35 Burst results for "Ucsf"

Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:59 min | 6 months ago

Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

"Our guest is extraordinary. Dr a friend of mine. A pioneer in the field of neurodegeneration. Who's broken ground. That few have treaded on. And it's none other than dr dale bredesen's who you may remember from our previous podcast where we discussed his book. The ending alzheimer's. His latest book is called the end of alzheimer's program which is much more robust programmatic insight into how to actually use the protocol that he uses with patients that i use and how can kill her to anybody at any age in any part of the journey along protecting your brain or fixing your brain. He's been on the faculty of ucsf ucla university of california san diego. He's directed the program on aging at the burnham institute before we coming to the buck institute in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight as its founding president and ceo and he's currently a professor at ucla chief science officer at apollo health which is a great online platform for addressing nerd. Degeneracy so welcome dale. Thanks so much for having me on mark. I really appreciate it okay. So so. let's get into this. Because in almost people worry about heart disease diabetes But it doesn't take away who you are. Alzheimer's takes away who you are. Not gender disease takes away your soul in a sense Your memory which is really what we're made of is memories and and i think that it's a terrifying disease for so many it's it's growing and scope it's affecting millions and millions of american thinking about five million now projected to be about fourteen million and a few years the caregiver burden is enormous. That goes along with this The costs are even more than taking care of a patient with cancer. Heart disease And this is an epidemic really Globally it's you know literally hundred of millions of people are going to be affected by this.

Alzheimer Dr Dale Bredesen Ucla University Of California Burnham Institute Buck Institute Apollo Health Heart Disease Diabetes Ucsf DR Ucla San Diego Dale Heart Disease Cancer
"ucsf" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:10 min | 7 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday feels is professor. Emeritus of neurology at ucsf. He was a founding of the ucs of being management center and has made me contributions to understanding and treating neuropathic pain. Beckham hold afternoon. Thanks for doing this. So i want to start but i know that you are. You are a a bell known. One of the votes experts on pain I want to start on the order papers from two thousand six entitled a motivation decision. More than of pain. Than all of opioids you see pain. Sensation like touch vision and also action as defined by subjective properties Although activation of primary afrin nosy sceptres initiates a variety of of sponsors. It distillation of the north. Just two minutes to the psychophysical properties off the subject of expedience at us attracted attention of most researchers Think that pain is pretty simple Some electrical impulses traveling up the nose into the brain. And that you feel you. That is something motor. There's a lot more to it. It is relatively simple compared to for example a vision or all faction it. We know the detectors. In the periphery. We call them. Nossa sectors Which means that they detect actual or impending tissue damage. We know how the message the information is transmitted. It's just like every other In the nervous system through action potentials that are conducted from the tissue. That's been threatened or damaged to the central nervous system we know the pathways. We know the neurotransmitters. We know the coral areas that are activated by that stimulus. We've even got information now. From functional imaging functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake human beings where we can correlate cerebral blood flow with reports of pain and this has given us an understanding of wear in the cortex you need neural activity to produce the sensation of pain. So this has been a tremendous set of experiments over the last thirty years or so to get all this information but there is still at the end a very mysterious process that we don't understand at all. In fact i would say it's one of the sort of major difficult problems in neuroscience sensory neuroscience in general which is how do you convert.

Mike yesterday two minutes Beckham One two thousand six last thirty years one ucsf
"ucsf" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 7 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"ucsf" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:32 min | 7 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Out to info. At scientific sense dot com. So you're back scarred. We've been talking about epilepsy. Disease that is reasonably prevalent. Fifty million people around the world suffer from it and your lab at ucsf is taking video interesting approach to it using a mortar from a superfish base moral and doing some genetic manipulation of superfish to to to show a lipsey like Light disease And using actually approved drugs underplay testified can actually sees the The issue and seems like you'd have had some successes in that area. You have another paper that just came out last week. Inca nearer origins in the embryonic Legal gang leoni imminence so before we get into this so you say inter neurons contribute to the complexity of twenty neural circuits and maintenance of normal brain function what what exactly are into neurons so interence are one of two major classes of neurons that we have in our brain Eighty percent of our neurons are considered excited jewelry. Neurons that Have a nerd transmitter called glutamate and they regulate Most of our normal functions and the tuning of these cells and the precise timing of when they fire when they work is controlled by the other twenty percent of neurons or brain called insurance and so basically they make synapses at various points this circuit to control the flow of information To simply and they do this by releasing gabba which is an inhibitory transmitter that hyper polarizing are brings it further away from its firing potential. The interesting thing about insurance even though they only make up twenty percent of the neurons.

Eighty percent last week Fifty million people twenty percent one dot com two major classes ucsf twenty neural
"ucsf" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:54 min | 7 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Fenfluramine was actually recently approved as one of the first drugs by the fda for driving syndrome and clemson all the other drugs that we've developed are currently in clinical trials. Could you seem stem is on iran for a long time. Could you just do some sort of a bridging study and now we we were hoping that um and that was kind of the intention when we discovered it but it turned out the company that that manufacturer clemens all in the fifties no longer existent that the fda approval of drugs the nineteen fifties was not as strict as it is now so there wasn't actually a lot of safety data that the fda looks for at and more important that no one in the world has manufacturing clinton's all anymore so we had to actually spin out company Epigenetics therapeutics to kind of address. All those those needs to bring to the market so basically formulate the drug Go to the fda get all the approvals do all the preclinical and clinical safety data and then move forward with clinical trials. yes so Can you go back and and perhaps even improve the molecule eve since you know the mechanism. Now you could. You could presumably getting better a great question. And that's exactly what we set out to do. An paper we published a few years ago in a brain communications. I think or frontiers. I forget what journal. Sorry i'm where we worked with. Medicinal chemists here. Ucsf and we manufactured twenty eight derivatives of clemens all and then rescreen them and we actually developed. Three drugs are out of that called novel. chemical entities that are potentially better than clemens all so though that kind development to just take a side drug development works for a novel camp chemical entity which entity which might be a better drug than the original. Like you said the issue is that it has to go through all the initial screening and and safety steps That that would exist by the fda which which has never undergone some repairs drug has some of that data but for an nc. It's a it's a longer path. So we're in the process of getting that data ready for the fda so we can approach the Them later to clinical trials. But it's it's usually a couple of years behind a repurpose drug and it's fascinating approach. You have another people of which just came out or just coming out here. It's about lipsey superfish project as you say we used for to generate forty single gene mutants superfish lines representing catastrophic time. What i was wondering scott as if this is sort of a a platform technology. Could you develop Thanks for other at these things meeting other seabra fish morals that you could attend along the same rather seen as diseases. Yeah we think so. So the epilepsy refresh project which is about to be published was taking this approach and advances in crisper technology which are which are well known which are very efficient for making single gene mutations and our essays for finding fish that have seizures and doing a large scale. So you're correct took forty known human epilepsy. Jeans made zebra fish line for all forty of those screaming. Larbi screen one hundred larvae per line. with our electrophysiology recording so looking for spontaneous seizures screened over four thousand zebra fish from that and came up with now eight eight or nine new.

Epigenetics nine eight one hundred larvae Three drugs forty single gene mutants nineteen fifties over four thousand zebra fish forty twenty eight derivatives Fenfluramine single gene forty known human epilepsy few years ago Ucsf scott first drugs one of years fifties
"ucsf" Discussed on Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!

Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!

02:30 min | 8 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!

"I figured it out and jim. That's how i've survived. I guess you did. And when did you join ucsf. So i joined the university in twenty twelve. And i must say it's a direct result of the recession. The recession of i think it was twenty ten or least that was the night yeah mine. Consulting business held up a little while in disappeared. And i thought this is not a good strategy for career. I think i'd better go find a paycheck and Luckily ucsf produced one. You know the role has evolved quite a lot in the beginning as they they really said. Look we had this entrepreneurship program. It sort of has disappeared. And we want you to take it over in building. And so i started with a blank sheet of paper and like any good entrepreneur no funding and no source but but the the freedom to go for what i thought was right and i built a program over the years that has had a lot of traction is certainly known every place around. Silicon valley has reputation in the united states into us government state department in other places including the white house and alan building global reputation. So it's been a good ride. It certainly has so you were a startup yourself. Totally restarted this year. So i've done it twice a startup and or a turnaround. Either way you wanna look at it but What a great. I just love a great career story and that is a good one and since then you have really influenced a lot of companies. You've helped influence the introduction of a lot of technologies and in in science that ended up benefiting people so congratulations to you. So let's let's move on to what it takes to be an entrepreneur and one of the things we we're talking about the other day which i think is really important as united spoke about it is what is the entrepreneurial mindset. I mean what. What are the things that make somebody capable of being effective.

ucsf twenty twelve this year twice twenty ten Silicon valley white house united united states jim one alan
"ucsf" Discussed on Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!

Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!

05:27 min | 8 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!

"Stephanie it is really terrific to have you on the program today. Thank you for taking the time. This is a really great addition to what. I am. Calling my in the c. suite series. Because you're dealing with it. Dan and day out with startups. So thanks for being here. Of course it's good to be here with you. Ted so i've got a bunch of questions we're going to ask you today as we talk about. what you do what your role is and the listeners of always already been introduced to you in a in a couple of different ways but you do really have a terrific background and career history Just give us a brief introduction of yourself and the description of what. Your role is at this Ucsf innovation ventures. Sure happy to do that. So probably i should tell people who. Ucsf is in case there listeners. Some viewers who aren't too sure It's the university of california san francisco. So we're one of ten campuses that part of the university of california ar- campuses quite unique because we are only graduate institution and we only deal with science and medicine as so. Do scientific research allow nobel laureates. We have top tier. Us hospitals medical school and really great special teas in great clinicians. And that's my world so So what do i do. We in that world i i. I'm very different on the business person who teaches all these scientists and clinicians have to set up a business around their innovative ideas. So these are people who were on the line at actually doing the work and they come up with ideas for instance on the clinical side. They might see a better way to do a procedure if they only had a certain tula medical device or on the diagnostic side. They might see a better way to diagnose a disease state and then from those ideas some of them a small number but some of them are interested in starting a commercial venture around them and bringing that information in that that idea out eliza product so my world is to try to help people at ucsf and more broadly in the ecosystem that i participated in which is silicon valley Them start new companies that can bring science technology out to the world..

Stephanie Ted Ucsf today Dan one ten campuses silicon valley california eliza product nobel california san francisco tula
Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:10 min | 9 months ago

Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

"Welcome to the talking biotech podcast. Weekly podcast about agriculture medicine with an emphasis on biotechnology and the good things we can do for people and the planet names kevin volta. I'm a professor and a podcast host. Who cares about science communication mostly around the area of biotechnology. So today we wanted to talk about something interesting. Radiation and radiation has many places in biology. Of course our resistance to it. The problems that can be caused from it as well as its use as a therapeutic agent used to induce genetic variability when we do plant breeding but has some deleterious downsides and they've represented barriers both for remediation of radioactive. Waste as well as if there's issues with the side effects of radiation therapies for cancer. So i was excited to learn about some work. That's happening. The innovative genomics institute out at the university of california berkeley. There's work that's gone. Underway under darpa funding to attempt to use gene editing to solve some of the problems associated with radiation exposure. Mostly in acute radiation sickness. and so. today we're going to talk to dr feodor urnov. He's a professor in molecular and cell biology department at the university of california berkeley as well as the director for translation technology at the innovative genomics institute associated with berkeley. So welcome to the podcast. Dr urnov thank you for having. This is really a pleasure. I was really excited to read about this. Because it seems like such a cool project that's long overdue and i can certainly understand arpaio's interest in this. I tried to frame a little bit of the problem ahead of time. But could you give me a better explanation of. What is the problem with acute radiation sickness. And where do we see it across. The bay from the berkeley campus is one of the best if not the best teaching hospital in america. Ucsf in the chair of radiation oncology. Dr mary fung has told me how frustrating it is to have. Her patients succumb to cancer of the abdomen and of the pelvis. Oh things like pancreatic liver you. Try a variant. Despite the fact that she has a powerful weapon to pure those cure is a big word and the weapon is radiation as you pointed out as all technologies radiation has had a positive side in the negative side the negative side. Of course we think about weapons. We think about radiation disasters such as mobile in in the ussr. Where i went grow was born and raised three mile island Shema but then on the positive side radiation is used to determine how our teeth are doing or our lungs are doing which is particularly timely given. What's happening right now. In our nation and has also a really really powerful medicine to cure cancer. The reason it's not more widely available is what's technically known as dose limiting city and in english. That means you cannot give enough of the cure before it side effects overpower its benefits. So in dr funk's practice the physician. So i'm regurgitating. What i learned from her and other had the honor to collaborate with. She has a patient with a with a major cancer of the abdomen. Or or the pelvic area she can irradiate the tumor and eradicated. The patients do not recover because tissues that are inevitably also effective so the gut and the bone. Marrow where are aquatic stem cells live are irreversibly damaged by the radiation itself. So the patients Die off either lethal diarrhea which cannot be stopped using anything

