Washington and Thomas Jefferson? The Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant. Theodore Roosevelt and Coolidge. Dwight Eisenhower and Ronald Reagan and beyond do you think they would have left? A terrorist cell. In a place where Americans were slaughtered. More deaths, as I recalled

Al Qaeda Taliban Ulysses S. Grant George Washington Thomas Jefferson Theodore Roosevelt Dwight Eisenhower Coolidge Lincoln Ronald Reagan
"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

The God and Gigs Show

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

"Even <Speech_Male> get a chance to touch <Speech_Male> on all the incredible <Speech_Male> artists. <Speech_Male> He's worked with <Speech_Male> christian mcbride <Speech_Male> joy alexander <Speech_Male> jazz <Speech_Male> heads in my <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> audience. You guys <Speech_Male> all know the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> names that i'm mentioning <Speech_Male> and you realize <Speech_Male> that. This is <Speech_Male> a top drummer <Speech_Male> in the field. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> that's not again <Speech_Male> what our core <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> effort is <Speech_Male> about. Even though <Speech_Male> we do care about success <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you heard the heart of <Speech_Male> the man. He was talking <Speech_Male> more about legacy <Speech_Male> and building something <Speech_Male> that matters beyond <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> showing up on stages <Speech_Male> and getting accolades <Speech_Male> and getting <Speech_Male> grammy's <Speech_Male> and things like that. Even <Speech_Male> though he has <Speech_Male> every single <Speech_Male> of that he has all <Speech_Male> the musical credentials. <Speech_Male> You could want <Speech_Male> and yet his hardest <Speech_Male> to help others. <Speech_Male> And that's what. <Speech_Male> I hope has really <Speech_Male> impacted you today. <Speech_Male> And why <Speech_Male> we are continuing <Silence> <Speech_Male> to trumpet <Speech_Male> and the push <Speech_Male> and to talk <Speech_Male> about building a better <Speech_Male> creative life <Speech_Male> from <Speech_Male> the inside out <Speech_Male> not just your career <Speech_Male> but your entire <Speech_Male> life so <Speech_Male> i hope this <Speech_Male> interview has inspired <Speech_Male> you. Please make sure <Speech_Male> you subscribe and <Speech_Male> review this <Speech_Male> show. This would be a great <Speech_Male> show to <Speech_Male> stop after <Speech_Male> we finished. And make <Speech_Male> sure you review it <Speech_Male> and let us know <Speech_Male> what you thought <Speech_Male> what helped you said <Speech_Male> more creatives <Speech_Male> like you can <Speech_Male> find a show. <Speech_Male> Make sure that check <Speech_Male> everything else. We're doing <Speech_Male> out at <Speech_Male> got engaged dot <Speech_Male> com and. <Speech_Male> I can't <Speech_Male> wait to shear <Speech_Male> yet. Another <Speech_Male> inspirational <Speech_Male> educational <Speech_Male> and encouraging <Speech_Male> episode. <Speech_Male> With you in <Speech_Male> the weeks to comes. <Speech_Male> Make sure you continue to <Speech_Male> follow us until <Speech_Male> then <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> continued to become <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the creative. You <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> were created to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be. Thanks guys. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i'll see you <SpeakerChange> next time. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for joining <Speech_Music_Male> us here. At the garden gig <Speech_Music_Male> show please leave <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was a review on i tunes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like our facebook <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> page or <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> visit and gigs <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com. And <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tell us what you thought <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of this show. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We'll be back soon. <Speech_Music_Male> In the meantime <Music> go create something <Music> amazing.

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

The God and Gigs Show

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

"So as we continue to share that positively that becomes infectious and then that creates manifestation. So yeah man. that's that's yes. I say at the south up instagram. So people keep in touch with me via that and you know i always say too many. Us's was doing is on. It is is definitely us's but he's my dad so not up and he's not on instagram. Like you doing on facebook go but this has been an incredible talk again. I'm gonna wind this myself just to hear all break down but we're going to make sure this goes out to everybody. We can't ulysses thank you so much for your time. Thank you thank you for and we're dipping hopefully do this again some time but until then bless you and thank you so much for sharing your time. God bless you. You take care of brother my friend. I am absolutely certain that you are inspired and motivated now. Not just to be a great musician. Creative artists. I believe that by listening to this interview you've discovered and heard the secrets of having an impactful legacy told career one that will not just bless hugh but will bless generations after you and if you didn't get that then i suggest you go back and listen again and even if you did keep this interview in your cue downloaded. Save it because this is one of those things you're gonna wanna review. Please make sure you check out. Ulysses book the musician's career guide were living link in the show notes as well as links to all of his music again. He's a grammy winner. We didn't even get a chance to touch on all the incredible artists. He's worked with christian mcbride joy alexander jazz heads in my audience..

facebook Us hugh Ulysses christian mcbride alexander jazz
"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

The God and Gigs Show

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

"In here are allen. Come here april now. You come a lot of times. We get in and everyone like all right. My mom made it'll be biden's bins in the house and listen. I'm making them an by mama bins to. But by the time i do that. I'm gonna have probably twenty other people in that room with me. I've helped them as well. So i that is why. Don't miss a beat exists. Because i think. And i'll say this and be quiet that the true evolution of the african american community. Because i i am artist and a human being but i'm a black man and and the evolution of our race is not going to evolve into we as a people come together and create new opportunities that shape that new society. We can't be waiting on the other person or the other culture to give us. We still even. Though they bought the hand some more opportunities we still got to create our ownership. And help our people and that's how we will see that society that we want over time. So that's why. That's why i started by mississippi. That's beautiful man. I resonate with all that. And i haven't i haven't pulled my my north west florida card yet but i'll oh i tend to. I'm here in pensacola growing up. So as you talk about this. I'm thinking about my neighborhood's i'm thinking about you know i. I haven't been able to go back of course in florida. But you know miami and northwest. Larva are like two different states united. Okay i'm thinking about the people that i didn't you know don't say i wanna say left behind but that are still there than don't have the opportunities because we are still as you said building and as i was coming up in school i thank god there were people mentors but as you now you're building that pipeline you're becoming that that gateway right to where now somebody else thirty forty years from now will feel your space and i think that's what that's a biblical thing to we talked about. You start absolutely you know. We are supposed to be looking for our moses and our joshua's right so moses doesn't have joshua to come back and take over and go on to jordan and moses dies and everything just ends with him war and again not to not to beat that horse. Because you know..

