37 Burst results for "Ucsf"

Fresh update on "ucsf" discussed on Mark Thompson

Mark Thompson

00:33 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ucsf" discussed on Mark Thompson

"Your chance of surviving the most severe case of the infection is likely higher than in some other place is here you go. Here's a statistic for you. The survival rate on a ventilator at UCSF and S F general Has averaged around 80%. The national average is more on the order of 60% or 70%. So it just speaks to using? Yeah, it speaks to the quality of health care on the city. I mean, we always dump on the city. I mean, you've got break ins, burglaries crap on the street people shooting up public nudity, homelessness out of control, So I feel like I feel like I have an obligation to point to. A virtue in San Francisco. I mean, obviously several magnificent place and we've got your views, and I just think it's a spectacular world Class city, right? Right. But but also a world class city problems. Big city issues that are getting worse. Yeah, so it's nice to see you. That we lied in a category that is something that's really Braga ble, and it's also pointing out that San Francisco is healthier. In other words, there's a low rate of obesity and a low rate of smoking. And the Bresse point on that Also in this piece, and again, I'll tweeted if you're curious, but they referenced the fact that, in essence, the population didn't push back on mass restrictions and other things social distancing. So Bret's right, You really have a a society with in the Bay area that is ready to play ball to try to beat this thing or to try to limit its spread. So that matters, you know. Something happened with Stolen identity. And it's wild. The lady who did the stealing. Is right here and know Peter's, but I want you to hear this and I'm going to suggest to you at the end. I don't think He's the problem. In a way, San Diego man dealing with both fraud and frustration. Right now, you want to apply for benefits, only to find someone in male Penis was already using his identity That's going to be used, and Reuben explains for Sebastian Alvarez getting his identity back and his benefits restored. Is proving to be impossible. It was like being kicked when he was already down. 20 year old Sebastian Alvarez watched the pandemic, take his business, then watched a stranger take his unemployment benefits. She said that she bought it at a spot meat for $80, a woman in Bill Peters had apparently bought his identity for $80 US. Gotta swap me. She said that she bought it at a spot meat for $80. A woman in there. Peters had apparently purchased his Social Security number, using it to collect thousands of dollars in e D. D benefits in her own name. Alvarez reported the crime to police. He also reached out to Eddie D. Repeatedly. It's a little frustrating because I call on that call. I tell them the same thing, 1000 times and like they've even said Okay, we get an investigator's going to call you in. An investigator never calls me. I'll tell you something. I should be ashamed of themselves. And the governor needs toe weigh in on that that is a state fail. And I have talked about this in relation to just trying to get ahold of Edie and Newsome has acknowledged it is a problem. But okay, so you've acknowledged it is a problem. It's like that thing where they will, because the biggest relevant would you have a substance abuse problem is admitting you've got the problem. I suggest the biggest problem is stopping the substance abuse. In this case, the biggest problem is fixing it, Edie out of time when we're desperate. We're desperate for those benefits. I truly feel as though this is a huge fail on the state on the state's part. Clearly it is, but I also understand that they're understaffed that the technology is behind these air things that governor actually references in his remarks about their office. About their office, a DVD, But what I would say to you is You need to ramp up in a hurry. Look Wildfires Pandemic restrictions County by Scott by County a kind of some counties revolting against those restrictions. I get that there's a lot on the plate. But what I'm I'm passionately asking is for us to ramp up this agency to get these people the help they need, not this guy. He actually went through everything. He's just trying to get ahold of somebody to explain his situation, which he has now repeatedly explained. His identity was jacked and somebody else is getting his benefits and he can't even get that. But what I'm suggesting is that is to say that attention. They promised. Somebody is going to call him back some case worker and he never gets that return call, But what I'm suggesting is he's just one example of how they're letting people down repeatedly. It's a little frustrating because I call and I call and I tell them the same thing. 1000 times and like they've even said, OK, we're gonna an investigator's going to call you in. An investigator never calls. He's not alone in his frustrations. Former director Michael Bernick says the more applications and more money on the line the more fraud cases they see. I know people are very, very, very tired of contacting DVD very, very, very tired of waiting for a D D but t transfer, there's no Easy answer to this. But Alvarez says answers are what he needs that and an ability to collect benefits or established credit for himself. As for the woman using his social Security number, she told no Penis police. She purchased it three years ago and have been using it ever since. To apply for jobs and benefits. I don't want it to get supported, but at the same time to like, like she's not making it any easier for anyone for me, especially because she keeps she keeps like attempting Tio collect benefits using my social millipede is police. Have wrapped up their investigation on the Santa Clara County, D. A s office says the case is under review Oil and Ruben Katie via Fox. Thank you and Ruben and Katie v u I. I think that the woman obviously is doing something wrong, but she's trying to participate in this economy. She's here illegally. Obviously, there's an entire underground economy as we know in restaurants and sanitation and custodial services. I should say. And I mean and well, well beyond that. I mean, you know, everywhere. And I mean the common agriculture. The economy of California and of America is built on so much of this of this grey economy. You know, people who are working people are paying taxes, but they're not in the country legally. So she gets this so security number the same way. Probably hundreds of others have and she, you know, gets it at the swap meet for $80. But she's ripping off a real person who desperately needs this. He's seen his business go under. It strikes me that.

Sebastian Alvarez Investigator Bill Peters Ruben Katie San Francisco Fraud Ucsf Edie San Diego Bret Braga California Santa Clara County Eddie D. Peter Reuben America Scott
Fresh "Ucsf" from Murph and Mac

Murph and Mac

00:40 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh "Ucsf" from Murph and Mac

"Help to keep you safe. When you're ready to travel. Amtrak is ready for you look now at Amtrak dot com. Yeah, We're talking here about health, right? We just talked about. You know Jason Sudeikis getting the covert test and Jon Gruden saying he had the cove and all that, and the topic was health and that made me think about it. My friends at Bern Health because they're here in the North Bay still sitting here reminding you that Doctor's appointments have been put off by too many people, and that's kind of a crucial thing. The numbers show that the last six months people are like, Oh, yeah, I'm going to stay in. I'm not gonna go to the doctor. No, no, no. You need to take care of yourself. Somewhere in health is providing this friendly reminder. We have convenient clinics throughout the North Bay. They are part of UCSF health, and we have expert primary care providers of specialists. Maybe you need a cardiologists or an orthopedist or urologists. We have him. Maybe you're more comfortable doing a video pirate from home. That's fine. We do video appointments from the comfort of your own home. If you do come into clinics are clean, they're safe. They're disinfected regularly, and we scheduled appointment at intervals to reduce weight times. So maybe you.

Bern Health Amtrak North Bay Doctor Jon Gruden Jason Sudeikis Ucsf
Vaccines and the Future of COVID  with Epidemiologist Dr. George Rutherford

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:43 min | Last week

Vaccines and the Future of COVID with Epidemiologist Dr. George Rutherford

"This isn't the same rehashed discussion of covert. This is. Well more worth listening to. This is stuff that you need to know. This is medicine we're still practicing. I'm building. Of course, I by friend and Co host zooming in Dr Steven. Tailback he's a quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care, and he continues to fight on the front lines of the covert battle here in California for which we are eternally grateful. Steve. How you doing? Hey Bill. Good to see you. And R various special guest Dr, George Rutherford. He is the internationally lauded head of infectious disease and global epidemiology at the UCSF School of Medicine. He is also UCSF's professor of pediatrics and adjunct. Professor School of Public Health at California Berkeley. I had a chance to print out Georgia's see. It's one hundred, twenty, six pages long with two hundred and twenty one published papers and so many important accolades. So I'm going to read the whole thing to you now. Only. Kidding. Dr Authored although socially distance. Thanks so much for joining real pleasure. So Professor of epidemiology and biostatistics director at the prevention and Public Health Group. What do you do? Well, I'm an academic. So I teach school right I do research and I provide advice. So the mission of anybody in Academic Vinnie academic medical entity is education research, clinical care and public service. So my clinical care is really the clinical practice of public. Health and I advise the City Health Department San Francisco Department of Public Health, the California Department of Health and some of the various health departments around the state on approaches to controlling the Kobe deputy hammock. You did mention that your research is partly funded by CDC. Yes. That's correct. Yeah. Hell is a bit about that and how that affects your work during these crazy days. So I've worked with CDC for decades and most recently. I've been doing predominantly HIV related work in developing countries as part of the Presidential Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief I, have a large competent, very competent research group that basically tries to help governments and occasionally universities but mostly governments CDC missions in developing countries to understand what's going on with their. HIV. Epidemics, how things are working to evaluate progress and to discover new ways to try and stop the spread of HIV and try and. Improve. Clinical outcomes of people who already have HIV. So cases per one million population worldwide is running at about three thousand, five, hundred cases per one million in the US is running at about nineteen thousand, three hundred. So did we screw up or do we have a population that's more difficult to manage? Yes and yes, we have six fold higher numbers of cases than we should have and other countries like India may eventually catch up. I think that the US mister major opportunity early on and that was the problem with not having up tests and having the wrong tests and having tested didn't work and trying to control tests and trying to restrict out tests were being used for whom they are being used. I think they've always been you know a whole myriad lack of policy leadership which the states. have taken over and I think first of all the bay area in which the six county health departments acted in concert to move to a shelter in place ordinance early on on March. Sixteenth, and there is a very good reason for March sixteenth it was the day before Saint Patrick's Day, and then later the state moved in the same direction. So I think California's really been a leader in this. Now, you wouldn't know it from the last two months or three months since mid June under there's a huge wave of new infection a disappointed but I think we still are leaders in this. We showed data today in medicine grand rounds at UCSF that looked at numbers of deaths per hundred cases and in New York ten percent in. San. Francisco, it's zero point, seven percent. So it's less than one percent in San Francisco and the next best in a big city is something I one and a half percent did we screw up as a country? Totally? Did we screw up regionally in the north in northern California I don't think. So we scrub stay somewhat I think we made the reopening little to easy S. Really Hindsight Wealth speak that hindsight just for a second I mean in New York they've had four hundred, forty, five, thousand cases in thirty, three, thousand deaths. So they got a hold of this thing long before we did but we've already exceeded the case we're up to seven, hundred, fifty, thousand cases almost eighty percent more than they've had, and we've had fourteen thousand deaths. Half of what they've had when you say that we as a country may have screwed up, do we have a hold of this thing now and how much of it is that the population is not wearing masks enough especially young people who've decided that they're not as susceptible what New York was bad luck and they had continuous importation from Europe and may have had who? knows. Thousands of cases imported from Europe each one of which starts a new chain of transmission. We in San Francisco we probably at tens coming from Asia and you know the first death care was on February six dot and that was diagnosed retrospectively. Womanhood attended a convention in Las Vegas choose living in Santa, Clara County near San Jose and that convention probably people from China. or at least in the in the hotel that's probably where she got it. If she'd come home and hit a large crowd event at the wrong time with very high levels of virus inter nose and throat and spread it around we could have been just as bad office New York but we weren't and that's really a question of luck. So New York at Bath Block. But guess what we do. This was coming since the thirty first of December. That's when the UBA provincial CDC notified the central Chinese CDC that Oh, by the way, we may have a little problem here the central Chinese CD setup team to Wuhan on December thirty first basically started began an immediate investigation started closed down and drain the whole thing under control. That was the starting Bell I. Mean there was basically two months lost now CDC will say, well, we were having we we developed tests. We did this. We did that. Yeah, that's true. But then the FDA threatened to decertify their laboratory that was producing testing. They produce tests in the hundreds, not in the tens of thousands which was what was needed thousands. Of people came from Europe to New York and it got spread around helped by a couple of super spreader events where people in fact, at one person they affect hundreds of people at the same