University Of California Berke Kevin Volta Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Feodor Urnov Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Urnov Berkeley Campus Dr Mary Fung Pancreatic Liver Cancer Darpa Arpaio Ucsf Cure Cancer Dr Funk America Diarrhea
"ucsf" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Some of our international <Speech_Male> medical graduates <Speech_Male> have come from developing <Speech_Male> countries or wartime <Speech_Male> countries with <Speech_Music_Male> minimal resources <Speech_Music_Male> in risen to the challenge <Speech_Music_Male> of being very <Speech_Male> successful here in the <Speech_Male> US. <SpeakerChange> He <Speech_Male> also have folks who have <Speech_Male> grown up in the US <Speech_Music_Male> where the very first <Speech_Music_Male> person in their family <Speech_Male> to go to college. <Speech_Male> UCSF has <Speech_Male> a rich history <Speech_Male> over the last several decades <Speech_Male> in supporting <Speech_Male> marginalized groups. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> is very well outlined <Speech_Male> in our office of diversity <Speech_Music_Male> website which encourage <Speech_Male> everyone to <Speech_Female> visit. We seek <Speech_Male> fellows from a wide <Speech_Male> array of backgrounds <Speech_Music_Male> as they will be best <Speech_Music_Male> able to take care <Speech_Music_Male> of diverse array <Speech_Male> of patients <Speech_Male> that trickles all the <Speech_Male> way up to our fellowship. <Speech_Music_Male> In Division. You'll see an <Speech_Male> emphasis here from <Speech_Music_Male> the division to focus <Speech_Music_Male> on health disparities <Speech_Music_Male> in antiracism <Speech_Music_Male> during training <Speech_Male> actually have an anti-racism. <Speech_Music_Male> Working <Speech_Music_Male> Group anti-racism <Speech_Music_Male> Journal, Club <Speech_Male> within the division. <Speech_Male> We feel that these are important <Speech_Music_Male> aspects <Speech_Music_Male> that trainees should <Speech_Music_Male> be more aware of in <Speech_Male> order to better <SpeakerChange> take care <Speech_Male> of. Patients <Speech_Male> finally, I'd like <Speech_Music_Male> to say that many of the <Speech_Music_Male> training programs featured <Speech_Male> here on Cardio nerds <Speech_Male> have been wonderful <Speech_Male> collaborators <Speech_Music_Male> colleagues especially <Speech_Music_Male> during this very <Speech_Music_Male> difficult <SpeakerChange> year with <Speech_Male> covid nineteen, <Speech_Male> which has made us rethink <Speech_Male> how we train our fellows <Speech_Music_Male> interview applicants <Speech_Male> in a virtual <Speech_Male> environment <Speech_Male> leave a program director <Speech_Male> serving, and there have been <Speech_Male> countless examples <Speech_Male> of sharing knowledge <Speech_Male> and resources across <Speech_Male> programs that <Speech_Male> many fellows can <Speech_Music_Male> benefit from <Speech_Music_Male> cards. I. Think <Speech_Male> fits in with the <Speech_Male> small very well. <Speech_Male> So thanks again <Speech_Male> for lying ucsf <Speech_Female> up to take part <Speech_Music_Male> look forward to working <Speech_Music_Male> with <SpeakerChange> you again in <Music> the future. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> What <Music> <Advertisement> an amazing episode <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a huge <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thanks to the fellows <Speech_Music_Male> and faculty for enriching <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> us with another terrific <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> discussion <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and an incredible edition <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the Carter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> case. Report series. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Be. Sure <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to check out the show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> notes for all the case <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> media available <Speech_Music_Male> review key <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> take on points <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and discussion points <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and links to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the program. If you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> liked the educational <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> takeaways, graphics <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> delivered directly to your <Speech_Music_Male> email up <Speech_Music_Male> for the heartbeat, the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Cardio nurse newsletter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by clicking on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the link in the episode <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> show notes. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank. The <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ACC, relevant training <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> session chaired <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by Dr Notion reasons <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for their incredible <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> support <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in collaboration <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and a very <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> special thanks to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our phenomenal <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> production team <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for elevating the platform <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> column <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Tommy. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> UNICEF. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Rick Ferraro. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Evelyn <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Song and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Verghese internal <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> medicine senior <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> residents as the Johns <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Hopkins Hospital, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as well as the team <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> men had <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mentor and University <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of Maryland Cardiology <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> fellow kearns <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> decide if you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> love the show as much as <Speech_Music_Male>

UCSF US ucsf program director Dr Notion Johns Maryland Cardiology Carter Hopkins Hospital kearns Rick Ferraro.
"ucsf" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Cardionerds

"It'd be really difficult I think to find that any single hospital we have the main university hospital at UCSF. Then we also have the Department of Public Health County Hospital the general and we have our va hospital where we get the privilege of treating our veterans. They're also so many research opportunities here. The faculty are extremely approachable and other anything about our program is are flexible. Third Year we have to intensive clinical years. Basically all of our clinical rotations upfront and the third year is traditionally a research year, but it can actually be used to pursue classes further you're experiencing imaging or Cath, or to pursue your other academic interests, and it's it has just so much flexibility to work with. Of course, being in the beautiful area doesn't hurt at all and may very favorite thing I have to say about UCSF is getting to my amazing co fellows. I am so lucky to get to work with them and hang out with them. It's it's a really fun and Supportive Group of people, and we all get very close during the years of fellowship. UCF is an incredible place, the quality of teaching and mentoring standing I think the three hospital system particularly the county hospital. You just see things that I wouldn't see anywhere else in you end up growing so much through that in through your. Experiences every Thursday. Morning, we have a an hour-long deep dive in the case just like this, and there is so incredibly through these cases that fouls managing even though it's early in the morning the room, it's now a virtual room but the room has always packed with just amazing clinicians and senior faculty members who come to pass along these amazing paroles for each case, and so even though I'm on my critical carrier off and on other services have pre around instead is still try to join law doing my pre rounding and hear about the cases. So when and Dandridge. Present case the hardest question it was like, what case do we present? Every week, there's a case just like basically and I think the great thing about that is at the end of really at the end of your second year if you'll incredibly comfortable with your general cardiology skills between your time at all three hospitals so whether it's procedures whether it's cases whether it's concerts, things like this you're comfortable handling even if it's two in the morning or afternoon sometimes and then I think the best thing for me is Mike. O. Fellows we used to stay in hang out together until all the work was done it ended up being a group process people used to tease us because we would walk into the ICU with four people to do one p until we were all signed off was just such a supportive place even though during Covid, we haven't had as much in person time. We still have weekends Zoom Happy Hour hangouts that we've organized. Ourselves is a lot to love. My all's.

Department of Public Health Co UCSF UCF Supportive Group va Dandridge Covid Mike
"ucsf" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Heparin during the case on right heart. Cath. pressure was twelve is mean pulmonary artery pressure was twenty six. His Wedge was twenty two with an L. VP of twenty and his cardiac output was six with an index of three point four. So mildly elevated filling pressures with normal cardiac output while he was on northern Efren actually can I ask you? Do you have the? Systolic diastolic just. As RV functioned with a pappy because it thinking about what the next steps may be. It may be human dynamic support if needed or mechanical true support rather and understanding or localizing the source of been trickier dysfunction could be really helpful in determining the next steps yet his. Stolac was thirty seven and his diastolic was twenty which correlated with his LV. Matt, were you surprised by these numbers or yeah I very surprised I expected his cardiac to be much lower and I expected his filling pressures to be higher than they were despite his massively he'd been resuscitated with a lot of fluid lot of blood A. so I was definitely surprised by these numbers. I would just GONNA. Ask you know what is s Vr was at this point because potentially maybe he has a what appears to be normal cardiac output VR is very low the mason. Okay. Was this like a face Oh, dilatory phase of hemorrhagic shock or a genyk shock where the filling pressures Andy caddick apple may seem okay. Extra potentially help precisely the cause hypertension. His S VR was about seven hundred through very impressive numbers. And thing I do recall from the tracings is that there wasn't significant V wave suggestive of really severe mitral regurgitation. So he had mildly elevated filling pressures with a normal cardiac output a wall on some norepinephrine had persistent. Seo. Time still going to the Catholic one other surprise was that this was about twelve hours or so after his initial St elevation showed up on the. And he hadn't started to out yet definitely suspicious that maybe there's more to this. So I was just GonNa say when you have numbers that don't really reflect what you expect. The first thing that you start to think about is the fidelity of your actual testing and I'm sure that basically zeroed over lines have made sure that all the tracings were as expected look like legitimate tracings and then one thing that I do with a dilution is you can also look at the sat the could be very helpful and basically if you're chronic output is like pretty bad and your ad is pretty low, then you're like, Kay this kind of works together and on the other hand if you're. Not on the low side and your credit but or index is also nonetheless idea like okay. That goes together kind of fact, checking yourself within the same tests it could be very helpful yet defect which admittedly is not with a measure is correlated decently well with Thermo election but I think Matt's point is important that indirect is really Matt, your gold standard for cardiac output, your best closest to the gold standard, which is a direct cause..

Matt Efren Stolac hemorrhagic shock Heparin pulmonary artery L. VP Andy caddick Kay Cath. RV hypertension apple
"ucsf" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Hi, I'm Matt Dr Seinfeld and I'm glad to be here. I'm a third year cardiology fellow interested in global cardiology general noninvasive cardiology, HIV implementation science disparities. This year I'm working on my masters in clinical research in doing research. With Dr Priscilla Shoe a world leader in HIV cardiology I'm from SAN JOSE. East Coast at Yale. Penn. than nyu before returning home for cardiology fellowship at UCSF. My wife is a pick you fellow at Stanford, and we have a two and a half year old toddler amazing Matt Ben Emily Welcome to the show and I'm always gets the hit these off. So he always gets to shut up to the people that we love from before we started the show and so I'm just GonNa the opportunity to save that Dan Kelman one of my best is definitely saw his passion for critical care. See you like definitely rubbed off a mate definitely had a big part of why. I'm in cardiology and why I love critical care and intervention as well. So then you haven't aged since the day I last saw you which that was a great day, which we cannot get you on the air not safe for work but guys. So excited to be in San Francisco actually have been there before multiple times because I did have family there and I loved it and I honestly just did all of what the regular tourists do. So could you guys take us to someplace where niche and we're the cool kids hang out so we can talk about some serious cardiology, the fisherman's warf. The only. Orchids now. To Alcatraz. Shipping. Never been out. To Alcatraz on Halloween the it was very scary. Kind of fun. Those are all amazing places. When I'm not in the hospital I try to be outside I have a ninety pound dog who loves to be outside hiking, backpacking, going to the beach exploring all the things so that they area has to offer my favorite places in the city are the huge public parks that were so lucky to have..

cardiology fellow Matt Dr Seinfeld Dr Priscilla Shoe Matt Ben Emily Dan Kelman San Francisco SAN JOSE UCSF nyu East Coast Stanford Yale Penn.
Vaccines and the Future of COVID  with Epidemiologist Dr. George Rutherford

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:43 min | 1 year ago

Vaccines and the Future of COVID with Epidemiologist Dr. George Rutherford

"This isn't the same rehashed discussion of covert. This is. Well more worth listening to. This is stuff that you need to know. This is medicine we're still practicing. I'm building. Of course, I by friend and Co host zooming in Dr Steven. Tailback he's a quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care, and he continues to fight on the front lines of the covert battle here in California for which we are eternally grateful. Steve. How you doing? Hey Bill. Good to see you. And R various special guest Dr, George Rutherford. He is the internationally lauded head of infectious disease and global epidemiology at the UCSF School of Medicine. He is also UCSF's professor of pediatrics and adjunct. Professor School of Public Health at California Berkeley. I had a chance to print out Georgia's see. It's one hundred, twenty, six pages long with two hundred and twenty one published papers and so many important accolades. So I'm going to read the whole thing to you now. Only. Kidding. Dr Authored although socially distance. Thanks so much for joining real pleasure. So Professor of epidemiology and biostatistics director at the prevention and Public Health Group. What do you do? Well, I'm an academic. So I teach school right I do research and I provide advice. So the mission of anybody in Academic Vinnie academic medical entity is education research, clinical care and public service. So my clinical care is really the clinical practice of public. Health and I advise the City Health Department San Francisco Department of Public Health, the California Department of Health and some of the various health departments around the state on approaches to controlling the Kobe deputy hammock. You did mention that your research is partly funded by CDC. Yes. That's correct. Yeah. Hell is a bit about that and how that affects your work during these crazy days. So I've worked with CDC for decades and most recently. I've been doing predominantly HIV related work in developing countries as part of the Presidential Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief I, have a large competent, very competent research group that basically tries to help governments and occasionally universities but mostly governments CDC missions in developing countries to understand what's going on with their. HIV. Epidemics, how things are working to evaluate progress and to discover new ways to try and stop the spread of HIV and try and. Improve. Clinical outcomes of people who already have HIV. So cases per one million population worldwide is running at about three thousand, five, hundred cases per one million in the US is running at about nineteen thousand, three hundred. So did we screw up or do we have a population that's more difficult to manage? Yes and yes, we have six fold higher numbers of cases than we should have and other countries like India may eventually catch up. I think that the US mister major opportunity early on and that was the problem with not having up tests and having the wrong tests and having tested didn't work and trying to control tests and trying to restrict out tests were being used for whom they are being used. I think they've always been you know a whole myriad lack of policy leadership which the states. have taken over and I think first of all the bay area in which the six county health departments acted in concert to move to a shelter in place ordinance early on on March. Sixteenth, and there is a very good reason for March sixteenth it was the day before Saint Patrick's Day, and then later the state moved in the same direction. So I think California's really been a leader in this. Now, you wouldn't know it from the last two months or three months since mid June under there's a huge wave of new infection a disappointed but I think we still are leaders in this. We showed data today in medicine grand rounds at UCSF that looked at numbers of deaths per hundred cases and in New York ten percent in. San. Francisco, it's zero point, seven percent. So it's less than one percent in San Francisco and the next best in a big city is something I one and a half percent did we screw up as a country? Totally? Did we screw up regionally in the north in northern California I don't think. So we scrub stay somewhat I think we made the reopening little to easy S. Really Hindsight Wealth speak that hindsight just for a second I mean in New York they've had four hundred, forty, five, thousand cases in thirty, three, thousand deaths. So they got a hold of this thing long before we did but we've already exceeded the case we're up to seven, hundred, fifty, thousand cases almost eighty percent more than they've had, and we've had fourteen thousand deaths. Half of what they've had when you say that we as a country may have screwed up, do we have a hold of this thing now and how much of it is that the population is not wearing masks enough especially young people who've decided that they're not as susceptible what New York was bad luck and they had continuous importation from Europe and may have had who? knows. Thousands of cases imported from Europe each one of which starts a new chain of transmission. We in San Francisco we probably at tens coming from Asia and you know the first death care was on February six dot and that was diagnosed retrospectively. Womanhood attended a convention in Las Vegas choose living in Santa, Clara County near San Jose and that convention probably people from China. or at least in the in the hotel that's probably where she got it. If she'd come home and hit a large crowd event at the wrong time with very high levels of virus inter nose and throat and spread it around we could have been just as bad office New York but we weren't and that's really a question of luck. So New York at Bath Block. But guess what we do. This was coming since the thirty first of December. That's when the UBA provincial CDC notified the central Chinese CDC that Oh, by the way, we may have a little problem here the central Chinese CD setup team to Wuhan on December thirty first basically started began an immediate investigation started closed down and drain the whole thing under control. That was the starting Bell I. Mean there was basically two months lost now CDC will say, well, we were having we we developed tests. We did this. We did that. Yeah, that's true. But then the FDA threatened to decertify their laboratory that was producing testing. They produce tests in the hundreds, not in the tens of thousands which was what was needed thousands. Of people came from Europe to New York and it got spread around helped by a couple of super spreader events where people in fact, at one person they affect hundreds of people at the same

New York CDC California HIV Ucsf City Health Department San Fra Doctor Of Internal Medicine Pu Europe United States Professor School Of Public Hea Ucsf School Of Medicine San Francisco Dr Steven Professor Of Pediatrics Public Health Group California Berkeley George Rutherford California Department Of Healt
UCSF scientists develop nasal spray to fight COVID-19

Tom Sullivan

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

UCSF scientists develop nasal spray to fight COVID-19

"At the University of California, San Francisco, say they've come up with a nasal spray to combat Corona virus. While not a cure. The spray is an antiviral that would help Ward off Cove in 19 UCSF researchers are now working with the business community to try to bring the nasal spray to stores at an affordable price.

