20 Burst results for "Ugandan Government"

"ugandan government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:57 min | Last month

"ugandan government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Well, the situation in Uganda so desperate that the serum institute is in fact rolling out one of these experimental vaccines to see if that makes any difference in Uganda in the next few weeks, but because of COVID I think situations like this have really dropped out of the limelight. Because Ebola was a huge problem about four or 5 years ago, wasn't it, but the vaccine and the vaccines I think there's about 6 in process at the moment they're trying to pull together. But because of COVID, everybody put the Ebola vaccine to one side. And as a result, we've now got a much worse problem, or not we have the potential for a much worse problem. That's right. And there's a real concern about the spread of Ebola in Uganda and the wider region. The first ever case was recorded in Kampala, just a few days ago. So the fact that it's even gotten into the capital city is of great concern. And I think what's interesting here too is that Uganda is relatively well prepared to deal with Ebola. They've had a couple of outbreaks in the past so they have the infrastructure they have the know how to deal with this. But this is a particular strain of Ebola for which there isn't a vaccine at the moment. And the Ugandan government is really saying to researchers and governments around the world, just like COVID, you need to help us in our time of need. We're now going to try a bit of a handbrake turn. We're going to leave the death and destruction which you have delightfully and deliciously meted out to us for the last couple of moments. And we're going to move to an issue of major importance in the United Kingdom. Sorry, in the United States, which is men's hair. I did wonder how you were going to do this Emma, but I didn't. I did it badly. I knew as an absolute professional that you would have absolutely no challenge in moving us seamlessly from Ebola in Uganda to the national mullet championships in the U.S.. This is a running story. I don't know if you've been following this Emma, but I have very closely for the last month and thankfully NPR have been following this blow by blow. We are four weeks into the national mullet championships and we are about to reach at the end of the competition. The winner of the national mullet champion in America will be announced on Thursday. This is as a result of online, but also celebrity mullet judging. We're down to the last 25. There's a fantastic NPR interview with Scott Salvador from stillwater, New York State, who's one of the 25 finalists who tells us that he spent four and a half years cultivating this mullet. And most of your listeners, I'm sure will be familiar with the mullet, but of course it's short in the front and very long at the back. And look at the front party at the back. Indeed, and I can confess to having sported one of these in the 1990s. So hence a very close why? Well, I mean, I come from Adelaide where this was almost a badge of honor. It was very difficult to be a young man and not have a mullet in the place that I'm from in South Australia. So what makes a good mullet? I think I feel some of the mullets in this current competition are over cultivated. I think it has to have a slightly off handed feel. It has to be natural at it. You have to seem like you might popped out of the womb with one of these. So I wasn't convinced by Scott Salvador's interviewer. He said he'd spent four and a half years cultivating. This where I come from that would have disqualified you immediately. But tell us, I mean, what's an amazing about this? So I'm still rendered reasonably speechless by this. Is that they've actually got names for these ballads? They do. I didn't, but I did have a band called mullet. This is how far we took it. And our symbol was a picture of a fish, the mullet, with a mullet, it worked on many levels. I see at least a thankfully. Many people say Americans don't have a sense of irony. There is a huge amount of irony to these mullet championships there. NPR website has profiles on the individuals. And a real sense of where they come from and why they've done what they've done, but the nation waits with bated breath, the world waits with bated breath to see who's announced the winner on Thursday. Phil Clark, we are immensely grateful for telling us about that. Listening to the globalist.

Ebola Uganda serum institute Ugandan government Scott Salvador Emma America NPR Kampala United Kingdom stillwater New York State Adelaide South Australia Phil Clark
"ugandan government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | Last month

"ugandan government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Has promised a thorough investigation into an explosion of the mind that killed 41 people. Right now, the world news summary. BBC News, a big fire is broken out at avian prison in the Iranian capital, Tehran, where hundreds of political prisoners and dozens of dual nationals are held. In videos posted online, gunfire and sirens can be heard. It comes as anti government protests have again been held in a number of Iranian cities. The Ugandan government is imposed an overnight curfew and closed places of worship and entertainment in two districts affected by Ebola, the measures were last for three weeks, president yori Museveni said 19 people it died from the disease so far. The Russian defense ministry says there's been an attack at a military training ground in the southern region of bordering Ukraine, at least 11 people have been killed. Russian news agencies say the victims were volunteers, wanting to take part in Russia's war in Ukraine, and that the assailants came from an ex Soviet republic. Elon Musk says his Starlink satellite company will continue to provide Internet to Ukraine for free despite threatening earlier to start charging for the servers. Ukraine has described styling as vital, saying it helped the country survive critical moments during the Russian invasion. 92 migrants have been found near the Greek border with turkey, the men were naked and some had been injured. Greece says that Turkish authorities had forced them into Greek territory, turkey hasn't responded to the allegation. An aid worker is said to have been killed in Ethiopia during an Eritrean backed government attack in the northern Tigray Region, intensifying fighting between government forces and tigrayan rebels has led to growing international concern. A data center fire has caused widespread disruption to Internet services provided by two major South Korean tech companies. BBC News. You're listening to NewsHour the Ukrainian successes on the battlefield in recent weeks have perhaps obscured a more complex picture of what's actually happening in eastern Ukraine as a whole because in some parts of the Donbass Russian forces, led by the private military company, the Wagner group, have secured gains. So what is to be said about the overall war. Our defense correspondent Jonathan Beal has this report. Every hour, day

Ukraine Ugandan government president yori Museveni Russian defense ministry BBC News Ebola Tehran Elon Musk Soviet republic northern Tigray Region turkey Russia Greece Ethiopia Wagner group Jonathan Beal
"ugandan government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:28 min | Last month

"ugandan government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And why? And the brightest flash, the universe has ever seen what caused it. All that coming up after this bulletin of the latest world news. BBC News with Sue Montgomery. A big fire is broken out at avine prison in the Iranian capital, Tehran, where hundreds of political prisoners and dozens of dual nationals are held. In videos posted online gunfire and sirens can be heard, an Iranian official has been quoted in the local media, blaming the fire and what he called unrest, which he said had been brought under control. Sebastian Asher has more details. We only have these videos at the moment to go on, but what is clear from that is that this is a fire on a very big scale. The BBC Persian is just spoken to a lawyer with a client in the prison who is saying that the riot police have entered the prison also, but the families, of course, for the prisoners are gathering with great concern over what's happening. It's unclear whether this is a demonstration, perhaps by the prisoners in support of the protests that have been going on now into their 5th week or something else has happened there. The Ugandan government has imposed an overnight curfew in two districts affected by Ebola, the measures were lost for three weeks. Patients are reports. President Museveni has declared with immediate effect a 21 day quarantine in the two districts of muve and Cassandra in the central region, which are the epicenter of the epidemic, moving into or out of the two districts is now prohibited as 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. kafue is also in place. All burials, weather confirmed to be Ebola related or not are to be conducted by trained teams, a president said that he was tired of educating and pleading with a public to comply with health guidelines after officials discovered that some people had traveled from one of the affected districts to eastern Uganda. The Russian defense ministry says there has been an attack on a military training ground in the southern region of Belgrade border in Ukraine, at least 11 people have been killed, Russian news agencies say the victims were volunteers, wanting to take part in Russia's war in Ukraine. Elon Musk says his Starlink satellite company will continue to provide Internet to Ukraine for free the U.S. billionaire had earlier threatened to start charging for the service. His risk to puku. The starling system has proved vital for Ukraine as it defends itself against Russian aggression. The network of small satellites that provide broadband Internet assisted the country in restarting its infrastructure after this week's missile attacks. It has also been used on the battlefield to help retake territory occupied by the Russians. Elon Musk gave no reason for his apparent change of mind, but the threat to start charging Ukraine had been harshly criticized as had been his earlier proposals for ending the war, which many felt favored the Kremlin and would have allowed it to keep illegally occupied land. BBC News. And for WNYC news, I'm Tiffany Hansen. A carbon monoxide leak at a senior's apartment complex in Newark, hospitalized 11 people this morning. Police responded to a call reporting two people had passed out at the Stephen Crane senior citizen building shortly before 6 a.m., 11 residents were taken to local hospital for lightheadedness and shortness of breath, according to public safety officer Fritz froze, their ages were not disclosed and officials say they are in stable condition, firefighters on the scene found a furnace emitting carbon monoxide PSE and G has been notified. And Republican candidate for governor of New York, Lee zeldin is focusing on his plan to declare a state of emergency on crime as he nears election day. He says that would allow him to temporarily suspend recent laws that reformed New York's rules for cash bail and solitary confinement. But Zelda, who made a stop in Albany yesterday, says he will not apply the same logic to the state's abortion laws. The Republican opposes abortion, but pledged to leave New York's law alone. When we woke up the day after