New York CDC California HIV Ucsf City Health Department San Fra Doctor Of Internal Medicine Pu Europe United States Professor School Of Public Hea Ucsf School Of Medicine San Francisco Dr Steven Professor Of Pediatrics Public Health Group California Berkeley George Rutherford California Department Of Healt
UCSF scientists develop nasal spray to fight COVID-19

Tom Sullivan

00:16 sec | Last month

UCSF scientists develop nasal spray to fight COVID-19

"At the University of California, San Francisco, say they've come up with a nasal spray to combat Corona virus. While not a cure. The spray is an antiviral that would help Ward off Cove in 19 UCSF researchers are now working with the business community to try to bring the nasal spray to stores at an affordable price.

Ward Off Cove San Francisco Ucsf University Of California
State, county officials call for continued COVID-19 eviction protections in California

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

01:09 min | Last month

State, county officials call for continued COVID-19 eviction protections in California

"Public health officials and lawmakers today came together to call for the extension of eviction protections in the state of California. Hey, CBS is Mike Dewald has story as members of Congress continue to debate unemployment benefits. The statewide protections are set to expire in California next Friday. It's creating conditions that public health and lawmakers say could bring about an eviction crisis in the state. The county public health officer Dr Cinderelly May says they're strong connections between health and housing. Noma County residents like many across California. Fazing housing screens that was undermining all of our health. Homelessness is a big big issue as well. In Sanoma County. We have one of the biggest home of populations in the country in terms of urban centers, may says that the existing housing affordability crisis was already putting the strain on renter's Dr Margo Kushell with UCSF says that as of two weeks ago, almost 1/3 of California's renters Said they either missed their last housing payment or didn't have confidence that they could make their next one black and Latin next Californians who have already experienced the disproportionate burden of the Corona virus infection. Face the highest risk of eviction. Michael Walled, KCBS California

California Dr Margo Kushell Noma County Mike Dewald CBS Sanoma County Michael Walled Dr Cinderelly Ucsf Congress Officer
Los Angeles - UC Davis Medical Center ninth on U.S. News’ best California hospitals list

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:25 sec | 2 months ago

Los Angeles - UC Davis Medical Center ninth on U.S. News’ best California hospitals list

"Well these northern Californians and have a lot to worry about these days when it comes to public health, but we can rest easy now. One of our local hospitals is one of the best in this state, according to the U. S News. Best hospital rating rankings. U. C. Davis Medical Center is ranked number one in Sacramento and number nine in all of this state. Other newer Cal hospitals ranked high on the national list, with UCSF Medical Center, coming in eighth overall.

Ucsf Medical Center U. C. Davis Medical Center Sacramento U. S News
UC San Francisco Study Suggests Masks Do Protect Wearer From Contracting Coronavirus

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:23 min | 2 months ago

UC San Francisco Study Suggests Masks Do Protect Wearer From Contracting Coronavirus

"Caven to mask Way up because is ISA it protects knockers those attorney around us from getting Let's Corona be clear virus, that this But now is he's health soon to care be published. sales. UCSF study This is not Suggests masks rendering are protecting health us care services Mohr than we thought. to patients OK, CBS yet reporter Holly text Kwan messages has this we story. obtained It's show not Vita you, It's sales me, people or visiting rather, it's multiple not just Bay you. Area It's nursing me. homes and There's doctor's a lot of offices unanswered during questions. the pandemic. But I think the debate has They been took numerous Oh, Selfies it looks like with mass health protect care workers, other people. We some truly bringing think gifts that must protect of pizza, you as an individual. chicken or UCSF donuts. infectious disease Under position, one picture. Dr Monica A rep Gandhi even argues wrote in a paper six to be published boxes in the of Journal these of made General their Internal way Medicine into a local that Mass nursing are home. protecting That the isn't where allowing As food well in as those from the around outside. us and the less virus A fellow were employee exposed texted to back. the less sick. Sneaky, We're going to get sneaky. one example Another in email the paper shows is a manager the cruise running ship a weekend at the beginning referral contest, when no saying one was asking. Whoever gets the most The rate of people Selfies who weren't with sick medical was personnel about 20%. could win And then everyone personnel, wears masks including on nursing a later home cruise staff, ship, emergency which was, um room staff, These are physicians continuing cruise or ship nurses. where there was an outbreak You know, my mom and dad and are 80% are in their of people seventies. didn't have symptoms. If it was my parents in one This of these suggested facilities, wearing a and mask I had isn't any just idea a selfless what this company act. was But the doing, next big question is Um, immunity. I would be outraged. Let's say the mass protects me from It's getting not terribly appropriate. sick. This So just former how Vita immune sales am I? I? rep, If If who did I I may may not symptomatic symptomatic want to be identified, this this comes comes told is is Contra Contra us Costa Costa her Supervisors Supervisors manager's wanted today today are are her expected expected to keep to to consider consider visiting imposing imposing centers hundreds hundreds with of of dollars dollars cancer in in patients. fines fines on on people people I'm who who don't don't a danger wear wear mass. mass. to them. Several Several Even North North if I have Bay counties the flu. already do. I'm a danger to Ali them. Guan KCBS And so the fact just that they ahead on continue

Mohr Ucsf Supervisors Supervisors Manage Guan Kcbs Holly Text Kwan Gandhi Mass Attorney Mass. Costa Costa Vita Reporter CBS BAY ALI Dr Monica A Flu. Of Journal
How NBA players are using the Oura smart ring to warn of coronavirus