biden allen west florida pensacola mississippi miami florida united joshua moses jordan
"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

The God and Gigs Show

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

"Track all of that and then over time people wanna work with you then when she got into a certain level of mastery then i think it's okay to say. Wow okay. I can play. I feel comfortable in my instrument. People love what i do. I've a little bit of an audience. Now how do i become entrepreneurial and maximized Town okay and that mastery but what you have now. And i'm seeing it all the time. I mean you know. Even even brands are doing this. They're finding these kids who are talented. And they're they're pushing them in the on right and they haven't achieved mastery. That's and i love her. But there's really talented girl nandy bushnell. She's really talented girl. Plays the drums cute girl adorable. But she's like twelve and all of a sudden everybody's like all this stuff but she's not a mashed. She's twelve years old and she's talented. She's not a master. So what you're doing is you're giving her the appearance of mastery and you're given all winning ten years. Will she still be playing. Or if she's playing will she still be able to have a body of work. So the unfortunate thing albie quiet as that we as As pop society we have pushed the world towards talent. Yeah we've pushed work towards town as a result of that we don't even we don't even respect mastery anymore so to your point to your point. I think what i would say to. That musician is be mashed. Okay mitt to mastery and when you get to a certain baseline then you can start infusing. Some entrepreneurial elements but don't think that you can be entrepreneurial successful and you can't even pick up sticks. You said so much. The only reason. I it's like you just so many things. Thank goodness has a podcast. And it's like wait. Oh that's right we got this. Got this on tape. So here's what. I want to jump into this to media subject to just jump away from you. Just mentioned the fact that the people looking for talent versus look for mastery so now turn it back on us as musicians to avoid that voice right because so much of us so much pulling us toward the social media you just mentioned it the The the top generation of minute at a time a second at a time our attention spans are being shrunk down and so for us as musicians. We can pink that all it takes is just that one moment again going viral. You just mentioned it in terms of social media. So how do you get people out notice whether through the reading books like yours..

nandy bushnell albie
"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

The God and Gigs Show

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

"Poking back to ulysses response to that question in just one moment but i wanna talk to you directly as a fellow creative. Who's highly motivated. Who believes in what you are sharing and what you can create but maybe you felt like you're all alone. Maybe you felt like the lone wolf. Maybe you don't know that there's other people around you that want to achieve like you want to achieve who have voiced at wants to be amplified and who believes that god is pressing for more out of but just don't know where to go to get that motivation accountability and support well. I'm happy to tell you there is a place for you. It's called guiding gigs. three sixty. it's our membership are highly motivated creatives. Gather in god and gig three sixty an online hub for creative training accountability and support. We have weekly calls. We have classes and courses but most importantly you're going to find a home there where you can grow as a creative beyond what you can do by yourself. And i'm also happy to tell you that there is a free trial that won't keep your insurance simple and quick you can get in. You can try it out. There's no risk. But i can tell you honestly that the people who stay stick.

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

The God and Gigs Show

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

"This miles davis recall milestones. This affiliate joel. General been you know. The rest is history simultaneously. I started playing gigs jacksonville. Jacksonville of a place. That's very talented musicians. Because of the school university of north florida which it kinda been a place that winter marsalis has spent a lot of time at. I'm and this is. The time of winter was hiring a lot of people in his band that were from the south so he got wycliffe from up the street tallahassee before you he got marcus roberts. Excuse me markus Prenup from university of north. Florida really got me yeah He got vincent gardner from university of north florida. He got marcus. Roberts who's from jacksonville You know so. You've got this sort of southern contingency that he's getting these guys. So what meet what that means is a lot of the players are playing their bought off because winter is coming to town all the time the jacksonville jazz festivals going well so i started getting serious about jazz during that time as well and i start playing local gigs. By the time i was seventeen i started running my own jam session And i was playing. I mean i was playing probably three or four nights a week so thursday wednesday night. I had a jam session. Friday saturday. I was doing corporate gigs sundays at church all day. You know and i just. And then i was in high school district all city all county all state all that so i think the idea of of a profession started when i was sixteen because i was i was paying bills paying bills and bamako's and stuff from giga. You know because i'd already been working professionally as drummer at church. They were paying the at church by the time. I was ten years old ten eleven years old. so i've been professional and working most of my life. You know because of the music. Wow and that's what's so interesting that you just mentioned about being paid even as a kid and i wanna get that whole thing but my dad. Yeah so i wanted to ask you. In terms of the professional education's we at musical education professional education learning like. Okay the do's and don'ts of the gig. Laugh the do's and don'ts of if you wanna get hired and so i kind of i always go from positive to negative and the positive right so accountable goto the negative a little bit. Because there's probably some by listening saying well. I wanted to do that. i wanted to be. I want to get found. I wanted to be discovered. i didn't have these opportunities. so were there any lessons. You learned that kind helped you avoid or maybe you fell into some of the pitfalls the professional things where you get hit by. I don't know something about brothers being time learning using any of the things. We're like you learn lessons that you now can take say to somebody else. Here's how you avoid some of the pitfalls when you're trying to get to the professional world of plane absolutely madam. I think for me to be honest. My my parents are amazing My mother is very much the visionary. She's the one you know. She's from that generation baby boomer generation stuff by bootstraps You know worked as a secretary by the end of her corporate career. She was a executive or senior vice president. At merrill lynch you know on so she was a vet generation where you were hard and how to manage and how to do all these things without a college degree so i had a mother. Understood understands corporate mindset understand strategic building and really entrepreneurship. My dad military guy. Very much about order So i think having these really amazing parents that gave me a lot of great advice remember..