Sue Montgomery Ukraine Sebastian Asher Ebola Ugandan government President Museveni BBC News Russian defense ministry Elon Musk Tehran BBC WNYC news Tiffany Hansen Belgrade Uganda Stephen Crane senior citizen b Fritz froze Russia U.S. Lee zeldin
"ugandan government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:48 min | 2 months ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Arrived at the casar Rani stadium earlier today, the swearing in ceremony was delayed for weeks after Riley Odinga challenged the election of Ruto as Kenya's 5th president. In the United States the Biden administration has urged railroads and unions to reach a deal to avoid a shutdown of the country's rail system, saying it would pose an unacceptable outcome to the U.S. economy. The strike could start on Friday if no agreement has been reached between 13 labor unions and the national railway labor conference, representing rail companies in the U.S.. And a senior Taiwanese diplomat has said that Lithuania's new representative office in Taipei has already begun operating. This comes after the Baltic country allowed Taiwan to open a de facto embassy in Vilnius. China has repeatedly denounced Lithuania for its engagement with Taiwan and has downgraded diplomatic ties. Those the day's headlines, back to Andrew. Thank you, Emma, you are listening to the briefing on monocle 24, Uganda has written a check for 65 million U.S. dollars to the Democratic Republic of Congo. The first installment of a total of $325 million. Uganda is on the hook for this amount by way of reparations for its involvement in the multi country wars, which consumed the DRC during the late 1990s to early 2000s. This gesture towards justice has been a while in coming. The DRC first tried to haul Uganda before the International Court of Justice in 1999, then seeking $11 billion in compensation. While joined with more on this by Phil Clark, Professor of international politics at psoas University of London, Phil, first of all, before we get to the reparations, let's talk a bit about what Uganda is having to pay reparations for. Why did Uganda get involved in Congo in the first place? Uganda was really trying to capitalize on a really weak period in Congo in the late 90s. This was after the fall of mobutu. Uganda saw in particular a huge economic opportunity. So Uganda put its national army across the border. It invaded the attorney province of northeastern Congo and basically occupied their territory for the best part of 5 years. And during that period there was the mass murder of local Congolese citizens at about 500,000 Congolese people were displaced from that area. There was also a mass pillage. Uganda was basically ripping gold and diamonds and other natural resources out and enriching them that way. So this was a really brutal period of Uganda and occupation, but also incredibly lucrative for the Ugandan government at the time. Well, is it possible therefore that Uganda is actually been quite happy to pay this if it makes the whole thing go away because $325 million is $325 million, but it's a lot less than 11 billion. Indeed, and that was one of the things that the Congolese government complained about in 2015. They went back to the International Court of Justice and said, look, Uganda's refusing to pay any compensation at all. So we need the court to have a look at this case again. And I think it's true that Uganda's calculation is that what they've been forced to pay in terms of reparations is minuscule in terms of what the Congolese government was demanding that the first time around, that the other thing that's happening here is that in the meantime, Uganda and Congo have actually fostered quite positive relations in the last year and the Ugandan government is now benefiting from very lucrative contracts in eastern Congo. These are deals that they've done with the Congolese government. So it seems that now Uganda's also quite comfortable to pay these reparations because at the moment they're doing quite well out of these new contracts in eastern Congo. So if you add all of that up, Uganda's coming out of this looking pretty good. Is there a delineation here in this judgment between Uganda's involvement in the first and second Congo wars granted that the two followed each other with such rapidity that they almost seem like the same conflict, but is it possible for example that more cases might be pending? I don't think they're in cases pending. I think this is probably the end of the legal road. But the question you ask is exactly the right one that there's a bit of a slide of hand that's gone on here that if you look at exactly what the International Court of Justice has said, it focuses on Uganda's occupation of turi. Particularly between 1999 and 2003, and of course that was a very brutal period. But what it leaves out is what Uganda was doing in that same part of Congo between 1996 and 1999, which arguably was just as brutal and just as rapacious and just as lucrative for the Ugandan government. So I think that's another part of this case that Uganda will be quite pleased about that the court hasn't scrutinized those crimes, particularly from 1996 to 1999. Nevertheless, if you read the breakdown of the amount and how the ICG ICJ rather has arrived at it, a lot of it is fairly boldly compensation for the obviously atrocious behavior of Ugandan troops in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Is the extent of those crimes widely understood within Uganda or do the Ugandan media not really pay all that much attention to it. No, these crimes are definitely well documented in the Ugandan press. Uganda's media is pretty vociferous and they were reporting even in the late 90s and the early 2000s, almost day by day, the crimes that Ugandan army across the border. But one of the big things that I think that ICJ case leaves out because of course the ICJ can only look at our cases of state versus state concerns. It doesn't zero down to look at individual Ugandan military officers.

Uganda Democratic Republic of Congo Congolese government Ugandan government United States casar Rani stadium Riley Odinga Ruto Biden administration national railway labor confere Taiwan de facto embassy International Court of Justice Lithuania Phil Clark psoas University of London Vilnius Taipei
New lab gives early alerts for zoonotic diseases

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

New lab gives early alerts for zoonotic diseases

"Monkeypox and COVID-19 have raised awareness around the world of zoonotic diseases that are passed between animals and human beings According to the Centers for Disease Control more than half of all human infections such as malaria Ebola and SARS are zoonotic in origin It's scientists estimate more than 6 out of every ten known infectious diseases in people can be spread from animals Now the Ugandan government has built a lab that tracks zoonotic diseases in national parks where many communities live close to a wide variety of wildlife The Uganda wildlife authority says the country must address the major challenges faced in wildlife conservation and disease control I'm Charles De Ledesma

Monkeypox Ugandan Government Ebola Centers For Disease Control Sars Malaria Uganda Wildlife Authority Charles De Ledesma
"ugandan government" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"This week East Africa mourns the loss of an important journalist Sumi seduni was a Spanish American freelancer based in Kampala Uganda She was fiercely dedicated to stories in Uganda and elsewhere in the region that didn't get a lot of coverage So dohrni died in a car accident earlier this week in Pierre's Ada Peralta has this remembrance Sumi sadurni covered the war in South Sudan and in Uganda when suicide bombers attacked last year she ran to the scene This is a tough chaotic region but sardines photography always felt intimate as she explained in the video for the coalition of women in journalism maybe it was because she was a woman We're hard We're hardest nails you know And we also have this empathy and those two things make a really touching and very personal account Michael o'hagan a journalist and friend says had already often dressed in all black Personality at the invited people towards intimacy So the people would share their most difficult moments Some of Sedona's photographs were iconic and the region she photographed rebels getting ready for battle in South Sudan ugandans bloodied by security forces and small moments the opposition leader hugging his children women backstage at a beauty pageant She caught the moment Stella Nancy one of the Ugandan government's most vocal critics lost consciousness as police dragged her out of a protest So there were his friend Michael o'hagan again People want to talk to be with them in those difficult times In Uganda there are a lot of difficult times It's a place where authorities smile when delivering punishments and always seem to stop just short of killing you As journalists we focus on that we weigh the risks of weaving through Kampala as columns of military men ready themselves for a crackdown or the risks of getting caught in the opposition leader's house just after security forces have broken through fences when it came to that Was fearless but as o'hagan notes what her death shows us is that life is much more fragile than that That's today's tragedy that it was in the most unexpected and ordinary circumstances that she was killed It was driving to an assignment When a truck crashed into her car according to police.

