40 Burst results for "Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian"

After leaving Russia, McDonald's to reopen in Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 14 hrs ago

After leaving Russia, McDonald's to reopen in Ukraine

"The Big Mac is coming back McDonald's is reopening in Ukraine McDonald's will open the doors to some of its restaurants in Ukraine in the coming months a symbol of the war torn country's return to some sense of normalcy and a show of support after the American fast food chain pulled out of Russia The burger giant close its restaurants in Ukraine after Russia's invasion nearly 6 months ago but has continued to pay more than 10,000 McDonald's employees in the country The Ukrainian economy has been severely damaged by the war and restarting businesses even

Russia Mcdonald
Fresh "Ukrainian   " from Here and Now

Here and Now

00:36 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh "Ukrainian " from Here and Now

"Cracking down on tent encampments. That's next time on marketplace. This evening at 6 30 on 90.1 I'm Jack lepire, as authorities in Cincinnati, Ohio, San armed man approached an FBI field office today fleeing when confronted by agents. They say he later exchanged gunfire with police at another location and has not been captured. The incident comes a day after the FBI director warned of threats against law enforcement over the bureau's Rey to former president Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago home on Monday. Britain, Denmark and Norway are promising another one and a half $1 billion in long-term military aid to Ukraine. The Danish defense minister says the money will go toward increasing artillery and ammunition production and for training Ukrainian forces, authorities in Yemen say, at least 38 people are dead after torrential rains and flash flooding over the past two days, flooding is mainly been in the southwestern part of the country, including its capital, which is under control of Houthi rebels. You're listening to here and now. Support for WAB

Jack Lepire FBI Cincinnati Ohio Donald Trump SAN Denmark Norway Britain Ukraine Yemen
Denmark Ukraine Digital Backup-Backup Intro and Wr

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 1 d ago

Denmark Ukraine Digital Backup-Backup Intro and Wr

"Volunteer archivist are digitally preserving Ukrainian heritage religious sites monuments and museums have been destroyed in Russia's war in Ukraine a new digital project is offering a way to keep these places safe The fastest way to erase a people's national identity is by destroying their cultural heritage So when we saw exactly that happened we knew that we needed to do something and we needed to do it fast Tao Thompson with virtual futures as part of an effort to document historical sites in Ukraine digitally Soren liqueur Janssen with blue shield Denmark says this lets ordinary Ukrainians become volunteer digital archivists They can help protect their own cultural heritage Not only the big monuments and what you haven't seen but also what you find being important cultural heritage And that is a completely game changer All the processing can be done in the cloud just 100 images are required to create a detailed 3D scan I'm Ed Donahue

Ukraine Tao Thompson Soren Liqueur Janssen Denmark Ed Donahue
Fresh update on "ukrainian " discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:13 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ukrainian " discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"The only the only senior White House adviser in the history of this republic to ever be criminally charged in this manner. Former White House strategist Steve Bannon was convicted on similar charges last month. The FDA has released updated guidelines on COVID, the agency now says asymptomatic Americans should repeat at home rapid tests up to three times about 48 hours apart to make sure they're negative and keep the virus from spreading. Experts say symptoms of new strains are harder to detect. Triple-A says gas prices have now dipped below four bucks a gallon nationwide. White House economic adviser Brian deese. Certainly, we're not taking anything for granted and looking forward there uncertainties in the market. But what I can tell you here is saying today is that good news over the course of the last 60 days and that dollar a gallon is money and people's pocket that they are feeling right now. Overseas a huge blast at a Russian air base. New satellite images appear to show deep craters and scorched earth with the Ukrainian government claiming at least 8 Russian warplanes destroyed. CBS Charlie says this happened earlier this week in Crimea, which is Russian controlled territory in southern Ukraine. Dozens of people got hurt at a legoland park in Germany. On a north. In southern Germany, 31 people have been injured two of them severely after two roller coaster trains crashed into each other at an amusement park. One roller coaster train breaked heavily in another train collided with it at the legal land park in Ginsberg. This park

Steve Bannon Covid White House Brian Deese Ukrainian Government FDA Legoland Park Crimea CBS Germany Charlie Ukraine Legal Land Park Ginsberg
Biden's Response to Russia Is Historically Weak

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:26 min | 1 d ago

Biden's Response to Russia Is Historically Weak

"Joe Biden suggested that we were pulling out of Afghanistan. This is going to free up our hands to deal with Russia. There's only one problem. The pullout from Afghanistan actually incentivized. The war between Russia and Ukraine because after all, where Joe Biden has been clear he has been wrong and where he has been unclear, he has provoked conflict. So no wonder Russia thought that Joe Biden was a weak horse. After all, Joe Biden had basically been a Russia defender in the 2012 election. You'll recall that he was ripping on Mitt Romney for suggesting that Russia was a geopolitical threat. Here's Joe Biden's circa 2012. Governor Romney's answer I thought was incredibly revealing. He acts like he thinks the Cold War is still on, Russia is still our major adversary. I don't know where he's been. I mean, we have disagreements with Russia, but they're united with us on Iran. The only way we're getting one of only two ways we're getting material into Afghanistan to our troops is through Russia. They are working closely with us. They've just said to Europe, if there is an oil shutdown in any way in the gulf, they'll consider increasing oil supplies to Europe. That's not this is not 1956. This is not 1956. It says Joe Biden. Don't worry. Rush will take care of the oil for the Europeans. Russia will help us with Afghanistan. And then of course, Russia helped us with Syria by basically taking Syria off the hands of president Obama to the wild cheers of people like Joe Biden. And in 2014, Russia invades Crimea. And Joe Biden has some words for Russia. That's pretty much all he has for Russia. So his vice president when that administration did nothing over the invasion of Crimea. Here was Joe Biden circa 2014. I want to make it clear. We stand resolutely with our Baltic allies and support of Ukrainian people and against Russian aggression. As long as Russia continues on this dark path, they will face increasing political and economic isolation. There are those who say that this action shows the old rules still apply. But Russia can not escape the fact that the world is changing and rejecting outright. Their behavior. Of course, that was a lie. It turns out that the steps that The White House pursued, under vice President Biden, were extraordinarily weak. And basically they announced a Visa ban on a couple of Russian and Ukrainian officials. And they canceled a couple of talks on trades and commercial ties. That was pretty much all of the things. And by the way, they then proceeded to deny lethal aid to Ukraine.

Russia Joe Biden Afghanistan Governor Romney Crimea Syria Mitt Romney Ukraine Europe Iran Rush Baltic Barack Obama Biden White House
Fresh update on "ukrainian " discussed on Balance of Power

Balance of Power

03:35 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ukrainian " discussed on Balance of Power