Ward Off Cove San Francisco Ucsf University Of California
Los Angeles - UC Davis Medical Center ninth on U.S. News’ best California hospitals list

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Los Angeles - UC Davis Medical Center ninth on U.S. News’ best California hospitals list

"Well these northern Californians and have a lot to worry about these days when it comes to public health, but we can rest easy now. One of our local hospitals is one of the best in this state, according to the U. S News. Best hospital rating rankings. U. C. Davis Medical Center is ranked number one in Sacramento and number nine in all of this state. Other newer Cal hospitals ranked high on the national list, with UCSF Medical Center, coming in eighth overall.

Ucsf Medical Center U. C. Davis Medical Center Sacramento U. S News
How NBA players are using the Oura smart ring to warn of coronavirus

The 3:59

10:49 min | 1 year ago

How NBA players are using the Oura smart ring to warn of coronavirus

"What exactly does the Smart Ring Do, and and let's start with what its original purpose is, and what it was marketed for initially sure, so the has been around for two years and never got to review. It was one of these things I meant to, but it is a it is. A fitness rang health ring much. Much like the ring made by motive years ago, it checks heart rate it contract sleep it contract motion and activity, but it also tracks temperature. The temperature sensor is the interesting part because there aren't any other wearables that do that, but it's not necessarily the temperature sensing. You think it can't give you like an actual body. Reading of like you know what hundred point seven or whatever? It's a relative temperature that's. Night to show temperature fluctuations plus or minus degrees Fahrenheit. That's mentioned. Just show your changes in your baseline, so to speak, and so how is it being used as a early warning system for covid nineteen? Now been working with a couple of research teams UCSF has a study that you can opt into in the APP. That's been going on for a while. That's asking people to log You know their own moods and symptoms to try to study correlations. That's similar to what other companies are doing trying to see. If there could a way could help connect to symptoms and krona virus, but those researchers are seeing that you can with with the temperature capabilities see signs of illness symptoms a couple of days in advance of when you would normally perceive them. That could line up with the couple of day. Lead time that people believe might might be you know a symptomatic spread period now I'm not a another doctor. My research scientist from talking to researchers working with this and I've been I've been really curious about what that could actually mean. Another research team at Rockford Neuroscience Institute West Virginia University. Has Been Looking at trying to create a health forecasting APP that they have in place that they're using with with frontline workers and seeing if you could provide you know a couple of day pre forecast of whether you're likely to be getting sick. And built on a similar idea of using temperature mainly as a way to pick up ways that you're you're readings are hinting towards the sign of sickness, but not necessarily a sign of coronavirus, just a sign of sickness general from what they perceive. They claim it's like eighty nine percent. Accurate in predicting so far signs of upcoming sickness that will be when you get a coronavirus. You know that's when you get tested. That's when you would maybe. Go into work in some future world where we go back to work, and you know the reason why folks might be more familiar, we're now is because NBA players are supposed to be wearing them as they. Get set to kick off their their special. BUBBLE SEASON DOWN IN FLORIDA. Yes so NBA players have been wearing this of chosen this this wearable. OPT in program and. Coaches that that can look at the stats get kind of a distilled subset of the stats that aware of the ring, now like the consumer version would get so I see all these different pieces of information. There is a respiration. There's heart rate variability temperature these are estimated again. A couple of those key factors of four of them were pulled out and turn into a risk score. That idea is that if you seem like you're, you're scoring significantly high on that, you would Pull yourself out. Get Kobe test, and that type of thing. But you. You get something like that on the on the order APP itself. There's a score, the kind of shows like a whole bunch of factors and talks about like you know Harry feeling today. It sometimes it correlates with our. I feel sometimes a dozen so. Same thing asleep scores but it will let me remind me of like how I'm sleeping. And how much I'm you know? Both bedtime in some element of restiveness, how much I can do about that is is the other thing, but that the NBA is using again is kind of a pre screening tool for those who were bubbling Brian. So you're obviously not an NBA player, Sarah Scott, but how how are you using this? And how does that differ from what they're using this for? As as Early Warning System, yeah, so again as curious and I've not been doing any of those those things and I'm not using any advance APPS. I'm just using the consumer version and seeing what it's like so I just live with it. I've been wearing three months since late April. All the time and what have been noticing is that a lot of ways I don't notice anything because I. Just live my life, and then I check the APP in Awhile, and it says okay. This is sleeping and I tried to make myself sleep better, but like a lot of sleep tracking things. I don't act on those things as well. They should still go to bed super late, even knowing do. But the temperature thing is mostly been fluctuating around the same thing, a little down a little, if I who knows I, haven't knock on wood. I haven't gotten sick over this period. If I had actually gotten sick or perceived something that might be kind of interesting so hard to tell in that vacuum, but. I just wear. It will give some testing with it and I'm curious. I don't think it's it wouldn't replace a fitness watch because it's not as detailed as that and the one thing that the ring is, it's totally invisible with how it shows stuff. It's this nettle ring with no readouts doesn't buzz no buttons and you'd have to check the APP and also if you don't know if it's running out of batteries on the seven day battery life. Until you check the APP where you get a notification from your phone, so there's times where just went dead, and then I had like five days of no readings because I forgot to charge it, which is not ideal if you want a wearable, that's going to help provide early detection for people in a future workplace so that that's one challenge with it. The other thing is talking to the researchers and thinking about what would we all be doing with this? The NBA is bubbling now in a world where you go back to work and have some sort of you know wearable screening tool, which is what people are imagining. Its Eye, contact tracing unit everyone to opt in. And that means rock varner sciences. He was also trying to build towards. Maybe eventually a ways like at that would show ideally like where signs of potential illness popping up through crowdsourcing, but much contact tracing that requires people to participate and right now you still have questions. People are still refusing to wear masks so I mean. The. The degree to which you get people to all agree to wear wearable. Seems extremely optimistic and then when you deal with things like public. It adds all sorts of other complications so an office. Could all agree to do it? But how do you? What do you do in the larger world? I think those are questions. It still hadn't been worked out because the systems are only as good as everyone else's reporting, and just to be clear that this is not a cheap option. This is not cheap solution. Right? Like how much does this thing go for? And how easy is it the by one? The pretty easy to buy, and they're not that cheap there four hundred dollars so. Yeah the falls line with with. Your standard good smartwatch or Apple Watch or thing like that, but you know it's made like titanium plastic on the interior and It's it feels nice, but that's a lot of money, and I think some people will really like it because it's convenient. Enter praying and not a watch Some of the researchers also pointed out that a doctor's and frontline workers don't like wearing rings because they're not good that the germs could get in there. LEXIE! Shoes she's wearing. It didn't like it because of swelling and for exercise, the ring didn't feel ideal was uncomfortable for her and you have to get fitted. You have to get a particular size on the ring. They send you a sizing kit, so if your size changes, that's not great. A watch is adjustable, so there's a lot of things that are weird about it, but I think. It opens interesting questions about what temperature could possibly do. On, wearables in I'm really curious, what will pops up after this? It seemed like from your experience that made you call it somewhat invisible and the data I mean how ultimately how useful is this data? Have you used it to change your life for because you sort of hinted that that you looked at the data? then. It hasn't really changed anything, but like ultimately is this useful? In terms of changing my life. No, because you're right. You know this reminds me of like the talk. I had with with Kevin Lynch on Apple. Watch and apple could be making a lot of decisions on this to why they're only doing. Certain elements of sleep tracking. You know they're just doing the bedtime. Wake up is they claim that the rest is not actionable? Now they call so it could be that apple isn't fully develop the rest of the tools to their liking. But I think that's true in terms of when you get sleep scores like on this. What do I really do with like that? I didn't rest well enough you. There's really not much you can. Do you try to get to bed earlier? Maybe try to take it easy. Me could try to like take on yourself, and that's what the APP recommends like. You know you're reading the scores. Great. Go do it today, or it's not great. Take care a little bit today and I think that's interesting. So in that sense did change the way I would perceive some days I go. Hey, I'm not a great readiness score. just be a little easy on myself. What I know that just waking up and just feeling like crap. Probably you know I think some of these things correlate with how you would normally feel. Feel anyhow, if you're a self aware, but I think the getting back to work thing, the bigger question which is like you know I hate to even leave with that in the story, but it's what people think about about the possible Kobe awareness. I can't yeah for me I'm I you know I? Pi- blood pressure. I'm not going to put myself at risk going out. Out in the world, even if there's a sliver of it and then if I don't know that the APP, the rest of the world is behaving in a responsible way. Then I don't want to put myself there and that doesn't have to do other a wearing ring. It's like so the hard part. There was a halo over everyone's head. That said you know yes I. I am using the device I. Am I am part of your network? Then that's bubbling I. think that would be. That might be a different story, but again. None of these data things that these research programmes are absolute yet. These are all experiments, and all the researchers things a tip of the iceberg, so look how long people have been researching sleep and possible signs of. OF APNEA. or All. These research programmes with wearables they can go on for years and the NBA is very much an experiment. We don't know at all how that's going to turn out

NBA Apple Ucsf Florida Research Scientist Rockford Neuroscience Institut Kobe Sarah Scott Apnea. Harry Rock Varner Sciences Lexie Kevin Lynch
A Critical Inflection Point for Responsible AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

04:34 min | 1 year ago

A Critical Inflection Point for Responsible AI

"Remond, welcome to the twin Wa podcast. Thank you for having me Sam, then a few years in the making and I'm glad we're able to do this. You know what it only takes a global pandemic to make this conversation happen. These are the best conversations I think when I'm finally able to connect with with friends and you know folks I know from industry, and you and I in particular I. Think I've been trying to make this conversation happen for as you said a few years and it's always. I'm going to be in Asia. I'm not in the bay area and. been able to to make it happen so super, super, super excited. Get this going. Let's start out as we usually do here on the show and have you share a little bit about your background? You work in ethical and responsible How did you come into into that field? In the answer, that is a lot of meandering. By background data scientists in a social scientist. I would officially say me Quantitative Social Scientists I have degrees in political science management economics. Bastions quantitative methods one degree or like five or six. I know folks like you. But I moved to Silicon Valley in twenty thirteen to receive a job in this weird little fields called details, science which I had heard about anecdotally while Mike Kishi procurement ucse everybody's crazy. Nobody understood while leaving a political science teach de Haram to do some weird tech job on Humira seventy years later. with Dina Science in anything related to data signs in. Being the only thing people talk about so after my stint as a data scientist action, teaching data science at bootcamp, cold medicine, and that's when. I was doing talks on polling, the elections and in the sense of how numbers and statistics can be misleading, because I woke background and things design only and quantity of human behavior analysis and you know extension was three years ago. Looking for someone to lead this weird thing is sponsored. And that's how that's how! That's how I got this job. And so you've been at accenture. How long now three years actually hit the three year mark in early, February wow nice, nice, which sponsor air world makes the ancient. Absolutely. And you're based in San Francisco. How have things been going for you with? Shelter in place and covert, and all that kind of stuff, yeah I mean fortunately San Francisco had a really good response and people stayed at home than they more or less have been listening. I think everyone just getting antsy, so I see more and more people although people whistle being careful. Fortunately, it's been pretty quiet. Ellen Mission Bay, which is near the UCSF hospitals. and. It hasn't been that bad I fortunately. I live in a really walkable neighborhood is parks here by CETERA, so it hasn't been over the fuzzy I just think this is also the shortest as I've a longest amount of time. I have ever spent not flying somewhere in the last few years, so it's been nice yeah. I've commented to to fight back just earlier today. Like by this time a normal year I'd have been probably to half a dozen at least conference. Is You know not? That's not a dozen. It's probably would have been around the world a couple times, but I mean it's funny because I have all these place holders on my calendar when by one they all truck, but you know. By now I would have been in London what Vice. India and the Nordic sexually this supposed to be doing it for different Nordic countries to visit different accenture offices, client partners, and then in a month those supposed to be in Atlanta. still have this thing in Singapore. That apparently is still on the calendar for August, but I think they're being ambitious at this point. But you know. It's nice to be home. It's nice to be around by my pets. Organize my apartment Buehler's things that come to do.

