6 Burst results for "Uganda Wildlife Authority"

New lab gives early alerts for zoonotic diseases

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

New lab gives early alerts for zoonotic diseases

"Monkeypox and COVID-19 have raised awareness around the world of zoonotic diseases that are passed between animals and human beings According to the Centers for Disease Control more than half of all human infections such as malaria Ebola and SARS are zoonotic in origin It's scientists estimate more than 6 out of every ten known infectious diseases in people can be spread from animals Now the Ugandan government has built a lab that tracks zoonotic diseases in national parks where many communities live close to a wide variety of wildlife The Uganda wildlife authority says the country must address the major challenges faced in wildlife conservation and disease control I'm Charles De Ledesma

Monkeypox Ugandan Government Ebola Centers For Disease Control Sars Malaria Uganda Wildlife Authority Charles De Ledesma
"uganda wildlife authority" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

05:56 min | 8 months ago

"uganda wildlife authority" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"The rectangle stitch back the rest after two days during the rest of the group. But doctor Gladys and her team kept thinking about Cara's rectal prolapse. And what might have caused it? And there was one explanation that would make a lot of sense. Human contact. The human communities surrounding the bwindi impenetrable national park are among the most impoverished anywhere in Uganda. They wouldn't wash often or bathe of ten. Sometimes as open defecation didn't have toilets, they didn't have hand washing stations. Doctor Gladys thinks kahara probably drank water contaminated by human fecal matter. That's what put a strain on her digestive system. And eventually caused her prolapse. But kahara is, of course, not the only example of this kind of thing happening. Years earlier, doctor Gladys treated a scabies outbreak that spread from people to gorillas. A baby gorilla died before she was able to diagnose the problem. So it was our first realization that you can't protect the gorillas without. Taking care of the health of the people who then share their habitat with. Doctor Gladys had been hired by the Uganda wildlife authority to care for the gorillas. But it was becoming more and more obvious to her that in order to do that, she had to look after people's health too. And so she founded a new organization called conservation through public health, or CTP, and so what would you say is the biggest difference between what you do now and what you did when you first started working directly with the mountain gorillas in 1995. I'll tell the biggest difference is that when I first started working the mountain gorillas, I was only focusing on the animals, but right now the biggest difference is the health of the people and the community well-being is as much a part of what I do as the health of the animals. Doctor Gladys is still available if a gorilla needs emergency surgery. But her team is also really focused on the health of people. They visit local churches and village centers. And they bring flip charts that show how to wash your hands. They demonstrate how to use stoves that burn fire would more efficiently. So people don't have to cut down as many trees. And CTP also provides family planning support. They've helped increase the number of women in the region on birth control from.

Gladys kahara bwindi impenetrable national p Uganda wildlife authority Cara Uganda CTP
"uganda wildlife authority" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