"So much, Charlie. This is balance of power coming from the Bloomberg interactive broker studio in New York. I'm David Wesson. Well, Russia's war in eastern Ukraine continues, even though there's not a lot of territory moving back and forth by all accounts. Most recently, there was some sort of an attack it appears in Crimea that president zelensky of Ukraine claims destroyed at least 9 Russian aircraft. We've heard an update now on where we are on this war in Ukraine. We welcome Evelyn farkus. She is executive director of the McCain institute. Doctor farquhar's earlier served as deputy assistant Secretary of Defense for Russia Ukraine and Eurasia in the Obama administration. So doctor, thank you so much for being back with us. What do we know about this attack and Crimea? And is it getting particularly a lot of attention because if, in fact, it happened as described. It was way behind the lines. Yeah, I mean, so first of all, David, thanks for having me back on. I think it's significant because, first of all, it caught the Russians completely by surprise. And the impact was pretty devastating. The attack, and it's unclear exactly what munitions were used and how far away the targeter was. So the people or peoples who conducted the attack, we don't know, again, again, it's very hard to judge right now. But they managed to destroy at least 8 aircraft. It sounds like a significant chunk of the runway, ammunition depot. It looks like the ammunition depot was indeed the target and the Russians were foolish enough to park their aircraft in close proximity. But it caught the Russians so off guard that the explosion occurred right near a beach and, you know, what you see on television now are fleeing the Ukrainians, of course, are enjoying. Video casting this because there's a Reuters photograph that I saw that has people along the beach in their cabanas and there's a fireball behind them. It's quite a dramatic photo. And the Ukrainians have made propaganda videos out of it. But the whole point being, look, if your country is launching a war, don't go vacation in Crimea, our country, the one that your country invaded. So, you know, they're making a point to the Russian people. And certainly to the Russian government. But I think the most dramatic impact to get to your question is really that it came out of the blue. It had a significant military impact, psychological impact. And it shows the west also, frankly, that Ukraine can take the initiative is willing to take the initiative and they may have people behind the lines, which is also, of course, very interesting because this could have been a sabotage attack, meaning that somebody there were Ukrainians in or Russians in Crimea who are willing to help the Ukrainian military and the Ukrainian government. So I think it is significant on for multiple reasons. So exactly. One of the things that I was puzzled by is they have not at least thus far said this as a result of those so called high Mars, right? High mobility artillery rocket systems that are much vaunted. They've not said that. And there's some suggestions that may have been essentially guerrilla warfare. People behind the enemy lines. And I'm not sure which is better for the Russians from their point of view. I mean, on the one hand, they don't like the high Mars, they think that's really going to hurt them in the end. If they've also got gorilla fighters behind the lines, that's pretty dangerous, too. Yeah, and I think yesterday, a Ukrainian defense official said that we used a Ukrainian made weapon, which would further indicate that it wasn't high Mars. Frankly, I'm not a big fan of the Ukrainian military saying that they didn't use western made munitions because it really shouldn't matter. We are providing Ukraine with munitions. They should use in any way to strike any military target. This was a legitimate military target. So they should be able to use high Mars to do that. I don't think they need to deny it. But they are proud that they didn't have to. The sabotage thing I think is really important. And this is why I think the Ukrainians are not going to run and try to tell television and radio hosts. How they actually conducted this because they want to get into the minds of the Russians and scare them about how many other sabotage attacks might be coming, how many other agents there are in their midst? It tell us about the support that Ukraine is getting in terms of military hardware right now. There was a meeting, I think, just today with the UK Denmark and Germany, I think, and I know UK has providing more rocket systems. So I believe the United States just agreed to another $1 billion, wasn't it a military equipment? Are they getting what they need? It sounds like they're getting what they need to take some initiative, even this, you know, this opportunity probably wouldn't have been possible if they hadn't had the high Mars and the ability to degrade some of the Russian capabilities. And frankly, turn the Russian attention to the high Mars attacks. So the attacks that are coming into Donbass from using western equipment clearly turned Russia's attention away from their hidden vulnerability in Crimea and elsewhere. So I do think that they're making a difference, but I will say that the real difference will only come if the Ukrainians have enough weapons and ammunition and manpower, frankly, and a good strategy and excellent intelligence aided by the west to take the offensive. And we know that they are already talking about retaking care song in the south and that is strategically important that city is important and the Russians have dug in there. If they

Crimea David Wesson President Zelensky Evelyn Farkus Mccain Institute Obama Administration Russia Russian Government Farquhar Ukrainian Government Eurasia Charlie Reuters New York David UK Denmark Germany United States
 Ukraine says 9 Russian warplanes destroyed in Crimea blasts

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 d ago

Ukraine says 9 Russian warplanes destroyed in Crimea blasts

"Kyiv says Russian planes have been put out of action Ukraine's air force says 9 warplanes were destroyed in massive explosions at an air base in Crimea amid speculation they were the result of a Ukrainian attack that would represent a significant escalation in the war Russia's denied any aircraft were damaged in Tuesday's blast or that any attack took place Ukrainian officials have stopped short though of publicly claiming responsibility for the explosions while poking fun at Russia's explanation that

Kyiv Russia Crimea Air Force
Fresh update on "ukrainian " discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ukrainian " discussed on AP News Radio

" The Big Mac is coming back. McDonald's is reopening in Ukraine. McDonald's will open the doors to some of its restaurants in Ukraine in the coming months, a symbol of the war torn country's return to some sense of normalcy and a show of support after the American fast food chain pulled out of Russia. The burger giant close its restaurants in Ukraine after Russia's invasion nearly 6 months ago, but has continued to pay more than 10,000 McDonald's employees in the country. The Ukrainian economy has been severely damaged by the war and restarting businesses even in a limited capacity helps. I'm Charles De Ledesma

Ukraine Mcdonald Charles De Ledesma
Mykolaiv residents emerge after 54-hour curfew

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 1 d ago

Mykolaiv residents emerge after 54-hour curfew

"Residents of the southern Ukrainian city of Michael alive have emerged from a 54 hour curfew to queue for water and pick up food aid in a region has seen nearly daily bombardments from Russia Resident lud Myers started was forced from her village near Kirsten three months ago and has been living as an internally placed person in nearby Michael live since She tells the AP of course people are afraid Russia will advance even further to everyone's hoping that they will not reach us here and things will get better Her friend Natalya adds our village is occupied We want to be able to go there I want not only our village to be liberated but the whole of Ukraine Michael alive is less than 65 miles from cursing which came under Russian control early in the war and Ukrainian officials have vowed to retake it I'm Charles De Ledesma

Lud Myers Michael Russia Kirsten Natalya Charles De Ledesma
Fresh update on "ukrainian " discussed on Bloomberg Markets

Bloomberg Markets

01:15 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ukrainian " discussed on Bloomberg Markets

"It. Right now, let's head down to Washington, D.C.. World and national news that Nathan Hitler. Paul interesting, development in the war in Ukraine this morning the golden arches are coming back. McDonald's says it will reopen some of its restaurants in Ukraine in the coming weeks, starting in the capital Kyiv and in western Ukraine areas far from the fighting. The burger chain closed its Ukraine locations after the Russian invasion, but it has still been paying. It's more than 10,000 employees. Meantime, Ukrainian president Vladimir zelensky says Russia lost 9 fighter jets in a wave of explosions at an air base in Crimea. He says armored vehicles, ammunition warehouses and logistics routes were also destroyed. Russia has said a munitions explosion set off those blasts at the saki air base, but Ukrainian officials have hinted their forces were behind it, a top aid to president zelensky says it's just the beginning of efforts to reclaim Crimea. Secretary of State Antony Blinken's wrapping up his three nation African tour, he says the U.S. is concerned about credible reports that Rwanda is backing rebels in eastern Congo, blinken says he raised the issue with Rwanda's president Paul Kagame. I also raise serious concerns about human rights. As I told president Kagame, we believe people in every country should be able to express their views without fear of intimidation, imprisonment, violence, or any other forms of repression. Secretary blinken, gas prices are back below $4 a gallon on average for the first time in more than 5 months, a bit of relief for this driver in North Carolina. Every little bit helps. And so, you know, I'm grateful to see it at this price. The triple-A says the nationwide average is three 99 for regular, though drivers in California and Hawaii still pay 5 plus, the cheapest gas is in the south and Midwest. Global news, 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. This is Bloomberg. At Bloomberg market, when you bundle your renders in auto insurance with progressive, you could save money, but it doesn't cover any terrible memories living rent free in your head. Hey, just wanted to remind you of that time your kicker missed the extra point and lost the game, even though he literally never missed an extra point. He chose this playoff game to miss. Yeah, I just noticed he hadn't thought about that in a bit. Wouldn't want you to miss, you know, thinking about it. Sorry, we can't save you from that memory

Ukraine Washington, D.C. Nathan Hitler Vladimir Zelensky Crimea President Zelensky Secretary Of State Antony Blin Blinken Russia Rwanda President Kagame Kyiv Secretary Blinken Mcdonald Paul Kagame Bloomberg Paul Congo U.S.
Large explosions rock Russian military air base in Crimea

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

Large explosions rock Russian military air base in Crimea

"Powerful explosions have rocked a Russian air base in Crimea killing one person and wounding several others Russia's defense ministry says the installation has not been shelled but Ukrainian social networks are abuzz with speculation it was hit by Ukrainian fired long-range missiles videos posted on social media sites showed sunbathers fleeing a nearby beach as huge clouds of smoke from the explosions rose over the horizon if the base was in fact struck by the Ukrainians It will mark the first major attack on the Russian military site on the Crimean Peninsula I'm Charles De Ledesma