jacksonville school university of north flo marcus roberts markus Prenup university of north vincent gardner university of north florida marsalis wycliffe tallahassee Jacksonville joel davis bamako marcus giga Roberts Florida don merrill lynch
"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

The God and Gigs Show

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

"About great entertainers right. I think that's what it is. We get the best education musical and otherwise from our from our beginnings in the church. And as you said is really. I never thought of the conservatory. I loved that phrase and that because now you do teach now you are in conservatory places. I went to university of miami for school music and it was like there was som- things that i learned in school that i can only learn in the academic environment and then there's certain things how never learn until i get on stage or behind pope it and i. I love how you point that out. That's what a connection is one the other piece. I want to mention to that you know and not to belabor the point but the other side and you know this having grown up in church is when you talk about conservatory. As a person went to conservatory. One of the key ingredients that. Make it what it is and also allows you to produced a beautiful product is the toughness rice. And that's what church also provided right on the also. Have you know another side of that that we won't even delve into which is church. Hurt right which you have a lot of emotional issues that come out of church because sometime. We just didn't know how to handle stuff you know. Hurt people hurt people yet but the other side was this toughness of you know if you could make the church get up and saying catch the holy goes or you could inspire as a child. Your church You did something you know. You got up on sunday and and people start crying. That's a tough audience. Because you're talking about blue collar workers you talking about people who you know come from nothing people who are coming to church to feel better and if you have talent that can shift your church chances. Are you can ship carnegie hall. You know siding. That's the other piece of it that does make a very much conservatory will..

university of miami for school carnegie hall
"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

The God and Gigs Show

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

"Owens junior. Welcome to the guiding gigs program. How you sir. I'm great brother. I'm so glad to be here. Glad to talk to you and Being part of what you have gone on our member and you shot me a message on instagram. I was incredibly excited. Because i you know one of getting the word out but particularly getting the word out through people like you that are truly into the music into artists. So honor thank you no thank you. The pleasure is all mine. As i just mentioned i am i i came in contact with your music. Strictly that way through. We just mentioned one that your collaborators show to and then your own album songs of freedom. We stowed as many cut off of that as we could cover them all. I hope i hope you got the royalty. Check from that hallway. Because again like you're you're aspect in terms of your music already. Echoes what i believe in. I'm talking as a musician. I i really should be going to guide and gigs. But now i'm doing. The right is so important to me to connect with musicians. Who really understand the fullness of what's available to us as you know genre less could say so. When i saw what you did with that with pulling from spirituals pulling from the nina simone than from some pop stuff in everything kinda like went to the back so i guess i have to start with this question which is always kind of like you know what you do which everyone knows what you know. You can look up wikipedia to see what you do but what was the. What was your first. You know things that. Start to feed your mentality in terms of music. Was it what you heard as a child. Was it a musical family. Like what started to feed your music musical mind at the beginning that you know started to evolve over time. Sure so beginnings are very much the pentecostal church. And i'm sure you know dislike many. You live in miami The pentecostal church particularly in the south is is huge. You know and especially back then in the eighties. When i grew up in the nineties church for the black southern person. Unless you know you know you're non-religious which wasn't that many in the south but most of your entertainment and exposure to the arts came through the church. So yeah for me. Listening to the choir in jonah key. James cleveland commission. You know what have you. Those were all huge influences for me And always say to people. I think that's why the sound of a big band was very easy for me. Because i was able to go from hearing like this choir to big bay you know so that was a very easy transition for me to think about an intimate so yes so that that was my and my dad Which is why you know which we'll talk about later. The jazz festival is really important to me. Because my dad started taking me to the jacksonville jazz festival. When i was really young and he would take me there and i got to see the yellow jackets i got to see. You know. count basie band. I got a lot of really great artists and that really kind of blew my mind in terms of like. Wow there's another type of music out there also had or have a cousin. Same kevin sibley he was..

pentecostal church Owens nina simone James cleveland commission miami jacksonville basie kevin sibley
"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

The God and Gigs Show

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"ulysses" Discussed on The God and Gigs Show

"And creatives of all kinds looking for help. Balancing your passion to create with your everyday life not sure of your faith can coexist with your profession. Welcome to a place where real artists discuss. Realize you're listening to the garden gig. Show visit garden. Gigs dot com for shown us links and more information. Hello and welcome again to the show. Thank you so much for making this podcast heart of your creative day. I'm your host. Alan see paul and this podcast is here to help you build a better creative life from the inside out so new listeners. You're among friends and you're in the right place. My guest today is such a incredible example of what got engaged. Is all about ulysses. Owens junior is not just a musician at the highest caliber in the jazz and art world. But he's also a producer and educator and author of the book the musician's career guide. And i want to get right to this conversation. He's worked with everyone from winton marcella to moghul miller to kurt ellie. He's a grammy winner already. But his bio would take up half of this episode so rather than get into his bio. I want to get to the man himself and let me tell you how he has built a career that is based on faith family and giving back to his community and the legacy that he's building through. His career is all based on the principles. He's teaching both in his book and in the rest of his endeavors. So let's get right to this great discussion. You're gonna learn so much. Let's get right into it with your liberties horns junior.