Accenture Scientist San Francisco Dina Science Asia SAM Mike Kishi Ucsf Ellen Mission Bay Buehler Silicon Valley Singapore India London Atlanta.
"ucsf" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KGO 810

"Briefly before we open up to questions I want to thank the partnership we advance with UCSF and with UCLA the first cohort we have the capacity got to three thousand people week trained we're starting with the first cohort of five hundred individuals a five day training twenty hours of training for our tracing want folks to know to clean our immigrant communities that we protect your data this is not Big Brother we do not share this data what people feel safe and comfortable about working with public health leaders and that's why the training is so foundational trainings about cultural competency it's about how to engage diverse communities it's about how to soften the edges of concerns when someone is asked to provide information about their contacts if they indeed I have developed the virus but this is all the way to keep our broader community safer working we've done some workshops with immigrant communities and representatives that across the spectrum across the state they want to make sure that we're preserving privacy and respecting the protocols that are well established in California but are certainly going to be well reinforced through the this next phase of Tracy in the state UCSF they get it don't get that done UCLA they get it I'll get that done and the data backbone that we have the management system all of this is a predicate it's a foundation of being able to move this board and scale but the good news is that is already under way that virtual training academy twelve hours virtual about eight hours of one on one work that first cohort will be trained within next few days and then next week we'll keep building on that army we re directed local and state personality for that first cohort we expect from multiple Cora cohorts do the same again try to get to ten thousand and at first base and expand that we believe up to about twenty thousand in subsequent phases over the next number of months so from PP finally seems to mimic a real consistency movement on testing to now re opening a business is up and down the state again with new protocols a new procedures all again based on all based upon the data based upon these indicators this is a this is a good way to answer and a mother's day weekend after the weekend and I'll just I referenced it but I'll say it again all the moms out there that are home schooling their kids taking care of her husband's in many cases or their spouses their loved ones for all of those that care givers and status of families that you know just make us proud that are really stepping up all we have uncles they're substituting his parents because of unique circumstances and foster parents doing incredible work I can go down the list also just extend deep appreciation all of you but always a little bit extra to women and girls that that have a little bit more to do in these circumstances and I know that just intimately my wife is a perfect example of that and you talk about super heroes we talk a lot about heroes and social workers and they're super heroes those essential workers by day and those incredible monster by night and so happy mother's day to all of you at least we can get these flowers shops open so you can get appropriately supported and placing closing for thanks to support local businesses a lot of the big chains because they were essential because of food delivery in particular they were able to out compete at this moment look out for your neighborhood florist okay off your neighborhood business they need your support they haven't gotten the kind of support they deserve you will be determinative of whether or not they will survive and so if it means you have got to go an extra blocker to seek them out find them make some calls to the old business you want to you don't just go to that big box retailer they had a little vantage on folks like this and it's time to re balance things as well so that's it terms of my opening statements course now happy to answer any questions hi governor I'm Katie or politics reporter with KQED and I will be asking you questions on behalf of the passport so first question does come from KQED the national unemployment rate we found out rose to four point seven percent in April you've already.

UCSF UCLA
"ucsf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:33 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of medicine at UCSF and welcome our great good to have you with us good morning morning to you yeah glad to have you I think the place to begin is what are we talking about when we're talking about a second wave because alone this summer many experts are saying is likely to bring on other coronaviruses I mean they do pick up in the fall generally is what I meant to say so they're not as hard in the summer environment we talk about the fall we talk about the winner or both what I want you to do we know who I am if you look at you although warmer climes right now that they see continue to sustain transmission in places like Iran and Australia suggesting that you the the the the the change in temperature may not be as important as other factors I think the concern around that Cecere braces simply that what we want to avoid is that second wave in concert with it I I I and uncontrolled influenza epidemic and so there are things that we can begin now to prevent influenza epidemic in the hole in terms of preparing people for the reality the everybody eats you got connected again hello you because it's a preventable disease and I think that's the message your CDC wants to outline when the when when they sat discussion points were what we shared earlier this weekend well the other thing messages that second way depends on our behavior on the nature of the virus how we prepare all that's right absolutely and I think yeah I think there are many things that we can begin now to prevent a second way the common public health done a phenomenal job of helping us prepare so that we we mitigate that potential second wife in terms of ensuring that we maintain such a different thing you know and and I'm preparing for a point where we're able to move beyond shelter in place and that means having rapid action the testing capability and being able to track every use case and reach every new contact of anybody suffering from my concern and the concern of many of us with the virus and a second wave is there were some serious precautions taken and a lot of work done in Singapore and South Korea came roaring back in both places and M. I. T. researcher said that early opening in China and Italy spell disaster with exponential explosion of infection so we're going to be very careful or walking a real tight rope here I couldn't agree more there is no there's no room for complacency I think here here and in the bay area we've done a great job of implementing robust public health interventions but we are certainly not out the woods and that we need to stay vigilant and and everybody needs all in terms of you know keeping your distance wearing a mosque you know staying in place but those kinds of things talking with doctor Michael me he's infectious disease specialist and assistant professor of medicine university California San Francisco so it could be in the fall we've got months really to get our act together here with testing we've got right now well according to at least a Harvard study about a hundred fifty thousand going on and we need five hundred thousand a day so we're not even close to where we are plus we I'm sorry so so great about this but lack of swabs reagents are needed for tests and control I mean contact tracing is needed to as you suggested so we're really behind the eight ball here I'm sorry to say our I I I mean I think I think that's fair I think we have a long ways to go when we compare where the U. S. is that compared to other countries and I think that reflects the political decisions are being made along the way and what what what what what priority funding I would say I think there's an opportunity to re frame these policies and recognize that to move beyond this moment that needs to be a massive investment in public health infrastructure you mentioned contact tracing I think temperatures get to public public health he's he's really needing in in this area right now they they're they're mobilizing a workforce of librarians folks from the city attorney's office medical students to do contact tracing across the city so that we have a work force an army of people that that already she she wanted to pay and and support contacts when they when they are at risk for developing code nineteen which which is essential if we are able to move beyond shelter in place in the context racing actually is a our we spent with experts talking and talking about where it's going to go and so forth it's in our because this is for listeners to know but let me ask you about the openings are going on I want to take a look at your service some new information about symptoms has come out of the CDC openings in Georgia Oklahoma Florida South Dakota Nebraska I mean this is the sort of thing with the president was talking about liberating we really have to ask ourselves what the harm can be there I mean we could be as somebody once said having a situation here that could be comparable to whack a mole Yummy could take a month before a new infection search appears and then states are opening up now will be playing that kind of a game loosening and tightening again and so forth your rate I mean I you know there are many precedents in history but the ones that are he talked that I think is worth reflecting back on is the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic right and unless some fairly robust evidence from that era that cities that aren't Lucinda session distancing policies will more likely to have second way and and and and had a you know a big desk told Associated Press policies whether that's the case now I I you know I hope that's not what what we will see but I think you know the the the economic argument opening cities out early has to be weighed against the you know the the the potential death toll of alcohol drug policies and I think again I here in California the seats are we taking a more cautious approach and I think we should be commended for that recognizing them the last of that that does place new and and and and commanders impacts on on many people yeah I'm with you there with a commendation for here in northern California just wondering though what you think about what's happening and unfurling in Sweden because Sweden pretty much allowed for non social distancing and there were more deaths there than any other neighboring Scandinavian countries Denmark Norway and and Finland yes the same time they're claiming maybe that they're moving toward herd immunity is that the use of sense of things I mean I I I think it you know what they are just so many unknowns around this virus that that I would be cautious about back kind of speculation first of all we we don't have a good sense of what I mean if you really looks like you know somebody is exposed recovers and and developed antibodies how long protection we don't know we don't have a clear sense of what proportion of the population needs to be infected in order to protect everybody else had immunity you know even in settings like Wuhan China where there was widespread transmission early on it's estimated that the the the proportion of the population that is that has any kind of antibodies is relatively low five to ten percent and so you know at that level that they sent me one I don't know and sweet and what what their what their estimates the problem solved but I would worry that on day two may be a long ways off having that kind of population level protection that they'll be hoping for and I I think you you know even thinking about her community and and and even recognizing that many people have relatively mild infections we are seeing across the country just devastation from this infection and so I think I would be very cautious about recommending that kind of wrong more liberal approach to you too I think you're right what what matters now is just what you touched on how much we don't know what I want to get into that but I want to give listeners an opportunity to ask questions we have Mike read with this infectious disease specialist and if you have questions for me to give up the second wave which is what we're really looking at here we do want to hear from you in here not only any questions you have that any thought you might have you give us a call now and invite you to do that toll free it's eight six six seven three three six seven eight six please feel free to join the program again the number for your calls toll free is eight six six seven three three six seven eight six or get in touch with us on Twitter and Facebook recommended for more email any questions or comments you might have to form a KQED dot org we do want to hear from you this is a half hour segments so if there's something on your mind something you want to bring into the conversation when the way of questions or comments please join us now there's a saying in in the realm of all that we don't know Mike reed we also have a vast majority who are infected with no symptoms or mild symptoms and now the CDC is officially said six symptoms as indicating novel coronavirus adding to fever cough and shortness of breath can you break that down for us yeah so I think that they're suggesting that if anybody who has chills writers body shakes with with chills muscle pain headache sore throat or loss of taste or smell which was previously an underappreciated gems and those folks should also be evaluated on this extends beyond that you know that the previous three symptoms that what will highlight your checks he got call from shortness of breath again I think it's just you know is an acknowledgement of the fact that we are understanding that there are broad exceptions to the people who present with and if we're really going to ask if we're really going to get a handle on this this epidemic we we have to recognize that those are presenting symptoms and wet testing is available they should be criteria for getting tested well it would do it in from from this this is what we tell people to maybe make them more cautious or more monitoring their own self diagnosis or when they feel they have to go get help I think if you're presenting with any of those symptoms that I think it's absolutely reasonable to recharge your primary care provider if you have one if your uninsured or underinsured and Aaron chapter discouraging after sophisticated public public health in asking for advice we are currently prioritising all of our testing capabilities for those that are at greatest risk but Adam when testing access increases and it is increasing every day then an inmate that that might be a scenario where we we would also recommend that an individual gets tested here in San Francisco you can go to S. S. A. dot gov and and and and and and and log your symptoms and then be referred for testing and the program and I think testing is part of the message the other thing though is that people get tested so that I can inform bad behavior so if you're not able to get it but you have those symptoms like office space you will be high that you'll you'll you'll you'll ailments could be related to cover nineteen next day off and then you you should take appropriate precautions recognizing that you could be infectious to somebody else and please stay home if you can prevent your keep yourself away from other vulnerable populations and and then dies frail and then found in close proximity to you except for the watcher here systems to the fourteen days after exposure correct that's right six six you're typically an individual who is exposed to somebody else suffering from cover nineteen will present with symptoms out about five days but that ranges between two and fourteen day so that's why we say this is west of clarifying this distinction between isolation and quarantine you here and then in that in the news a lot we also people that are suffering from CO that nineteen to isolate themselves at home if they can that really means minimizing contact with you not anybody else ready staying home I old times given your infectious risk and quarantine quarantine so those individuals in close proximity with an individual suffering from because the nineteen but do not have symptoms themselves and you may not have symptoms but if you are if you are harboring or EQ baking back inspection it may develop between two and fourteen days and so we are suggesting quarantine at home before Tuesday this is sort of the the standard recommendations that something's going to public public health is making to all contacts of individuals suffering from the nineteen let me bring some colors aboard we go first to Kathy in cinema Kathy joined us on air hi good morning thank you I'm calling as a clinical psychologist following much of this intersection reports on the virus in our county where it's very low our percentage of death is way less than point oh one percent our percentage of getting it is a little bit higher but not much anymore what genes that many counties are the emotional toll that this virus is taking on gold with her rising incidences of domestic violence child abuse mmhm and just emotional devastation addictions to alcohol consumption drug abuse you know it's it's outrageous and I'm wondering if you're considering any of that with the corn all county to quarantine yeah you're right yeah I I think about this all the time my wife is a psychiatrist and and she's she's managing patients that are you know are are are suffering from many of the the the the kinds of things are just describing I I think that that the the traumatic talk call of of Kobe nineties beyond the specific disease that it courses are a tremendous and I you know I think we we need to think beyond this pandemic waters what what will oppose pandemic recovery look like and I I think it's going to require a substantial amount of psychological support and therapy for all communities to keep on all members of our communities and as we look to to oppose vaccines moment I I think having that capabilities with enough that you can be crucial you're absolutely right yeah I think Kathy for the call when I get another call around that's great read from Oakland good morning you're on the air.