Crimea Russia Crimean Peninsula Charles De Ledesma
Ukraine: Shelling hits town near Russian-held nuclear plant

AP News Radio

01:11 min | 2 d ago

Ukraine: Shelling hits town near Russian-held nuclear plant

"At least three Ukrainian civilians have been killed and over 20 wounded by Russian shelling in the last 24 hour period including an attack not far from a Russian occupied nuclear power plant The office of Ukraine's president since the Russians have fired over 120 rockets from grad multiple rocket launchers At the southern town of which is across the dnieper river from Ukraine's largest nuclear power plant several apartment buildings and industrial facilities were damaged Meanwhile drones are playing a crucial role in Ukraine's military operations in the myco live region where shelling from Russia has been escalating in the recent weeks A Ukrainian reconnaissance team named fireflies operates out of a derelict house They jump back into the room following an explosion The leader who goes by the nom de guerre baton tells the AP his unit is using drones to monitor and combat any Russian attempt to seize more territory in the region I'm Charles De Ledesma

Russia Dnieper River Charles De Ledesma
 Ukrainian resistance grows in Russian-occupied areas

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Ukrainian resistance grows in Russian-occupied areas

"In a growing challenge to Russia's grip on occupied areas of southeastern Ukraine guerrilla forces loyal to Kyiv have launched a campaign of resistance As military forces have reclaimed some occupied areas west of the knee pa river the guerrilla activity has increased The campaign includes killing pro Moscow officials blowing up bridges and trains and hoping the Ukrainian military identify key targets This spreading resistance has eroded criminal control of those areas and threatens its plan to hold a spate of referendums as a move towards annexation by Russia and dry a guerrilla coordinator in the southern Persian region tells the AP our goals to make life unbearable for the occupiers and use any means possible to derail their plans I'm Charles De

Ukraine Pa River Kyiv Moscow Charles De
US pledges $1 billion more rockets, other arms for Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 d ago

US pledges $1 billion more rockets, other arms for Ukraine

"The U.S. is pledging a massive new arm shipment to Ukraine as analysts warned Russia's gearing up to stop a Ukrainian counter offensive in the south It's a $1 billion worth of rockets ammunition and other arms under what's called presidential drawdown authority coming straight from Pentagon arms stalks This is the largest single drawdown of U.S. arms and equipment utilizing this authority to date Pentagon policy chief Colin hall says the new shipment will give you craniums more of what they've been using so effectively and trying to stop Russian forces from seizing more ground The latest aid brings the U.S. total to roughly $9 billion since the invasion began more than 6 months ago Sagar Meghani Washington

Ukraine U.S. Pentagon Colin Hall Sagar Meghani Washington
Ship carrying grain from Ukraine arrives in Istanbul

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 d ago

Ship carrying grain from Ukraine arrives in Istanbul

"The captain of the first grain ship to arrive out of Ukraine under an international agreement spoke to reporters at the dock in turkey Ahmet Eugene Ali Baylor is the man at the helm of the polar net of Turkish flagship that em loaded cargo at the Ukrainian port of chana Moors before the Russian invasion in February He says this sad incident happened war broke out in the port was under blockade by the Ukrainian military They were finally able to leave on Friday forming a convoy with two other ships in a harbor guide near Odessa then followed a predetermined 17 leg route through dangerous corridors that had been cleared and deemed The latitudes longitudes and positions were provided by the joint coordination center They arrived at the Turkish port of Dorinda today with the 12,000 ton load of grain The first of a dozen ships authorized to sail under the deal between Ukraine and Russia brokered by turkey and the United Nations I'm Jennifer King

Ahmet Eugene Ali Baylor Chana Moors Ukraine Turkey Joint Coordination Center Odessa Dorinda United Nations Jennifer King
3 more ships with grain depart Ukraine ports under UN deal

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 6 d ago

3 more ships with grain depart Ukraine ports under UN deal

"A UN bet deal to export Ukrainian grain that's been trapped by Russia's invasion seems to be working three more ships with grain have left ports and Ukraine and are headed to turkey for inspection The ships are loaded with more than 58,000 tons of corn Ukraine is one of the world's main breadbaskets and the trapped green has helped create a sharp rise in food prices and has been raising fears of a global hunger crisis the first shipment of grain since the war in Ukraine left the country earlier this week the shipments are still just a fraction of the 20 million tons of grain Ukraine says are trapped in the country's silos and ports I'm dawn of water

Ukraine UN Turkey
The U.s. Needs to Get Out Away From Endless Wars

The Officer Tatum Show

00:52 sec | Last week

The U.s. Needs to Get Out Away From Endless Wars

"Can somebody explain to me why Nancy Pelosi in the United States government feel that there is a need for us to even attempt to travel to Taiwan? This is the weird part about Democrats that I will never understand. Why do they want to participate in being involved in endless wars? I think it's the Democrats that are pushing in this wars. I think we should have no business of our government giving money to the Ukrainian government. Now I understand that people may want to help out the families that are displaced and different things like that. That makes sense to me, right? We can still be a helping hand to the people that are not responsible and have no real involvement or connection with what their government is doing. But why did Nancy Pelosi feel that it was that important for her to travel to Taiwan?

Nancy Pelosi Ukrainian Government Taiwan United States
Rep. David Kustoff: It's Legitimate to Ask About Ukraine War Funding

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:58 min | Last week

Rep. David Kustoff: It's Legitimate to Ask About Ukraine War Funding

"Listener in eads, Tennessee, his name is Mike. And he wanted to know about the funding for the war in Ukraine, which I had been critical of it seems like we just have a blank check. He wants to know where you stand on voting to fund this war in Ukraine. So it's a good question and it's something that's been asked a lot and it's absolutely legitimate. That boat was within the last couple of months. We had we've talked about it as Republican congressman. Part of Steve's police is with teams he's our width and it's tough because on the one hand and the criticism is, as you know, that it's a lot of money, $40 billion. We've got a lot of issues in our country from the border. We all know the issues and that money can be better spent here. But the information that we had at the time and I'm talking about Republican members of Congress was that that money was crucial in their fight, the Ukrainian spite to ward off the Russians and that and that the Ukrainians at that point in time and I still think they do they have a chance to win. However you define when that they've got a chance to win, it's important. I talked about this at the time and we're seeing this play out now as it relates to China and Taiwan because there's no doubt that at some point that China will invade Taiwan. It's not a question of if it's a question of when and part of the decision, at least at that time. And I still think it is today the Chinese are looking to see what happens with Russia and Ukraine.

Ukraine Eads Tennessee Mike Steve Congress Taiwan China Russia
US says Russia aims to fabricate evidence in prison deaths

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

US says Russia aims to fabricate evidence in prison deaths

"U.S. officials believe Russia's working to fabricate evidence concerning last week's deadly strike on a detention center for prisoners of war in Ukraine An official familiar with the intelligence finding tells The Associated Press Russia's looking to plant false evidence to make it appear Ukrainian forces were responsible for the July 29th attack on the prison the left 53 dead and wounded dozens more the official ads the classified intelligence shows that Russian officials might even plant ammunition for medium range high mobility artillery rocket systems or himars As evidence that the systems provided by the U.S. to Ukraine were used in the attack I'm Charles De Ledesma

Ukraine The Associated Press U.S. Charles De Ledesma
Ukraine's Mykolaiv hit by Russian shelling

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Ukraine's Mykolaiv hit by Russian shelling

"The Ukrainian city of Michael live faces a pummeling from Russian shelling Speaking with the AP Michael lives mayor says over 130 civilians have been killed in Russian shelling so far while nearly 600 other people have been seriously injured since the start of the Russian invasion Alexander sienkiewicz says several buildings have been recently hit by what he thinks are S 300 weaponry a series of long range surface to air missile systems developed and operated by the former Soviet Union Russia has kept up its bombardment of the city hitting it with a barrage of shells in the last 24 hour period I'm Charles De Ledesma

Michael Lives Alexander Sienkiewicz Michael Soviet Union Russia Charles De Ledesma
 Ship with Ukrainian corn anchored off Turkey for inspection

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

Ship with Ukrainian corn anchored off Turkey for inspection

"The first cargo ship to leave Ukraine since the Russian invasion is anchored in the Black Sea awaiting an inspection Russian Ukrainian Turkish and UN officials will check if the grain shipment is in accordance with a crucial agreement signed last month by Moscow and Kyiv to unblock Ukraine's agricultural exports and ease the global food crisis The Sierra Leone flag rizzoni loaded up with 26,000 tons of corn set sail from Odessa on Monday Its final destination Lebanon

Ukraine Black Sea UN Kyiv Moscow Sierra Leone Odessa Lebanon
What's the Connection Between Biden, Ukraine & the Secret Labs?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:52 min | Last week

What's the Connection Between Biden, Ukraine & the Secret Labs?