Capitol Police warn of extended March 4 – 6 militia threat against Congress

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Capitol Police warn of extended March 4 – 6 militia threat against Congress

"The trump cult cunanan having failed to take the capital on january the sixth or hero roundup the deep state. Satanist cabal secretly controls the world on inauguration day had lately drawn a red circle around today march the fourth on which they believe. Donald trump will return to the white house and resume his presidency spoiler alert. He won't nevertheless fbi intelligence about another possible plot to storm. The capital has resulted in the implementation of extra security on joined with more on this. Jeffrey howard political philosopher. University college. London jeffrey with old you acknowledgement of the perils of taking any of the cunanan and associated. Nonsense seriously. why were they excited about march. The fourth march the fourth has a particular role to play in the broader cunanan story and the short version of it is that marched. The fourth was the original inauguration. Date for the us presidency so george. Washington's inauguration was scheduled for march the fourth seventeen eighty-nine as it happens it didn't actually occur in fact due to bad weather and so it had to be postponed to april. But for nearly a hundred and fifty years marched. The fourth was the inauguration date for the presidency until the twentieth amendment which was enacted in nineteen. Thirty three changed. The inauguration date a january twentieth for the reelection of franklin roosevelt. And so it's part of a broader aspect of cunanan ideology which very much anchors it at as in the american past in particular before nineteen seventy one cunanan followers believed that the. Us government has been wholly illegitimate Since the presidency of of ulysses s grant for very complicated and bizarre reasons we could get into. But it's that idea of march the fourth as the original. The right inauguration date for the american presidency that has given it such prominence in the cunanan ideology.

Cunanan Satanist Cabal Jeffrey Howard Donald Trump University College FBI White House Jeffrey London George Franklin Roosevelt Washington United States Us Government
What to expect in Trump's historic second impeachment trial

Here & Now

04:52 min | 1 year ago

What to expect in Trump's historic second impeachment trial

"Now Democrats and Republicans are gearing up for another momentous impeachment trial beginning tomorrow, the two sides are hammering out the details of the unprecedented second trial of former President Donald Trump. We're joined now by NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Domenico. We've simply never seen this before. In American history. A president impeached twice the second time after he's left office. However, senators preparing for this occasion Well, you know they're going to be the jury, and we've already seen that 45 Republicans have sided with Senator Rand. Paul, who brought this measure forward that believing that this is unconstitutional for Senate to even bring it forward. Well, we're gonna see tomorrow. Them starting this trial. We know that the house impeachment managers on the democratic side are trying to push a, you know. Shortened case one heavy on video and emotional pleas from you know, recalling the events of January 6th to try to make it, You know, sort of somethingto, you know, almost try the president. Before the public to convince them rather than just the senators. I see. And they will be led by representative Jamie Raskin and again the charges for inciting a riot. Aside from that emotional appeal, I mean the nuts and bolts. How are they gonna make the case? You said the president, a singularly responsible not just based on his rhetoric at the January 6th rally at the lips of the White House when the pro Trump mob then stormed the capital, but also his role in false claims that set the groundwork for this and this false grievance that they had That that the president had a right to say that there was that the election was stolen from him, even though there was no evidence for that, and that that groundswell that was the whole reason why they were there in the first place, and that the president's responsible for that. So his culpability is sort of a substance of the case against him. But there's also this procedural point and as you said Domenico 45, Senate Republicans voted to dismiss the trial before it even began claiming that just from a process standpoint, you can't convict a president who isn't in office anymore. Let's hear Trump ally Lindsey Graham. And the way he put it on face The nation yesterday. If you believe you committed a crime, he can be prosecuted like any other citizen. Impeachment is a political process would never impeached a president. Once they're out of office. I think this is a very bad idea. So Domenico, he says. It's a bad idea. On the other hand, he like all of these members of Congress had very scary experience just last month, so I mean to Republicans think Trump should face any consequences. Then you know, some have called for censure. But on the case of president, you know it's interesting. Lindsey Graham leaves out the case of Ulysses S. Grant, swore secretary in 18 76, who was tried after he resigned and the impeachment managers back then thought that this had settled the case because the Senate had voted back then. Uh, that it was that they did have jurisdiction. Now it was controversial. Back then the trump lawyers who have just put out their 75 page. Brief responding to some of the charges. You cite this case and said that you know, essentially because Belknap wasn't convicted by two thirds and because most of the senators back then Didn't think that they had standing. Almost the senators who voted to acquit him thought that he didn't have standing that. That's enough to say it's unconstitutional, even though the majority of the senators voted to convict him. So it was a controversy back then, and it's still a controversy today. I see some details there of the arguments that the former president's defense team is going to make. How about a few other process things Domenico in the moment that we have left because we need other things to get sorted out like how long the trial is going to take whether both sides can call witnesses where those things stand. We're not sure how long this is going to go on. You know, all signs are that it could be a week or so on. Do you know I really think that what's interesting is going to be how the Trump Team how their lawyers go down this path. They're going to make what looks like a narrow constitutional argument that a former president can't be tried and then impeachments mainly about removal and not disqualification from office because if they go down the path Of the election fraud that that could shake loose some Republicans, and there's only just a glancing mention. Of even the election fraud and the president's rhetoric on one line and one page of the 75 page brief. That's NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Domenico. Thanks You're

Domenico Domenico Montanaro Senator Rand Jamie Raskin Senate Lindsey Graham Donald Trump NPR White House Paul Ulysses S. Grant Belknap Congress
America Is in a Dark, Deeply Divided Place: Inauguration Day 2021