The 3:59

10:49 min | 2 months ago

How NBA players are using the Oura smart ring to warn of coronavirus

"What exactly does the Smart Ring Do, and and let's start with what its original purpose is, and what it was marketed for initially sure, so the has been around for two years and never got to review. It was one of these things I meant to, but it is a it is. A fitness rang health ring much. Much like the ring made by motive years ago, it checks heart rate it contract sleep it contract motion and activity, but it also tracks temperature. The temperature sensor is the interesting part because there aren't any other wearables that do that, but it's not necessarily the temperature sensing. You think it can't give you like an actual body. Reading of like you know what hundred point seven or whatever? It's a relative temperature that's. Night to show temperature fluctuations plus or minus degrees Fahrenheit. That's mentioned. Just show your changes in your baseline, so to speak, and so how is it being used as a early warning system for covid nineteen? Now been working with a couple of research teams UCSF has a study that you can opt into in the APP. That's been going on for a while. That's asking people to log You know their own moods and symptoms to try to study correlations. That's similar to what other companies are doing trying to see. If there could a way could help connect to symptoms and krona virus, but those researchers are seeing that you can with with the temperature capabilities see signs of illness symptoms a couple of days in advance of when you would normally perceive them. That could line up with the couple of day. Lead time that people believe might might be you know a symptomatic spread period now I'm not a another doctor. My research scientist from talking to researchers working with this and I've been I've been really curious about what that could actually mean. Another research team at Rockford Neuroscience Institute West Virginia University. Has Been Looking at trying to create a health forecasting APP that they have in place that they're using with with frontline workers and seeing if you could provide you know a couple of day pre forecast of whether you're likely to be getting sick. And built on a similar idea of using temperature mainly as a way to pick up ways that you're you're readings are hinting towards the sign of sickness, but not necessarily a sign of coronavirus, just a sign of sickness general from what they perceive. They claim it's like eighty nine percent. Accurate in predicting so far signs of upcoming sickness that will be when you get a coronavirus. You know that's when you get tested. That's when you would maybe. Go into work in some future world where we go back to work, and you know the reason why folks might be more familiar, we're now is because NBA players are supposed to be wearing them as they. Get set to kick off their their special. BUBBLE SEASON DOWN IN FLORIDA. Yes so NBA players have been wearing this of chosen this this wearable. OPT in program and. Coaches that that can look at the stats get kind of a distilled subset of the stats that aware of the ring, now like the consumer version would get so I see all these different pieces of information. There is a respiration. There's heart rate variability temperature these are estimated again. A couple of those key factors of four of them were pulled out and turn into a risk score. That idea is that if you seem like you're, you're scoring significantly high on that, you would Pull yourself out. Get Kobe test, and that type of thing. But you. You get something like that on the on the order APP itself. There's a score, the kind of shows like a whole bunch of factors and talks about like you know Harry feeling today. It sometimes it correlates with our. I feel sometimes a dozen so. Same thing asleep scores but it will let me remind me of like how I'm sleeping. And how much I'm you know? Both bedtime in some element of restiveness, how much I can do about that is is the other thing, but that the NBA is using again is kind of a pre screening tool for those who were bubbling Brian. So you're obviously not an NBA player, Sarah Scott, but how how are you using this? And how does that differ from what they're using this for? As as Early Warning System, yeah, so again as curious and I've not been doing any of those those things and I'm not using any advance APPS. I'm just using the consumer version and seeing what it's like so I just live with it. I've been wearing three months since late April. All the time and what have been noticing is that a lot of ways I don't notice anything because I. Just live my life, and then I check the APP in Awhile, and it says okay. This is sleeping and I tried to make myself sleep better, but like a lot of sleep tracking things. I don't act on those things as well. They should still go to bed super late, even knowing do. But the temperature thing is mostly been fluctuating around the same thing, a little down a little, if I who knows I, haven't knock on wood. I haven't gotten sick over this period. If I had actually gotten sick or perceived something that might be kind of interesting so hard to tell in that vacuum, but. I just wear. It will give some testing with it and I'm curious. I don't think it's it wouldn't replace a fitness watch because it's not as detailed as that and the one thing that the ring is, it's totally invisible with how it shows stuff. It's this nettle ring with no readouts doesn't buzz no buttons and you'd have to check the APP and also if you don't know if it's running out of batteries on the seven day battery life. Until you check the APP where you get a notification from your phone, so there's times where just went dead, and then I had like five days of no readings because I forgot to charge it, which is not ideal if you want a wearable, that's going to help provide early detection for people in a future workplace so that that's one challenge with it. The other thing is talking to the researchers and thinking about what would we all be doing with this? The NBA is bubbling now in a world where you go back to work and have some sort of you know wearable screening tool, which is what people are imagining. Its Eye, contact tracing unit everyone to opt in. And that means rock varner sciences. He was also trying to build towards. Maybe eventually a ways like at that would show ideally like where signs of potential illness popping up through crowdsourcing, but much contact tracing that requires people to participate and right now you still have questions. People are still refusing to wear masks so I mean. The. The degree to which you get people to all agree to wear wearable. Seems extremely optimistic and then when you deal with things like public. It adds all sorts of other complications so an office. Could all agree to do it? But how do you? What do you do in the larger world? I think those are questions. It still hadn't been worked out because the systems are only as good as everyone else's reporting, and just to be clear that this is not a cheap option. This is not cheap solution. Right? Like how much does this thing go for? And how easy is it the by one? The pretty easy to buy, and they're not that cheap there four hundred dollars so. Yeah the falls line with with. Your standard good smartwatch or Apple Watch or thing like that, but you know it's made like titanium plastic on the interior and It's it feels nice, but that's a lot of money, and I think some people will really like it because it's convenient. Enter praying and not a watch Some of the researchers also pointed out that a doctor's and frontline workers don't like wearing rings because they're not good that the germs could get in there. LEXIE! Shoes she's wearing. It didn't like it because of swelling and for exercise, the ring didn't feel ideal was uncomfortable for her and you have to get fitted. You have to get a particular size on the ring. They send you a sizing kit, so if your size changes, that's not great. A watch is adjustable, so there's a lot of things that are weird about it, but I think. It opens interesting questions about what temperature could possibly do. On, wearables in I'm really curious, what will pops up after this? It seemed like from your experience that made you call it somewhat invisible and the data I mean how ultimately how useful is this data? Have you used it to change your life for because you sort of hinted that that you looked at the data? then. It hasn't really changed anything, but like ultimately is this useful? In terms of changing my life. No, because you're right. You know this reminds me of like the talk. I had with with Kevin Lynch on Apple. Watch and apple could be making a lot of decisions on this to why they're only doing. Certain elements of sleep tracking. You know they're just doing the bedtime. Wake up is they claim that the rest is not actionable? Now they call so it could be that apple isn't fully develop the rest of the tools to their liking. But I think that's true in terms of when you get sleep scores like on this. What do I really do with like that? I didn't rest well enough you. There's really not much you can. Do you try to get to bed earlier? Maybe try to take it easy. Me could try to like take on yourself, and that's what the APP recommends like. You know you're reading the scores. Great. Go do it today, or it's not great. Take care a little bit today and I think that's interesting. So in that sense did change the way I would perceive some days I go. Hey, I'm not a great readiness score. just be a little easy on myself. What I know that just waking up and just feeling like crap. Probably you know I think some of these things correlate with how you would normally feel. Feel anyhow, if you're a self aware, but I think the getting back to work thing, the bigger question which is like you know I hate to even leave with that in the story, but it's what people think about about the possible Kobe awareness. I can't yeah for me I'm I you know I? Pi- blood pressure. I'm not going to put myself at risk going out. Out in the world, even if there's a sliver of it and then if I don't know that the APP, the rest of the world is behaving in a responsible way. Then I don't want to put myself there and that doesn't have to do other a wearing ring. It's like so the hard part. There was a halo over everyone's head. That said you know yes I. I am using the device I. Am I am part of your network? Then that's bubbling I. think that would be. That might be a different story, but again. None of these data things that these research programmes are absolute yet. These are all experiments, and all the researchers things a tip of the iceberg, so look how long people have been researching sleep and possible signs of. OF APNEA. or All. These research programmes with wearables they can go on for years and the NBA is very much an experiment. We don't know at all how that's going to turn out

NBA Apple Ucsf Florida Research Scientist Rockford Neuroscience Institut Kobe Sarah Scott Apnea. Harry Rock Varner Sciences Lexie Kevin Lynch
2 more death row inmates at San Quentin die from coronavirus complications

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:26 min | 2 months ago

2 more death row inmates at San Quentin die from coronavirus complications

"There've been two more deaths on San Quentin's death row from Kobe, 19 and as K CBS's Megan Goldsby reports, the growing outbreak at the prison does increase the risk to residents Submarine. That's because, says Dr Peter Chin Hong infectious disease specialist at UCSF, First of all, a lot of people in community work in the prison system. Guards, concessions things people, administrators. And they go back and forth between the community and the prison system. The second issue is, of course, the person doesn't have a nice view. The prison doesn't have an acute hospital, which means patients are being treated at hospitals in Marin, although, says Marin Assembly member Mark Levin. Oh, yes has been working on partnerships with 14 hospitals. All the way up to Folsom to make sure that prisoners who need hospitalization won't all fall just to Marin or Bay Area Hospital. He calls the situation at San Quentin, where 40% of the inmates are now infected, a tragedy that will likely get worse. We're at nearly 1400 prisoners, now 120 staff I'll probably end up getting to 2000 prisoners with covert 19 and about 200 prisoners that will require some level of hospitalization or I see you so We will probably also see increases immortality with the prisoners living says they now have a unified incident command with the Office of Emergency Services to handle management of the outbreak a little late, Making gold to be

San Quentin Dr Peter Chin Marin Marin Assembly Mark Levin Megan Goldsby Ucsf Kobe Bay Area Hospital Office Of Emergency Services CBS Folsom
"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:05 min | 3 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

"At UCSF and senior researcher at the interdisciplinary center for healthy workplaces at UC Berkeley professor yelling always a pleasure to speak with you thank you for joining us thanks for having me so where are we saving money and where are we spending more while we are working from home well people aren't spending at the gas pump that's a good thing and people are not spending money for lunches at work and stuff like that but they are having to spend more to get food at home and they may be saving on you took their spending more and utilities as well at home because there are more I was thinking about that if it gets hot we've got the air conditioner on a B. it's cold we've got the heat on and then the lights are all on and all our appliances or or laptop at centre all plugged in exactly and then a lot of the bay area people are home for the middle of the day when it's hot and so they're using their conditioners I live in San Francisco so we think more about putting the heat on if we look at the demographics of who benefits most from working from home what do we know which groups to benefit most well you know younger workers the so called millennials those who have young they have young kids so they're spending considerably more than usual and you can see why they are probably would go to warehouse stores or Walmart in order to buy food but they can't do that because they're stuck at home so they're having to spend more to either shop at a local store that may be more expensive or tap food delivered at home I don't think you get L. as people are spending more at home does that mean the company who has an empty office building that they're spending a lot less on utilities and things like that you know that would be an interesting hypothesis I think a lot of people who rent companies to rent offices the utilities are built built into the rent so it could be that the owner of the buildings are reaping a reward from not having to turn the air conditioning up quite as much but I don't think that most people who rent offices are seen statements on their monthly bill I guess it will be interesting when it's okay to go back how many companies say you know what this is working out okay everyone can stay home and perhaps they don't even need to rent those buildings are you know we've been doing that interestingly center quite a lot of work in this area and employers and employees are both thinking very long and hard about how to return for many workers there have been many pluses but we all miss social interaction of work in this a lot of collaborative points of work that aren't done as well and when you're working from home even in this year of zoom calls hard to read a room in the zoom call and how do you think the stress of spending more money working from home could impact our stress levels overall do you think people are suffering well I you know I think that money is part of the taking care of kids in the home is an important part of that friend certainly in the millennial generation that are trying desperately to keep up with work as best they can to to provide childcare now this summer to provide more childcare and apps in exchange for not monitoring their kids school soon's pearl for five hours every day so it's a lot of very stressful things and there's always the stresses well of thinking about whether they're doing enough to keep their job four for many people thinking about it might risk because my company may not be doing this well professor ed Yellin thank you for joining us great thank you so much.