"Early on, we were told that there were these laboratories that everybody was very concerned about. And there's been a lot of speculation about those laboratories what they were doing and why the United States needed to go into Ukraine to secure those laboratories. Some people are saying it had to do with the China virus and it very well may be. I do not know. But we do know this that the United States is willing to risk American lives and treasure to protect those labs, so something important was happening inside those laboratories. The other part of it go it predates even the Trump administration where you have Joe Biden and his son doing all sorts of very nefarious business transactions with the Ukrainians. We've known for well over a decade that there has been great corruption within the Ukrainian government. But they've all decided to take a blind eye at that. Because there's something else going on here. Now, do we care about Ukraine? I don't think we do. I think Biden wants us involved in a shooting war with the Russians and the question is why. And it's really not Biden. It's whoever is pulling the strings, which would be Susan Rice a Barak Hussein Obama. But I want to go on to the next line here of this very disturbing story out of the New York times. Meanwhile, senior U.S. officials still believe that Putin is quite prepared to consider using a small nuclear weapon against Ukraine if he sees his army facing certain defeat. In short, this Ukraine war is so not over. So not stable, so not without dangerous surprises that can pop out on any given day.

Trump Administration Ukraine United States Ukrainian Government Biden Joe Biden Barak Hussein Obama China Susan Rice New York Times Putin Army
Ukraine seeks to retake the south, tying down Russian forces

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

Ukraine seeks to retake the south, tying down Russian forces

"Ukraine's seeking to retake the occupied parts of the south and tie down Russian forces Even as Moscow's war machine crawls across Ukraine's east trying to achieve the Kremlin's goal of securing full control over the country's industrial heartland Ukrainian forces are scaling up attacks to drive the occupiers from the territory they've seized since the start of the invasion including the southern region of Kirsten while Moscow has pledged to hold on to the occupied areas and take more ground around the country Ukrainian military analyst Olly Satan of notes that by stepping up the attacks in the south Kyiv has forced Russia to spread its forces I'm Charles De Ledesma

Russia Moscow Kirsten Olly Satan South Kyiv Charles De Ledesma
"ukrainian  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

03:28 min | 2 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Exist for queer people in those Western countries. I hope that next year, Ukraine, pride can expect the landscape on our event and maybe he will sign laws that could make Ukraine really free and modern and European country. So they're very optimistic that in the coming years, as this war hopefully fades into the distance that Ukraine will become a more open place. For them. Kate, thank you so much for this very important conversation. Thank you so much. 2022 will be pivotal for Los Angeles. The first open mayoral primary in nearly a decade happens in June, alongside with many other competitive races across the city and county. Subscribe to our limited time newsletter, LA on.

"ukrainian  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:55 min | 2 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Firework. It was something bad and big happening. And it wasn't a gossip anymore. We were confused. Should we pack our backs with essential staff? Should we look for nearby shelters? What should we do next? We were confused. She stayed hunkered in her apartment for that first week of the war. She was terrified to leave, not only because of bombs, but also because with martial law and Ukraine issuing guns to pretty much any man of fighting age who wanted one. She was afraid for her safety as a trans woman in the street. And then she got a call from a queer friend who told her some unsettling news, basically that there were people, homophobes transphobes who were looking for her. When I received that call, I was more afraid that moment of Ukrainians of armed civilians because, you know, you have to protect the country and everybody had guns. So I was afraid of that group and nation of Russia, so I knew that I had to live care then somehow I got in touch with my former colleague and he had some space in his car. And we left the week after the war started. So she decided she had to get out of Kyiv had to get out of Ukraine. So this is when things became really tricky for Z and for other trans women across Ukraine. Because she had the male sex stamped on her passport, but she identified as a woman. Because her passport said she was a man. It meant she would be unable to cross the border because of this emergency decree that it said any man of fighting age had to stay in Ukraine to fight the Russians. Z has been living as a woman for years, but she said she hadn't changed her passport because the process is so onerous in Ukraine. She actually would have been forced to stay in a mental facility for a month and go through this kind of humiliating process with doctors and nurses just to kind of legally change her gender in the eyes of Ukraine. I didn't want to go through that hell. So she hadn't done that. And it meant that she was trapped, basically, by her own identity, an unable to leave Ukraine legally. And what happened to Z when she tried to go through those checkpoints in Ukraine. The really had to flee for her life. She arrived at the border with Romania and couldn't get across legally. She basically was stopped by Ukrainian police. We're giving her a very hard time and she was afraid she would be imprisoned or sent to do military service. And so when she had a chance, she ran. She basically left all of her possessions behind and made a break for it. She crossed this muddy swamp and walked through bushes and.

Ukraine Kyiv Russia Ukrainian police Romania
"ukrainian  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

02:26 min | 2 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"The past decade. The world is standing with Ukraine. It's true. It's beautiful, but they don't know many things that happened in different communities there. And.

"ukrainian  " Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

03:17 min | 3 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

"I mean, obviously just because we're putting this issue out. But then at the same time, I know that we will continue finding ways to work together, we will see each other that this is once you build a relationship with people like each of you, it doesn't go away. You don't do one project together and then say, well, that was fun. And never see them again. And so I really think that to me, that's what I hope people outside of Ukraine have not already experienced that. I think they will, as soon as they work with it with anyone, whether it's creatively, journalistically, on an illustration for a campaign, you build a bond with those folks and you want to keep working with them. And I want to keep working with each of you. And I know we will find a way this will not be a one issue only, and then I'm so excited to continue working with each of you following each of you. And I will have you each in my thoughts too over the next few months. I think if nothing else, when you know people somewhere, it is not. It is not a news headline. That you read each day. It's people. And with each person I've met in Ukraine coming out of Ukraine since the war began in February. It's felt so much more real and so much more personal. And you can picture those people. And I know for you that that's, that's your life. You know, everyone you know is there. But I hope, again, I hope if my goal for this issue is that people reach out, they find new partners. And that they really see this as a human crisis, that's happening, and that they can help that they can be a part of it. So David, and I wanted to thank you for having us in a week for giving us so much freedom with everything. With thank you for supporting us in each point. This was awesome. This is awesome. And thank you for your huge and really support. It's something well, thank you, Hannah. I'm getting very emotional now thinking about just, you know, and I'm so proud to have been a part of this, but it's the three of you. Each of the contributors who really just have so much to be proud of, this I've been with Adweek for 15 years. I've never worked on one project. I'm more proud to be a part of, I've never worked with a team that has been so incredible every step of the way. And yeah, so it's been an amazing experience. I can not thank each of you enough, all of our contributors. Everyone who supported this issue, it's really something. So I would encourage everyone to check it out. It's in print and ad week gets on Adweek dot com. It's all free. Like I said, so I hope you'll check it out. I hope you will share it. I hope you will connect with Sofia dasha with Hannah. And if you'll be at the Cannes Lions, all three will hopefully be there as well with us. So come find us. And with that, thank you

Ukraine Hannah David Sofia dasha Cannes Lions
"ukrainian  " Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

04:16 min | 3 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

"Because the whole issue is brighter and it's really important, but I think that the illustration we have on a cover is a really special for me because it made his Ukrainian artist, but his work in all around the world. And he's doing it like the last ten years. And he's bringing Ukrainian trade Ukrainian culture all around the world because you can find his murals on a buildings like in every single city in Europe and I think that even in the USA and right now you can even go to his exhibition in New York City. You can do it David. And for him, it was the first experience like an artist for a cover because he had never do it before..