08:03 min | 8 months ago

"uganda wildlife authority" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"End in the forest begins. The villagers who live on the outskirts of the forest call it windy. In ruche, it means a place of darkness. Because it was like once your inside is dark because it's very thick dark forest. The forest is deep and tangled. The plant life twists around itself and tumbles into steep, impenetrable valleys. Once you get off the main trail, you have to use a machete of panga to get through and it regenerates very, very quickly all the time. It rains almost every day. The air is thick and warm. And inside every fold of the forest, there's life. It's home to more than 340 bird species, more than 200 kinds of butterflies. Black and white color basket to see blue monkeys as far as elephants. But the life, the bwindi impenetrable forest, is most famous for, is even rarer. Wandering deep inside the stark forest are nearly 460 mountain gorillas. That is nearly half the remaining population. In the entire world. I've seen them hundreds of times. But, you know, hundreds of times we visited them, checked on them, but every time I learned something new, it's really amazing. I'm Sarah Wyman, and this is Atlas obscura. A celebration of the world's strange, incredible, and wondrous places. Today, we head into the heart of windy impenetrable forest. To meet the mountain gorillas who live there, and a veterinarian who spent more than 25 years fighting for their survival. This is not a story of man versus wild. It's a story of man and wild. And how both depend on each other to survive. That's after this. Doctor Gladys kelem, was 24 years old when she saw a mountain gorilla for the first time. In my last year of vet school, and I'd come to conduct research on the guerrillas for the first time, I had been dying to do this, I've been so looking forward to doing it. Ever since I first heard about them when I was setting up a wildlife club in my house school in Uganda. Doctor Gladys had been studying mountain gorillas for four years at this point. She had even picked them up as for specialty, in vet school. But unfortunately, the mountain gorillas out in the wild were not thriving. The mountain crews were critically in danger. There were only 600, about 600 lived in the wild. And about 300 of those were believed to be living in the bwindi impenetrable national park. But even though she'd grown up only a few hours drive away, and even though she'd been obsessed with gorillas since high school, before this moment, doctor Gladys had never seen one in the wild. But there was one small problem. I had been waiting in windy for about a week if I could go up to see them because I had a very bad cold. And I just developed it just as I wrote the national park. Which meant that I couldn't, I just wasn't allowed to visit a gorillas. Mountain gorillas and humans share 98% of our DNA, which means doctor Gladys could pretty easily pass her cold onto a gorilla. A critically endangered gorilla. So when I finally got better, we went with a ranger, we walked up and the first gorilla we saw was on his own. He was very, very accommodating, he was a silverback called katja Pura. He was on his own, and he was called katira because he has a broken hand. I felt a very deep connection when I looked when I was watching katsu Pura. I could really feel a deep connection when I looked at his eyes. So I felt like this is an animal, the first time I've met this anymore, but I'm feeling like it's a strong connection between us. Which is ambitious really amazing. And it has never gone. You know, I'm still working with the gorillas. You know? 27 years later. Just one year after she met katsu pera, clas got her first job. As the official vet for the Uganda wildlife authority. And a big part of that job was to make sure the gorillas in the windy impenetrable forest survived. I just don't think how did it feel to be put in charge of half of the population of a critically endangered species. It was daunting. Very daunting, but also very fulfilling because you know that you really making a difference. Really making a difference by any little thing you do for the gorillas, even just saving one life, you know, everything comes. Every time you even stop being like one culture entering the forest, you're protecting the gorillas poachers are one reason why the mountain gorillas are endangered. But deforestation and disease are also big concerns. If farmers are members of the surrounding community, cut down trees along the edge of the forest for firewood, or to plant crops, they were also cutting down the size of the gorillas habitat, which meant the gorillas were more likely to come into contact with humans. And get sick. And once they got sick, doctor Gladys had to figure out how to help them. Which wasn't always easy. First of all, nobody really understood what that does with wildlife, because wild animals are supposed to be left on their own. You know, if it's gorillas have wounds, it's because they're fighting, you shouldn't intervene. There's a sick animal. It was always assumed that this is all about survival for the fittest and the weak animal. It was time for that one to go so that stronger ones continue. And so when you tell people that now I'm a vet, I'm supposed to attend to the sick animals and they're like, ah. So it was like, with the gorillas, it was always intervene if it's human related or life threatening. But even then it was a bit of a gray area. Because sometimes if a gorilla had a life threatening, you thought it was life threatening, but you're not sure if it's human related. Sometimes thinking maybe I should intervene, just in case you human related, but we don't know. And that was always a big cause of debate. One day, a few years into her work, one of doctor Gladys colleagues called her into the forest to examine a young gorilla. They'd been following for a while. This 'cause she loved babysitting her younger brother. She's a life girl who likes the babysitter and her sibling. But on this day, kahara was not looking after her little brother. She was really sick. Her rectum had fallen out of her body. And it was rotting. So when they called me, I had no choice but to carry out an operation on her, even if we're not sure whether it was human related. But I could tell it was definitely life threatening, because the maggots were slowly crawling up her body. So I intervened and we removed the rotten parts of.