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:54 min | 2 years ago

America Is in a Dark, Deeply Divided Place: Inauguration Day 2021

"In july eighteen. Sixty four some fourteen thousand confederate troops to just six miles within sight of the us capitol dome for president lincoln. It was a rude shock after all. This was a year after the union. Victory at the battle of gettysburg and the confederacy seen near defeat. Just the nicotine. Seventeen thousand union troops dispatched by ulysses s grant arrived and pushed the confederates back. Well today joe biden. Sworn in as the forty six president of the united states twenty thousand national guardsmen will defend the same capital this time from enraged citizens. It's impossible to understand how we've reached this point unless we look beyond the last few weeks even beyond the election to pre existing conditions such as our decades-long thinning out of civil society. The most recent lawlessness at the capitol reflects an escalating lawlessness that spans political parties religious affiliations age brackets social classes. And so we're faced with. The question will a militarized america. Be the new normal. Will the armed troops protecting the citadel of democracy today be patrolling the streets of writing cities tomorrow will the blatant failures of our institutions and our leaders continued to fester to this explosive level of distrust chuck. Colson often said that unless people are governed by their conscience they will be governed by the constable when people were unable to govern themselves. They then face a choice. Between order or continued chaos. Most often people will choose order which inevitably means the loss of freedoms the freedom to peaceably. Assemble is impossible to maintain when assemblies frequently turned into riots. looting or sedition. The freedom of speech seems particularly vulnerable today when big tech world so much power and decides like twitter facebook and instagram. Already have to crack down on political speech they deem offensive or dangerous and just last week representative alexandria. Ocasio cortez spoke openly about forming a committee to rein in our media environment. That's something that should anyone who has ever read any dystopia novel ever and our second amendment freedoms are most vulnerable. When used as cover by mass shooters are insurrectionist. Perhaps the most consistent refrain from america's founders is that our national experiment would ultimately prove unsustainable unless there was a virtuous citizenry. our constitution simply cannot ever knows who refused to govern themselves. John adams our second president said it most clearly quote. Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It's wholly inadequate to the government of any other and yet americans are becoming increasingly. Immoral and irreligious are shocking. Lack of conscience on display in rising numbers of both deaths from despair by that. I mean addiction self harm and suicide and acts of desperation meaning violent acts riots and even self mutilation pursuit of identity or sexual pleasure. Look we pump poison ideas into our hearts and minds and then call it entertainment. We pump lies into our children and then call it education. The result is that america finds itself in such a dark deeply divided. Play place that alexander solzhenitsyn accurately described in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight speech at harvard. We have he said quote very little defense against the abyss of human decadence such as the misuse of liberty for moral violence against young people such as motion pictures full of pornography crime and horror even the strict. This laws sits alternates in might add even twenty thousand national guard. Troops will ultimately be powerless. Defend people against such moral corrosion but the situation is dire. But it's not without hope as chuck. Colson often said despair as a sin. Christ is risen from the dead and god and his gracious goodness has revealed to us what is true and what is good. He's given us his word and through prayer. He makes himself available to

Ulysses S Grant America President Lincoln National Guardsmen Ocasio Cortez Gettysburg Joe Biden Colson Chuck Instagram Alexandria John Adams Twitter Facebook Alexander Solzhenitsyn Harvard
Trauma in the Philippines asthirdmajor storm barrels through

UN News

05:21 min | 2 years ago

Trauma in the Philippines asthirdmajor storm barrels through

"These southeast asian nation of the philippines has being pummeled by the third major storm in three weeks adding to the pain and suffering thousands of families typhoon vanco locally known as ulysses made landfall on wednesday night and although it's much weaker than super typhoon goni. It bought catastrophic flooding across the capital manila sprawling densely populated city. Un uses video spoke to the un migration agencies. Kristen dedi chief of mission of iowan philippines who just driven to marikina central manila began by describing the scene just hours. After the latest storm's arrival parts of manila. That are twenty meters you. The water rose to twenty one. Point five meters so really significant. I'm actually standing on the river. Bed near marikina where the floodwaters absolutely raging l. And car are being taken away. And what things did. The storm hit manila. So the rain started yesterday evening. about six o'clock in the evening it started raining quite hard and then Definitely i was awoken in two wins howling at. You know it wasn't supposed to be as it certainly wasn't the strength of typhoon rolly last week but the damage in manila is much much more severe than it was last week so i was awakened at about midnight. One o'clock in the morning took a winds howling. Rains pounding poured throughout the night so at about three thirty in the morning they raised They have a signal system here in the philippines and they raise the signal for an area called fateh kina to level three and they were doing evacuations throughout the night so yeah quite quite intense so as things stand a lot of the population was already impacted by goni and were in evacuation centers. But how has the situation changed with this new star yet. While it's absolutely astro faded. The scituate ation so the for the new storm made landfall rowley or ideas. It's known go. Knee and international did not severely affect manila but it affected the provinces of alibi and cut to anise and camera. D'or sewer And those areas were again hit extremely hard with with ulysses just coming through so it's absolutely exacerbated. The situation you had people that were evacuated. Three and three weeks is the third type. Third major tie phone In three weeks. So it's exacerbated the situation for sure now this recent one which came through last night that had the additional impact on manila and manila was not as impacted from the first two typhoons Last week and the week before. But it's been hit hard with the with this one absolutely hit hard with a lot of flooding. People are still being evacuated enough rescue boats pulling in more rescue boats to bring people loud. Government is just doing an amazing job of the red cross of additional rescues. They've really. I mean right now you could see. They're bringing a lot more rescue boats for the people in terms of any initial estimates any any indications of damage or displacement especially in manila. It's not clear yet in the middle. It's not clear i'm not. I'm not sure what the numbers are at this point. I mean it's a very it's a moving situation But it has to be in the tens of thousands in terms of damage. it's massive. But i'm not sure. I mean it's too early to calculate exactly and i'm not. I'm not aware of any fatalities at this point. I have been on news today to see what the if there have been reported casualties. I haven't seen any but The damage from the flood waters is going to be is going to be massive definitely. I mean they're having flooding levels higher than joy under a hit in two thousand nine which really devastated parts of parts of manila. Absolutely government in a stretch the quite quite skill. that's. Cincinnati stripped earthquakes from the year then from co bid and now now. Three typhoon lebron It's just up. The we feel very bad for them outside manila. How's the situation in luzon and the areas that the typhoon went through. Yeah quite quite strong. There was a lot of flooding. This typhoon brought much more flooding than the whereas typhoon rolly lot of in damage but this typhoon. People's how are they coping. One one storm iphone and another over the last few weeks detrimental evacuated three times in three weeks. They lost their homes completely I mean they're tastes. Now t percent of what you know in some of these areas where they've been evacuated multiple times The definitely suffering Kidger also particularly stressed. I mean filipinos are the most resilient people in the world. But i don't know how much more i can take to be on his.