UCSF senior researcher professor
Global coronavirus cases top 9 million

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Global coronavirus cases top 9 million

"The United States is not the only country seeing a significant increase in corona virus cases KCBS reporter Melissa call Ross tells us the number of cases soaring around the entire globe the sheer volume of Kobe nineteen cases is what's striking says Dr George Rutherford director of the prevention and public health group at UCSF ribbons through this out twice with the rise and fall case to China the rise and fall cases in Europe and now this continuous rise in the Americas and also Russia and India it see how truly alarming the World Health Organization is warning countries against making the pandemic a political issue and Rutherford says that with so many cases what the demand for vaccines is going to be difficult to demand for therapeutics will be as we get better and better with our therapeutics we would like to appreciate it as many cases as possible so there's really enough to go around more than nine million confirmed cases of coronavirus infection have been reported around the world

United States Melissa Call Ross Kobe Director China Europe Americas Russia India World Health Organization Reporter Dr George Rutherford Ucsf
A Critical Inflection Point for Responsible AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

04:34 min | 3 months ago

A Critical Inflection Point for Responsible AI

"Remond, welcome to the twin Wa podcast. Thank you for having me Sam, then a few years in the making and I'm glad we're able to do this. You know what it only takes a global pandemic to make this conversation happen. These are the best conversations I think when I'm finally able to connect with with friends and you know folks I know from industry, and you and I in particular I. Think I've been trying to make this conversation happen for as you said a few years and it's always. I'm going to be in Asia. I'm not in the bay area and. been able to to make it happen so super, super, super excited. Get this going. Let's start out as we usually do here on the show and have you share a little bit about your background? You work in ethical and responsible How did you come into into that field? In the answer, that is a lot of meandering. By background data scientists in a social scientist. I would officially say me Quantitative Social Scientists I have degrees in political science management economics. Bastions quantitative methods one degree or like five or six. I know folks like you. But I moved to Silicon Valley in twenty thirteen to receive a job in this weird little fields called details, science which I had heard about anecdotally while Mike Kishi procurement ucse everybody's crazy. Nobody understood while leaving a political science teach de Haram to do some weird tech job on Humira seventy years later. with Dina Science in anything related to data signs in. Being the only thing people talk about so after my stint as a data scientist action, teaching data science at bootcamp, cold medicine, and that's when. I was doing talks on polling, the elections and in the sense of how numbers and statistics can be misleading, because I woke background and things design only and quantity of human behavior analysis and you know extension was three years ago. Looking for someone to lead this weird thing is sponsored. And that's how that's how! That's how I got this job. And so you've been at accenture. How long now three years actually hit the three year mark in early, February wow nice, nice, which sponsor air world makes the ancient. Absolutely. And you're based in San Francisco. How have things been going for you with? Shelter in place and covert, and all that kind of stuff, yeah I mean fortunately San Francisco had a really good response and people stayed at home than they more or less have been listening. I think everyone just getting antsy, so I see more and more people although people whistle being careful. Fortunately, it's been pretty quiet. Ellen Mission Bay, which is near the UCSF hospitals. and. It hasn't been that bad I fortunately. I live in a really walkable neighborhood is parks here by CETERA, so it hasn't been over the fuzzy I just think this is also the shortest as I've a longest amount of time. I have ever spent not flying somewhere in the last few years, so it's been nice yeah. I've commented to to fight back just earlier today. Like by this time a normal year I'd have been probably to half a dozen at least conference. Is You know not? That's not a dozen. It's probably would have been around the world a couple times, but I mean it's funny because I have all these place holders on my calendar when by one they all truck, but you know. By now I would have been in London what Vice. India and the Nordic sexually this supposed to be doing it for different Nordic countries to visit different accenture offices, client partners, and then in a month those supposed to be in Atlanta. still have this thing in Singapore. That apparently is still on the calendar for August, but I think they're being ambitious at this point. But you know. It's nice to be home. It's nice to be around by my pets. Organize my apartment Buehler's things that come to do.

Accenture Scientist San Francisco Dina Science Asia SAM Mike Kishi Ucsf Ellen Mission Bay Buehler Silicon Valley Singapore India London Atlanta.
"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Discount not available in all states or situations a CBS news time ten eleven UC San Francisco Benioff children's hospital went from no video medical appointments to almost all inside of one month KCBS is Tim Ryan tells us the majority of in person office visits could become a thing of the past Dr Angela Barney in an article published yesterday in the journal of adolescent health said ninety seven percent of visits at the adolescent and young adult clinic in the month of March were via video conferencing Jeff flake and if you were at a video chat with their friends we have a secure system in private system in place where we can talk to our patients over video chat privacy rules were followed and with patients as far away as the Oregon border there are obvious benefits so far and all the patients that have wanted to see us this way has been able to because you don't have to have a computer for these visits you can also do the same thing if you have a smartphone or tablet there's obviously a lot the doctor can't do over a telephone take your pulse for example but if you happen to have an apple watch UCSF says they can't do that some families also have blood pressure cuffs and home Barney says UCSF is not proposing the complete end of in person visits Tim Ryan KCBS coming up on KCBS the Victor will have the latest on the desktop in the NFL over black lives matter that since sports two minutes away KCBS news content thirteen Hey DD perks members in Washington DC now that we're slowly getting back to running make.

Tim Ryan Dr Angela Barney Jeff flake UCSF Tim Ryan KCBS NFL CBS San Francisco Benioff journal of adolescent health Oregon apple KCBS Washington
"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:40 min | 3 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

"A KCBS UCSF Benioff children's hospital went from no video medical appointments do almost everything being done on video within a month KCBS reporter Tim Ryan tells us this could be a thing of the future Dr Angela Barney in an article published yesterday in the journal of adolescent health said ninety seven percent of visits at the adolescent and young adult clinic in the month of March were via video conferencing Jeff flake and if you were at a video chat with their friends we have a secure system in private system in place where we can talk to our patients over video chat privacy rules were followed and with patients as far away as the Oregon border there are obvious benefits so far and all the patients that have wanted to see S. display has been able to because you don't have to have a computer for these visits you can also do the same thing if you have a smartphone or tablet there's obviously a lot the doctor can't do over a telephone take your pulse for example but if you happen to have an apple watch UCSF says they can't do that some families also have blood pressure cuffs at home Barney says UCSF is not proposing the complete end of in person visits Tim Ryan KCBS it's a thirteen at key CBS it's Jamie progressives number one number two employee leave a message at the Hey Jimmy it's me Jamie this is your daily pep talk I know it's been rough going ever since people found out about your archipelagos Matt harmony but you will bounce back I mean you're the guy always helping people find coverage options with the name your price tool it should be you given me the pep talk now get out there hit that high.

Tim Ryan Dr Angela Barney Jeff flake UCSF CBS Jamie Matt harmony UCSF Benioff reporter journal of adolescent health Oregon apple
Coronavirus vaccine for United States possible by December

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:10 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus vaccine for United States possible by December

"The nation's top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci says it's conceivable the U. S. could begin to roll out a coronavirus vaccine by December KCBS is Kerry who decide gets reaction from a local medical expert Dr Joel earns professor of medicine at UCSF tells KCBS it's too early to tell which kind of vaccine will produce a quick answer first any vaccine has to be safe second it has to be effective in other words it needs to raise the kind of immune response that our bodies need to fight off the infection and third it needs to be produced for a pandemic like this in massive quantities billions of those well we could see a corona virus shop idea of the year experts say it's not a promise earns believes we may have more than one vaccine that can help different age groups there might be one vaccine that's particularly good in older individuals another vaccine that might be less expensive to produce and appropriate for younger individuals instead when a vaccine is approved will they be readily available to everyone like a flu shot and says it that's unclear because we don't yet know the immunity of covert nineteen well we need another injection every year

Dr Anthony Fauci Kerry Dr Joel Ucsf Professor Of Medicine FLU
United to let passengers on packed flights rebook

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

United to let passengers on packed flights rebook

"An update on a story we brought you yesterday about the crowded United Airlines flight from New York to San Francisco that a UCSF doctor in over two dozen of his colleagues had you and your United posted a tweet just last night indicating a change beginning next week customers on United flights that are expected to be close to full capacity will now be able to rebook on a different flight or receive a travel credit the airline says it will do its best to reach out about twenty four hours before departure to provide

New York San Francisco United Airlines Ucsf
UCSF Launches Statewide Contact Tracing Training Program

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:17 min | 4 months ago

UCSF Launches Statewide Contact Tracing Training Program

"This week we've been hearing about the need to boost so called contact tracing before we can lift the lockdown now KCBS reporter Keith Menconi tells us about a new statewide effort aimed at training thousands of civil servants each week to carry out this work state health authorities are partnering with UC San Francisco it to launch a program re training civil servants to carry out the difficult work of contact tracing that is tracing the recent contacts of those who have tested positive for code nineteen point is is that we're limiting their ability to transmit the virus to other people UCSF professor of epidemiology Dr George Rutherford is helping to lead the effort he explains the twenty hour training program will prepare the staffers for the many phone calls and interviews that are needed to carry out this contact tracing work they have to be not afraid to call people up and well and talk them through this state figures suggest local health departments throughout California now I have about three thousand contact tracers but governor Newsom wants to search that number many times over hence the need for this training but this will bring another large group on top of that for people from other parts of civil service who can you know get to really time intensive jobs done the first class of five hundred started

Keith Menconi San Francisco Professor Dr George Rutherford California Governor Newsom Reporter Ucsf
"ucsf" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:39 min | 4 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KGO 810

"Briefly before we open up to questions I want to thank the partnership we advance with UCSF and with UCLA the first cohort we have the capacity got to three thousand people week trained we're starting with the first cohort of five hundred individuals a five day training twenty hours of training for our tracing want folks to know to clean our immigrant communities that we protect your data this is not Big Brother we do not share this data what people feel safe and comfortable about working with public health leaders and that's why the training is so foundational trainings about cultural competency it's about how to engage diverse communities it's about how to soften the edges of concerns when someone is asked to provide information about their contacts if they indeed I have developed the virus but this is all the way to keep our broader community safer working we've done some workshops with immigrant communities and representatives that across the spectrum across the state they want to make sure that we're preserving privacy and respecting the protocols that are well established in California but are certainly going to be well reinforced through the this next phase of Tracy in the state UCSF they get it don't get that done UCLA they get it I'll get that done and the data backbone that we have the management system all of this is a predicate it's a foundation of being able to move this board and scale but the good news is that is already under way that virtual training academy twelve hours virtual about eight hours of one on one work that first cohort will be trained within next few days and then next week we'll keep building on that army we re directed local and state personality for that first cohort we expect from multiple Cora cohorts do the same again try to get to ten thousand and at first base and expand that we believe up to about twenty thousand in subsequent phases over the next number of months so from PP finally seems to mimic a real consistency movement on testing to now re opening a business is up and down the state again with new protocols a new procedures all again based on all based upon the data based upon these indicators this is a this is a good way to answer and a mother's day weekend after the weekend and I'll just I referenced it but I'll say it again all the moms out there that are home schooling their kids taking care of her husband's in many cases or their spouses their loved ones for all of those that care givers and status of families that you know just make us proud that are really stepping up all we have uncles they're substituting his parents because of unique circumstances and foster parents doing incredible work I can go down the list also just extend deep appreciation all of you but always a little bit extra to women and girls that that have a little bit more to do in these circumstances and I know that just intimately my wife is a perfect example of that and you talk about super heroes we talk a lot about heroes and social workers and they're super heroes those essential workers by day and those incredible monster by night and so happy mother's day to all of you at least we can get these flowers shops open so you can get appropriately supported and placing closing for thanks to support local businesses a lot of the big chains because they were essential because of food delivery in particular they were able to out compete at this moment look out for your neighborhood florist okay off your neighborhood business they need your support they haven't gotten the kind of support they deserve you will be determinative of whether or not they will survive and so if it means you have got to go an extra blocker to seek them out find them make some calls to the old business you want to you don't just go to that big box retailer they had a little vantage on folks like this and it's time to re balance things as well so that's it terms of my opening statements course now happy to answer any questions hi governor I'm Katie or politics reporter with KQED and I will be asking you questions on behalf of the passport so first question does come from KQED the national unemployment rate we found out rose to four point seven percent in April you've already.