Europe USA New York City David
"ukrainian  " Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

05:39 min | 3 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

"So I wasn't given this day and but I went away with my friends in a first day when it starts and now we are on a west side of Ukraine in the mountains that's why sometimes I have a really bad connection here. But we are still in Ukraine and we keep going we are doing projects as creative agency and in this issue it's my first experience as an editor and it's a great experience and that's it. Wow. You have been such a wonderful editor to work with and I can't say enough about it. I've been a big fan of angry the agency where dasha works for years angry has done some of the best just different work. I don't really know the right word for it and I'm sure angry also has trouble communicating the kind of work it's not just ads that create really fascinating ideas and it's an agency I've just been intrigued by for so many years and your team were the first I mean, I feel a little bad saying the first people I thought of. But in terms of our industry, when the war broke out, angry was immediately on my mind because it has always been such a stellar representation of the Ukrainian creative spirit and what made it different. So it was an honor getting to have you on this team and getting to work with you. Thank you. Sophia, tell us about yourself and how your life has changed since the war began. Usually and right now I'm an editor, a journalist and screenwriter, usually I focus on creativity, culture, human rights issues. And I'm born in I was born in the town in the west of Ukraine, called lutsk. But for the last 8 years, I was living in gyp..

Ukraine dasha Sophia
"ukrainian  " Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

05:10 min | 3 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

"And then to pay all of the talent that Hannah and the team put together, all of them were paid at the highest end of ad week's freelance rates. And then after that, any money left over would go to Ukrainian charities, they're helping with the humanitarian effort. I don't have the final number yet as we record this, but it's around $75,000 that we raised through this project. So tremendous thanks to the advertisers who supported this, you will obviously see them in the issue and on the website. But just a tremendous amount of support from the industry and we really appreciate it. But this was just wanted to be clear that this was completely a project aimed at raising awareness of what's happening in Ukraine about the creative community there. The Diaspora of people from that community that have spread around the world. And also to help the ongoing humanitarian crisis created by the all out war that is being perpetrated against the Ukrainian people. So Hannah, before we go to dash and Sophia to talk about this, tell us about your, if you're comfortable sharing your experience at the beginning of the war and how you managed to reach safety. Well, spent two weeks in my home city, which people would assume. And I stayed there until there was physical ability to come out because for two weeks we just couldn't get out or there was a very high risk of getting killed in the road. So I just waited until it was physically possible. And then I left, I had no car. I didn't have anyone who could pick me up. And among my Friends. Because they either left awarded and have either. So a family I actually did a new before. They just say that, you know, you can jump in our car and go there..

Hannah Ukraine Sophia
"ukrainian  " Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

05:14 min | 3 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

"You're listening to yeah, that's probably an ad, it's the AdWord podcast where we talk about marketing media technology, pop culture, because in the end, everything is an ad. This is a very special episode. I'm so excited about it. We have a tremendous project to share with you that goes live today as you're listening to this. We have for the last, wow. It's been over a month. I forget exactly when we started this. We have been working with a wonderful team based in Ukraine or from folks who have left Ukraine over the last two months amid the war. And we basically handed over an entire issue of ad week to our peers and designers, editors, writers, illustrators, in Ukraine, from Ukraine to take over an entire issue and to make it whatever they wanted in whatever they wanted the world to know. About Ukraine about what is happening in the country right now. And with me to talk about that are the three editors who ran this issue. Like I said, this was fully 7 more than 20, I think we ended up with well over 20 folks working on this issue. All of whom are outside of Adweek. So with that, I'll start by introducing Hannah rodenko, who is our editor in chief for this issue. Hannah, you and I have been working closely together for many weeks now and it is such a pleasure to be at the finish line and to have this issue ready to go. Thank you so much for all your work. Thank you. Hello. Thank you for inviting us. Absolutely. So Hannah, let's start and then I'll introduce our other two guests too, but why don't you tell us a little bit about yourself and then we'll go from there..

Ukraine Hannah rodenko Hannah
"ukrainian  " Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:41 min | 4 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Security Now

"If they steal mobile phones from Ukrainian citizens and connect to Ukrainian telecommunication networks. He said, we know about these cases, but they are hard to track. And of course, he's putting the best face on it possible. In other words, yes, of course, Russians are taking civilian handsets and using them for their own purposes. So anyway, he said, if the Russians managed to seize our fixed Internet infrastructure, we block the equipment. So they can't use it. During the war, all Ukrainian Internet providers are working closely with our military and intelligence services to avoid such incidents. He said, no, that there's also a very reasonable theory that Russians need Ukrainian Internet services for their own purposes, either communication or intelligence gathering like eavesdropping on phone calls. And interestingly, to secure his own conversation with Ukrainians allies, the Ukrainian president zelensky uses a secure sat phone that the U.S. gave the Ukrainian government a month before the invasion. So they were ready and he has a secure means of communicating with allies. So Ukrainian officials also said that Russia's own cellular handsets and networking equipment do not work properly in Ukraine, encouraging its soldiers to therefore steal mobile phones from ordinary Ukrainians. It's also possible that Russia is trying to avoid ruining the telecommunications infrastructure that it hopes it would need and be able to use if it manages to take the country, although anyone who's been keeping up with the news knows that the possibility of that happening is dwindling now by the day. It was noted that when Russian troops destroyed several three G cell towers in kharkiv, they could no longer use their own encrypted phones that communicate via that network. Whoops. And it turns out that rebuilding infrastructure from scratch is difficult. When Russia had illegally annexed the Crimean Peninsula in 2014, the Kremlin needed about three years to regain full control of that region's mobile infrastructure. So it makes sense that they would be preserving it if they think that they'll be needing it shortly. They probably learned some hard lessons from Crimea. The record asks, how accessible is you are is UK or telecoms Internet in Ukraine now. And the CTO said as a march 21st or 25th, rather. UK telecoms, Internet coverage, stayed up to 84% of pre war levels. He said major disruptions happen in the occupied territories where there's no electricity or where the Internet infrastructure, including fiber optic underground cables, were damaged during the attacks. He said, our workers make heroic efforts to provide Internet access even in besieged cities. They go to the front line a few times a day, while some of them live in their cars because they have to work around the clock. We know what it's like to provide Internet during a war. He said, we learned it in 2014. So we try to protect our workers from unnecessary danger. Oh, and he said, also, during the COVID-19 pandemic, we learned to.

zelensky Ukrainian government Russia kharkiv Crimean Peninsula U.S. Crimea UK CTO
"ukrainian  " Discussed on Science Vs