Uganda Michael o'hagan Sumi seduni dohrni Ada Peralta Sumi sadurni South Sudan Kampala East Africa Stella Nancy Ugandan government Pierre Sedona hagan
"ugandan government" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:45 min | 9 months ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"International press corps in East Africa has lost an important colleague sume is a dirty was a Spanish Mexican freelance photojournalist based in Kampala Uganda She stood out for her dedication to stories in Uganda and elsewhere that don't get a lot of coverage And for what she brought to the stories herself Last night she died in a car accident in VR's eighter Peralta brings us this remembrance Sumi saturni covered the war in South Sudan and in Uganda when suicide bombers attacked last year she ran to the scene This is a tough chaotic region but sedaris photography always felt intimate as she explained in the video for the coalition of women in journalism maybe it was because she was a woman We're hard We're hardest nails you know And we also have this empathy and those two things make a really touching and very personal account Michael o'hagan a journalist and friend says had orni often dressed in all black But she had a luminous personality at the invited people towards intimacy So that people would share their most difficult moments Some of Sedona's photographs were iconic in the region she photographed rebels getting ready for battle in South Sudan ugandans bloodied by security forces and small moments the opposition leader hugging his children women backstage at a beauty pageant She caught the moment Stella Nancy one of the Ugandan government's most vocal critics lost consciousness as police dragged her out of a protest So during his friend Michael o'hagan again People want to start to be with them in those difficult times In Uganda there are a lot of difficult times It's a place where authorities smile when delivering punishment and always seem to stop just short of killing you As journalists we focus on that we weigh the risks of weaving through Kampala as columns of military men ready themselves for a crackdown Or the risks of getting caught in the opposition leader's house just after security forces have broken through fences When it came to that sadhguru was fearless but as o'hagan notes what her death shows us is that life is much more fragile than that That's today's tragedy that it was in the most unexpected and ordinary circumstances that she was killed It was driving to an assignment When a truck crashed into her car according to police she was 32 years old April and Pierre news Cape Town You're listening to all things considered on 90.1.

Uganda Michael o'hagan International press corps Sumi saturni South Sudan Kampala orni East Africa Peralta Stella Nancy Ugandan government Sedona sadhguru hagan Pierre
"ugandan government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The Serbia, the pandemic really is an opportunity for the country to persuade some of those who left that they can have a fulfilling life at home. If not now, then at least in the years to come, because without them, Serbia itself may be facing an increasingly troubled future. For monocle, in Belgrade, I'm guy deloney. Many thanks to guy our Balkans correspondent. You're listening to the globalist on monocle 24. Well, let's continue now with today's newspapers and joining me in the studio actually down the line. I was having a moment of hallucination there, Phil I thought you were here in front of me, but in fact, not Phil Clark. Thanks so much for coming on the show. Thanks, George. I prefer to be in the studio. That would be the ideal place to be. Absolutely. Let's talk about this terror attack in Kampala. So this happened on Tuesday. What more can you tell us? So this is the big story in all of the Ugandan and the East African newspapers this morning. So I'm looking particularly at the piece in the daily monitor, which is the main opposition newspaper in Uganda. It's reporting that Islamic State had claimed responsibility for these two suicide bomb attacks that took place in Kampala that Ugandan capital yesterday. There was a big bomb attack right near the Ugandan parliament. There was a large bomb attack on the central police station only a few minutes later. Straightaway after the attacks, the Ugandan government said that this was the responsibility of a group called the IDF, which is a sort of loosely Islamist rebel movement based in eastern Congo. In the last few hours, Islamic State have come out and said that they are responsible for this attack. Now, this is the kind of thing we've seen Islamic State do in the past. They often claim responsibility for attacks that they have a very tenuous link to. So I wouldn't take these reports to seriously that Islamic State is at all directly connected to these suicide bombings yesterday, but it does seem pretty clear that this ADF group from eastern Congo is responsible. This is a group that's been seeking the overthrow of the Ugandan government for a very long time. These are the largest bombings that the ADF have been able to carry out in Kampala itself. They had typically been relegated to quite a small territory in the borderlands between Uganda and Congo. But this shows that the rebel group have got a much larger reach and they're able to get very close to the seat of power in Uganda now. And their aim would be simply to remove the government. That does seem to be its objectives. And again, there's a lot of discussion today in the Ugandan newspapers about whether the ADF really would even be able to carry that objective out. It seems like ultimately what they're trying to do is to really disrupt the Ugandan state to send a message that they are here that they are a very present rebel group that they're reaches increasing. But the capacity of this group is still incredibly limited. They're not the kind of group that could really bring down a Museveni's government. In Uganda. But certainly this is the largest idea of attack that we've seen in Kampala are several people were killed yesterday. They're a scores of people in hospital today. So it does suggest that this group is expanding in its reach and expanding in its clout in this wider region. Let's move on to look at the story that's dominating all the British press today. And that is the Yorkshire cricket racism hearings. This is a big piece in The Guardian today reporting on these parliamentary hearings that were held in London yesterday, particularly featuring a young British Asian cricketer called azim Rafiq who I guess has lifted the lid on institutional racism in British cricket. Rafiq was a long-standing player for Yorkshire, and he said that over many years he suffered racial epithets from very senior players some of those senior players had also represented England and that there was selection issues that many British Asian players simply weren't being selected for Yorkshire because of the color of their skin. And that this issue around Yorkshire has become such a big issue. The parliament, in fact, held a special hearings yesterday to try to get to the bottom of it now. What I think is important here is that this is more than just about Rafiq it's more than just about Yorkshire cricket club. It's about cricket in English society, more generally. But I think a lot of what Rafiq talked about yesterday I really goes to the heart of racism in Britain more broadly. It's partly about what's happening on the cricket field, but it's also about what's happening in the society, writ large. And I think that's the reason that all the British papers are running very prominent stories on that parliamentary select committee today because it says something very important about racism in British culture. And let's look at racism in Australian government regulations because basically this new heritage Bill. That is at the heart of the row about it. There's been a lot of criticism about this bill, which is meant to protect protect indigenous culture. This is a story in the WA today, which is one of the more left leaning newspapers in Western Australia. Reporting on this new heritage bill that was put before the western Australian state parliament yesterday. The crux of the bill is that it's designed to protect Aboriginal cultural sites from the kind of destruction by mining companies that we saw with Rio tinto about 18 months ago, many listeners will remember there was this big case at the duke on gorge where Rio tinto were opening up a new iron ore mining spot. And in the process destroyed a 46,000 year old indigenous site. Well, that prompted the tabling of this new bill yesterday, which is ostensibly designed to protect indigenous heritage. But the bill has been very heavily criticized by Aboriginal groups in Western Australia, who picked up on the fact that the bill basically gives the relevant state minister complete control over determining whether a mining company can dig in a particular spot with no consultation with the indigenous groups in question. So a huge amount of power invested in in one single minister. And also that the bill doesn't include any appeals process. So if an indigenous group is worried that their cultural sites are likely to be destroyed by a mining company if the minister finds against that particular group that they have no recourse under this bill. So there's a concern that the western Australian parliament is trying to seem like it's doing something to protect indigenous heritage. But if you really dig down into the details of this, it looks like this is a bill that is still heavily skewed towards mining interest in the state of Western Australia. And finally, let's talk about 3D stake. This is a remarkable story. It said that doing the rounds and again in a lot of the British papers today, Marco Pierre white who's this very well known French chef. He was the youngest ever chef in the world to win a Michelin star at the age of 32. Has come out and said that in all of his London restaurants, he's going to start serving 3D printed vegan steaks. And he's got a long interview in the independent newspaper today talking about how he discovered an Israeli company that makes these vegan stakes. He's saying that we need to be eating less meat. There's obviously a health and a climate related concern around the eating of too much meat. And so he thinks that 3D printed steaks in the way forward. How on earth does that work? I mean, why do they need to come out of a printer? I think it's quite amazing. It goes into pretty graphic detail about how these stakes are produced that they made out of peas and chickpeas and beetroot and apparently they fed through one of these are 3D printers and white claims that these states have the same texture as a meat steak wood and he thinks that you can't tell the difference at all in the taste, but I think this also fits a bit of a culinary pattern in London at the moment. A lot of these restaurants are competing with one another to have the most weird and wonderful steak based products on their menus, many people will have seen the story recently of a London restaurant that was selling 1000 pound at gold plated estates. It should be said that whites 3D printed states look like they're only sell for about 30 pounds, so that perhaps not as grandiose as the gold plated states. But there is a bit of a competition going on for quirky meat based products at the moment. But white has decided to push his into a more environmentally friendly lane. Very interesting stuff can't wait to try it..