Manila Vanco Kristen Dedi Iowan Philippines Marikina Central Manila UN Philippines Rowley Government Luzon Cincinnati
Ladies' First

Your Brain on Facts

05:35 min | 2 years ago

Ladies' First

"Valentina Tereshkova was twenty two years old when she made her first parachute jump with a local aviation club in nineteen, fifty nine and she loved it. unbeknownst to her this exhilarating pastime was giving her skills that would bring her to the attention of the Soviet government. The Soviets needed someone who could handle themselves jumping from twenty thousand feet. The mandatory ejection altitude from the re entry of a rocket capsule. One of the many facets of the space race to the Soviets wanted to win was to have the first woman in space in February nineteen, sixty, two Tereshkova and four other women, three parachutists and one pilot began the intensive training to become cosmonauts. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We're headed toward another presidential election and it seems like both a minute ago and an attorney ago that we had a female candidate for president would most people don't know is that the first female candidate? Rian before she was even allowed to vote. Victoria Claflin later, Victoria Woodhall was one of ten children born to illiterate mother and a petty criminal father. Would Hell attended school sporadically for a few years. At Age Fifteen, she married a doctor who soon revealed himself to be an alcoholic philanderer. To make matters worse the sixteen year old woodhall gave birth to a mentally handicapped son who would need extra care in eighteen fifty four. Three of would hold siblings had died as children. And she claims she had clairvoyant powers to communicate with them. Always looking for a new scam, to run. Her father put her on the road with her sister Tennessee as a faith healing and fortune telling act selling elixirs that promised to cure everything from asthma to cancer. They didn't. In fact, Tennessee was indicted for manslaughter after one of her patients died. By some good fortune that I don't know the sisters found themselves with a wealthy patron in the form of railroad magnate Cornelius Vanderbilt. He and Tennessee were rumored to be lovers. Stock Tips that she picked up during their relationship came in pretty handy during an eighteen, sixty, nine gold panic during which the sisters supposedly netted seven hundred thousand dollars. With. Vanderbilt's bankrolling Victoria and Tennessee then opened their own highly publicized firm named Woodhall Claflin and company becoming the first female stockbrokers on wall. Street. However they were never granted a seat on the New York Stock Exchange. It would take another near century before Muriel Siebert did in nineteen, sixty seven. In the same year that she became a stockbroker would attended her first suffragette rally and immediately became a passionate devotee of the 'cause. She befriended or beguiled a congressman to get her an invitation to testify before the House Judiciary Committee. She argued that women did already have the right to vote under the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments those granted persons born or naturalized in the United, states citizenship and prohibited voter discrimination. But the house declined to enact any legislation on the matter. Even still the appearance made her a celebrity among suffragettes. In. April. Of Eighteen seventy, just two months after opening her brokerage firm woodhull announced her candidacy for president of the United States on a platform of women's suffrage regulation of monopolies nationalization of railroads, an eight hour workday direct taxation. Abolition of the death penalty and welfare for the poor what whole helped organize the equal rights party. which nominated her at its May eighteen, seventy two. Famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass was selected as her running mate and told about eventually he never acknowledged it officially, and in fact, he campaigned for the incumbent Republican Ulysses s grant. What else name appeared on ballots in a couple of states. Knows for certain votes she received because apparently they weren't counted. All of this was essentially moot. Though considering that would hold did not reach the constitutionally required age of thirty five until six months after the inauguration. It would be nineteen, sixty four before a woman was actively considered for a nomination of a major party. When Margaret Smith qualified for the ballot of six state primaries even coming in second in Illinois. The only female candidate other than Clinton was faith spotted Eagle a native American activist who received a vote from Robert. Sexual. Junior. WHO's referred to as a faithless elector for not voting has pledged section also voted for why known Luke for vice. President. Luke is executive director of honor, the Earth a native environmental organization, which plays an active role in the Dakota access pipeline protests.

Valentina Tereshkova Tennessee Cornelius Vanderbilt President Trump Victoria Woodhall Muriel Siebert Victoria Claflin Woodhall Claflin United States Luke Soviet Government Frederick Douglass Rian Margaret Smith House Judiciary Committee Asthma United Clinton Congressman
Demonstrators Topple Statues in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park

Leo Laporte

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Demonstrators Topple Statues in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park

"In San Francisco demonstrators have defaced then knocked down statues of former president Ulysses S. grant missionary who do para Serra and Francis Scott key in golden state park grant who led the union in the civil war and key who wrote the star spangled banner both owned slaves at

San Francisco President Trump Ulysses S. Francis Scott Golden State Park
How Did Juneteenth Get Started?