UCSF
'Why We Swim' Looks For Answers In People And Places Across The Globe

Environment: NPR

05:21 min | 1 year ago

'Why We Swim' Looks For Answers In People And Places Across The Globe

"And humans came from. Dust says ECCLESIASTES DIS but Bonnie Sui us that humankind also wants sprang from end still seeks. Water why we swim is her latest book which Texas from Ponds Pools to surfers racers and a few who have survived icy currents Bonnie Soy who writes frequently for the New York Times in California Sunday magazine. Join just for more home in Berkeley California. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks so much for having me Scott. You begin with an amazing story about a man whose name I will not chance to even try and say March Eleven nineteen eighty-four what happened on this planet. Good Liquor Thorson. He's an Icelandic fishermen and fishing trawler with his crew. It's calm waters it's cold it's forty one degrees and the boat overturns with forty one degree water within twenty to thirty minutes we die from hypothermia but he did not everyone else did and he ended up swimming six hours and when he finally got to the hospital the doctors weren't able to discern his heartbeat or read his temperature on the thermometer but he didn't show any signs of hypothermia and he was only a little bit dehydrated. He was a strong swimmer certainly but was he also saved by his own biology. He was like the story very much. Because it is this the distillation of what makes swimming so special for humans. We have to learn how to swim. we're not born knowing how to do it instinctively and yet there are sort of traces of that evolutionary past still within us that our evolutionary past that came from the sea and so with good liquor for. Thorson turns out that his body fat was two to three times normal human thickness and more solid and so he resembled a Marine Mammal. More than terrestrial mammal. And that saved him. Did you grow up feeling? Pull into the even. If it was only Jones Beach in New York I did. I mean my family origin story is at my parents met no swimming pool in Hong Kong. We grew up with swimming family and so we grew up at Jones beach in the pool. Lifeguards swim team. I just always remember feeling more comfortable and happy in the water actually than on land. I mean there's just a sense of magic that you get from being in the water and buoyancy that you just don't have on land you in this book talk to swimmers all over the world right nearby you though you you swim San Francisco Bay without a wet suit and there are people including I gather you who believe that's actually good for you in all ways it can be. I mean I have also talked to scientists and researchers who say cardiovascular risk. Don't go into sudden shock cold water because it could stop your heart that aside a wr decided there are benefits to cold water immersion. And there's been quite a bit of research in recent years where your dopamine levels go up in your over time that your cardiovascular system is strengthened and you know there are people there are things that we knew from across cultures around the world that there was a water cure there. Was you know jumping in cold? Water was good for you and jumping in hot water and then jumping into cold water and so we didn't know why exactly in the science kinda starting to catch up. What is this Brown fat you talk about in this book. Well this was really interesting. I did not know about Brown fat until I started swimming with a Dolphin Club swimmers in San Francisco Bay and so I went to ucsf to talk to the foremost researchers in Brown fat and it turns out that mammals are born with two kinds of white fat which we all know about the energy stores of our bodies and Brown fat which actually Burns and produces heat energy. We kind of start to lose it as we get older but there are ways to do what's called the Browning of white fat which is to kind of turn it into energy burning tissue. That fat is called Beige Fat. And so what? Kind of encourages. The development of beige fat is cold water exposure and exercise among other things. But those have been proven to be causing this change in our bodies. Wonder if you have any words for people who aren't able to swim these days you know. The water is a draw for us no matter what and so even if you can't get in the water if you can walk near it can look at. It can see it can You know have some what a wall Nichols calls domestic waters in your house and you know. Take about the shower. Just look at imagery watches surf movie. I mean those things. Make a difference for our souls and our the way our bodies and brains work. Click we respond to those set points in the environment and even if we can't get in the waters right now you know the ocean will be waiting for us. The pools we waiting for us on the other side of this Bonnie Choi. Her book why we swim she in the Water

Thorson Bonnie Sui San Francisco Bay Jones Beach Berkeley California Bonnie Soy Bonnie Choi Ponds Pools New York Times Hypothermia Texas Hong Kong Scott Dopamine Brown California Sunday Magazine New York Nichols Ucsf
San Francisco ramping up effort to track every COVID-19 case and contact

Pacifica Evening News

04:17 min | 1 year ago

San Francisco ramping up effort to track every COVID-19 case and contact

"San Francisco city officials are taking measures to repair this city for a win coronavirus restrictions are lifted including a new program for testing and contact tracking but the city is also facing criticism for their handling of the homeless population during the crisis K. because the woman is reports city officials in the new program for contact tracing will identify people who might have come into contact with an infected person the program is a partnership between the department of public health UCSF and the software company DiMaggio director of the department of public health grant Colfax is this program will be essential when the ultimately left the shelter in place orders and moved to a new phase of fighting the pandemic San Francisco's innovative new program will engage with individuals who test positive for covered nineteen to identify their recent close contacts specially trained outreach workers will then follow up remotely by phone or text with any individuals who may have been in contact with the covert positive patient these conversations will be voluntary confidential and culturally and linguistically appropriate city officials also gave an update on plans for housing vulnerable homeless people in hotel rooms the city is focusing on those who are coping nineteen positive or under investigation for having the virus those over sixty and we have underlying health conditions they now have placed a hundred and seventy four individuals in hotel rooms for homeless individuals that don't belong in these categories they plan to continue to reinforce social distancing and hygiene protocols in homeless shelters but San Francisco supervisors disagree with the city's response the unanimously approved an ordinance on Tuesday directing the mayor to procure eight thousand two hundred and fifty hotel rooms for homeless people and first responders night April twenty sixth the move follows a corona virus outbreak at a shelter the infected ninety two homeless people intend shelter staff in what's being called the largest homeless corona virus outbreak in the country supervisors say they've been warning for weeks that shelters would be a breeding ground for cove in nineteen and the mayor's office was moving too slowly making an outbreak unavoidable your supervisor Hillary Ronen saving lives matters more we can rebuild our economy over time but stating lives means more we have simply not done that pretty and house population we have not gone all out we have not used those rooms than there has not used her power to commandeer which is now a public memo from the city attorney's office giving her that power we have not needed a fiscal priority that we want to save those lives just as much as we want to save our own and it's time to make that clear statement not with the resolution like we did last week but with the binding law Maryland every double down her response arguing it is not that easy to put that many homeless individuals and hotel rooms giving that many deal with mental illness and substance issues and needs for cevik resources it's not easy and if it were that easy we would have done it a long time ago and other major cities in this country would have done the same thing we are we have moved faster and further along than almost any other major city in the country as a relates to housing are on house population over seven hundred people have been house out of our shelters and counting so I'm really proud of the work that they continue to do what I like to do more yes I'd like to do more what I like to open up eight thousand nine thousand ten thousand hotel rooms of course who wouldn't but that is not the reality of what we as a city can do the mayor's administration have been working to obtain a total of seven thousand hotel rooms the ordinance ups the ante it says seven thousand rooms should be allocated for homeless people five hundred rooms for discharged hospital patients who have no place else to quarantine and seven hundred and fifty for frontline workers who can't commute large distances or who fear infecting their

San Francisco
Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

On The Media

06:54 min | 1 year ago

Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

"President trump who's told states to fend for themselves has had female blocking orders for vital equipment secured by governors some of them anyway so the government can buy them instead this week FEMA see is that in order for five hundred ventilators from a private company obtained by democratic Colorado governor Jared Paul is only to have trump give back a hundred of them at what he called the request of the state's endangered Republican senator Cory Gardner Thursday's Denver post editorial declared trump is playing a disgusting political game with our lives but the trump administration says it's got a plan and that it's working White House adviser Peter Navarro April second these guys up here doing a heck of a job organizing the supply chain well I think that's news to a lot of medical providers no I'm levy is a national health care reporter for the LA times trying to follow the cultic nineteen supply chain I can't say I've talked to many hospitals or doctors offices or clinics around the country who feel that the supply chain is being managed in anything close to a rational way that's for sure and we can't seem to get answers from FEMA or the White House about what system if any is being used to balance the needs a couple weeks ago I was speaking with the head of the Texas academy of family physicians who working with the golfing buddy of his managed to in about a half million masks over the border from Mexico and then spent about seventy two hours getting them to rural hospitals and doctors offices around Texas because the state of Texas didn't have anything to distribute so you've got the system in which everybody's running around trying to get masks and ventilators and everything else and then on top of that is a totally opaque system of what appears to be haphazard intervention by the federal government on some supplies but not all of them everyone is completely perplexed we hear that trump is having no problem directing to Florida whatever Florida seems to need so zero which is the agency that is allegedly responsible for distributing supplies from the strategic national stockpile has claimed that they have some formula for distributing medical supplies that reflects states in large metro areas relative populations and the relative severity of corona virus outbreaks they are actually shipping things across the country however it's impossible to find out what that formula is whether or not allowances are being made in one way or another four criteria that have not been identified president trump hasn't been shy about claiming that he's willing to reward its friends and punish his enemies the conspiracy minded person might think well is there some nefarious methods to how these supplies are getting distributed or not we just don't know what difference does it really make if we know or we don't know what the formula is for distributing this stuff this is taxpayer money that we're talking about private actors in the market of course don't have an obligation to be transparent about what they're doing because there's no expectation under normal circumstances that they're acting in the public interest we hope that the government is acting in the public interest but without transparency who knows who's accountable for this who's in charge is it rear admiral John Paul love check who's at the head of FEMA's coronavirus supply chain task force is it FEMA director Peter Gaynor is it Peter Navarro who is reportedly coordinating private and public sector communication maybe it's the Jared Kushner or the invisible hand isn't really fundamentally the president and no one else you know without clear lines of authority things are not getting done as far as we know in a particularly efficient way nor do we know that however they're being done is being done in a lawful way frankly if for example the president's son in law is dialing up private companies and asking them to give support in one way or another to the supply chain challenges what assurances are being made to those companies about what they can expect I'm talking about promises that are made the company acts that if they help out that they'll be made whole in the end with they'll be reimbursed at a certain level without a process all of that is open to question is there a way to have an informed data driven approach to this as Jared Kushner said the federal government was engaged in if in fact the federal government isn't engaged in an informed data driven approach can big business small business health officials state officials do this on their own so the facts on the ground suggests that this can't happen on its own no that's not to say that there aren't a lot of efforts by individual actors some of them quite influential to play a constructive role I mean we've seen a number of large companies including apple for example say we are going to use our connections to the supply chain to procurer masks and we're going to distribute them the owner of the New England Patriots flew the patriots plane to China to go pick up a shipment of masks and flew back to Boston the problem is when you have this sort of thousand points of light approach to procuring and distributing needed supplies what ends up happening is that well connected medical centers that have relationships with large companies either because they do business with them or because they're located in their backyards are often times at the top of the list so for example sales force made a donation to the university California San Francisco Medical Center because they have a long standing relationship both being based in San Francisco does UCSF knew that equipment more than a hospital in New York City or New Jersey that's a lot to ask of sales force to try to make that determination they don't have any expertise in

Fema President Trump
Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

On the Media

06:54 min | 1 year ago

Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

"President trump who's told states to fend for themselves has had female blocking orders for vital equipment secured by governors some of them anyway so the government can buy them instead this week FEMA see is that in order for five hundred ventilators from a private company obtained by democratic Colorado governor Jared Paul is only to have trump give back a hundred of them at what he called the request of the state's endangered Republican senator Cory Gardner Thursday's Denver post editorial declared trump is playing a disgusting political game with our lives but the trump administration says it's got a plan and that it's working White House adviser Peter Navarro April second these guys up here doing a heck of a job organizing the supply chain well I think that's news to a lot of medical providers no I'm levy is a national health care reporter for the LA times trying to follow the cold pick nineteen supply chain I can't say I've talked to many hospitals or doctors offices or clinics around the country who feel that the supply chain is being managed in anything close to a rational way that's for sure and we can't seem to get answers from FEMA or the White House about what system if any is being used to balance the needs a couple weeks ago I was speaking with the head of the Texas academy of family physicians who working with the golfing buddy of his managed to in about a half million masks over the border from Mexico and then spent about seventy two hours getting them to rural hospitals and doctors offices around Texas because the state of Texas didn't have anything to distribute so you've got the system in which everybody's running around trying to get masks and ventilators and everything else and then on top of that is a totally opaque system of what appears to be haphazard intervention by the federal government on some supplies but not all of them everyone is completely perplexed we hear that trump is having no problem directing to Florida whatever Florida seems to need so zero which is the agency that is allegedly responsible for distributing supplies from the strategic national stockpile has claimed that they have some formula for distributing medical supplies that reflects states in large metro areas relative populations and the relative severity of corona virus outbreaks they are actually shipping things across the country however it's impossible to find out what that formula is whether or not allowances are being made in one way or another four criteria that have not been identified president trump hasn't been shy about claiming that he's willing to reward its friends and punish his enemies the conspiracy minded person might think well is there some nefarious method to how these supplies are getting distributed or not we just don't know what difference does it really make if we know or we don't know what the formula is for distributing this stuff this is taxpayer money that we're talking about private actors in the market of course don't have an obligation to be transparent about what they're doing because there's no expectation under normal circumstances that they're acting in the public interest we hope that the government is acting in the public interest but without transparency who knows who's accountable for this who's in charge is it rear admiral John Paul love check who's at the head of FEMA's coronavirus supply chain task force is it FEMA director Peter Gaynor is it Peter Navarro who is reportedly coordinating private and public sector communication maybe it's the Jared Kushner or the invisible hand is it really fundamentally the president and no one else you know without clear lines of authority things are not getting done as far as we know in a particularly efficient way nor do we know that however they're being done is being done in a lawful way frankly if for example the president's son in law is dialing up private companies and asking them to give support in one way or another to the supply chain challenges what assurances are being made to those companies about what they can expect I'm talking about promises that are made the company acts that if they help out that they'll be made whole in the end with they'll be reimbursed at a certain level without a process all of that is open to question is there a way to have an informed data driven approach to this as Jared Kushner said the federal government was engaged in if in fact the federal government isn't engaged in an informed data driven approach can big business small business health officials state officials do this on their own so the facts on the ground suggests that this can't happen on its own no that's not to say that there aren't a lot of efforts by individual actors some of them quite influential to play a constructive role I mean we've seen a number of large companies including apple for example say we are going to use our connections to the supply chain to procurer masks and we're going to distribute them the owner of the New England Patriots flew the patriots plane to China to go pick up a shipment of masks and flew back to Boston the problem is when you have this sort of thousand points of light approach to procuring and distributing needed supplies what ends up happening is that well connected medical centers that have relationships with large companies either because they do business with them or because they're located in their backyards are often times at the top of the list so for example sales force made a donation to the university California San Francisco Medical Center because they have a long standing relationship both being based in San Francisco does UCSF knew that equipment more than a hospital in New York City or New Jersey that's a lot to ask of sales force to try to make that determination they don't have any expertise in

Fema President Trump
Codependency and the Nervous System, and Managing Stress in a Pandemic with Victoria Albina

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

07:05 min | 1 year ago

Codependency and the Nervous System, and Managing Stress in a Pandemic with Victoria Albina