Uganda Kampala Ugandan government ADF Congo Rafiq Phil Clark Yorkshire Serbia cricket Ugandan parliament azim Rafiq Yorkshire cricket club Balkans Belgrade Western Australia IDF Rio tinto western Australian state parli Museveni
"ugandan government" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

08:28 min | 1 year ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"Is that what you've observed definitely and what is explaining is not any different from what we're seeing across the continent. The one thing that i would like to put on the table. I is this messing makeup free lunch. Free trade agreements good for today's no free lunch anywhere. These are return somewhere. And that is what Documents that are about because the number one thing that we how critical mazes that free-trade remains negotiated on very unequal taps and the things that the concessions that we are making when renegotiate free trade agreements Exactly what is making us. Stay back not develop. If there's any such thing as development i think development should be defined convicts to We have failed to do that. Real food to appreciate what we have and we are maybe a disadvantage ourselves. But listen tally mistake. Always because every difficulty experiencing on that continent is rooted in so many things. Colonialism i don't know tribal is he graces the all the bad 'isms that we know about cuisine what we assume the continent but if we took about agriculture which i'm very passionate about i think was boat. I love food. I love good foods. I'll qualify to and fresh organic food sustainably grown food and we still have that on the continent we can definitely feed ourselves but with the free trade agreements we rick amazing that the agricultural sector is being affected every single day. Africa is home to about seventy. Three million smallwood fabulous. Wow on most women now when we took a boat though contribution women women controversy about sixty percent before integrate contractor monday produced about eighty percent of the food that he's called shoot out so we ended up play the role of slow farmers at any point and our governments. And i'm sure the kenyan government says it's the ugandan government has declined mini and the governments in every single political policy. Document that you read. They tell us that ugly coach that is the backbone of all economies. Yes we let that in school. And then we agree is the backbone of economies funded sufficiently funded so somebody sink so one idea and says okay. Let's go to africa to this continent that is vast and bring something that will change the entire food and agriculture assistive. So the first thing that was done enough kind continent was to remove the government from the sector under the impotent Through that stretch had just been programs and once the role of the government was removed from the agricultural sector and even the hill. Six tally because all of those was taste Privatization means making money. It doesn't mean anything else. It means making money so rules that way. Important lake extension services medicine services for hospitals and planning medicine hubs business as a louis things for farmers. What completely lost once we privatize because they were kaz of the government concern. That meant that somebody else gutted. Running agriculture sector. It means that somebody else is putting the strings on the kind of seeds the plant when we plan to them and the kind of crops that we have so number one free trade agreements do not help alike agriculture sector. Because one of the things they do is the push for the commodification or things makes seats. The commodification of suits also comes. We'd standardization so they had very bad seed laws that have been passed at the moment which are pushing fool commercial seats expense or seeds are growing in our communities now to give you an example when we rented seeds before the african continent what used to the women used to collect seats and then decide which feeds into the next season and we seem to be used as food on which is going to be stored so the selection process. The storage persist all of those jobs that were done at home. Even the akzo seed exchange. That was so happy because you went to a nearby. Because you see it wasn't doing too well and your name by enhanced your crop with by giving you seat when we go into free trade agreements with criminalize the signals that come criminalize some of these things some communities sherry. So you're supposed to go to the market to buy the seat that you plant the next season as opposed to saving seed from the previous season to the next season. When does that do it removes the role of women in traditional roles of women. Sat getting promex. Because who buy city women. It's meant safe. You can impair value. Chain white entails itchy. It means that the man bites because the man owns the money so by the will sell the seat the jobs that had done in between the visting parenting storage weeding all of those identify women. Which has thankless jobs. A tweet hundred triple so that is one. The second one is that the free trade agreements push for agribusiness. agribusiness comes into the continent. They push for industrial from which is pushing for planting when large tracts of land and therefore smallholder farmers we know plant in about three to ten it. Yes they never planned to be of not the moment you say you bring an industrial farm. You're planting maize was soya which is also used for fuel mostly. But you're planting veteran about ten square miles of mates to acquire land. The was that need to plant maize. You need to get rid of moore who out to. Actually you read many many small crane to get enough land to us. Industrial culture culture is very expensive. Because you're planting one type of crop unique pesticides you need machinery and you need a huge labor force so that farmers that were originally independent become employees industrial coach assistant or they become outgrow us some playing the bigger firm and that way they lose their independence if they had outgrew as those data querying bit because they have to get fundraisers and seed from the farm because they have to plant in uniformity. That's another story affecting diversity. Losing additional varieties. We start losing. If there's about seventy five varieties of maize kind of gun to an fob. Where you know they need uniformity. You plant one join of and that is also sort of like a linkage to issues so with free trade agreements one of the things that we sign when we negotiate is liberalization which is always systematically brutalization station six tenths essentially doing with liberalization is that we are breaking down. How going to open up our buddhist so we can listen more staff from other countries as leader say our industries. Then begin failing because if we have seen gonna. I don't know how i am not too sure. Because he's a new variety. That comes up but i know about ten inches of builds those bins. We dry them. And therefore it's very hard to prepare those bins pain they heinz bins in the supermarkets. I'm coming from work. I go made heinz beans. I don't have to go to the markets to buy the dry beans and cook them for hours on end. So that's the sort of the discussion around opening of borders can have more staff but remember because we are not funding agricultural ten subsidizing farmers. We should done in the us and the rest of the want. The farmers are subsidized. Handy comfortable heavily subsidized so what is happening to our farmers. They're sending very very minimal prices.

kenyan government ugandan government rick Africa africa moore heinz beans us
"ugandan government" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Serb place. He's doing his best to cape up there. The man from again that among ended up winning bronze his second paralympic medal. It was uganda's second middle to molly is the president of uganda's paralympic committee. He's in tokyo now. And tells me that david among has made a big impact on para sports in the country since two thousand sixteen so that was time. Uganda got its first paralympic middle so that opened up the eyes of government the eyes of the public and also the perception started changing the perception about physical disability. In uganda. he means bomani tells me ugandan. Government is starting to see that. Disabled athletes are worth investing. In this year they sponsored four paralympian to go to tokyo. That molly says he wants to see more government gun safe find two hundred able bodied athletes and then it finally five war at most at most at most thin five to ten disabled athletes at most by molly says that type of sports discrimination starts very early in this person with disability children with disability. I left out but we managed to be them manage to take them that. Look here it is derived of these trudeau into also spitting physical education. Disability activists in. Uganda have been pushing.