UCSF UCLA
States partly reopen, despite health officials' warnings

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:03 min | 5 months ago

States partly reopen, despite health officials' warnings

"CVS health when he takes the first tentative steps toward opening back up health experts are warning that there's a risk of the covert nineteen and it still remains here's more from Keith Menconi there are some promising signs for the bay area among them says UCSF epidemiologist George Rutherford hospital bed capacity it's a key indicator of the virus is spread and it seems to be holding steady never the less he says this could come back in a heartbeat this is not the time for a victory lap and while California has yet to experience an infection surge similar to what occurred in the most hard hit states this past week saw California's highest one day death toll yet the troubling told the reflection of the continuing high transmission rates in many congregate living facilities part of it is day to day what's going on without breaks in nursing homes and homeless shelters which really exaggerate those peaks and valleys of of of nuclear when you look at charts of new infections so rather for device as officials consider when to begin lifting the lockdown with caution we got to be careful about about going back to

Keith Menconi California Ucsf George Rutherford
'Why We Swim' Looks For Answers In People And Places Across The Globe

Environment: NPR

05:21 min | 5 months ago

'Why We Swim' Looks For Answers In People And Places Across The Globe

"And humans came from. Dust says ECCLESIASTES DIS but Bonnie Sui us that humankind also wants sprang from end still seeks. Water why we swim is her latest book which Texas from Ponds Pools to surfers racers and a few who have survived icy currents Bonnie Soy who writes frequently for the New York Times in California Sunday magazine. Join just for more home in Berkeley California. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks so much for having me Scott. You begin with an amazing story about a man whose name I will not chance to even try and say March Eleven nineteen eighty-four what happened on this planet. Good Liquor Thorson. He's an Icelandic fishermen and fishing trawler with his crew. It's calm waters it's cold it's forty one degrees and the boat overturns with forty one degree water within twenty to thirty minutes we die from hypothermia but he did not everyone else did and he ended up swimming six hours and when he finally got to the hospital the doctors weren't able to discern his heartbeat or read his temperature on the thermometer but he didn't show any signs of hypothermia and he was only a little bit dehydrated. He was a strong swimmer certainly but was he also saved by his own biology. He was like the story very much. Because it is this the distillation of what makes swimming so special for humans. We have to learn how to swim. we're not born knowing how to do it instinctively and yet there are sort of traces of that evolutionary past still within us that our evolutionary past that came from the sea and so with good liquor for. Thorson turns out that his body fat was two to three times normal human thickness and more solid and so he resembled a Marine Mammal. More than terrestrial mammal. And that saved him. Did you grow up feeling? Pull into the even. If it was only Jones Beach in New York I did. I mean my family origin story is at my parents met no swimming pool in Hong Kong. We grew up with swimming family and so we grew up at Jones beach in the pool. Lifeguards swim team. I just always remember feeling more comfortable and happy in the water actually than on land. I mean there's just a sense of magic that you get from being in the water and buoyancy that you just don't have on land you in this book talk to swimmers all over the world right nearby you though you you swim San Francisco Bay without a wet suit and there are people including I gather you who believe that's actually good for you in all ways it can be. I mean I have also talked to scientists and researchers who say cardiovascular risk. Don't go into sudden shock cold water because it could stop your heart that aside a wr decided there are benefits to cold water immersion. And there's been quite a bit of research in recent years where your dopamine levels go up in your over time that your cardiovascular system is strengthened and you know there are people there are things that we knew from across cultures around the world that there was a water cure there. Was you know jumping in cold? Water was good for you and jumping in hot water and then jumping into cold water and so we didn't know why exactly in the science kinda starting to catch up. What is this Brown fat you talk about in this book. Well this was really interesting. I did not know about Brown fat until I started swimming with a Dolphin Club swimmers in San Francisco Bay and so I went to ucsf to talk to the foremost researchers in Brown fat and it turns out that mammals are born with two kinds of white fat which we all know about the energy stores of our bodies and Brown fat which actually Burns and produces heat energy. We kind of start to lose it as we get older but there are ways to do what's called the Browning of white fat which is to kind of turn it into energy burning tissue. That fat is called Beige Fat. And so what? Kind of encourages. The development of beige fat is cold water exposure and exercise among other things. But those have been proven to be causing this change in our bodies. Wonder if you have any words for people who aren't able to swim these days you know. The water is a draw for us no matter what and so even if you can't get in the water if you can walk near it can look at. It can see it can You know have some what a wall Nichols calls domestic waters in your house and you know. Take about the shower. Just look at imagery watches surf movie. I mean those things. Make a difference for our souls and our the way our bodies and brains work. Click we respond to those set points in the environment and even if we can't get in the waters right now you know the ocean will be waiting for us. The pools we waiting for us on the other side of this Bonnie Choi. Her book why we swim she in the Water

Thorson Bonnie Sui San Francisco Bay Jones Beach Berkeley California Bonnie Soy Bonnie Choi Ponds Pools New York Times Hypothermia Texas Hong Kong Scott Dopamine Brown California Sunday Magazine New York Nichols Ucsf
Remdesivir, convalescent plasma treatments showing promise in the fight against Coronavirus

KCBS 24 Hour News

01:04 min | 5 months ago

Remdesivir, convalescent plasma treatments showing promise in the fight against Coronavirus

"There's promising news about a drug developed by Gilead sciences of foster city to treat the coronavirus the bio pharma website stat reports promising results of ram does appear KCBS is Margie Shafer reports antibody tests are also on the horizon UCSF is working closely with Stanford on antibody test research says UCSF director of division of prevention and public health doctor George Rutherford the market is flooded with antibody test summer gonna be good it's summer going to be job and then they have all the university's doing their home for is for research purposes Struthers says the market needs to shake out and that false positive and negative issues are huge especially if someone wants to make an assumption of the unity with it which I would not do until we get that straightened out but if you say oh I'm positive I mean me and I don't have to wear a mask in the intensive care unit on that's not a good idea you should be taken out to the to the bank for people who believe they were infected he suggests waiting until may when there will be a better understanding of how well these tests performed

Gilead Sciences Margie Shafer Ucsf Director George Rutherford Struthers
"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:36 min | 5 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

"At UCSF some of our disaster service workers with San Francisco or some of our librarians and other city workers will be trained to do this work and there will be an apt to help facilitate this the app will allow people to keep track of their symptoms and to check in with people who are monitoring their condition and also determine whether or not they should or should not be tested right now there are fifty of these trackers the city hopes to have five times that many in just two weeks information is confidential and will not include immigration status in the early stages of this outbreak when was confined to Asia we talk with a journalist in South Korea who said the contact tracing was key to their ability to slow the spread but they also allow the government to check their credit card statements to show where they've been and who they've talked to something that might not fly here now you're gonna see a big ship coming into the bay around midday the MSE Anna is the largest ship to pull into the port of Oakland at thirteen hundred feet it's longer than the salesforce tower is high it's coming to collect empty shipping containers from California ports and bring them back to Shanghai shipping is the down all over Oakland reporting a seven percent drop this week compared to a year ago fifteen voyages have already been canceled for may and June Holly Quan KCBS KCBS news time nine thirteen do you have a tax problem the IRS or state back taxes or have on file tax returns hi Patrick here with tax defense partners if you're in trouble with the IRS don't wait any longer to resolve your.

UCSF San Francisco Asia South Korea Oakland IRS Patrick salesforce California Shanghai Holly Quan
San Francisco ramping up effort to track every COVID-19 case and contact

Pacifica Evening News

04:17 min | 5 months ago

San Francisco ramping up effort to track every COVID-19 case and contact

"San Francisco city officials are taking measures to repair this city for a win coronavirus restrictions are lifted including a new program for testing and contact tracking but the city is also facing criticism for their handling of the homeless population during the crisis K. because the woman is reports city officials in the new program for contact tracing will identify people who might have come into contact with an infected person the program is a partnership between the department of public health UCSF and the software company DiMaggio director of the department of public health grant Colfax is this program will be essential when the ultimately left the shelter in place orders and moved to a new phase of fighting the pandemic San Francisco's innovative new program will engage with individuals who test positive for covered nineteen to identify their recent close contacts specially trained outreach workers will then follow up remotely by phone or text with any individuals who may have been in contact with the covert positive patient these conversations will be voluntary confidential and culturally and linguistically appropriate city officials also gave an update on plans for housing vulnerable homeless people in hotel rooms the city is focusing on those who are coping nineteen positive or under investigation for having the virus those over sixty and we have underlying health conditions they now have placed a hundred and seventy four individuals in hotel rooms for homeless individuals that don't belong in these categories they plan to continue to reinforce social distancing and hygiene protocols in homeless shelters but San Francisco supervisors disagree with the city's response the unanimously approved an ordinance on Tuesday directing the mayor to procure eight thousand two hundred and fifty hotel rooms for homeless people and first responders night April twenty sixth the move follows a corona virus outbreak at a shelter the infected ninety two homeless people intend shelter staff in what's being called the largest homeless corona virus outbreak in the country supervisors say they've been warning for weeks that shelters would be a breeding ground for cove in nineteen and the mayor's office was moving too slowly making an outbreak unavoidable your supervisor Hillary Ronen saving lives matters more we can rebuild our economy over time but stating lives means more we have simply not done that pretty and house population we have not gone all out we have not used those rooms than there has not used her power to commandeer which is now a public memo from the city attorney's office giving her that power we have not needed a fiscal priority that we want to save those lives just as much as we want to save our own and it's time to make that clear statement not with the resolution like we did last week but with the binding law Maryland every double down her response arguing it is not that easy to put that many homeless individuals and hotel rooms giving that many deal with mental illness and substance issues and needs for cevik resources it's not easy and if it were that easy we would have done it a long time ago and other major cities in this country would have done the same thing we are we have moved faster and further along than almost any other major city in the country as a relates to housing are on house population over seven hundred people have been house out of our shelters and counting so I'm really proud of the work that they continue to do what I like to do more yes I'd like to do more what I like to open up eight thousand nine thousand ten thousand hotel rooms of course who wouldn't but that is not the reality of what we as a city can do the mayor's administration have been working to obtain a total of seven thousand hotel rooms the ordinance ups the ante it says seven thousand rooms should be allocated for homeless people five hundred rooms for discharged hospital patients who have no place else to quarantine and seven hundred and fifty for frontline workers who can't commute large distances or who fear infecting their