Sarah Wyman Gladys Gladys kelem Doctor Gladys katja Pura katira bwindi impenetrable national p katsu pera Uganda wildlife authority Uganda clas national park kahara
"uganda wildlife authority" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

07:08 min | 11 months ago

"uganda wildlife authority" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"Which wasn't always easy. Possible, nobody really understood but a bit does with wildlife because wild animals are supposed to be left on their own. You know, if gorillas have wounds, it's because they're fighting. You shouldn't intervene. There's a sick animal. It was always assumed that this was all about survivor from the fit test, and the weak animal. It was time for that one to go so that stronger ones continue. And so when you tell people that now I'm a vet, I'm supposed to attend to the sick animals and they're like, ah, so it was like, with a gorillas, it was always intervening if it's human related or like threatening. But even then it was a bit of a gray area because sometimes if a gorilla had a life threatening, you thought it was life threatening, but you're not sure if it's human related. Sometimes you're thinking maybe I should intervene. Just in case you human related, but we don't know. And that was always a because of debate. One day, a few years into her work, one of doctor Gladys colleagues, called her into the forest, to examine a young gorilla, they'd been following for a while. She's a life girl who likes the babysitter and the sibling. But on this day, kahara was not looking after her little brother. She was really sick. Her rectum had fallen out of her body. And it was rotting. So when they called me, I had that I had no choice but to carry out an operation on her, even if we're not sure whether it was human related. But I could tell it was definitely life threatening because the maggots were slowly curling up her body. So intervened, and we removed the rotten part of the rectum stitch bacteria after two days during the rest of the group. But doctor Gladys and her team kept thinking about Kara's rectal prolapse. And what might have caused it? And there was one explanation that would make a lot of sense. Human contact. The human communities surrounding the bwindi impenetrable national park are among the most impoverished anywhere in Uganda. People who didn't cover their rubbish heaps, they wouldn't wash off ten or 8 of ten. The sometimes as open education didn't have toilets, they didn't have hand washing stations. Doctor Gladys thinks kahara probably drink water contaminated by human fecal matter. That's what put a strain on her digestive system. And eventually caused her prolapse. But kahara is, of course, not the only example of this kind of thing happening. Years earlier, doctor Gladys treated a scabies outbreak that spread from people to gorillas. A baby girl had died before she was able to diagnose the problem. So it was first realization that you can protect the gorillas without taking care of the health of the people who they share their habitat with. Doctor Gladys had been hired by the Uganda wildlife authority to care for the gorillas. But it was becoming more and more obvious to her that in order to do that, she had to look after people's health, too. And so, she founded a new organization called conservation through public health or CT PH. And so what would you say is the biggest difference between what you do now and what you did when you first started working directly with the mountain gorillas in 1995. Until the biggest difference is that when I first started working the mountain gorillas, I was only focusing on the animals, but right now the biggest difference is the health of the people and the community well-being is as much a part of what I do as the health of the animals. Doctor Gladys is still available if a gorilla needs emergency surgery. But her team is also really focused on the health of people. They visit local churches and village centers, and they bring flip charts that show how to wash your hands. They demonstrate how to use stoves that burn firewood more efficiently. So people don't have to cut down as many trees. And CT PH also provides family planning support. They've helped increase the number of women in the region on birth control from 20 to 67%. When we improve the people's health, we don't only reducing a risk of direct disease transmission between people and gorillas, but we were also showing that we care about them, their health as well are not only caring about the gorillas and other wildlife and the forest. And then it makes them turn one to care about the wildlife. City and boost community attitudes when you improve their health. But there are even more incentives for the community to feel invested in the gorillas future. For one thing, some of them work for CT PH now. Doctor Gladys and her team have started a telecenter and an eco friendly coffee business. Both of which provide jobs for locals. And along with the Uganda wildlife authority, has hired and trained gorilla poachers to become gorilla trackers. We used to call them born again poachers. You know, for my poachers are actually the best trackers. As a result of all of these changes, and thanks to money from gorilla tourism, there are hundreds more gorillas, living in the forest than there were in the 1990s. And the gorillas neighbors, outside the forest, are happy to have them there. But before we go, doctor Gladys told me one more story. About a gorilla named ruhn daysa. Actually, he was kahara's dad. And when he got old, and couldn't keep up with his group. He came out of the forest. Onto community land. We went with my team and when we checked on him, he was outside the forest in community land. And the communities even showed us that he is, he was just covered under a shade of a shrub. And I could see that he was really comfortable there and the communities were not having a problem with him being there. And I thought that even if we got him on translocating and taking back into the forest, he's probably going to come back out. He feels safe in the community. Where does it have to compete for food with the bigger, stronger, silver bucks were younger than him because now he had aged. And so we educated the communities. And they even said, even when I elderly get old, we look after them. So they looked after him and a few months later when he passed on. The actually everyone came to visit his grave to pay their last respects. And it just showed me how much the community really appreciated the gorillas because they're like because of ruin this I was talking with tourists. We now have gorilla tourism and he's helped his help to lift us out of poverty. The fact that they were willing to show a lot of compassion towards Hinduism showed me that people had really, really appreciated the gorillas and.