"Love to get started by talking about your story. So you talk about how you coach. Women raised by people who are codependent or alcoholic or both to stop being anxious exhausted and overwhelmed so you can cultivate better relationships with yourselves with other people and then also you have this other like cool section of your work. Were this intersection of like you. Also help people here. They're adrenals and justify issues with functional medicine. So how did you get to that place? Yeah so my story starts like so many of the stories of the folks who do the work. We do With a lot of sickness so I grew up with wake. Bowel Syndrome heartburn. So bad I couldn't sleep lying down for years and I really. I was very very sick. All of that led to my adrenals. Doing what adrenals should do when you're so sick which is just kind of giving up the ghost a little bit you know and it was really really really challenging to find help. I went to a hundred thousand different. Doctors had every test imaginable including like swallowing radioactive liquids. And getting all these extra. It was bananas and the Best Advice I ever got was good luck right like pretty much. There's nothing we can do for you in Western medicine and you're on your own Kitto and that didn't Jive for my super science-based nerdy self right. I knew that another way was possible and I realized I had to find it on my own so I started started studying herbs. I started studying supplements holistic medicine. Public Health I eventually went to. Ucsf the University of California San Francisco and became a nurse Practitioner I really wanted to understand the science behind it all and why couldn't stop having these terrible symptoms and through that work. I started practicing medicine. I worked in primary care for years and I realized that again the drug based one pill one ill western system couldn't help with the deeper underlying stuff and so my science brain said well more advanced. Testing is the way to go so. I trained in that I stayed with Chris Presser. I learned how to do all the advanced functional medicine route. 'cause work all of that helped me and helped my patients to heal things like small intestine. Bacterial overgrowth CBO library. Which is the same thing in the large intestine and I would get better and it symptoms would relapse and then I'd get better and I'd take a fistful more supplements and symptoms would relapse and what I came to understand. Over the last decade was that while the physiology is incredibly important. Right I had parasites. I beg overgrowth. They needed to be dealt with appropriately. Murdered I couldn't get back into real health really feeling well until I learned to attend my nervous system. Because the autonomic nervous system is the thing that rules Gosh everything are digestion are thyroid. Our Dreams are hormone balance and by not looking at my trauma my own co-dependency my own struggles with self doubt perfectionism et CETERA. I was in fact keeping myself ill without realizing it right because I was stuck in all these coping strategies which were gifts when I was a kid but as an adult no longer served me so I recognize that I needed to bring all this work deeply into my practice. I trained as a life coach with a life coach school I trained in somatic modalities and here. I am helping. Women folks assigned female at birth when folks who identify as women to shake free from codependency and all those old patterns that keep our physiology stock so we can heal in deep ways. It's so amazing. And so interesting too. Because I feel there aren't enough. People that are talking about the interconnectedness between between our psychology and physiology right and especially in the nutrition and the functional medicine world. We tend to blame everything on food or we tend to say unfortunately a lot of what's tended to happen not necessarily by experienced practitioners. But let's say influencers out there is like oh you have this condition like let's slap this food on it or like let's slap this supplement on it and then it'll fix everything just remove this one food and then it'll fix everything and like you mentioned you can do all the testing you can do all the elimination diets. You can do all the work and stuff that you would assume but then your symptoms kept coming back and it was because of this psychological side that you finally realize absolutely yeah and the deep ways like you said that psyche and Soma are one your mind and body are one and your spirit is a huge part of this as well spirit soul whatever word you use your vital life force energy needs to be. Gosh in your consciousness right. Yeah and I think. We're getting a big wakeup call right now to attend to ourselves in all of these ways. Yeah definitely and we so. If you're listening to this now we're going to be talking about the how to manage the stress response that we're all experiencing due to. Cova a little bit later. But first I want to talk about a word that you had mentioned and I had mentioned but I haven't actually dove into on the podcast yet so I'd love if you could talk a little bit more about codependency and what that is. Yeah so codependency is when you chronically. Put yourself last in order to gain the love. Validation Acceptance Care approve all of other people so any put other people's thoughts feelings actions wellness ahead of your own because somewhere deep inside. You believe that this will make you worthy of love. It will make you a valid person and usually one has been doing this since childhood and so it becomes a part of your identity right. Oh I'm just a caretaker. Oh I just I love doing things for others which to be clear. There's nothing wrong with taking care of other people. I just want to support folks in taking care of themselves. I I believe in the power of collective healing I believe in the power of Inter dependence. But that doesn't mean putting yourself last.

Bowel Syndrome Kitto Chris Presser Ucsf CBO San Francisco University Of California Cova
"ucsf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We've been also seeing supply dries at universities one one that I spoke to at UCSF for instance rounded up all of the gloves and the masks and supplies they've been using in the lab and because of the shutdown they were no longer in the lab and they told me that those to hospitals what about the high numbers of asymptomatic people we're just a few here into this as you see yeah the high numbers of a symptomatic people really reinforced the importance of staying home because if even if you don't have symptoms it means you could still spread the virus to people and that's why it is so important for everybody who can stay home to stay home it also reinforces recent guidance to wear masks not just to protect yourself but especially to protect others because it's possible that even if you don't think your sack that you could spread infected infectious droplets just by speaking closely with someone for instance so the the the a symptomatic spread of the virus is is important and it's important to stop that spread by staying home we tell you Rachel Becker of calmatters again a lot of emails here let's get to as many as we can Blake writes please ask Rachel to discuss whether widespread serology testing might enable those with immunity to go back out in public and also this racial believe any communities in the United States will achieve population level immunity before a vaccine is approved D. at the question of returning to work with immunity to you code nineteen is is such an important question and the fact of the matter is that we just don't know we really don't know at this point do we we really don't we well the the thing is is that but studies from sars indicate that antibodies could last you know between two and three years studies of corona viruses that cause more common cold showed antibodies can last about a year but folks can be re infected and so they're folks who had antibodies it was a study in the nineteen nineties as a result interesting study basically researchers infected for fifteen volunteers and then had them come back a year later and be re exposed to the virus and they were two thirds of them were re infected even if they had developed infections in the first place but their subsequent infections were milder so it's possible I mean in the short term it's suggestive that antibodies may be protective but we just don't know how long that antibody response last how protective it is over the long term and really how protective it is over the short term and there was a study out of Munich nine patients were all exposed to that who are all impacted by the same individual and even after they developed antibodies the viral the viral load that the levels of the virus in their spit in their saliva and in their mucus that they were coughing up it didn't decline immediately if it declines slowly and steadily over time which means an antibodies aren't a magic bullet and so I think there's going to really need to be you know more research and a lot of caution before saying like it's before allowing people to to put themselves at risk quick question because we got seconds left here Ruth wants to know this is a concern that even with more testing the numbers mean nothing I have a friend who had two nasal swab tests both came back negative but after he had after that he had to be intubated they took a bronchial swab they came back positive so one of these numbers really mean if it took three testify call the nineteen is that mean the numbers showed one case out of three tests yeah I'm so sorry to hear about your friends and eight eight it does mean that it's hard to really interpret the numbers right now you know as we talked about earlier there is potential for false negative it could have to do with you know where in the respiratory system the virus is hanging out in a given person could have to do with sampling.

UCSF
Coronavirus and homeless senior citizens: Why they're especially at risk

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus and homeless senior citizens: Why they're especially at risk

"Are concerns that the new coronavirus could sweep through homeless communities and experts are worried about one of the fastest growing segments of the community senior citizens K. two D. Sir Husseini reports about half of those on the streets are fifty or older Dr Margot Kushel conducted landmark research on the group at UCSF she says most are prematurely sick and frail we often say that we should think of them more like people in their seventies or eighties because of their underlying health concerns and this is exactly the group of people who we really worry about with corona virus covert nineteen hasn't swept through homeless communities but experts like shell are bracing for that possibility I mean in some ways we have two intersecting crises the ongoing humanitarian crisis of homelessness intersecting with this new coronavirus shell says while affordable housing is a big part of the solution emergency measures like hand washing stations and temporary shelter for homeless folks who must warn teen help for now

Sir Husseini Dr Margot Kushel
Trump briefs the nation on how his administration is tackling the threat of a coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. but health care workers don't feel prepared

All Things Considered

03:17 min | 1 year ago

Trump briefs the nation on how his administration is tackling the threat of a coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. but health care workers don't feel prepared

"Tonight president trump briefed the nation on how his administration is tackling the threat of a corona virus outbreak with screening people we have been at a very high level screening people coming into the country from infected areas we have been quarantined those infected and those at risk now the centers for disease control and prevention says there are now sixty cases of the corona virus in the U. S. and the US healthcare system is bracing for more but some health care workers here say they don't feel prepared NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports so far coronavirus cases in this country have been isolated but this week the center for disease control warned communities to prepare for an outbreak that worries marine Dugan she's a veteran nurse at the university of California San Francisco Medical Center this month to corona virus patients were transferred there UCSF is one of the premier hospitals in the country but do can says her frustrations are mounting because she says her employer offered little notice or training to those caring for the infected patients you want to do that we work extremely hard to do the best for our patients so don't so the thought the sale was not only nurses if all the other staff it's a nursing assistant it's transport every staff member is worried coronavirus has yet to sink in American health care workers as it has in China the deaths of hospital workers there have heightened scrutiny of the US healthcare system's ability to protect people on the front line do then says the medical community it wasn't fully prepared for previous viruses like sars and Ebola and she's concerned lessons learned are not being applied today for example the medical where provided she says leave their necks exposed to guarantee or providing are in adequate I'm sorry I get very passionate about this because we work so hard to make sure that our our nurses were protected and therefore they can protect the public in a response UCSF said it's taken multiple extensive safety precautions including isolating sick patients and training for proper use of safety gear it said it brief workers treating the patients but the hospital does not as a matter of course inform general staff of incoming infection cases thus far hospitals in the U. S. have been able to plan for incoming patients that's very different from an outbreak we're sick people come in off the street that is far more dangerous for health care workers and the public they treat mark Robb is chief of infectious disease at the university of Nebraska it's the arm recognize case that comes through your hospital system or your clinics that really pose the greatest risk what sauce that'll is considered a model for managing infections it's pioneering Medical Center is one of the few with experience treating a bola it has an isolation chamber that filters pathogens it practices dry runs making sure respiration masks that workers most critically he says it screens patients at the hospital entrance right at the front door we sequester people away from the rest of the traffic that's one of the biggest hazards he says a coughing patient can quickly infect medical staff and other patients waiting in emergency rooms and doctors offices

Donald Trump President Trump
"ucsf" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Your institute Stanford Eric here institute Mayo Clinic UCSF UCLA and lectured at the doctor lecture to add house here told me look me in the eye and said you know what the proper diagnosis for what you have is I said no he says we don't know okay I'm just but but the good news is it can it can reverse it so I can quit as quickly as it comes up on the upon you so I'm hoping for that I'm open for stabilization and find a way to sing again yeah we've seen Phil Collins went through that I was well I don't know what his situation was but he went through that Ryan Johnson from AC DC the I think it looks like Brian real well of commiserate with him okay looks like we got something out worst case and Brian unfortunately worst case in him okay yeah but but he's a great guy and we we both have been helped by Stephen Ambrose who's a if you're a guy and so on so yeah it's so small it's a small little world of us we're hearing impaired there's David pack from the ambrosia keyboard player was a wonderful piano players he's been very supportive and here's what I have in one ear I have an unfortunate in both ears and I even got a note from B. towns and so it's a small world you know those of us with hearing loss is it isn't ringing like tennis or is it different I have to do this all the time but my team this is not a high pitched in and it's a low bridge roar what I what happens with me is below fifteen hundred cycles on my left side is falls off a cliff will make earrings bad and that that causes for distortion or they call it residence but it's distortion so instead of hearing a bass part might be bom bom bom bom I hear hi well it makes it really hard to listen to a to find and music impossible was well how unbelievable yet for a guy like you the so talented you've been taking your whole life in that that's that's your gifts it is is a tough deal but you know importantly Rick I have to remind myself that I'm still a lucky guy there's lots of people much worse off than I am and and you know I've still been lots of things to be grateful for it's there and that I am still as they say a lucky guy it's not easy sometimes but I think it's important to remember that he we Lewis he was Lewis and the news a new album the weather is out right now on BMG of first new recording of original music almost twenty years so you recorded this before the hearing issue right okay all along the way you know been compiling for the the last sort of fifteen years we write a song recorded but in the cat and said Hey you know we're not a very prolific bunch obviously but it's also hard to write you know it is ripe old age was music that means something and Jay you can read about cars and girls anymore so we got a you know you got to write about things that means something to yourself so that the songs are the important thing and you're just gonna have to wait for them to cut to show up we'll check it out well you know you've you've got fans all over the world people love you and you've done just about everything you could possibly doing the business you've accomplished everything I I hope you're hearing comes back for you for your sake you're still young and then hopefully got a a lot of great work ahead of you we have a mutual friend Chris Dorsey here in Denver and and he's the one that helped us up and I appreciate that all right I love Chris he's a great guy yeah he's a great dude thanks for your bed thank you seven Rick that's very sweet I get a much appreciated again he will you know been in radio my whole life you'll have an headphones on every day and I also played drums in a band and I've got to do this myself so I I totally understand you do have a high pitch I have the high pitched yes that's really the main worry about that that's that'll go away it's not in your ears incidents mental it's in your brain and you'll learn you'll learn to ignore it and it'll go away I'm pretty good at ignored and I don't focus on it you know use white noise when I sleep at night that type of thing but right right right I totally get the hearing thing I feel bad for your man because your whole thing is thing and you know and and I I hope you get it back man I'll I'll be praying for you and then I thank you for coming on the show hope to meet you again sometime thanks Rick interesting interview yeah yeah why what are the chances I feel bad for him man so I mean who wouldn't do you're you're here of a big rock star singer and now you can't saying you can't do what you love you can't that's your gift that's the gift you were born with you can't do it anymore yep although he has made a lot of money sold a lot of records I mean he's had a a a heck of a run I I guess you could say use the whole runway but then all of a sudden is taken away from me the about it but I think when you get to the end of the runway for guys want to continue working with you it's if you're not satisfied even though it is true and accurate that they've used all the runway thinking like wait a minute I want to get the four Wheeler and get off the roadway I still got songs to do here off road yeah right off runway he's sixty nine years old but he could still be out there touring which is a heck of a lot of fun then you can make a heck of a lot of money doing it and that that was taken away from them for now he's opening comes back yep yeah absolutely we're open Mike Rosen comes back never mind was here here Mike will be in for Mady Connell today so you you don't want to miss that that is going to do for our show we thank dragon red building millennial grant for Rick Lewis and Kathy Lee I'm Dave Logan stay to news is next Mike rose around the corner we'll see tomorrow nine AM on K. away Hey what's up big Ella judge.