Uganda paralympic committee molly bomani tokyo david
"ugandan government" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Like the crazy revisions. Jon m chu on a mission. Uganda deep inside your mind that it gets make an stock going dainik. Is this eireann. Do we think this is camp wrong. Cod cast okay. So we already have john chewing pete wentz involved in the story and we haven't even gotten to kony twenty twelve. This is important because Invisible children is incredible at marshalling celebrity activism. It is perhaps a thing. They are best at to the point. That win in two thousand. Ten obama signs. The lord's resistance army disarmament and northern. Uganda recovery act invisible. Children is in the oval office. This assigned they are perhaps one of the best organizations that we've covered so far at just sheer level of awareness and brand building and this comes into play in a major way march twenty twelve the main event. Oh boy so in march of two thousand twelve invisible children releases this slickly produced thirty minute long video detailing joseph kony's career with the point of making him a household name. Let's just assume the households are in the west going to stop. I made that promise to jacob not knowing what it would mean but now i do over the past nine years i have fought to fulfill it and the fight has led me here to this movie. Your watching because that promise is not just about jacob or me. It's also about you and this year. Twenty twelve is the year that we can finally fulfil it. The underlying message is that we need to do. We change the something about something. Is running appearing. Listen back to this video. So there's a clear focus in this video on the kind of promise of social media. the number. One thing they wanted us to do was to share the movie online the call to action had about three steps overall. One signed the pledge to get kony twenty twelve bracelet and action kit for only thirty dollars and three sign up to donate to invisible children. Kony twenty twelve goes viral in a big way. Perhaps the biggest way anything had ever gone viral. Yep that point shots to the guardian and the p. research center for compelling these stats kony two thousand twelve. The video was the speedy ever to reach one hundred million views on youtube which should achieved within sixty days of posting fifty eight percent of adults between eighteen and twenty nine said they had heard of the video in the days following the launch. That is just a cut homing large. That is insane. Things that go viral on the internet right now feel like they have a bigger reach but the things that we describe as viral on the show. I don't think they've day. Percent of adults between eighteen and twenty nine would say they've heard of bama rush talk. You know with that growth and that rapid league growing audience comes almost immediate backlash critics attacked russell and the film for bending facts and there were questions about the group's financial dealings glosses over not of the complexities for example in a war full of contradictions and it makes a villain out of one man in a wall full of bad people. There's also been a lot of criticism of the filmmaker himself. I think what is not shown in the video as the other part of this picture which is a ugandan military that has also been tremendously abusive in terms of the rights of invisible children. The organization has also come under fire for not sending enough of the donations. It collects to africa a couple of the key. Criticisms are that the kony two thousand twelve made it appear as though coney had tens of thousands thirty thousand child soldiers when we all watched that video in march two thousand twelve when that was how many children he had abducted over the course of decades and that is just to be clear horrifying and terrible but those details are important. It also didn't make clear that kony was most likely probably definitely no longer in uganda. Yes that's the kind of a key part. In terms of the fact that uganda was trending and coney was not there. The video also supported the ugandan government's army which also does not have a great human rights record no also doesn't have a great human rights record the united states military. What was wild about this. Video is that it was tacitly in kind of explicitly supporting military interventions specifically u. s. military intervention and. I feel like if there's anything we've learned is that maybe that's not great at this point. We're pretty well. Situated in march of two thousand twelve kony. twenty twelve is in many ways an unprecedented success. It has this huge groundswell of support followed quickly by a huge groundswell of criticism but what it also has is a call to action cover. The night is supposed to take place on april twentieth. Two thousand twelve a month after the video goes live across the world. Theoretically cities are supposed to wake up to streets covered in stop kony.

uganda Jon m chu lord's resistance army jacob pete wentz joseph kony Kony obama john youtube ugandan government russell kony africa army united states
"ugandan government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Been waiting for her had begun shirts and went outside to look. Hoping it might serve as evidence. He took a photo of calm yet as she lay dead on the street. I took those pictures because I was responsible for coming yet I knew that the time would come for me to prove to the government that that child was killed innocently. BBC AFRICA EYES Forensic analysis of video evidence indicates that security forces riding in a police pickup truck with registration, U P 5564. Killed calmly at Nanga Be our investigation further suggests that within the space of a minute or so at least three other people were killed or fatally wounded by security personnel in the simplest vehicle that shot it come yet on compile a road. By the Ugandan governments on count more than 50 people were killed in the crackdown off November 18th and 19th in the days that followed, security minister general early to Mina tried to justify the killings. What is has that right? Shoot you? I'm kidding you if you re just at that level or violence, he also stated that the government was looking into these deaths. Those who were foot Extended who showed him the under what circumstances Six months later, no public inquiry into the killings has been held, and no official investigation has been published. We put these allegations to the Ugandan government. They say its security forces were deployed to quell rights. He acknowledged that four people were shot on compile a road. Their own investigations concluded that all four were killed by stray bullets. And that was mercy. Juma reporting from Camp Father Thistles news hour..

November 18th 19th BBC Juma Six months later four people more than 50 people Camp Father Thistles Ugandan government U P 5564 Nanga Be least three other people a minute four Mina Ugandan AFRICA
"ugandan government" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reaction from politicians and listeners to an interview we did earlier We spoke to the lawyer of the You can't and activist up to Stella Nancy, who has fled the country and sought asylum in Kenya. George, would you clear claims she's been facing political persecution by President Museveni's government and Yankee has fled Uganda because of persecution because of what has happened to her, which is in plain Off the media. For frequent arrests, which is the most reason to Energon works have procuring an abortion in the Louisiana maximum prison. See how a button has been abducted. And her family has now been put in a mess by the dictatorial regime. Off the item. 70. What evidence? Do you have to back up these claims of persecution from the authorities? Yes, Feminist reports that their implants you, the human rights organization reports reports that they're telling Yankee has been prosecuted on the persecuted. And on the high court has defused all delegations. Friendliest leaders charges leveled Afghanistan. Well. Uganda's government spokesperson off one of the Bondo got in touch with news Day to reject the claims of harassment against Ellen Yan Zi. He said there were no incidents organized by the state against her in a recent parliamentary election, which he lost on said any claims that her Children have been harassed. Work also Untrue. You've been responding to his to Marty. Manual Rugal in Uganda says Really Dr Nancy technically ran away from her crime she committed, referring to her humerus legal problems with the Ugandan government. And Andrew Rodriguez can't see Gary in Kampala, said Stella. Nancy has fled the country for her safety. But how many can afford such a privilege of running away? How can you fight for people if you can't make the necessary sacrifices, always keen to have Your thoughts on news day. Now it's not unusual to see broadcasters producing documentaries examining the nation's political leadership. Somalis can from today see a six part feature marking President Mohamed of the Life form Badgers four years in office. With elections approaching, of course, but the president shouldn't expect to kind of picture as formaggio, false promises and fading hopes. Being produced by the Al Shabaab militant group of fighting to take control of the country sources all about Let's speak to be pitied Monitoring Africa security analyst Beverly of Shanghai Beverly. How unusual is it then a sort of big documentary Syriza from Al Shabaab, So the documentary is still waiting a real released, but it claims that the six part feature will be an objective view off some of the pledges that present for module has failed to fulfill over the past four years. The first episode six Acted any time today and will focus on the election, and those following somebody will know that the polls have been delayed due to protracted political differences. Al Shabaab wants to unpick this as a way of not just undermining the election, but also for modules tenure it sees itself as a stakeholder in Somalia's political developments, and in vast parts of Somalia are Shabaab is almost like an alternative and the most of burst of administration and this documentary is just an example of this. What I find interesting, just going By the title is the premise false hopes. Sorry. Excuse me, false promises and fading hopes, you know, that almost suggests that they had some hopes that President for Maja would bring from progress to Somalia. And yet, presumably, that wasn't al Shabaab's thoughts. When he came to office. They were opposed to him as I have been toe Any government in Mogadishu. It's a rather sort of sophisticated. You're into the documentary, isn't it? And that's true. I mean, I think it also please on what so money's on. Expectations were off our module and you have to keep in mind. Also, Bob's messaging tends to align itself to create some affinity with the local Demonstrate that it is with them so Somali people may have had hopes and it wants to pick on some of those hopes to some of the things that talks about is the state of the economy. Al Shabab has its own alternative economy. We've seen cases off. It's raising its own funds to be able to carry out militant activities and even humanitarian activities, so to speak, because it's not really a positive light. There are still a very dangerous group. And in doing so they do demonstrate that the Somali government is a failure and people should see all the ways that it has failed from our Joe came in off course, with the hopes that the militant group would be decimated. We've seen foreign and forces working in Germany and the U. S, which is also sort of made a comeback after being withdrawn under Trump's orders, has made some efforts to the institute, the national Army to be stronger. But according to about this is leading to further Balkanization of Somalia through the federal states, and we've seen federal state differences come up in this election. It also talks about how so many people themselves. They do not have a stake in the election. So the first part says. Is this an election or the selection process? What role they play? So it's more than hopes off the people that it plays up on its own documentary, Syriza's election selection. I've heard foreign diplomats make similar Commons. Macleod suggest there are lying to our ship, Bob. What I am interested about here is if they are saying here that the government has essentially failed. Are they likely briefly if you could convince people who weren't already likely to support them. E wouldn't say that they would convince them to support them because they are so deeply entrenched in places and present themselves as AH force to reckon with. So they do play up the sense that they are the administration and alternative parts central and southern Somalia. But for people who've already been so deeply disenfranchised, they are likely to be subdued to support al Shabaab, even if it's not within their will. But I don't think it'll just further undermine this election and the government. But its threat will continue. That is our Africa security analyst of BBC Mantra in Beverly or change. Thank you very much indeed. Right next to an old man.