BrainStuff

06:11 min | 2 years ago

How Did Juneteenth Get Started?

"Every year on June nineteenth, millions of people across America. Come together to celebrate June eighteenth with parties parades, prayer, breakfast and golf tournaments, cookouts and music. The holiday is now officially recognized in forty seven states plus Washington DC though it hasn't been made a national holiday yet, despite having been around for more than one hundred and fifty years. We spoke with Paula Austin a professor of African American Studies and History at Boston University. She said You'd be surprised. There are many students who get to my class, and they sort of never learned about the history of enslavement. They've never learned about the civil rights movement. I think I've had students who because of where they're from, or their families know about June eighteenth, and of actually participated in the celebrations, but most students come, and they don't know. But let's go back to the beginning on June nineteenth eighteen, sixty, five more than two months after confederate general Robert e Lee surrendered to ulysses s grant at APP Maddix which all, but ended the civil war, a US army officer by the name of Major General Gordon Granger. In Huston Texas with two momentous announcements, the end of the civil war, and with it the end to slavery. Nobody is quite sure why it took so long for news of summation to reach Texas several stories have been told throughout the years though none has ever been confirmed including one of an earlier messenger who was killed on his way to Texas to tell the news of freedom. Others believe that some enslavers truth, but simply continued going about business as usual. The most likely is simply that there were not enough troops to enforce the emancipation proclamation whether enslaved people knew about it or not, so things remained status quo. That is until Major General. Grainger showed up. After granger's announcement, some of the two hundred fifty thousand freed people in Texas, immediately left for the promise of true freedom in the north, while others traveled to rejoin family members one formerly enslaved person, Molly Herrell said in the slave narratives of Texas. We all walked down the road singing shouting to beat the band. Others stayed defined pain work in the fields elsewhere. That day marks what is now often called lack independence day, or the fourth of July. It's the American celebration of freedom from slavery. June teen was first observed in Texas in eighteen, sixty six. It wasn't officially recognized as a holiday in any state until Texas did so in Nineteen, seventy nine. Since then only North Dakota South Dakota and Hawaii have declared a holiday. In recent years both the US House of Representatives and the US Senate have formally recognized June nineteenth as June, tenth Independence Day. Various movements to grant the day status is a national holiday are ongoing. US Senator Cory Booker said in two thousand eighteen. On this day we must confront ugly parts of our history and honor the slaves who suffered and died under a repressive regime. We must also pay tribute to all those who had the strength and conviction to fight to end slavery and keep our Union together. June teeth independence. Day is also an important moment to recognize how far we've come and take note of how far we have yet to go. Certainly during the original June eighteenth, there was still a lot of work to be done. It came just months after the civil war ended and two years after the emancipation proclamation was signed by President Abraham Lincoln the Thirteenth Amendment to the US Constitution, which abolished slavery, had been passed by Congress was well on its way to being ratified by the states, but the fourteenth and fifteenth guaranteeing equal protection and the right to vote to all citizens, regardless of skin color were still a couple years off. And not all enslaved people in Texas were immediately freed some held by defiant plantation owners were not emancipated until much later, some formerly enslaved people who tried to leave historical reports show were tracked down and killed. Many more stepped into a future of poverty, fear and uncertainty. Austin suggests that many Americans ignorance about June eighteenth stems from a disinclination to completely face the country's past slavery, and it's far reaching and continuing aftermath. Still? June eighteenth has persevered. Its observance has waned through the years under the oppression of Jim Crow laws and attitudes, but the festivities that began in Texas eventually spread to more states and the idea of commemorating block independence picked up through the civil rights era of the nineteen sixties, and the parties continued today. Austin, said the kinds of celebrations that I've seen and been a part of have been incredibly wonderful there about black culture there about black history there about the resistance and the resilience of the black community. Several years before grainger made his do nineteenth declaration in Galveston famed American Orator Frederick Douglass himself formerly enslaved, spoke to an abolitionist group in New York about the fourth of July. As being dave independence, and how it didn't fit for all Americans, he said what the American slave is your fourth of July I answer a day that reveals to him more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim. Opel Lee a former schoolteacher counselor in Fort Worth. Texas has been instrumental in trying to get June. Tenth recognized as a national, holiday. This year she'll walk from the Fort Worth Convention Center to the will. Rogers Coliseum, leading a caravan, urging people to sign a petition for the cause leave who is ninety three years old has been part of the Fort Worth June eighteenth festivities for more than forty years. Last year, it's as important as the fourth of July. In fact I dream some day. They celebrate from the nineteenth to the fourth like they do Mardi Gras. I haven't dreamed as large as the Rose Bowl or the macy's parade, but I'm getting there. To those who observed June eighteenth despite its shaky beginnings, and it's still unfulfilled pledge the day still holds the promise of freedom, independence, equality, ideas, and ideals always celebrating.