San Francisco
"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:55 min | 5 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

"At UCSF and it kind of chugs along and then all of a sudden this March a massive spike amazing yeah it's really been a remarkable time we've been really committed to trying to make sure to take care of all of the patients that come to us for care even during stay at home orders and other limitations on people's movements so we've seen a seven hundred and eighty percent increase in the number of video visit that we're doing and at this point about sixty percent of the amatory care that we're providing is by video all right so let me ask you some more questions about how that works doctoring has usually involve laying on of hands or instruments so how does that work when you don't do that yeah not everything can be done by video obviously there's always going to be a role for that in person connection both because there is something irreplaceable about that but also because of the requirement to examine someone directly but for a lot of what you might call more routine care or follow up care it actually works terrific to do it by video and it's a real convenience to the patients because they can not have to take as much time off of work to get to the clinic they can do it from the safety of their home under current circumstances and meet the other obligations that are happening in our lives a lot of questions rise mean for some people to turn the phone around to selfie mode taking a picture of the rash is second nature for others maybe not so much how does that work yeah you know a rash is the kind of thing that is probably always going to be best examined in person but it is surprising how good the cameras are on people's phones these days and we're we we continue to be delighted by that number of interesting settings in which people call into their care it particularly using their cell phones a large number of these video visits are people holding their phone out in front of themselves like the press offi all right so is it what do you have a standard platform you use at UCSF is there any way that you could characterize the typical way people access this yeah we use them zoom that's been much in the news we were glad to have set it up with all all of the necessary security well before some of those issues had become more prominent in the news the last couple of weeks so we are quite confident in the security of that platform and zoom is available for just about everybody's device and so we we found that quite satisfactory there's obviously an equity issue not everybody has a home internet connection or a smart phone or computer in center how do you deal with that yeah that you know that's a really tough issue that we pay a lot of attention to we find that although the equity issue that you described as a a key one it's somewhat balanced by the opportunity to not have people have to take time off of work folks that have less ability to take sick time or away time or family leave we find video visits increase the accessibility of our services for those folks I also want to highlight that we do have video interpreter services when we do video visit so folks for whom English is not their first language can also do a video visit with us I know you started as an internal medicine specialist but you the geek on the team so if you've been doing this for a long time do you have a feel for the outcomes measured me whether you're talking telemedicine versus in person medicine yeah one of the most interesting statistics that we have is that patients satisfaction with the care that they receive in the interaction that they have with the physician or other provider is actually higher with the video visit them in person in terms of hard clinical outcomes that's so complex the study that we don't have that kind of comparative data but we do know that we're giving people a good care experience when they have a video visit thanks for your time this mileage let you get back to it that said Dr Russ cucina he is the UCSF Medical Centers associate medical director of information technology.

UCSF
Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

On The Media

06:54 min | 5 months ago

Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

"President trump who's told states to fend for themselves has had female blocking orders for vital equipment secured by governors some of them anyway so the government can buy them instead this week FEMA see is that in order for five hundred ventilators from a private company obtained by democratic Colorado governor Jared Paul is only to have trump give back a hundred of them at what he called the request of the state's endangered Republican senator Cory Gardner Thursday's Denver post editorial declared trump is playing a disgusting political game with our lives but the trump administration says it's got a plan and that it's working White House adviser Peter Navarro April second these guys up here doing a heck of a job organizing the supply chain well I think that's news to a lot of medical providers no I'm levy is a national health care reporter for the LA times trying to follow the cultic nineteen supply chain I can't say I've talked to many hospitals or doctors offices or clinics around the country who feel that the supply chain is being managed in anything close to a rational way that's for sure and we can't seem to get answers from FEMA or the White House about what system if any is being used to balance the needs a couple weeks ago I was speaking with the head of the Texas academy of family physicians who working with the golfing buddy of his managed to in about a half million masks over the border from Mexico and then spent about seventy two hours getting them to rural hospitals and doctors offices around Texas because the state of Texas didn't have anything to distribute so you've got the system in which everybody's running around trying to get masks and ventilators and everything else and then on top of that is a totally opaque system of what appears to be haphazard intervention by the federal government on some supplies but not all of them everyone is completely perplexed we hear that trump is having no problem directing to Florida whatever Florida seems to need so zero which is the agency that is allegedly responsible for distributing supplies from the strategic national stockpile has claimed that they have some formula for distributing medical supplies that reflects states in large metro areas relative populations and the relative severity of corona virus outbreaks they are actually shipping things across the country however it's impossible to find out what that formula is whether or not allowances are being made in one way or another four criteria that have not been identified president trump hasn't been shy about claiming that he's willing to reward its friends and punish his enemies the conspiracy minded person might think well is there some nefarious methods to how these supplies are getting distributed or not we just don't know what difference does it really make if we know or we don't know what the formula is for distributing this stuff this is taxpayer money that we're talking about private actors in the market of course don't have an obligation to be transparent about what they're doing because there's no expectation under normal circumstances that they're acting in the public interest we hope that the government is acting in the public interest but without transparency who knows who's accountable for this who's in charge is it rear admiral John Paul love check who's at the head of FEMA's coronavirus supply chain task force is it FEMA director Peter Gaynor is it Peter Navarro who is reportedly coordinating private and public sector communication maybe it's the Jared Kushner or the invisible hand isn't really fundamentally the president and no one else you know without clear lines of authority things are not getting done as far as we know in a particularly efficient way nor do we know that however they're being done is being done in a lawful way frankly if for example the president's son in law is dialing up private companies and asking them to give support in one way or another to the supply chain challenges what assurances are being made to those companies about what they can expect I'm talking about promises that are made the company acts that if they help out that they'll be made whole in the end with they'll be reimbursed at a certain level without a process all of that is open to question is there a way to have an informed data driven approach to this as Jared Kushner said the federal government was engaged in if in fact the federal government isn't engaged in an informed data driven approach can big business small business health officials state officials do this on their own so the facts on the ground suggests that this can't happen on its own no that's not to say that there aren't a lot of efforts by individual actors some of them quite influential to play a constructive role I mean we've seen a number of large companies including apple for example say we are going to use our connections to the supply chain to procurer masks and we're going to distribute them the owner of the New England Patriots flew the patriots plane to China to go pick up a shipment of masks and flew back to Boston the problem is when you have this sort of thousand points of light approach to procuring and distributing needed supplies what ends up happening is that well connected medical centers that have relationships with large companies either because they do business with them or because they're located in their backyards are often times at the top of the list so for example sales force made a donation to the university California San Francisco Medical Center because they have a long standing relationship both being based in San Francisco does UCSF knew that equipment more than a hospital in New York City or New Jersey that's a lot to ask of sales force to try to make that determination they don't have any expertise in

Fema President Trump
Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

On the Media

06:54 min | 5 months ago

Calling Trump: When connections help steer virus supplies

"President trump who's told states to fend for themselves has had female blocking orders for vital equipment secured by governors some of them anyway so the government can buy them instead this week FEMA see is that in order for five hundred ventilators from a private company obtained by democratic Colorado governor Jared Paul is only to have trump give back a hundred of them at what he called the request of the state's endangered Republican senator Cory Gardner Thursday's Denver post editorial declared trump is playing a disgusting political game with our lives but the trump administration says it's got a plan and that it's working White House adviser Peter Navarro April second these guys up here doing a heck of a job organizing the supply chain well I think that's news to a lot of medical providers no I'm levy is a national health care reporter for the LA times trying to follow the cold pick nineteen supply chain I can't say I've talked to many hospitals or doctors offices or clinics around the country who feel that the supply chain is being managed in anything close to a rational way that's for sure and we can't seem to get answers from FEMA or the White House about what system if any is being used to balance the needs a couple weeks ago I was speaking with the head of the Texas academy of family physicians who working with the golfing buddy of his managed to in about a half million masks over the border from Mexico and then spent about seventy two hours getting them to rural hospitals and doctors offices around Texas because the state of Texas didn't have anything to distribute so you've got the system in which everybody's running around trying to get masks and ventilators and everything else and then on top of that is a totally opaque system of what appears to be haphazard intervention by the federal government on some supplies but not all of them everyone is completely perplexed we hear that trump is having no problem directing to Florida whatever Florida seems to need so zero which is the agency that is allegedly responsible for distributing supplies from the strategic national stockpile has claimed that they have some formula for distributing medical supplies that reflects states in large metro areas relative populations and the relative severity of corona virus outbreaks they are actually shipping things across the country however it's impossible to find out what that formula is whether or not allowances are being made in one way or another four criteria that have not been identified president trump hasn't been shy about claiming that he's willing to reward its friends and punish his enemies the conspiracy minded person might think well is there some nefarious method to how these supplies are getting distributed or not we just don't know what difference does it really make if we know or we don't know what the formula is for distributing this stuff this is taxpayer money that we're talking about private actors in the market of course don't have an obligation to be transparent about what they're doing because there's no expectation under normal circumstances that they're acting in the public interest we hope that the government is acting in the public interest but without transparency who knows who's accountable for this who's in charge is it rear admiral John Paul love check who's at the head of FEMA's coronavirus supply chain task force is it FEMA director Peter Gaynor is it Peter Navarro who is reportedly coordinating private and public sector communication maybe it's the Jared Kushner or the invisible hand is it really fundamentally the president and no one else you know without clear lines of authority things are not getting done as far as we know in a particularly efficient way nor do we know that however they're being done is being done in a lawful way frankly if for example the president's son in law is dialing up private companies and asking them to give support in one way or another to the supply chain challenges what assurances are being made to those companies about what they can expect I'm talking about promises that are made the company acts that if they help out that they'll be made whole in the end with they'll be reimbursed at a certain level without a process all of that is open to question is there a way to have an informed data driven approach to this as Jared Kushner said the federal government was engaged in if in fact the federal government isn't engaged in an informed data driven approach can big business small business health officials state officials do this on their own so the facts on the ground suggests that this can't happen on its own no that's not to say that there aren't a lot of efforts by individual actors some of them quite influential to play a constructive role I mean we've seen a number of large companies including apple for example say we are going to use our connections to the supply chain to procurer masks and we're going to distribute them the owner of the New England Patriots flew the patriots plane to China to go pick up a shipment of masks and flew back to Boston the problem is when you have this sort of thousand points of light approach to procuring and distributing needed supplies what ends up happening is that well connected medical centers that have relationships with large companies either because they do business with them or because they're located in their backyards are often times at the top of the list so for example sales force made a donation to the university California San Francisco Medical Center because they have a long standing relationship both being based in San Francisco does UCSF knew that equipment more than a hospital in New York City or New Jersey that's a lot to ask of sales force to try to make that determination they don't have any expertise in