Somalia Stella Nancy Al Shabaab Uganda president Shabaab Yankee analyst President Museveni Bob Al Shabab Kenya Louisiana Somali government Ugandan government President Mohamed Ellen Yan Zi Mogadishu
"ugandan government" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Something to change. But nothing has changed in this election. So, according to me, I will not vote again in the Uganda Tenuous, says he's lost confidence in the electoral process. He and other young people say they're fed up with a bad economy and high unemployment. He tells me he had to drop out of college just because he couldn't afford it. Corruption is too much in Ugandan government. In fact, corruption is a big problem. Tenuous says the good jobs go to people who have connections with new seven E with his political party or people who come from the president, same region. During an evening address on Saturday, President knew 70 admitted that there are areas the government can improve on including the economy. But he also stressed how much Uganda has developed under his administration. He pointed to the recent election as an example, I think This may turn out to be the most Shooting free. Election since 1962 but the run upto last week's vote was marred by a violent crackdown against the opposition. Civic Society groups have said that undermined the election process from the beginning. Frederick OTA, a Canyon election observer said Election day itself was free of problems with one major exception. The beach was the blackout of the Internet. Now I can't even know exactly what's happening. That's the only thing that I think needed to be improved. In the future. You got this Internet was shut off the day before the election service only returned today. Officials said. This was to counter election disinformation and and security. But some see the Internet shut down as an example of how the government was trying to manipulate the election outcome. Candidate Bobby Wine thinks that too. Sitting in his home and McGary just outside of Kampala. He's here with his wife. They sent their Children out of the country for their safety. The military has surrounded his home. They say it's for his protection, but wine says he's effectively under house arrest. Is calling the election results a sham. They're wasps. Growth fraud, gross irregularities. The military spearheaded the ballot stuffing on some areas. People are blocked from voting. I'll be wine and his party, the national Unity Platform, said they can produce evidence of fraud. I asked him if he would consider running again in 2026. I did not show up, just run in an election. Sure that You add my effort on the many efforts to remove a dictator. And as soon the sooner we do that the better wine says he's not backing down. He's ready to consider all peaceful, legal and constitutional pathways to contest the election results. For the world. I'm Holly Mika Condi in Kampala. The pandemic has been brutal for small businesses across the U. S. But for many Chinatowns across the country, things have been especially tough. KQED is Farida Jarvela. Romero visits a once bustling Chinatown in Oakland, California and has this report Pretty much any day before the pandemic. Dozens of shoppers stream through this busy intersection in Oakland, But on the day I.

Bobby Wine Uganda Kampala president fraud Oakland Holly Mika Condi Frederick OTA KQED Farida Jarvela Civic Society California Romero national Unity Platform Chinatown
"ugandan government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:49 min | 2 years ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Least to set our top story this hour. An official result is declared in Uganda's presidential election today. The commission of the election announced 76 year old You wary Miss Ebony in power for the past 35 years, has been re elected. 5.85 million votes that's just shy of 60% of the total. His main challenger, the popular singer turned politician, 38 year old Bobby Wine came in second with 3.48 million votes. That's about 35% of the vote. Mr Wine has called it the most fraudulent election and Ugandan history, vowing to present the evidence. Once the Internet is restored. We'll hear from Mr Wine and a government minister in a moment. But first you where he was. 70 has responded to this announcement. Here's what he had to say about how a biometric voting system prevented fraud in a minute kisses. People wanted a baby by the machines. No ruddy by machines, Mitch Bed Sure. There is no cheating. So therefore, on account of the some print identification machines machines, this may turn out to be the most cheating free election. In the 58 years of Uganda's independence. Cheating free election in Ugandan history Well, I've been speaking to the BBC's Africa correspondent Catherine Bureau Hunger in the Ugandan capital Kampala. What it's late in the evening here in Uganda on the president looked hired. He's been through months off campaign and that really could show in his demeanor. This really felt like a campaign speech rather than a victory speech as well as a presidential source. We've also had parliamentary results coming in from parts of the country. And it's a bleak picture for the government. More than half off the cabinets have lost their seats. So what you had today was the president explaining to Ugandans what has gone wrong. And he blames what he caused elected elites. People he says, were elected under operating in their own interests, but in the interest off the masses Government is saying Kathryn that this proves that these elections were free and fair. The fact that so many members of the government lost their seats. I know it may be too early to say, But do they have an argument or something else had worked here? These are two very different elections. But on the national scale, the electoral commission has serious questions to answer. The president referred to these biometric machines, which we know we're not working properly on Election Day. He says. That might have something to do with the Internet. Shut down. The other thing is what whether results that the electoral Commission was announcing if there was no Internet and they could not receive Elektronik results. From local governments. Where were these results coming from? And so over This few days, you might see more questions on the electoral commission would have to explain. The results that they were announcing the opposition has the opportunity to go to the Supreme Court, where they can present evidence off vote rigging, they can present evidence of voter intimidation. Now. The other option is whether Bobby wind might call for popular protests against the result and even though his one million's off votes over three million votes There's no guarantee that there is an appetite for such protest in Uganda. Correspondent Catherine Nebula. Hunger Well, Certainly the government is declaring victory, and I heard that earlier from the government Minister Betty among a When I asked her whether she believed the process had been free and fair. The general observation not from government of Uganda, but from the head off European Union, the head off African Union or exam between all of them indicated that they're very interest with the peaceful way that the election was conducted. There was very high turnout throughout the country on people exercise their walking right in a very peaceful environment. But Minister Monkey and as you know, the United States and the European Union did not deploy observer teams, But the U. S. State Department's top diplomat for Africa has basically described and this is his quote. The electoral process has been fundamentally flawed, and he cited the fraud reports the denial of accreditation to observers. The violence and harassment of Opposition members, including of course, the main opposition leader, Bobby Wine and the arrest of civil society activists That doesn't sound like a verdict of free and fair. I can authoritatively say that yesterday. The head of the European Union delegation saves that I am impressed with the level of organization on this full contact exhibited during the presidential and parliamentary elections, but that's a different thing. With all due respect, that's a different thing. That's the peaceful nature. That's a credit to Ugandans that they came out and voted peacefully. This is about the process, and as you know, there's been grave concern about the violence. The attacks. The arrests against opposition supporters, including Bobby Wine, where arrested where arrested majorly because off flouting second rules and regulations off forbid 19. There might be a few incidences where security open overstepped demanded. When is the Internet going to be restored? There is very, very soon the Internet will be back on. It is not only one result that resulted in tow a decision being met that letters aloud the people of this country to make a decision not based on the influence of outside forces. That's based on their decision that we have seen on on the agenda off individual candidates. So the A robust defense of this election by government Minister Betty A. Monkey. Well earlier, we did get through to the main opposition presidential candidate, Bobby Wind, but Thean Internet in Uganda is still suspended as we've been reporting, so we talked to him on quickening landline. But when asked him what was his response to president was 70 claiming victory. I mean on reject announcements with a contemporary design. Even when this election was mined with violence with a lot of my practice with loved over his humanity with government, so dance, starting balance and 14 people to vote from 17 on gun point, even with those irregularity Everywhere isn't country. One under that meeting, and in only into commission decided to announce something completely completely their budget from the fact that came From the politicians. We therefore reject that result. It is not credible at all. This has been the most fraudulent elections in the history of Uganda on we call upon all the government's rejected with the contempt that it deserves. We spoke to Ugandan government minister who said that a number of observers described Election day as peaceful and the election is Organized..