Science Vs

07:52 min | 4 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Science Vs

"Brushless security forces through standard needs and opened fire at the protesters in her sock. And locals posted videos of civilians who had been injured. Protests in occupied territories have been going on for several weeks. At the same time, people started to disappear. Local politicians who refused to cooperate with the Russian army activists, journalists. Among them is the mayor of militia even further off. Melitopol had been occupied by the Russian troops since the start of the war in February. And the protest against occupation started the immediately and the mayor defined to refuse to give up or cooperate with the occupants. This may further off. He is saying that the TV and radio towers are controlled by the armed Russian forces. On the 11th of March, he has been detained and replaced by Galena de NI chunka. She was a member of a pro Russian party in Ukraine. And now is a Russian collaborator. He's one of her first speeches in military. She's saying that our main goal is to get used to the new reality, to study new way of life as soon as possible. She says that people in the city shouldn't take part in extremists actions. I ask you to be sensible, she says. Propaganda is a very important weapon in this war. In fact, when the Russians started occupying Ukrainian towns, the third thing they did was to block the Ukrainian broadcasting and start showing the Russian radio and television stations. Here are some examples of radio programs that are being broadcasted in the near middle and is also occupied by Russian troops. They say that Russia fights not against Ukrainians but groups of nationalists. But your argument. The radio broadcast say our main goal is to restore normal functions of state authorities and business. And to create conditions for the unification of the Russian Federation and Ukraine. They say that it's necessary that Russian got forces patrol the streets. Russia doesn't want to hurt the Ukrainian people. But to protect Russia from those who took Ukraine hostage. It is, of course, propaganda. The mayor of Mediterranean further of real mayor was released fairly quickly. Ukrainian authorities exchanged for 9 Russian soldiers. After that, he got a call from president zelensky himself who later awarded him with the order of courage. For instance, says that he is very glad to hear from the man. You have the voice of an alive man he says. The man showed up. Thanks zelensky for not leaving him. We don't abandon our role, says the denski. He's very happy to have further off back. On the 19th of March, I spoke with a woman in melitopol. She's a citizen of Israel born in melitopol. She's been there since the start of the war. And she told us what it was like to leave under Russian occupation. She says, the Russian special forces were chasing protesters and yelling catch the young and kick their legs. They took people outside the city and made them rub their faces with Zillow. This is green antiseptic used in the former USSR. It's painful if it gets in your eyes and the green stains your face. So it's some kind of a traditional form of humiliation in the former USSR. They would beat people up and leave them on the road she says. The Russian special forces, this is police, specifically brought from Russia to do this nasty things. She talked about Russian state TV that's now broadcasting and melitopol. And the news reports say that the Russians are fighting against Nazis here. Who are the Nazis? She feels like she's in the movie about the extermination of Jews during the Holocaust. But that it feels like a new nation is being exterminated this time. And shares that there are flares around the city saying we are looking for Nazis, contact us to help. There will be a price given for every not to surrender. I ask her, is it possible to get out of the city to escape? As she says, there is only one way to leave to Crimea, which is controlled by Russia. They can go to Ukraine controlled territory because it's blocked by Russian soldiers. But Jenna says that Russia has blocked access to food in the city also. She's worried about people starving. She tells me that Ukrainian sources are encouraging locals in Russian occupied territories to dismantle the railroad tracks running to Crimea. Because she remembers in the 90s, people stealing the rails. So she thinks that many hands still remember how to do it. We say our goodbyes..

Russia Melitopol melitopol Galena de NI chunka Russian army president zelensky zelensky USSR Mediterranean Zillow Israel Crimea Jenna
"ukrainian  " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:28 min | 5 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Today, Explained

"Support for their Saturday comes from Ben Jerry and our Friends over at vox creative who have made a new show called into the mix. It's hosted by Ashley C Ford, who's going to be sitting down with artists driving real change. People like Grammy winning musician and activist John Legend. That's what artists should be part of is the imagination of the future. It is imagining a better world and creating art that shows people that. Also, printmaker, and climate activist, fabiano Rodriguez. I make things that can be multiplied and exist in many different places at once, and even the pint that I did with pecan resist. It's my art on something that is going to be reproduced thousands of times. Ashley will be joined by all sorts of people who have made change throughout the season, including the Queen of bounce, big freedia. Check out into the mix from vox creative, wherever you listen. Support for today's show comes from our crowd. Many of you listening to this podcast don't have the funds to buy a startup company outright, which is fine. Life isn't all about money. But if you do want to try and buy into a startup company, our crowd can help you invest like a successful venture capitalist. Our crowd analyzes private companies and cherry picks the ones with the highest growth potential. Then they bring them straight to investors like you, making it possible to buy in early when growth potential is greatest. Our crowd offers investments across growth stages and industries from personalized medicine to cybersecurity to health tech, tackling the IVF and fertility treatment market, which continues to grow. Now you can invest in future family who's providing families with access to affordable treatment through buy now pay later financing. Future family powers fertility clinics throughout the U.S. and continue to grow patients served last year, invest today at our crowd. Our crowds accredited investors have already invested over $1 billion in growing tech companies. Join the fastest growing venture capital investment community at our crowd dot com slash explained that's OUR CRO WD dot com slash explained. Seagal, Samuel, you recently wrote about refugees for vox in light of this exodus from Ukraine. Wall Street Journal drew says Poland is certainly looking at Ukrainian refugees differently than say Syrians. It's not just a Poland thing, right? This is like the west at large? Yeah, I mean, I think this is a pretty widespread issue we're seeing. I think across a widespread of both governments and individual citizens, we sort of see some preferential treatment. I think we've been seeing discrimination play a rule here and worm its way into our discussion of refugees. When we're talking about Ukrainian refugees who are widely perceived as white and Christian and European, there's one set of attitudes and, you know, when we're thinking about refugees from, let's say, the Middle East, there is a different set of attitudes. We are sorry. It's really emotional for me because I see European people with blue eyes and blond hair being filled children being killed every day with Putin's missiles. And you've seen this worm its way into the media coverage. You had a senior correspondent Charlie dagata at CBS, who said about Kyiv. This isn't a place with all due respect. You know, like Iraq or Afghanistan that has seen conflict raging for decades, you know, this is a relatively civilized relatively European. I have to choose those words carefully too. City where you wouldn't expect that or hope that it's going to happen. That was his careful choice. Yeah, that was him being careful. So you see this double standard or discrepancy in attitudes when it comes to people who are seen as white and Christian versus people who are seen as non white, maybe Muslim right as in the case of many of the Syrian refugees who were fleeing around 2015. And of course, this plays out in fundraising efforts too, right? You write about this in your piece, according to the United Nations, the Ukrainian refugee crisis is currently 41.1 percent funded as a result of a flash appeal, which basically means several UN agencies working simultaneously to raise funds during a sudden onset disaster, but in late 2021, the drought in Kenya prompted a similar flash appeal, but they only managed to raise about 10.9% of the requested funding. Yes, so all refugees need support and generally refugee crises are underfunded across the board, but some much more so than others. But we hear about these crises a lot less than we're hearing about Ukraine. Why do you think it is Seagal? Is it just as simple as, you know, white versus Brown Christian versus Muslim? What is it? I think a big piece of this has to do with the identity of the people who are fleeing. Are they viewed as white and Christian or are they viewed as brown or black? Are they viewed as Muslim? That really influences how much people tend to sympathize with the people fleeing. There's also other factors, though, there's also foreign policy, you know, it is very relevant that this is an invasion of Ukraine by Russia, an invasion of one country by another. And there is an opportunity here for surrounding countries to sort of position themselves in a big grand geopolitical narrative. Like a clear good guy in a clear bad guy kind of thing, huh? Yeah, it's not every day that you have a chance to position yourself in such a sort of satisfying narrative where you can be aligning with the hero against the clear bad guy. And if you are a country that's going to be opening its borders wide to welcome the Ukrainian refugees, it's a way of signaling, hey, we're on the side of democracy. We're standing against the clear bad guy. So it's a way of telegraphing your geopolitical interests. I think the double standard we're seeing in how some refugees are treated versus others is really clear when you look at how, let's say, Poland, for example, is welcoming Ukrainians with open arms, but at the same time on Poland's other border with Belarus, it is actively forcibly keeping refugees out. These are refugees from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, who are trying to come in. So that's a clear double standard that I think is not part of the dominant narrative that we're seeing in the media, but it should be. You write in your piece about this idea of a deserving refugee. What does that mean? This is kind of like, in a different example, when we talk about poverty, sometimes there's the myth of the deserving poor versus the undeserving poor, which is really used to sort of give an excuse to avoid helping some people in poverty. There's a similar myth when talking about refugees. We have this myth of the deserving refugee that's a refugee who's like fleeing persecution and they really, really deserve help and we ought to be compassionate towards them and that's often contrasted with migrants who are cast as undeserving. Migrants mean people who are fleeing maybe for economic reasons, right? They're fleeing by choice. They have a choice about it, but maybe they're going to a new country because they want to be able to make more money, let's say. Whereas refugees, we understand to mean people who have no choice, but to flee. What about the Afghan evacuees that we covered on our show just a few weeks ago? Operation allies welcome, which was the legislation that airlifted Afghans out of gobble, had bipartisan support. I mean, they were largely Muslim, not white, and yet there was international attention and resounding support.

Ben Jerry Ashley C Ford fabiano Rodriguez Poland Ukraine Seagal Charlie dagata John Legend Grammy Ashley Wall Street Journal Kyiv Samuel Putin Afghanistan drew Iraq
"ukrainian  " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

03:18 min | 5 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Today, Explained

"This is about the future of Hungary, probably the most important issue of the years ahead. The future of our children and grandchildren. Who we live with, what will happen to our culture. What will happen to the lifestyle we have had up until now. It became an issue of sovereignty mixed up with a lot of kind of nationalistic.