Mayo Clinic UCSF UCLA
Carole Joffe: Author of "Obstacle Course: The Everyday Struggle to Get an Abortion in America"

The Electorette Podcast

09:45 min | 1 year ago

Carole Joffe: Author of "Obstacle Course: The Everyday Struggle to Get an Abortion in America"

"I'm Jim Taylor. Skinner in this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with professor reproductive. Rights Advocate Carol. Joffe about her new book. Obstacle course the everyday struggle to get an abortion in America. We opened our conversation by discussing. How legislation has failed to protect access to abortion because it overlooks the everyday obstacles. That make it nearly impossible from any women to obtain an abortion legislatively. I confess to being very cynical. I seriously I don't think that even I mean. Look the country's deeply deeply divided about abortion those who are pro choice. See these restrictions as inhibiting often in a very cruel way women's ability to get an abortion. Those who are against abortion say. Yeah that's the point. We we are putting these things in precisely so we don't believe in abortion so therefore These restrictions are good because they make it harder to get an abortion. They they make it easier to close down clinics so all is to say that. I'm I mean in terms of the legislative process I don't think that anything we say in our book will sway. Those who who are opposed to abortion could put an antiabortion restrictions. What my co author David Cone and I are hoping is that those who are pro-choice but do not do abortion work or study or advocacy twenty four seven like many of the People. We discuss in our book. will come to understand how onerous restrictions are and hopefully will will move to remove those legislators out of office so who who are doing this as people who are pro choice when. I look for someone to vote into office right just to put. It simply feels like this people when they speak to us and you know. They're saying vote for me when they talk about abortion they talk about Roe v Wade and it doesn't spread from there they don't really talk about all of the little restrictions that have gone into place which makes exercising your right to an abortion nearly impossible for a lot of women. I mean legislatively one of the things that you point out in the book is that you know Central v Wade past have been about what to- hundred restrictions by now probably probably more like thirteen hundred? Yeah I feel like none of our politicians are really focusing on those. Are you know they have a blind spot? They're only looking at Roe v Wade. We have the protective weighed. Yes no if certainly make sense and and You know what I would say in response to that is of course. It's important to protect Roe. V Wade and there's a lot to be very nervous about at this very moment about row but what researching and writing this book show to me. Is that many women already live in post real world. In other words if roe is overturned what presumably will happen is it will be turned back to the states. That means they'll be a lot of traveling from what we now. Call hostile states to quote haven states. But that's already happening. I mean one thing that really surprised me and I've studied abortion more than thirty five years. one thing. That really surprised me was just extent of the travel of efforts at took to just get to a clinic for so many women. The really important thing about your book when I was reading it. You outline the stories of a lot of women. I think the first person you highlight is a fifteen year old teenager right and her parents were kind of in and out of the picture. And when you think about the fact that in some states you have to have parental consent right and you think about the thousands of dollars at it takes to get an abortion and this particular person ended up in one of those e call fake clinic. What do they call them? A clinic crisis pregnancy center. You just talk us through that scenario of what that might have been like for her fifteen year old teenager while she was a extrordinary. We did not interview her personally. We we found her story she had written it up So I can't speak to her personally but she. She had extraordinary. Extraordinarily determination was like for her to go to the center. She lives in the state where she had to make a separate trip to the clinic. Twenty four hours before the abortion. She got to the clinic. She realized something was wrong. It was a fake clinic. These crisis pregnancy centers and there's thousands of them there. There are more crisis. Pregnancy centers in the United States. Now than there are abortion providing facilities and in a number of states. They get they get public funding. You know one of the most of the many things in this world to be enraged about one of the most enraging things is for example in the state of Texas. Money is taken away from family planning centres not even abortion. I mean you may be sure does not give money to abortion clinics but to family planning programs contraceptive programs and gives them to these religiously sponsored crisis pregnancy centers that outright. Lie To women they either tell them they're ultrasound is so far along that Can't pass get an abortion? Or sometimes they tell them they're ultrasound shows actually earlier stage in pregnancy than they actually are so these women won't rush and by the time they get to a clinic They'll be too late. Another feature of them is that they have been very aggressive about buying property. Is nearest possible to legitimate abortion facilities and it's often very very confusing to patients. I mean this this case that we talked about in the book we call her Collier. It's very common especially for example in in a case that we do discuss the park crisis. Pregnancy center had a parking lot right next to a clinic. People from the fake clinic would stand outside would wave women in who of course stopped that they were being waived into the real clinic. So yeah this is one of many many problems that women face when they try to get an abortion. When I read this story I I. It was just incredible to me. I was so angry. And just the Paul the links go to to to to lie to women and you know into teenagers who are going through something. That's really really hard. So and in that case with Talia this clinic you can remind me or tell me if I'm correct or not. This clinic was right next door very close to it and it looked very much like the real clinic and the name was very similar. That's right and when you go into these places they're they're you know they're wearing lab coats and make you think that their doctors that's right and just it's just unfathomable to me the link to go through none of the I think you hit the right word on the head. It's unfathomable that these fake clinics Goto but it also Jennifer I would also say it's unfathomable the lengths women not just teenagers but women in general have to go through to get their abortions and they do. Yeah they do right. That gets to one of my next questions do we do. We have any data on. The percentage is the percentage of cases where obstacles collectively were. They've been successful right in a woman knocking abortion we done. That's a great question. We don't have good data on specifically women who were dissuaded or allied to at a crisis pregnancy center. My colleagues here at UCSF in the answer program have come up with a estimate that about four thousand women a year Who Show up at clinics are turned away because they arrived too late in in just station. Your listeners should understand that all abortion facilities are not uniform some go only through the first trimester of pregnancy some go to eighteen weeks Some states a number of states have banned abortions after twenty weeks there's only three or four clinics and the United States that will perform abortions after twenty four weeks and that's usually for Fetal anomalies or the woman herself is is very ill. I mean those are not the only people who get abortions there. But that's the bulk of the cases so It's a very cruel vicious cycle Europe. Poor woman you find out you're pregnant you try you look around you. Try to find a clinic. You make an appointment you try to find someone who will drive you there. You try to arrange childcare for your children. Sixty percent of abortion patients are our parents You arrange to take time off from work so all you have to put all these things into place. What we found out is simply getting a getting a reliable ride to a clinic if you don't have your own car or even if you do some clinics a use sedation which means you are not able to drive yourself home afterwards. Anyway but the time you get all these pieces in place and you show up to the clinic you may be past that clinics limit

ROE Wade United States Professor America Jim Taylor Skinner Joffe Ucsf David Cone Texas Collier Talia Jennifer I Paul
How Teladoc Health Approaches Clinical Quality, Meets Hospital Virtual Care Needs

The Voice of Healthcare

11:30 min | 1 year ago

How Teladoc Health Approaches Clinical Quality, Meets Hospital Virtual Care Needs

"So recently I came across an article On Talladega with the title. What's not to love about being in virtual healthcare? Maybe you can comment a little bit about the experience that you hope to create for patients as well as what safety and quality measurements. Do you as a clinician hoped to focus on through tele doc solution so I do believe that just like ten or twenty years ago when folks began exploring what it meant to be Devoting one's career to hospital medicine and we had that growing growing definition of the hospitalised. Actually the physician that coined that phrase Dr Bob Wachter WHO's the current chair? Uh of the Department of Medicine that. UCSF recently joined our medical advisory board. But I do believe that There will be in the years ahead. A growing field of medicine known as virtual care and that we will have virtual lists and virtual lists will have outstanding upstanding website manner if you will that ability to connect with patients and a highly personal way and then be able to offer that that individual a whole range of services. meaning that if that person for instance needs an expert medical opinion that virtuous can achieve that or if they need a type of referral to some type of specific expertise again the virtuous can care for that individual increasingly from our clients were getting Strong interest in virtual primary care. You're so this is an area that we believe is very ripe for development right now So no longer. Does it mean that your interaction with your virtual doctor is that episodic interaction but increasingly I do believe that there's a number of individuals who have a variety of chronic conditions diabetes hypercholesterolemia hypertension that really lend themselves into a longitudinal relationship with a clinical care team. And all of this can be done. Virtually what about quality and safety. What are you looking for? What are you tracking with these teams until talk solution so we believe that At the end of the day clinical quality is really what differentiates health In the market today and so we take clinical quality. Quite quite seriously actually Dr Bill Frist is On our board of directors electors and he tears up our quality and safety subcommittee and I would say that my job is a pretty easy job because when coming to that committee and having various ideas in terms of how we can move the quality needle I feel as though the quality and safety committee at CAL is a highly receptive audience for initiatives in these areas. So what are the some of these initiatives one. Our current General Medicine Program does see a tremendous amount of individuals who are suffering from upper respiratory illnesses. As you know there's a ramp's over prescribing of antibiotics And one initiative that. We've been very very focused on is antibiotic antibiotic stewardship. We're very happy to report that. We're currently working on a ARC grant With some researchers from the University of southern in California. Just around antibiotic stewardship. We do believe that we're currently tracking a bit better than brick and mortar in terms of Not Not over prescribing antibiotics. And yet we also feel so there's always room to grow We also feel as though there's ED overuse of steroids Being utilized for individuals who have a variety of upper respiratory complaints so using I using steroids indiscriminately is obviously not good for the patient. So this is another parameter that we're very carefully monitoring and then as you might imagine we look very carefully at our providers NPS scores that member satisfaction. We look at complaint rates. We look at visit time. We look at visit volume And ultimately what we have created for. Our clinicians is a dashboard. Because we do believe getting feedback on how you doing and how you're doing relative to your peers is a very important way that we can dr clinical quality On our expert medical services. We have a whole host of parameters that were routinely ainley tracking changes in diagnosis changes in treatment again. The member satisfaction being the hallmark of We're really trying to deliver care that is meaningful to the individual at the time that they're reaching out for care from Talbot Health. I Love Love The web side Care and As you as you mentioned when you were speaking about the virtual health care physician and I've never heard that before. I believe a lot of our listeners. When they hear virtual healthcare they are going to think that? There's this additional technologies in play other than what is at the normal Brick and mortar clinicians office. If you will could you discuss with us a little little bit about the technology you all are using that help. Sure so I I. I'd say that at its simplest. We really really feel as though we want technology to be deployed in a way that enhances coulda call quality so We do have the capabilities to integrate With Taito care for instance which is a way that one can Listen to someone's chest and look at their ear But we don't want these to be GATING obstacles So if the issue of the individual can be resolved with a simple phone call. Aw We will do that If the individual requires a video consultation. Of course we do that. With a high degree of frequency We also are always looking for digital therapeutics and other ways as in which we can deploy technology to enhance clinical quality. But it's not the other way around so we're not looking to just put if if you will sizzle into our program through integrating devices and technologies. That at the in the end result are not meaningful meaningful in terms of driving meaningful clinical outcomes. That's great so we're we're not adding tech just to have more technology and play. I I think I think we can all appreciate that. You mentioned that one of the largest growing areas is primary care and chronic diseases which is so important A lot of times a diabetic doesn't necessarily need to go in to see the clinician in person every week or every month month. So when I if I'm a diabetic do I have the same doctor each time or do I simply have tele doc health physician each time when I reach out to them. Right so Again we are just beginning to dip our toe if you will into the waters of virtual primary care but I think it is all centered around an individual's care team so it would be a physician. It would be some type of advanced practice. Clinicians being a nurse practitioner or physician assistant would be a medical assistant. And this would be the care team team that would be connected with the individual Seeking care. But it wouldn't be the general network work of general medicine providers. We really feel as though that personal care team will be key In terms of the success of the program. Yeah Lou I think That's a great point. I I like to highlight care team management and personalized. Care as much as I can. I think I think The clinicians that I've worked with over the years in the literature allstate that the healing process and maintaining wellness health. I come from a community so creating that upfront. And being part of the plan is huge no matter how high tech the solution might be a little bit of if you can you had. Yeah right I mean obviously I don't think either one of you on this call would disagree with that. I'm pretty sure our listeners would applaud that as well Not I tonight one point that I did want to make. Is that what we're trying to create in terms of our virtual primary care offering is much more than Instead of seeing me in the office on Brooklyn Avenue we can have a skype call and We can resolve your issue without you needing to come in and park and go through all that inconvenience. I do believe leave. That virtual primary care can achieve a higher level of clinical outcome through the successful deployment of Data analytics so that this program can be specifically targeted to individuals that we know we'll take full advantage digital therapeutics remote patient monitoring a I a lot of other resources that that frankly are not available to the general internist practicing in the office setting so that if one can if you will not only be prescribing medications but also be prescribing digital tools. That will help drive the the individual to a greater state of wellness. I think you can begin to see. How virtual care can in some instances exceed what is traditionally unle available through your routine? Hi Mary Care in a brick and mortar setting.