Uganda Bobby Wine president electoral commission Bobby wind European Union Ugandan government Betty A. Monkey masses Government fraud official Kampala Mitch Bed BBC Catherine Nebula Thean Internet
"ugandan government" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Way in for Brian estrogen this morning. He's licking his wounds after that. TCU basketball lost last night. Yeah. Uh, but we've got how Jay we've got stupid joke and the rest of the morning crew as well. Uh, this big dose of hypocrisy came out from Twitter last night. I guess we'll just have to learn to live with it. Yeah. I don't know. You know, being a hypocrite. It's okay. I wouldn't go that far. But I mean, you have to remember your We're separating government from private industry here, and I know we can get into the conversation. And this one of my strongest opinions about all this is that Twitter has officially gone too far. But let me just read you a tweet. That was posted last night because and Uganda they're having an election. Yes, and there's some of the government is shutting down access to social media ahead of the election, which takes place tomorrow. So Twitter makes this post last night or yesterday says ahead of the Ugandan election. We're hearing reports that Internet service providers are being ordered to block social media and messaging, APS. We strongly condemn Internet shutdowns. They're hugely harmful and they violate basic human rights and the principles of the open Internet. There you go. There you go. Twitter. They strongly condemn Internet shut down, and they go on access to information and freedom of expression, including the public conversation on Twitter is never more important than during democratic process is particularly elections. Unless you're right. And that's it unless the folks who run Twitter want to invoke You know, some such didn't do You think that they thought when they posted that that boy, this is going to get picked apart, left and right, Or do you think they're just that tone deaf and they were like, No, that No one's going to think twice about it. All right. Don't get picked apart by you and me. Maybe, but the national media won't say a thing about it. You know that I I do least I don't think that will. It's the hypocrisy is hilarious to me now again. The Ugandan government shutting down Twitter versus You Know, a private, publicly shared company, but a company deciding toe shut down accounts are two different things, but Why It's just it's It's talking out one side and you know doing another. That's where we are right now, baby. Well, you know, when we work together at the end of the week, you have the idiot of the week on which is what you wanted. My very favorite subjects are, uh Very favorite segments on radio. We ought to do the hypocrite of the week. We have too many candidates. Dude, can you imagine? Yeah. Way too many candidates, especially when then the news cycle that we we work in. They're just doing today Number 58? Yes. Yeah, we'll take it. We'll take the show into the weekend. If if we go into that, okay? 5 40 coming up next year old W B A. P, uh, talking about the first day of the Legislature, the Texas legislative session. And what went on in Austin later on this morning at 8, 15 Charlie gear and will join us to do that and talk about the very first day of the of the Texas legislative session. That's coming up in 8 15 this morning traffic.

Twitter Ugandan government basketball TCU Uganda Jay Brian Texas Austin Legislature
"ugandan government" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:59 min | 2 years ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The violence. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Tanya, mostly also Sam Sanders on what that riot says about us and this country's ongoing battle over race. And how does a company survive being singled out as a villain by the president of the United States? We talk with the head of Dominion voting systems there now suing a Trump lawyer for more than a billion dollars. It's Tuesday, January 12th actress s array turns 36 news is next. Live from NPR News on Korver Coleman. The House will take up legislation today, calling on vice president Pence to invoke the 25th amendment to remove President Trump from office. NPR's Claudia Chrysalis reports the legislation would create a panel to evaluate Trump's fitness for office. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in incoming majority leader Chuck Schumer have repeatedly called for pence to invoke the 25th amendment. But with Pence not responding to their requests. Democrats will take up a resolution calling for Trump's removal. House Democrats are expected to debate the legislation sponsored by Maryland. Jamie Raskin, and they believe they have the votes to pass it. However, they likely won't see the legislation taken up in the Senate anytime soon. The upper chamber isn't slated to convene until the day before President elect Joe Biden takes office. However, House Democrats say regardless, they'll take up a second impeachment of President Trump. The following day. Claudius Ellis NPR News Washington, The acting secretary of Homeland Security, has resigned. Chad Wolf did not cite the riot at the capital. He blamed quote meritless court rulings that questioned whether he was placed in the acting job properly. Head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Pete Gaynor will take over for him. More than 376,000. People have died in the U. S of poking 19. That's according to Johns Hopkins University, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has widened the list of eligible people who can get a covert vaccine in his state. It now includes teachers and anybody older than 75 from member station W. N. Y C. Fred Mogul reports. Driven widespread reports of computer glitches and long phone wait times to reserve a vaccination slot. Christmas Aurora High School teacher proven our from Great Neck, Long Island to a hospital Manhattan because she couldn't find anything closer. I think once you could get an appointment, it's wonderful, but to get disappointment, it was a nightmare. All molest mates. It will take about three months for everyone in the newly expanded group to be inoculated. Since the vaccines released hospitals and other institutions have administered only about half the dose is they've received because their employees are either refusing to be vaccinated or taking a wait and see approach. For NPR News. I'm Fred Mogul in New York. United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres says he is running for a second five year term. Linda Facil Oh tells us that the presidents of the U. N. Security Council and General Assembly are expected to meet today to discuss the election process. The U. N secretary general is elected by the 193 member General Assembly on the recommendation of the Security Council. Thus, any of the five permanent council members convene toe a candidate. However you an official suggests that current U N chief Antonio could cherish is not opposed by any of the five. It's not clear. Who else will be running for the post Linda Facil. Oh, reporting. This is NPR. Uganda holds national elections on Thursday ahead of the vote. Opposition candidates say they're being attacked and harassed by security forces. Presidential opposition candidate Bobby Wine says his house has been raided and his driver killed. He says the Ugandan government is trying to intimidate voters. The Treasury Department is repeating a mistake it made during the first round of stimulus payments as it sends out a second round. Some checks are once again incorrectly going to non citizens living overseas who are not eligible for the money. NPR's Sasha Pfeiffer has more The tax preparation firm. Sprint tax has more than 100, non American clients who notified the iris they mistakenly received a stimulus payment last spring. Yet recently received another check even after having returned the first one. Spring tax vice president ended, Kelleher said. One of his clients is a woman from India who sent her first check back to the Iris. Last summer. It took another two or three months before the check was actually deducted from her bank account. But yet two months later, she received the second stimulus. Jack Kelleher said many non citizens worry keeping the money will jeopardize their visa or immigration status. So are again scrambling to return their checks to the U. S. Government. Sasha favor NPR News. The University of Alabama has won the college football championship, defeating Ohio State last night. 52 to 24. Alabama coach Nick Saving has now won a record seventh national championship. Korova Coleman NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Cyber Reason, a cyber security company dedicated to helping companies and cyber attacks on computers, mobile devices, servers and the cloud. Details. It's cyber reason dot com and Americans for the Arts. Another great hour of morning edition just ahead, coming up the latest on the investigation into last Wednesday's Capitol attack in this half hour days before President elect Biden takes office. North Korea is threatening to build up its nuclear arsenal to deal with any threats by the United States. Also ahead. Noel King of NPR will speak with the CEO of Dominion voting Systems. Which found itself at the center.