"ukrainian  " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:41 min | 5 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Today, Explained

"Ukrainians feel very comfortable and generally speaking in Poland and languages are actually quite similar, culturally, they're very similar. They have shared history, the Polish labor market has been very tight the past few years. One of the most successful economies of the past 30 years after the end of the Cold War, and after 2014, when Russia annexed Crimea, Ukrainians found a kind of home here nearly 2 million Ukrainians moved here and became an omnipresent part of Polish society and a lot of their relatives in Ukraine are looking west and saying, you know, my cousin or husband or friend has a pretty good life in Poland and that's a natural starting place to go to. But amid the fear and exhaustion, we also found signs of kindness, volunteers with warm food and drinks, boxes, and boxes of supplies. Everywhere you look, you see polls where a Ukrainian flags on their coats wearing blue and yellow ribbons, Ukrainian flags, fly from buses, pictures of zelensky, all over town, there are billboards saying in Polish we are with you with the Ukrainian flag. There are everywhere you polish those people are donating when you go to the grocery store. There are boxes, any food you want to give Ukrainians leave them here. Thousands of polls have signed up to host a Ukrainian in their home. I mean, a way to put this would be that 2 million people have come to you with Poland and there are really, there's really partly anything like a refugee camp here. These two families were complete strangers until two weeks ago. They don't even speak the same language. Hola, her mother and two daughters ended up in Warsaw and found comfort in the home of Barbara. A 75 year old Polish woman. And you gave up your bedroom upstairs to sleep on the living room couch. You can sit here because Christians just won. And therefore. So they can take like a big error space. That's interesting. So they're almost all finding housing apartments hotels, moving in with other Polish people. That was definitely true in the first wave of people. They were staying with relatives, Friends, even strangers, and volunteers that offered. I think we're now starting to enter a phase where people are coming over without any clue of not knowing anybody here, not knowing where to go. If you're at the train station here in central Warsaw where I am, you see quite a lot of people sleeping on a blanket. Most of them are slipping on a blanket to catch a train maybe tomorrow to figure it out. You don't really see people kind of sleeping long term at places like that. But I think we're getting to a point where what Poland can accommodate on the back of samaritans is reached a limit. You know, I think I'm seeing it the same as every citizen of the city. It's a major challenge. Public housing for refugees is near capacity. The mayor says, his city needs more government funds to keep helping people. I mean, comparatively speaking, how significant a shock is this to Poland's population? Poland's population has been pretty much steady at 38 million people since 1987. It's a country that lost a lot of people to immigration after the iron curtain cell. And all of a sudden you have within the span of a few weeks, 2 million people entering Poland. To give you a statistic here, the capital of Warsaw has more than 300,000 Ukrainians have showed up here. If those people stay as the government expects most to do, one out of every 6 residents of the capital will be a Ukrainian who recently arrived. Incredible. And generally people feel good about this. Absolutely. I think polls have a long history of knowing what it's like. You know, this country has been invaded by Germany by Russia. My generation and older, they remember very well. How in Second World War Ukrainians and the polls fight together. But this situation in I am sure open the door for a new future between our nations. They have a kind of a sympathy for Ukraine that that could be us. If we want members of NATO, Russia will be doing this to us. If we weren't members of the European Union, Russia would be doing this to us. How does this compare to the last time Europe saw a massive influx of refugees? One thing that's different is already in the course of a month, we've seen twice the number of people come to the European Union as came to the EU in the whole of 2015. Another difference is that that 2015 wave headed primarily to Germany, maybe France, kind of the wealthiest countries on the continent. Right now, this wave is headed into, you know, the countries that are a little bit less wealthy, Central European countries like Slovakia, Poland. An irony here is these are the countries that in 2015 resisted any efforts to kind of spread Syrians around evenly throughout the European Union, and now they're asking for help. You're not saying we've got 2 million people in Poland, can anybody help us host these refugees? So they weren't that receptive to Syrian refugees back in 2015. In this demonstration in the city of wroclaw last week, they chanted raped beaten murdered by the Islamic horde, don't let this happen to you. Poland must stay Catholic. No, they are pretty much all these countries Poland Slovakia, Romania, were opposed to the idea of being told by the European Union who should stay in their country. Prime minister Victor Orban framed the issue as a showdown between Muslim invaders and Christian Europe..

Russia Warsaw Crimea Hola European Union Barbara Germany NATO government Slovakia Europe France wroclaw Prime minister Victor Orban Romania Christian Europe
"ukrainian  " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:40 min | 5 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Today, Explained

"Among the first images we saw after Russian troops invaded Ukraine were of jammed highways as Ukrainians fled their homes. Almost immediately after the war, people got in their cars and on trains and set in days long traffic jams to cross the border. Europe is now seeing one of the worst refugee crises since World War II. But unlike just about any recent refugee crisis that comes to mind, these Ukrainian refugees are mostly being greeted with open arms. We want to say the new life and the safe life is possible. Maybe somewhere. I mean, Poland and other countries in Europe or other countries in the world. On the show today, we're going to talk about the myth of the deserving refugee. Why the world loves a Ukrainian refugee but wants to wall off so many of the other ones. You know the brown ones. It's today explained. Support for the show today comes from a show that's actually made from vox creative. It's in collaboration with Ben and Jerry's. You'll know them from the ice cream. It's not about ice cream. It's about their commitment to activism, be it voting rights or climate justice. The show is called into the mix and your host Ashley C Ford sits down with artist activists like fabiano Rodriguez and Grammy winning musician and activist John Legend to talk about how to use creativity as a tool for change and how to find joy along the road towards justice. Check out into the mix wherever you listen. Into the mix launches February.

Europe Ukraine Poland Ashley C Ford fabiano Rodriguez Jerry Ben John Legend Grammy
"ukrainian  " Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