Fema President Trump
"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Emergency medicine at UCSF is doing his own covert nineteen K. this weekend that is eleven point eight miles to raise awareness about the struggles that a lot of my patients in a lot of folks in our community are facing and hopefully get other folks to donate to local charities and local businesses those struggles he says what he's seeing at work not for people with the virus but folks who are out of work and can't afford their medicine or even food he says this is the pick your own charity or small business to support kind of thing and then get out there alone letting people know on social media that you're running the code nineteen K. or maybe it's the ten K. or even one K. any run any distance getting people to to feel a part of this movement in a part of this because what's most important making gold speak KCBS off leash dog areas are now no go zone in Berkeley city park a statement from Berkeley city manager says nine parks in Berkeley are closed down entirely in the play structures athletic courts some sports fields are also off limits this is to help enforce social distancing amid covert nineteen shelter in place orders open spaces and large parks will still be accessible to visitors as long as they come alone or only with members of their own households and social distancing is theoretically possible on the golf course many courses around the county still open of course in an effort to provide an outlet for some fun and exercise but there are questions about safety and course managers are responding some have barred touching the flag sticks and have even turned the whole cops upside down so players don't need to reach in to retrieve their.

UCSF Berkeley city park Berkeley golf
"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:46 min | 6 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

"With the UCSF visionary who's trying existing cancer drugs against the coronavirus this is the fastest way to get some sort of treatment case CBS news time is for fifteen we had now did the case CBS sports desk and Kevin rabbit charters smart the twenty six year old guard out of Oklahoma state playing for the Boston Celtics announced today that he has tested positive for the corona virus he says he feels no symptoms but he wanted people out there to know that they should follow the guidelines and be safe same message from Sean Payton the New Orleans Saints head coach who also revealed he has tested positive for covert nineteen he wasn't feeling well on Sunday got tested Monday and told ESPN that he's feeling fine but again he wants everyone out there to know that the guidelines are serious and should be taken as such Tyler Beatty of the giants a Chris sale of the red Sox will have Tommy John surgery he felt tightness in his forearm in his last outing in spring training sailors battled a flexor strain and elbow soreness since last July and from the NFL the big news the rams of cut running back Todd Gurley and linebacker clay Matthews from the sports desk Kevin Raddatz KCBS this what's new today's topic who's the greatest of all time for my money it's progressive home and auto bundle it literally saves you money gentleman your thoughts look at when I say it again she had a four year old and I was told you so I disagree thanks fellas took the words right out of my mouth there's really.

Boston Celtics Sean Payton ESPN Tyler Beatty Chris sale red Sox NFL Todd Gurley UCSF CBS Kevin rabbit Oklahoma New Orleans Saints Tommy John clay Matthews Kevin Raddatz
"ucsf" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:52 min | 10 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KGO 810

"D. at UCSF medical school he completed two years of surgery residency at UC SF and then her on Anastasia residency at Harvard's Beth Israel hospital wall still working in the operated Rome she attended UC Berkeley's law school focusing on constitutional law on administrative law doctor singleton has become concerned that technology in algorithms will soon be making medical decisions instead of humans in order to maximize profits at the expense of what's best for the patient doctor Maryland singleton on coast to coast happy holidays to you Maryland well same to you and I'm so glad to be here tonight what an amazing subject well it's certainly caught my eye when last year Daddy came out that Google was working on where they put all the data of several patients into the computer and could predict which patients were gonna die how soon and whether they leave the hospital or not and that their prediction came out better than the doctors according to them tell us exactly Berlin if you can in layman's terms what is an algorithm it's basically taking a lot of data and and I mean and a person can make an algorithm for themselves and we probably do that in our own heads in everyday life if Johnny doesn't do the dishes then all have to do the dishes that's a very basic algorithm and if this then that if this and that and then you take all the facts and put the men and come up with an answer the problem.

UCSF medical school Harvard Beth Israel hospital wall Rome singleton Maryland Daddy Google Berlin Johnny Anastasia UC Berkeley
"ucsf" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

09:51 min | 10 months ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KNSS

"And earned her M. D. at UCSF medical school she completed two years of surgery residency at UC SF and then her on Anastasia residency at Harvard's Beth Israel hospital while still working in the operated Rome she attended UC Berkeley's law school focusing on constitutional law on administrative law doctor singleton has become concerned that technology in the algorithms will soon be making medical decisions instead of humans in order to maximize profits at the expense of what's best for the patient doctor Maryland singleton on coast to coast happy holidays to you Maryland well same to you and I'm so glad to be here tonight what an amazing subject well it's certainly caught my eye when last year Daddy came out that Google was working on where they put all the data of several patients into the computer and could predict which patients were gonna die how soon and whether they leave the hospital or not and that their prediction came out better than the doctors according to them tell us exactly Berlin if you can in layman's terms what is an algorithm it's basically taking a lot of data and and I mean and a person can make an algorithm for themselves and we probably do that in our own heads in everyday life if Johnny doesn't do the dishes then all have to do the dishes that's a very basic algorithm and if this then that if this and that and then you take all the facts and put the men and come up with an answer the problem is in Madison so much of how we treat people and how we really hear people becomes very individually with the patient there always seems to be some little glitch a computer with the is the glitch in each patient that they just don't follow the rules and this is a real problem if they say well we'll have the computer make the decision you'll just be then all the data state in the lab tests but then you have is silly as it may sound you have miracle and plenty of people have the story of somebody who is supposed to die they were on death's door and somehow they didn't well what do you do with that patient what do you say the computer said you were supposed to die so I guess we have to kill you at it's it's it's it's going to be a very very slippery slope of how much we use this data and how much we decide it can think better then we can also remembering who input the data human being doctor Jack Kevorkian the angel of death would be concerned Whitney well it's very interesting because in my view years ago all her Roorkee and was considered cool all for helping people die even it and presumably these people wanted to die and and he was in fact convicted of the water I believe it was manslaughter it could've been second degree murder and now some of our laws are just allowing them in and so when people think oh X. wires the will never happen we don't have to think back to many years to see how we viewed something twenty years ago and then now it's a completely different and it's happening now they are encouraging doctor assisted suicide in and and the son get that's right you know he was convicted of second degree murder Maryland and was the sentence to served eight years of a ten to twenty five year prison term and then he died in June of two thousand eleven I wonder though if he enjoyed doing what he was doing because that's where that goal thing comes in all right well I think one of the things that bothered people he was a pathologist and not clinical physician so some people thought well he doesn't really see patients and he's not an internet family doctor of whatever but I think he was compassionate hi I certainly didn't know and so who knows and all you can go by is what was written about it and I think he believed in what he was doing it was not medically or socially acceptable at that time and then magically now so should be acceptable and what's interesting to me is it seems we've regressed because if you go back to ancient Greece that elders decided which babies lived or died and which old people lived or died when you outlived your usefulness boom you were gone and then we seem to evolve from now and it seems like we're going back the other way now we're we're just deciding well you're expendable we don't need you anymore and yes it's okay to kill babies at birth what concerns you Maryland the most about all this that we're losing our humanity and it yeah it's interesting because of all in the news we see things about the factors of robots and all this stuff and I would read it and Jeff WAF when it came out it was like a joke actually and then suddenly it doesn't seem so silly anymore because people are actually buying into this stuff apparently the sales are up and then you look at kids they are dating because they're afraid to date because of all this political correctness and you wonder where it's all going first you don't talk to people because people are standing right next to each other but they're texting each other what that and what happened to people talking to each other it is it's become a really unusual if you say well I'll call you hello world text to me the information in and I don't think call you I don't think most younger people can go to dinner with a friend and not put their phone away where they don't look at it for the entire dinner instead they put it on the bars top or the restaurant table it's there in case somebody texts them or if they want to send the tax I don't think they can physically put it away there too addicted to it I think you're right and I certainly see that and just going for a walk in seeing people walking together and they both have their phones out so all these things taken individually you can sort of fluff it off but then when you start adding it up you have people not talking to each other anymore people forgetting how to talk to each other therefore you don't become comfortable with human emotion and maybe you'd prefer to sit in front of a computer screen for you know to learn about news the world or whatever rather than having a discussion with someone and and and so bit by bit we're just we're just losing our humanity do you remember the movie years ago fantastic mortgage yeah in this for people who have never seen it before a guy had some kind of tumor or something clock or something that needed to be operated on in the only way they could get to it was to shrink the medical people and put them in this little tiny machine like a little space ship that was so minute it traveled through his bloodstream and they want to the two more to fix the guy it was an amazing story is that is that doable one day hi I don't know I don't it's what enter the thing is now they are putting DNA chips in in animate objects there's a DNA chip by just read the other day that they put in a toy rabbit so I don't completely understand how they do it and I'd like to but they can put what is it millions and millions and millions of time more information in this little DNA chips then you could in a computer chip and so somehow they've been coded DNA put it in an animal object and that dining to me so certainly this whole concept of fantastic voyage could be out there I don't know that you could shrink people but certainly you could make some sort of capsule with a curative item in it and floated through.