NPR NPR News President Trump president vice president Secretary General Antonio Gute Pence Joe Biden Trump United States Jack Kelleher Sasha Pfeiffer New York Rachel Martin Korver Coleman Linda Facil Jamie Raskin
"ugandan government" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"ugandan government" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Later the so. I was in northern uganda which was blakely unstable place for various reasons. For many years. I was working in the area most affected by a war but there's a lot of cattle banditry refugees from sudan. The whole rotter region was a bit unstable but as when it stabilized around two thousand five the government in the much more stable and growing south in central uganda wanted to plow in resources into help the north catch backup and so this was they had a whole bunch of schemes to do that and one of them was you know the the deserted the dirty secret of a lot of foreign aid the last fifteen twenty years is governments. Want to get a lot of money of the fast it might be the british government or it might be the ugandan government with british money or world bank credit which was the case with this program and they don't wanna give people cash. It's so what they decided to say. We'll start with community. Development grant and in the community will get this to build schools businesses or things and then they dropped ten or twenty thousand dollars on that community and a helicopter practically and and it's basically a cash grant. Sometimes it's to a group sometimes. It's to a village councils. sometimes it's to individuals and so they were doing a lot of experiment quote unquote experimentation in the sense of like. They're trying out lots of ways of dumping cash in invest in big ways on lots of people but nobody was really studying it in a rigorous way. Say with this work and they wouldn't even call it cash transfer programmes property because it was just a pure cash transfer. They were doing other things training but they but but also politically like the whole idea that you just give some poor person cash. Of course they'd wasted they drink You know or dell. They'll the wasted. They'll make bad choices. So there's this sort of paternalistic attitude that we just can't give people cash and which was totally plausible. Actually thought it was a terrible program when they asked me to study it. I was like oh. This is gonna be a disaster. Why would you give these bozos cash. Like twenty what these like. Some twenty two year old getting you know twenty times their annual income or not twenty five. That's not you one or two times their annual income in one go. It's sort of like when i was twenty two if someone gives me like one hundred thousand dollars or whatever like two times. Somebody's annual income was in canada. Which is where i was like. I would have made short work of that money. Like opinion but But i think that trajectory wrong so that was sort of the start of a lot of experiments..

uganda ugandan government sudan british government dell canada
Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God

Cults

05:29 min | 2 years ago

Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God

"March seventeenth two thousand. The Movement for the restoration of the Ten Commandments of God held a huge party to celebrate the end of the world. The party was scheduled to last for two days as the leaders had roasted three bulls for feasting and acquired seventy crates of soft drinks. Hundreds of men women and children had arrived to join in the festivities and prepare for Armageddon yet. Armageddon came much more quickly than any of them had anticipated as the members gathered in the chapel at the primary complex in Congo. Uganda the doors and windows were boarded. Shut THE CHURCH. Building was set on fire. And at least seven. Hundred congregants were burdened ally. Hi I'm Vanessa. Richardson and this is colts. Apart cast original this is the thirteenth episode in our Daily Series. On the strange prophecies made by different cults and their leaders throughout this month. Were taking a daily look at the myriad of apocalyptic predictions to try and uncover. What makes these revelations so appealing? I'm here with my co host. Greg Paulson pyeryone today. We're discussing the beliefs of Christiania. Marin Day she convinced member cult the Movement for the restoration of the Ten Commandments of God. That Armageddon was imminent after predicting the world would end on January. First two thousand. The cut leadership killed their own members for reasons that are still not entirely clear. It's very likely they didn't want members to realize their doomsday predictions. Were wrong the Movement for the restoration of the Ten Commandments of God began in nineteen eighty nine. When Cronje Morandi a bartender banana beer brewer and sex worker claimed that the Virgin. Mary had appeared before her in the vision. Mary commanded Cronje to clean up her life and spread the news of a coming apocalypse. Cra Dona claimed at the world would face awful tribulation from God if people did not turn back to him and follow his ten commandments to the letter most people looked upon CR- Dona with skepticism. However she brought her predictions to form a government employee. Joseph Kibera Terry. He had also claimed have seen visions from God and when Cronje came to him he believed God had brought her into his life. Cuba Terry's endorsement of Kunia gave her story. The clouded needed together. Cronje and Cuba Terry Spread Their Doomsday message. Luckily for them Uganda was in a state of total chaos. Making Armageddon look highly plausible. Even the most sceptical Ugandans of the day the entire nation had been embroiled in a civil war with atrocity after atrocity being committed on all sides in addition HIV and AIDS had torn through the country at a rapid pace killing indiscriminately to make matters worse. The Roman Catholic Church one of the only pillars of stability in the region had become embroiled in its own awful scandals. People were desperate for safety and answers in could dona. Morandi was all too happy to provide. She called the people of Uganda follow her and promised to shelter them through the coming wrath of God. This message proved effective over the course of eight years. The movement's membership grew to over four thousand and built several dedicated living complexes throughout the region. Yet for all the cult successes Cra Dona had never decided on an official date for the end of the world to maintain control. Cordona stated that the world would end on January. First two thousand. The Colt was prepared to die. When the day finally came but as January first came and went so did CRA donas credibility. People began to leave the movement on mass in order to save face. Crony announced a new date. For the end of the World March eighteenth. They would have a grand party to celebrate starting on the seventeenth when over seven hundred people showed up to the Kananga Complex Cronje provided the apocalypse she had promised by burning them alive within the chapel. Some believe she died in the fire while others believe she escaped but more horrific revelations were still to come as the Ugandan government investigated the movement's Bases. They discovered mass graves at each and everyone in total. Three hundred ninety. Five additional members of the movement had been shot stabbed and poisoned by their own leadership sometime before the fire overall the Movement for the restoration of the Ten Commandments of God had proven to be one of the deadliest cults ever created when her doomsday prophecies. Failed CR- DONIO. Marinda made sure they would never fail again by killing more than two thousand of her own followers whether she died with them or escape to safety is unknown to this

Cronje Morandi Armageddon Cra Dona Uganda Kananga Complex Cronje Cr- Dona Joseph Kibera Terry Colts Richardson Congo Cuba Terry Daily Series CRA Mary Ugandan Government Greg Paulson Marinda Aids
Bratz maker's CEO bids $890 million for Toys 'R' Us stores

Red Eye Radio

01:03 min | 5 years ago

Bratz maker's CEO bids $890 million for Toys 'R' Us stores

"Ceo is fighting to keep toys r us going toya executive who launched a long shot bid to save toys r us says he's disappointed other companies didn't join the effort but he's still plans to formally submit a bid for more than three hundred stores in the us and canada is a clarion ceo of privately held mga enterprises was behind the push to crowd fund a future for the toy chain but that is raised just fifty nine thousand dollars more in three weeks larry and had pledged two hundred million dollars with other investors in hopes of saving part of the bankrupt chain keith peters reporting a ugandan government minister says the country is positively considering israel's request to take in five hundred era trian and sudanese migrants rejected by israel i official confirmation of an agreement to take in african migrants whose planned deportations have caused widespread protests in israel the ugandan minister in charge of refugees says may will be considered news and analysis the awards have been handed out and once again chris wires is the number one realtor in.

CEO United States Canada Mga Enterprises Keith Peters Israel Executive Larry Ugandan Government Official Chris Fifty Nine Thousand Dollars Two Hundred Million Dollars Three Weeks