10:36 min | 5 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Popcast

"Seems to be like maybe the best example of a current popular artist sort of saying, yes, I'm here for the smoke. What's going on? All these artists have said something to some degree, but max has really gone on Instagram and he has really just said like this is what is happening like my Russian listeners like this is what's happening and you speak to them and in Russian and you just gives it like a full breakdown basically. And what's happening with timati. Okay, so basically yes, this is what I was frantically messaging you about at this niche drama, but it's not actually niche. I mean, it's like really, it's like a bigger it feels reflective of the times. Yeah, and it's like a big reflective and it's like a bigger conversation in a way. So essentially what happened was max was instagramming all these things about what's happening in Ukraine. And then timati whose Russia's biggest rapper ever. I mean, this guy he's insane. I don't even know what to compare him to in the U.S. because it's just like he's such a weird strain of pop rap over there. Yeah, and the songs are like, they're big, they're a little bit cheesy, like they're but they're very like kind of like steroidal Drake tracks kind of. Wow, that's why they pay you the big bucks. I love that. Actually, he does note Timothy does know Drake, which is really funny. And Timothy has collaborated with American artists, which I find hilarious. Like he's collaborated with Snoop Dogg, but no one in America has ever going to see these videos. Getting all these secret bags. And Nancy is always on some or something with them. It's like wild will wrap an English. But anyways, okay, so chime tea is interesting. I mean, he wrote a song actually a few years ago that's like my best friend is Putin. And that is out in the world. You can watch it right now. He also is friendly with kadyrov. Wait, who's that? The leader of Chechnya, and he's always, he's always going there and taking selfies with him. They're like, I think they're hunting. Who knows? So I mean, do you mean he's like, and he said it, he's like, I'm very proud of who I am. Anyway, so max was saying all these things on Instagram and then team a T basically did this whole response to him and was like, who has fed you for all of these years? It's been us, watch what you say. The world is round and we're gonna meet again sometime. Basically this threat, then he deleted, then he did another video and he deleted it, but like that exists on YouTube, wild stuff. And targeted specifically at max. Yes, he said, I am talking to you. I am personally talking to you is what he said. And he was like, I mean, he basically was like, it was nothing to do with Ukraine or Russia. He was like, I'm just talking to you about it. But like obviously that's the prompt. Yeah. Is this the highest profile kind of scrap between like a popular Ukrainian performer and a popular Russian performer that's happened in the last couple of weeks? I don't know. I think this is like, at least for me, this is like the biggest drama ever. I mean, you've had Russian pop stars like say whatever. But this has been like the first time I've heard of someone addressing someone personally. And it has too much been going at other Ukrainian performers. Yes, okay, which leads me to put up in a nausea Ho top is like the male artist and then nastia is the female artist. They were like huge. I remember in like the 2000s. They had this, which means narayana basically means like in the hood and it's basically just them and like they're like local Ukrainian town being hoodlums and doing nothing. Pro top went on to max's side. And then did a video against team AT and was like, I am like on max's side. And then he was like, you should talk to your mother. She's very smart to him. It's like really just putting this guy in his place, like talk to your mother. She's very smart, like, ouch. Prior to the last two to three weeks. Did you ever see any kind of tensions between Ukrainian orders and Russian artists predicated upon tensions between the two peoples of the two countries? Personally, no, I never saw it. No. I mean, maybe it existed, but basically this feels like very specific to this moment. It doesn't feel like it's cooling off a little bit, or does it seem like it's going to persist throughout the conflict? I personally don't know, even if it was to progress even more, I don't think it can because they banned Instagram and Russia starting march 14th. And you're seeing all of these Russian artists, all of a sudden posting links on their Instagram being like follow me on telegram, which is like an app that everyone uses over there and also follow me on contact deal, which is like Russian Facebook. Can you explain that a little bit like, are Ukrainian artists on VK? Historically. Not now, not now, but historically. Historically, I don't know, because they banned contacted several years ago. So you can't even if you're a Ukrainian, you can't use it. Like if you live in Ukraine, you can't access contactor. So it's like actually weird though because then you'll have like a Russian artist be like team a T I did this and also this other guy gigan, who's from Odessa and he's like this blockhead rapper who lives in Moscow now. Anyways, long story short, he's like a team of tea like his best friend. They were posting their responses in their views to this war and they were like, go to contact here to find out my viewpoint on the war, which is funny because it's like no one from Ukraine can actually access that. It's only just like four Russians. I mean, of course, this information gets spread on other channels, of course, but it's just interesting that we already know what they're going to say. You know what I mean? And it's just interesting because they don't care in a way what probably the Ukrainian audience thinks. It's like, it's like an in vain sort of move. Yeah, although it seems like not every Russian artist has been doubling down on pro war pro Putin stuff, like there's a rapper named Oxy miron, who canceled a bunch of shows. He had 6 sold out shows and he canceled them in protest of the war. There have been these kind of like little small moments of resistance, but I was really shocked when we were talking about this that there's this kind of you have actual war, you have disinformation war, and then you have this kind of like proxy war of entertainers, not digging up arms, but taking up the positions for the hearts and minds of people. Of course it's not all Russian artists. Everyone is doing something that they can and their own way. Sure. Yeah, but it's just a specific instance. But it's notable when you have who seems like someone who seems like one of the most iconic musical figures of this generation in Russia sort of taking on the war pose and basically saying, yeah, this is my guy and I want all the smoke and like I'm going to come for you if you're going to push back on me. It's hard to fathom an American artist doing that. I guess, although country musicians and Trump, like, there's splatters of it, but it's like hard to fathom it at this level. When I was poking around to try to understand a little bit of what's happening on the ground right now, I came across the YouTube chart for Ukraine. Which is a lot more. It seems like a lot more hip hop or hip hop adjacent oriented in terms of songs that are doing really well on ear. I wanted to play the song that's currently the number one on the YouTube chart in Ukraine, which is stefania by kalush. Everybody falling on the edge I see one man in my school but you step what you do for you girl it's good for the most so this seemed to me like a little bit of like a folk textured hip hop adjacent style what do you see when you look at this group? I mean, they're super Ukrainian, the garb is ethnic Ukrainian motif. Everything is there. So that song and like I said, a lot of the rest of that chart is a little bit more hip hop oriented than some other stuff we've been listening to and I know how big hip hop is in various parts of Eastern Europe and has been for a long time so it would be really interesting to see how that scene kind of picks up the mantle of political awareness, especially as this conflict gets darker and darker and darker. Lyanna, I'm grateful that you took some time to be with us today. Thank you. Thanks for having me. That's our show. Listen to every podcast ever at NY times dot com slash podcast, email us at podcasts and then what time dot com, get on the Facebook group, get in the Discord subscribe anywhere you get your audio content, Apple, Google stitcher, yada, yada yada, our producer, as always, is Pedro rosato from head stepper media. We'll be back next week, but let's go out. I will say, as I was poking around the Spotify, Ukraine charts, and the YouTube Ukraine charts, I was struck by one song because it's called Putin, and I was curious about it. So I looked into it, and it's by a rapper name. I don't know if it's sippy or Cyprus. He has Polish, and this is a to say the least an anti Putin protest song that seems to be getting some traction. So let's go out with Putin by Cyprus. Every night yeah my 14 hour scooter missing out..

"ukrainian  " Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

05:51 min | 5 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on Popcast

"Let's listen to big and funny. Girl yeah it's a good thing man it's no money I don't yeah you gotta cook it yeah plus the east lot 'cause it could hurt them but it gets me a shot took a little money.

"ukrainian  " Discussed on ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

04:20 min | 5 months ago

"ukrainian " Discussed on ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

"All right, welcome back to the touch zones radio program we are honored to have you folks with us as we broadcast from cpac 2022, president Trump is going to be speaking. We've got yesterday. Congress or governor Ron DeSantis welcome to folks to his great state and we're going to be we're going to be broadcasting tomorrow or rather we're going to be on the main stage tomorrow hosting a panel with congressman Matt Gaetz and Sebastian gorka. So we hope to see you there. 8 four four 747 88 68 is our toll free telephone number that's 8 four four 747 88 68 and the question is whether or not we should be involved in the conflict between the Russians and the Ukrainians. And this is a matter of discussion that's being had here at cpac here on social media platforms like getter, you just heard our Friends from getter talking about how this is the big issue and the big question. Exactly how involved should we be? Meanwhile, we're hearing incredible reports of defiance in the streets of Ukraine, the president of Ukraine saying we are defending our nation. And as I was watching some of the reports coming out last night, I could not help but imagine what it must have been like to be a person who was living at the time of the American Revolution. Where Americans were standing up and fighting the British in the streets. Imagine being a part of that great Tea Party movement back in the early days of this great nation. Imagine what that must have been like. And I suspect we're seeing some of that unfolding in the streets and the cities of Ukraine. As a matter of fact, Ukrainian president Vladimir zelensky and this is coming from our Friends at Fox News posted a video on Twitter Friday night. Showing that he was still in the nation's capital Friday night there is about lunchtime or so here. So he is still there, he has not evacuated, there have been some concerns that he should in fact be evacuated and that the government should be operating in exile. But that is not the case. And again, that just tells me that the Ukrainian people are a, they're prideful. They love their country. And they don't want to they don't want to leave. They don't want the Russians to win the day. He pointed out that men with him and their positions all armed, noting they are leaders and ministers and the government and no one, no one in leadership in Ukraine in the Ukrainian government no one has fled the capital city. Quote we are all here, zelensky says in the video posted on Twitter. We are in Kyiv. We are defending Ukraine. He said that early Friday, Russia had designated him, target number one, his family number two, and he warned that Russian forces intend to decapitate the government. Meanwhile, there are reports over at Fox News that Tucker Carlson has softened his position and has backed off of his, has backed off of his what some people are calling pro Russia position. As a matter of fact, mediaite reporting that Tucker Carlson now placing some of the blame on Putin for the look, Putin deserves all the blame. I mean, we know the guy is a murderous thug in a monster. We get that. But man are they coming after Tucker Carlson? Unbelievable. 8 four four 747 88 68 is our telephone number that's 8 four four 747 88 68. Let's go to the phone so let's go to Al in Arkansas..

Russia president Trump Ron DeSantis Matt Gaetz Sebastian gorka Vladimir zelensky Congress Ukrainian government zelensky Tea Party Twitter Fox News Tucker Carlson Kyiv Putin government Al Arkansas