Mary Care Department Of Medicine Dr Bob Wachter Dr Bill Frist Ucsf Advisory Board Talbot Health Hypercholesterolemia Allstate Patient Monitoring California University Of Southern CAL Lou I
Who are the coronavirus victims? What to know about the fatalities as the pneumonia-like illness spreads

Forum

11:49 min | 1 year ago

Who are the coronavirus victims? What to know about the fatalities as the pneumonia-like illness spreads

"Org this new strain of coronavirus has killed dozens in China and spread to as far as the US from Wuhan where the onus is believed to have originated in originated with animals so listen the clerk you were at SFO earlier this week and talking with passengers as you mentioned and what is what is the effectiveness of airport screenings for an illness that may not show symptoms initially as people are coming in and you know it's kind of after the fact at this point the two cases that we did have in the U. S. are of people who were not at who came through the airports before the screening process took place but but they have been caught if they had come in you know it's it's an open question yeah I think you know the CDC is obviously putting a lot of resources on the ground to do this and would argue that this is an important precautionary measure to try to stop cation cases but as you know the CDC representative that I talked to did say you know not no measure is going to be full proof for sure they may or may not there are definitely some critique critical voices against or not against but but critical of that airport screening is actually going to do much of for example the World Health Organization does not recommend that countries around the world do airport screening because it's not it hasn't been shown to really justify the amount of resources that are necessary to do it and for example these both of these cases maybe at the airport screening was taking place they would have been caught but they might not have been if they you know they might not have been showing symptoms yet so at the airport I think it's important to know they're taking your temperature and they're asking you to fill out a health questionnaire are you coughing do you have fever you know are you having trouble breathing so if you don't if you're feeling fine still but you might be infected but you're just not showing symptoms you could you know potentially get through that screening and in fact people here in another place so I would say you know it depends on who you ask but there's definitely some criticism that it's we're putting too much effort into it we're joined now by Charles Chu is a professor of medicine at UCLA at UCSF he specializes in infectious diseases thanks for joining us on form thank you so let's just get down to basics here what is a coronavirus my understanding is it's the same virus as the common cold it is so curry viruses are a family it's of a family of viruses and they they do belong to a group of viruses that cause the common cold other viruses in this group include rhinoviruses an adenovirus and current viruses are simply a fat family of respiratory viruses that cause respiratory infections what what makes this a little different is our that certain kind of viruses have recently trance have recently crossover jumped over from animals to humans what we call zoonotic transmissions and so some examples would be in two thousand two we had sars coronavirus which was a a species job as well as members kind of virus and and I believe around around twenty eight to twenty eleven of which came from camels and so this is another corona virus it it appears to cause respiratory disease along with other Quinn viruses and but we don't we just don't know where it came from end how dangerous is this virus I mean the number of cases and deaths grow daily is this because it's spreading so rapidly or because existing cases are finally being diagnosed in the numbers updated trust you yeah we we we actually do not know at at this point exactly how dangerous or deadly the virus may be I think it's a bit and part of the reason is that it's still very very early in the course of the outbreak and there has been there have been hundreds of cases yes and and several fatalities based on the early data it does suggest that this does not appear to be as deadly as for instance sars coronavirus or even murders kind of ours and I I believe there as of as of today they're probably took twenty one fatalities and more than six hundred cases I saw that side of Italians meaning patients who are developed the disease and die from it so it does not appear to be as dangerous as prior coronaviruses but it's still very early days actually the numbers that I was seeing were more than eight hundred and twenty six outs at this yes again it just continues to grow so then we were talking with less in the clerk about how they're doing screenings at the airport but what symptom should people be on the lookout for especially if they've traveled to China or other regions in Asia that ours reporting cases yes it's a current affairs infections because a respiratory illness and it's it's just as in any viral flu like illness patients or Invid individuals were infected can demonstrate fever cough nasal congestion in this in a subset of patients in a purple small proportion of patients they may then develop more severe disease chest pain chest tightness and shortness of breath I can develop into a life threatening pneumonia a but it presents initially as any other common cold or viral like flu like illness at less cynical you wanted to jump in I just jump in in the sense that and nationally it looked like it was mostly older people with pre existing conditions who were dying from this this virus and just recently they announced that the a man thirty six years old in Shanghai has has died so it does look like it might be affecting and he was perfectly healthy he died of cardiac arrest a couple hours before the diagnosis so is that increasing the concerned doctor chew in terms of you know how this virus infects people and can affect people who did not have pre existing conditions who were apparently young and healthy I I think it is concerning but and and that was actually the case with for for instance some some other viruses that we scenes for instance the two thousand nine H. one and one pandemic influenza virus where it appeared to disproportionately because perhaps severe disease in in younger people so it's I I I do want to stress so that really is early days and we can't really really can make conclusions about how deadly the viruses I think probably much more concerning to me is the fact that this virus clearly is able to be transmitted from person to person for human to human transmission does that mean it can mutate essentially two or the L. yet this last week regardless of whether or not the the that that the the virus can mutate the greater concern is that the capacity for human to human transmission what that means is if it translates very efficiently it's very it would be very difficult to stop this outbreak it's very difficult to curb the spread of the outbreak or so I I I'm I'm what I'm worried about is that this may be an outbreak that would be very difficult or even impossible to stop and it certainly has that potential if it has really at if it really transmits officially from person to person so even if you have of say a virus that's not that deadly or perhaps only causes severe disease a small fraction of patients if you have millions of people infected it's still results in a large number of deaths from the virus so then do you agree with the world health organization's assessment at this point that this is not a global emergency they have not been willing to declare it so at this point I believe that the World Health Organization is being cautious at this point we we we see the evidence of transmissibility from person to person I believe what the world health organization's looking for those at this of sustained transmission what we describe as ongoing transmission passes initial introduction to a country if there's evidence of sustained transmission I do to believe that will help her position will be will likely to declare this an emergency well Emily I'm not yet yes is there any reason to avoid traveling to Chicago we have plans to travel there next week that's where the latest case has been confirmed in the U. S. should this person avoid that doctor to I I don't think there's any particular reason to avoid travel to to Chicago it's it's it's probably it's it's simply by chance at that we're doing and screening at major airports and and really across the United States that's the CDC is conducting surveillance for the virus I suspect that we will likely have additional cases and they will but they'll tend to pop up where where surveillance is being done and and I know that we we previously had the discussion about whether or not you know airport base surveillance is going to be effective I I do agree with my what what with I do agree with the other speaker in that I believe that it's it may be perhaps too little too late and perhaps not effective but it definitely is an attempt to prevent to prevent a transmission into this country what do you think is the likelihood that this illness will come to California to the bay area if it hasn't already we do have I mean server disco bitter national airport was one of the first airports to have screenings put in place because of direct flights from Wuhan in so there's a lot of questions especially among our listeners about the likelihood that it will be here in the bay area and what can be done for prevention I I think it's it's likely that we may eventually see cases have simply because based on the data from China based on information that's coming from China this does appear to be a relatively contagious virus it is and there have been several examples for instance of what we call hospital choir transmission where infected patients in China transmitted to multiple health care workers we've also seen some exam examples of sustained cycles of transmission in China meaning that someone's infected but then in fact somebody else and in turn affects somebody else so I I I believe that it's only a matter of time before we'll start to see additional cases well is eager asks I was surprised at the coverage on the Seattle individual didn't include information on the airports he visited or even confirmation Hughes the Seattle airport there also wasn't an acknowledgement of this information is being withheld is this normal is this advisable it's interesting lesson the clerk because I understand that one of the things that they were looking at was whether the Washington case that the man had even travel through SFO as on a connecting flight potentially so do we have any more insight into where you know I'm not exactly sure I don't have more insight on exactly where he flew in I think to address both that listeners concerns and the woman who who is traveling to Chicago those people who have come across in who are infected the CDC is monitoring anyone that they have come in close contact with since they have arrived in so they are trying to make sure anyone that that person you know had dinner with their talk to or whatever in the man in Chicago and Seattle apparently had not been contacted very many people and in both of them had live alone except dresser there was a fair amount of kit you know which I say so the service so their surveillance around those people who who have come across to make sure that they're not spreading it some took to relay their concerns must be king also a Charles true about information being withheld there were concerns that the Chinese government is not being as transparent as they should be maybe not sharing information as readily as they could be because of concerns about the previous you know sars epidemic when the Beijing government with held a lot of information initially about it do you think that this time around the government is sharing enough information about the case I do think that things are different with regards to disclosure of verses the what happened in two thousand two with the sars outbreak for instance are in two thousand two there was a lot of information that was that was simply not available for several weeks it but here

China United States Wuhan
Protein tangles in Alzheimer's patients could help predict brain shrinkage

The Takeaway

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Protein tangles in Alzheimer's patients could help predict brain shrinkage

"A small study just out from UCSF demonstrates how a specific protein in the brain can predict the progression of Alzheimer's disease KQED science reporter at Leslie McClurg explains scientists followed about three dozen patients with Alzheimer's to see how their brain atrophied over fifteen months images revealed the areas covered in a protein called how shrunk the most knowing which brain regions are likely to decline will help doctors forecast what kind of cognitive loss is coming are we speaking a language problem next I respecting eagles diesel problems this we hope is something that we're going to be able to address in the next years we know the joy is a UCSF expert on neuro imaging and lead author of the study the data adds to a growing body of research suggesting that tile maybe a more significant player and Alzheimer's disease than amyloid plaque unless limit cleared KQED

Ucsf Alzheimer Reporter Leslie Mcclurg Eagles Kqed Alzheimer's Disease
"ucsf" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KGO 810

"D. at UCSF medical school he completed two years of surgery residency at UC SF and then her on Anastasia residency at Harvard's Beth Israel hospital wall still working in the operated Rome she attended UC Berkeley's law school focusing on constitutional law on administrative law doctor singleton has become concerned that technology in algorithms will soon be making medical decisions instead of humans in order to maximize profits at the expense of what's best for the patient doctor Maryland singleton on coast to coast happy holidays to you Maryland well same to you and I'm so glad to be here tonight what an amazing subject well it's certainly caught my eye when last year Daddy came out that Google was working on where they put all the data of several patients into the computer and could predict which patients were gonna die how soon and whether they leave the hospital or not and that their prediction came out better than the doctors according to them tell us exactly Berlin if you can in layman's terms what is an algorithm it's basically taking a lot of data and and I mean and a person can make an algorithm for themselves and we probably do that in our own heads in everyday life if Johnny doesn't do the dishes then all have to do the dishes that's a very basic algorithm and if this then that if this and that and then you take all the facts and put the men and come up with an answer the problem.

UCSF medical school Harvard Beth Israel hospital wall Rome singleton Maryland Daddy Google Berlin Johnny Anastasia UC Berkeley
"ucsf" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"ucsf" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Coverage UCSF campuses will be the campus will be closed until Wednesday because a Dorian the school announced this change in its closure plans yesterday you see it says it will update students faculty and staff as the storm progresses this will say classes will resume once it's safe to do so on channel nine's Nancy Alvarez for news ninety six point five W. DVL some of accu ease of the four pot kind are making their way north to get out of the storm animals living in shelters in the path of Dorian will be going to Chicago according to pause Chicago a rescue group called Dale is new life will be driving two vans with dozens of pets from palm city Florida up to Illinois in the coming days. this is a special edition of Orlando's morning news we continue our team coverage here well we're talking about some little bit different than the storm the Hubble comedian and actor Kevin hardy was in a serious car accident during the early morning hours on Sunday he was a one of his classic cars though he was not driving when the car veered off the road California yeah it's lost at the infamous winding Mulholland highway in California known for being treacherous there was a woman Kevin and a driver in the car Kevin and the driver suffered major back injuries Hey it's eight or nine your listing to Orlando's morning news updated weather and traffic every six minutes the five day forecast brought to you by U. S. heating and air conditioning good morning Tom Terry all right Joe the countdown begins here's we start watching for Dorian to make that slow turned toward the north it was a historic storm of course last night incredibly powerful even through this morning still expected to gradually get a little bit larger as it goes through what I call I wall replacement cycles were the I can kind of tear itself apart and redevelop usually that can expand the wind field and sometimes bring it down to category in wind speed but it's so powerful right now don't expect much immediate drop we're going to continue to monitor the storm track should be at its closest point within about forty to fifty miles the center off our east coast by tomorrow night but we'll get out of school all starting later today tomorrow especially dangerous same for Wednesday could see tropical storm force gusts all throughout the listening area of the extent of five day forecast for times an hour were watching Dorian I'm John Terry time now we have a lot of sunshine it's kind of nice kind of warm eighty degrees now what Landau severe weather station safe touch cared a triple team traffic at Torrance what's going on not a whole lot going on with your drive on high for your other such floor expressways all up to speed at this time reminder that polls have been lifted on the turnpike.

Dorian UCSF five day eighty degrees six minutes five W
"ucsf" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"It's the Glenn Beck program live from the metroplex right here on real news information five seventy KLIF race race race race race and I'm not talking about a foot race or a horse race I'm talking about the insanity of the racists in the Democratic Party in the media who are labeling every white person a racist thinking that will get them elected joining us right now to discuss this with us some clarity is Dr Marilyn Ms singleton now I gotta tell you something about a background she's a board certified anesthesiologist she graduated from Stanford earned her M. D. at UCSF medical school to use a surgery residency at UCSF and then Anish these your residency at Harvard's Beth Israel hospital and while still working in the operating room doctor singleton attend the UC Berkeley law school focusing on constitutional law and administrative law how she wound up not being a left wing or I don't know but we'll find out in a moment doctor singleton welcome to the savage nation thank you so much for having me doctor singleton with your sterling credentials and having done most of your training here in the San Francisco area how did you wind up not being a left wing left wing wacko I think my parents raised me right thank you I didn't know that you had I know you a great I've read your columns for a long time are you based here in the San Francisco area are you giving me an Oakland now I live in southern California because well whatever I have a speech I'm giving at the end of the month a certain clubs private club I would've invited you why do you think the left wing media so stop so focused on race today doctor because it's an ugly word and racism racism racism and they ran out of other things to discuss and sadly it is a well known saying that the left hand to make people miserable in order to get people to change their ways culturally we have been moving along and getting along and doing very well and they don't like it doctor singleton.

Democratic Party Stanford M. D. UCSF medical school UCSF Harvard Beth Israel hospital Oakland California Glenn Beck KLIF Dr Marilyn Ms Anish San Francisco