Texas United States Paula Austin Gordon Granger Grainger Huston Texas Washington Us House Of Representatives African American Studies And H America Fort Worth Convention Center Dave Independence Senator Cory Booker Fort Worth Robert E Lee Rogers Coliseum Mardi Gras North Dakota
Ely Parker | Part 2 | The Civil War

Iroquois History and Legends

06:15 min | 2 years ago

Ely Parker | Part 2 | The Civil War

"Hello and welcome to Iroquois history and legends. I'm Caleb. I am Andrew we are continuing with our series on the lustrous Mr L. E. S. Parker last episode we talked about his early life is education his diplomacy with the United States and his job as a civil engineer, and where he finds himself, now is in between jobs, and at the brink of the civil war in the United States breaking out, and I'm GonNa sum this up. Up What had happened was we saw all these native American peoples being removed from their land and forced to move west across the Mississippi and into the Oklahoma territory with all these native peoples depopulated from the eastern United States that left all kinds of area that opened up for agriculture and farming, and this led to more tension between the northern and southern states, because you had people joining to rush into the southern and western states. And, they wanted to make sure that slavery was instituted these places because then they could keep their balance of power higher in the US Congress were they could get more senators or members of the House of Representatives to make policies that would guarantee the rights of the southern territories and states, so that's where we find ourselves in and states are rushing around to be declared slave or free, and then a Abraham Lincoln gets elected president, and all heck breaks loose now you may think hey, Parker. He became a captain in the New York. State militia right so he's probably getting ready for war to. But no, he wasn't called upon for his services in engineering in the military or anything so after he finished his contracts in. Illinois he moved back to the tunnel, Wanda reservation and began farming. He quickly became very bored Andrew farming was not the life for a man like him. Many of the Seneca were gearing up for war, looking to join the United States Army Parker went and spoke to his father. Who as you recall from last episode was a veteran from the war of eighteen twelve, and he received his blessing to take up the war, Pat, but Parker. He wasn't. GonNa go as grunt. He wanted to go as a commission soldier. You'd already been. been a captain in the New York militia, so he asked the governor of New York for a commission like a real commission is apparently the militia commissions didn't really count the governor of New York declined so then what did he do when things fail in New York do what everybody else does. Go to a different state. I'm just kidding, but he did. bypass New York state and try to go directly to the federal government. You know. He had some friends in high places in Washington at this point, so he said Hey. Captain in the New York State militia civil engineer. How about a commission? declined. He got a letter from the Secretary of war Edwin Stanton. Quote. Parker this is a quarrel between white men, in which you Indians are not concerned, unquote. Another federal official that he wrote to told him quote. Unquote and I'm sure. They said it just as condescendingly. Some people may have made departure that his lack of US citizenship. Maybe what's holding him back from getting this commission? Because this is the same time that we see, he actually applied for citizenship. Oh, how'd that work out for him? Mile had a lot like everything else to the government. He was turned it down again. So from eighteen, sixty, one to eighteen, sixty two, he worked on his farm, and he also worked for the Indians on the reservation. He penned one letter to an old militia General John Martindale where he jokes about being a bad farmer and eating a wife, he asked the general quote. If, he knew any strong, healthy, double breasted woman that would want to be a farmer's wife. Can you say that again? That strong. HOW DOUBLE BREASTED WOMAN! So I thought you said? Did you think double breasted? Okay then we're just. This is a family home to show after all so. We'll just leave it at that. I don't know it seems like pretty good things to look for in a woman. Was His. With a lot of single I'm. You were saying. Parker has been farming for about two years now any starting to think that he's never gonNA. Get his chance. But he did still have a few friends looking out for me and you. And they were a couple of friends that were becoming pretty influential in the war, and Parker didn't even think the contact them. One of them was the jeweler in Gallina, and the other was the grocer. They are now being known as General John. Smith and General Ulysses S grant. They actually said to themselves. You know who we could use right now is parker. Parker was joined to the General Staff with the rank of captain in May twenty, fifth, eighteen, sixty three, but you'll never guess Andrew. He found another complication and this one is coming from a different. Place than you would think. If you remember Parker was made a what. Saito in say tim was a life appointment. Holding has shown checks and balances aspect of the government. Say Chimps were the political leaders. And they could not go to war right? You would have a war chief appointed, and you would have your say. And you'll have your clan. Mothers Each end so now he wants to go to war, but he's a saint shown so Ariza. Wait a minute. Can you legally legally from the? WHO NEEDS schone standpoint? Can you legally go to war? So a meeting was held, and they decided that sense he would be a captain fighting in the war of the whites. You would not be violating the checks and balances protocol.

Mr L. E. S. Parker United States New York New York State Militia Andrew United States Army Engineer Mississippi Abraham Lincoln House Of Representatives Congress John Martindale Illinois Edwin Stanton Washington Oklahoma Ariza President Trump General John
Roman Forum find could be shrine to Rome's founder, Romulus

Not Too Shabby

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

Roman Forum find could be shrine to Rome's founder, Romulus

"Italian archaeologists have unveiled a significant new find on the Roman forum the remains of the temple of the city's mythical founder wrong with us the newly discovered temple will now be the subject of a sorry okay logical investigation is expected to open to the public in two years time Mr PK reports the forum was the heart of ancient Rome so the news that the remains of a temple it's mythical founder Romulus had been discovered that caused a lot of excitement especially as the building was from the very earliest days of Rome and contained a mysterious sarcophagus but hopes that Romulus his body had been discovered have been dashed the grave is an empty one only use for ceremonies some classical scholars had raised their eyebrows at the speculation about Rome Ulysses grave ancient sources tell us that he didn't leave behind a body if he ever existed in the first place he was either raise to heaven all told to pieces by senators jealous of his

Founder Mr Pk Rome Romulus Rome Ulysses Grave
Spain pulled into diplomatic spat between Bolivia, Mexico

PRI's The World

00:29 sec | 3 years ago

Spain pulled into diplomatic spat between Bolivia, Mexico

"Karen. Longer Week is the Bolivia's Foreign Minister Ulysses Talk Today in Michigan. No I'm reluctant to believe that. The Mexican government with risk cream the lawsuit before the International Court of Justice Perfects. That have not occurred. These are mere presumptions. This lawsuit will be rejected immediately. The United States recognizes the new government of Bolivia but so far. US officials have largely kept quiet about this diplomatic feud

Bolivia Mexican Government International Court Of Justice United States Michigan Karen.