Gladys kahara Uganda wildlife authority bwindi impenetrable national p Kara Uganda ruhn daysa
"uganda wildlife authority" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

06:37 min | 11 months ago

"uganda wildlife authority" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"Up in the hills of southwest Uganda. There's a clear line where the farmlands end in the forest begins. The villagers who live on the outskirts of the forest call it windy. In Rio chiga, it means a place of darkness. Because it's like once your inside is dark because it's very thick duck forest. The forest is deep and tangled. The plant life twists around itself, and tumbles into steep, impenetrable valleys. Once you get off the main trail, you have to use a machete of panga to get through and it regenerates very, very quickly all the time. It rains almost every day. The air is thick and warm. And inside every fold of the forest, there's life. It's home to more than 340 bird species, more than 200 kinds of butterflies. Monkeys, you know, black and white color basket to see blue monkeys, as far as elephants. But the life, the bwindi impenetrable forest is most famous for, is even rarer. Wandering deep inside the stark forest are nearly 460 mountain gorillas. That is nearly half the remaining population. In the entire world. I've seen them hundreds of times, but hundreds of times we visited them, checked on them, but every time I learned something new, it's really amazing. I'm Sarah Wyman, and this is Atlas obscura. A celebration of the world's strange, incredible and wonders places. Today, we head into the heart of windy impenetrable forest. To meet the mountain gorillas who live there, and a veterinarian who spent more than 25 years fighting for their survival. This is not a story of man versus wild. It's a story of man and wild. And how both depend on each other to survive. That's after this. Think bigger. At the life size, Noah's ark in northern Kentucky. It's an unforgettable adventure. For the whole family. And now kids tendon under explore for free. Visit us at ark encounter dot com to plan your trip. Doctor Gladys collema zuko was 24 years old when she saw a mountain gorilla for the first time. I was actually in my last year of vet school and I'd come to conduct research on the gorillas for the first time. I had been dying to do this. I've been so looking forward to doing it ever since I first heard about them when I was setting up a wildlife club in my house school in Uganda. Doctor Gladys had been studying mountain gorillas for four years at this point. She'd even picked them up as her specialty in vet school. But unfortunately, the mountain gorillas out in the wild, were not thriving. The mountain curves were critically endangered. There were only 600 about 600 lives in the world. And about 300 of those were believed to be living in the bwindi impenetrable national park. But even though she'd grown up only a few hours drive away, and even though she'd been obsessed with gorillas since high school, before this moment, doctor Gladys had never seen one in the wild. But there was one small problem. I had been waiting in windy for about a week before I could go up to see them because I had a very bad cold. And I just developed it just as I arrived the national park. Richmond that I couldn't I just wasn't allowed to visit a gorillas. Mountain gorillas and humans share 98% of our DNA, which means doctor Gladys could pretty easily pass her cold onto a gorilla. A critically endangered gorilla. And I finally got better. We went with the ranger. We walked up and the first gorilla was so was on his own. He was very, very accommodating, he was a superbug called Katy Perry. He was on his own, and he was called Katy Perry because he has a broken hand. I felt a very deep connection when I looked when I was watching katria. I could really feel like deep connection when I looked in his eyes. So I felt like this is an animal the first time I've met this animal, but I'm feeling like it's a strong connection between us. Which is really amazing. And it has never gone. You know, I'm still working with a guerrilla, you know. 27 years later. Just one year after she met Kathy pyra, GLaDOS got her first job. As the official vet for the Uganda wildlife authority. And a big part of that job was to make sure the gorillas in the windy impenetrable forest survived. I just don't 26. Yep. How did it feel to be put in charge of half of the population of a critically endangered species? Was daunting? Very daunting, but also very fulfilling because you know that you're really making a difference. Really making a difference by any little thing you do for the gorillas, even just saving one life, you know, everything comes every time you even stop being like one portrait entering the forest, you're protecting the gorillas poachers are one reason why the mountain gorillas are endangered. But deforestation and disease are also big concerns. If farmers are members of the surrounding community, cut down trees along the edge of the forest for firewood, or to plant crops, they were also cutting down the size of the gorilla's habitat. Which meant the gorillas were more likely to come into contact with humans and get sick. And once they got sick, doctor Gladys had to figure out how to.

Rio chiga Sarah Wyman Uganda Gladys collema zuko Doctor Gladys Gladys bwindi impenetrable national p Katy Perry Noah Kentucky Kathy pyra Uganda wildlife authority Richmond national park
"uganda wildlife authority" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"uganda wildlife authority" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Then, until you're the first people off there. Have been really hard, very hard being a very different situation is discovered 19. Has messed up everything. Gorilla Heights Large opened in gringo on the edge of the 20 forest, just as Uganda went into lockdown. Since then, guests have been few and far between. Manager Eric Kyla says. Normally there'd be employing 30 local people, but they now have a skeleton staff of five. You have to remain positive for someone. Cause that will keep asking you what's happening in town. Have you seen any guests coming at a logic getting here? So if you're getting guess we're getting them from which to operate. I using Please give me some was well, so it Z no serious competition for a few guests, but I know it will go back to normal. Getting back to normal might take a bit longer than Eric hopes, while the Uganda Wildlife authorities cutting prices to encourage domestic tourism, the U. N World Tourism Organization believes there's not likely to be a returned to pre pandemic levels of international tourism before 2023 Well beyond and this is a problem for a community that's almost entirely dependent on money from international tourists. Gorilla tourism has become so successful in Uganda it supports all the 22 national parks in the country. Two decades. It's helped the mountain gorilla population grow from just two families to 20. The Ugandan government recognizes its importance and since 2019 has handed out heavy sentences to poachers. But communities and goring go now need to diversify to survive. Conservation through public health has been giving away fast growing seedlings to locals to encourage them to go back to farming. People used to farm actually before the gorilla tourism came by a many of them abandoned it when they're getting so much more money from tourism. We're telling them to go back to what they used to do before. You know, we just have to make sure the communities are not 100% reliant on tourism to even just to feed themselves. The pandemic has been a huge I open off of this. Race, Kalamazoo could soca and in that report from Uganda by Sarah Pass more.

Eric Sarah Pass 22 national parks U. N World Tourism Organizatio 2019 Eric Kyla 20 two families first people five Kalamazoo gringo Ugandan Two decades Gorilla Heights Large Uganda 30 local people 20 forest 100% Uganda Wildlife