M. D. UCSF medical school Harvard Beth Israel hospital Rome singleton Anastasia UC Berkeley
"ucsf" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"It's the Glenn Beck program live from the metroplex right here on real news information five seventy KLIF race race race race race and I'm not talking about a foot race or a horse race I'm talking about the insanity of the racists in the Democratic Party in the media who are labeling every white person a racist thinking that will get them elected joining us right now to discuss this with us some clarity is Dr Marilyn Ms singleton now I gotta tell you something about a background she's a board certified anesthesiologist she graduated from Stanford earned her M. D. at UCSF medical school to use a surgery residency at UCSF and then Anish these your residency at Harvard's Beth Israel hospital and while still working in the operating room doctor singleton attend the UC Berkeley law school focusing on constitutional law and administrative law how she wound up not being a left wing or I don't know but we'll find out in a moment doctor singleton welcome to the savage nation thank you so much for having me doctor singleton with your sterling credentials and having done most of your training here in the San Francisco area how did you wind up not being a left wing left wing wacko I think my parents raised me right thank you I didn't know that you had I know you a great I've read your columns for a long time are you based here in the San Francisco area are you giving me an Oakland now I live in southern California because well whatever I have a speech I'm giving at the end of the month a certain clubs private club I would've invited you why do you think the left wing media so stop so focused on race today doctor because it's an ugly word and racism racism racism and they ran out of other things to discuss and sadly it is a well known saying that the left hand to make people miserable in order to get people to change their ways culturally we have been moving along and getting along and doing very well and they don't like it doctor singleton.

Democratic Party Stanford M. D. UCSF medical school UCSF Harvard Beth Israel hospital Oakland California Glenn Beck KLIF Dr Marilyn Ms Anish San Francisco
"ucsf" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This podcast and following message are sponsored by ucsf finnity some things are hard to control you'll like over caffeinated co workers other things are easy to control like you're in home why fi with x finnity x fi set why fi curfew change your password and create user profiles all with e x fi app another reason why x finnity is simple easy awesome go online call one eight hundred xfinity or visit a store to learn more restrictions apply no matter what you've got planned you need a song of the summer this week npr's pop culture happy hour we are rounding up experts from npr music we will play a ton of songs to lift your spirits might even find your next favorite artists that's npr's pop culture happy hour listen and subscribe now this is on point meghna chakrabarti were talking this hour about s m are it is also known as thomas sensory meridian response there's a whole genre of youtube videos out there with many millions of views and everything from people whispering to scratching paper topping it's designed to generate this brain tingle as people call it an ass mar has had its most mainstream moment yet with eighty super bowl commercial that featured zoe kravitz the air just a couple of weeks ago and i'm joined today by craig richard he's professor of biopharmaceutical sciences at shenandoah university and founder of s m are university a and we've got so many comments coming

npr thomas zoe kravitz craig richard shenandoah university founder ucsf youtube professor of biopharmaceutical
"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

"KCBS news time twelve twelve and one of the first studies to take advantage of Colorado's twenty twelve legalization of recreational pot UCSF, researchers found good news and bad as KCBS reporter, Holly Quantel legal marijuana can reduce product pain. But it also increases car crashes and injuries UCSF looked at twenty eight million hospital records in the two years before and after Colorado legalized pot and found a ten percent increase in vehicle accidents five percent increase in alcohol, abuse and overdoses but five percent drop in hospital, admissions for chronic pain, senior study, author Gregory Marcus UCSF, professor of medicine that increase in injuries related to substance. Use could be because we're seeing more people that were physically injured directly related to cannabis use. It's also possible that with increase access to cannabis that people were more likely to consume other drugs such as cocaine heroin, etc. At the same time, he found no Mark increase in hospital stays at twenty fourteen. The national survey on drug use than health down over forty four percent of Americans have used pot more than twenty two million said it was in the last thirty days, but it is still a federal crime in only nine states, including California have legalized recreational use Marcus says that change in California law now allows him to do a deeper dive into the health effects of cannabis and that in turn can help frame how we handle addiction and abuse in San Francisco Lequan KCBS CBS news time, twelve thirteen. Steve bicker along with the latest on the warriors. And Steph curry. Okay, family announcement are smart home is online cool to had smart lights. Smart fridge. Smart thermostat. The smart speaker place music or answers questions like this. Check it out question. What animals besides humans have chins? Can't find home internet several impressive, dad. Hold on question. Can you find the home internet can't find internet? Your home is only as smart as your.

Gregory Marcus UCSF cannabis UCSF KCBS Colorado Steve bicker Steph curry Holly Quantel California marijuana professor of medicine reporter San Francisco CBS cocaine heroin five percent forty four percent ten percent thirty days
"ucsf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With anxiety and depression. They're here with us studio. Jennifer of Lincoln high school in Elliot lake Wilmer dang and ton is also here with us psychologists and clinical director of the child adolescent mood and anxiety clinic at UCSF this is all conjunction with the youth takeover program. And Elliott was in the middle of personal narrative there about some of the pressures that she feels that have maybe contributed in addition to maybe biological disposition other mysteries that you're trying to solve. But let's explore this little more with you. And I'm interested in also funny out something I believe that you expressed about the fact that there's a lot of workshops that go on at your high school, but nothing really that broaches on or proxy mates. This whole question of mental health. I mean, they'll talk about I guess ADHD. They'll talk about this Lexi, but not the kind of things that you struggle. Yeah. And I think that's something that has it's been difficult. Not. And I think that we're talking about having to have a facade or mask on at school. And I think part of the reason is that it's very stigmatized and my school in a lot of schools. Don't do great job of bridging the gap between the experienced are having what's being talked about in the classroom. And I think that's it's been a conversation that frankly, I've been a little bit disappointed that it's not part of the narrative our school has explored because we spend a lot of time and resources, which is fantastic on people who have learning differences like ADHD dyslexia or something of the sort which Inouye mental health should take away from. But I think it's equally as important to have conversation around clinical depression, and then also just the more generalized, anxiety and depression are generations feeling let's find out what our listeners are feeling. I wanna go to your calls here valley tidal you wanna add anything to what each. Huge proponent of workshops, actually, I think the really important to help as many people as possible access information and kind of a good bridge between trying to understand what's going on with the person and then seeking treatment. I think it's a good way to disseminate information, so I would love to see more schools doing workshops, and that's something that we offer at UCSF also should mention here little editor coming the schools. Most of the schools, even the private schools are woefully lacking. In terms of counselors and psychologists and psychiatrists just not there. Yeah. It's true. And also, you mentioned KC precious. That's definitely the case historically in private schools, but I see in public schools as well that many teams up until two three in the morning doing homework and these students that starkly do quite well. Imagine how hot is even for the students who have dyslexia ADHD or struggle in other ways. And so, yeah, I think the schools I would encourage schools to kind of look at that. And see how it's impacting students mental health. We mentioned a couple of things that are really central to this whole discussion stigma and treatment necessity for treatment and the necessity to do something really profound about stigma because it is a profound problem. Let me get to caller. So Jacqueline we open with you. Good morning Jacqueline. I have a question for psychologists. You have on red program the school seems to be lacking in understanding how to deal with this problem. Even though you seem they informed that this is a rising problem with a student. I have a God athletic woman that is has been open to the school about and iden-, depression and taken more that she told us in hug hug softly. And I think only now have they been able to provide somewhat of a structure support for her allowing her to discuss issue with teaches directly and I wanted to ask the student as well as to what do they seem to be helpful and the psychologist? What did you suggest the school to do? Because. The school is really not supporting the student. What would you in an ideal world? Let me ask both for Nellie. What would you like to school to do? They could do not only for your peers, but could have done for you or could still do for you make things more supportive. I think something that's pretty basic that could implemented as our school has a freshman and sophomore year health class and within that health class. They do. Of sexual education. They talk about gender identity all which is fantastic. But I think the mental health component is really missing. And I think if you can start educating kids early enormous ising the idea of struggling with mental health that could help in sort of a proactive measure to address issues that they will very well face later on while I'm gonna ask you for two. But I want to read a tweet because it's addressed to both of you. This is Chris pleased. Let your guests know that they are very very courageous and brave people. I hope they're honesty and willingness to speak about mental health problems encourages other young people come forward and seek help Jennifer. What are your thoughts about what could be more supportive, and what could be really helpful to your peers or could be to you even feel like every school should also have a support system or like a wellness center? Also provide like out sort outside resources for people who don't want to be involved in that school situation and just rather do outside and also have a conversation with friends. That you trust because I feel like having a support system. Just makes you just wanna talk about it more and be more open ineffective. Just respond to something. You said really quick. I think at least for myself, it's really sobering. To hear stories of people who don't have access to treatment who go to really large schools who have even for me. It feels that. I don't have a lot of access to conversations about mental at the school, but for people even less, and I think thinking about my own experience and how difficult it's been. It's crazy thing that just more various people have in the lack of congressman privilege and equity that needs to be made. Sometimes it just helps to know that there's somebody there who can listen to what you have to say, and you can open yourself up to entrust absence. Almost that simple. Not simple, but simple in the sense of it being needed and desperately needed in. So many situations. Adriana writes, my daughter struggle with depression and UCSF dialectical behavior therapy program saved her even with insurance, it was expensive and investment of time that we. Thankfully, we're able to do like it or not parents need to be involved are teens one us to leave them alone. But also stay on top of them and being gauged, they need their parents, another support of adults to chicken often, we need to learn to listen to our teams not just as parents. But seeking to understand where they're coming from another comment from Kelly says as a teenager. I also struggled with depression. I remember feeling unsupported by my family now that I am a parent. I am wondering from the teenage guest's perspective, what qualities in adults are in your family would help you and support you through this and for Natalie with the very of talking to adults and minor. They're successful programs for peer support for teens. Let's go first to actually Elliott spoke about support from her. Parents let me go to you on this Jennifer because it's been more of a challenge for you. And everything. What could you do to break down that barrier that your parents have? I mean, some of it's cultural I realized I feel like just sitting down and just tell them and saying that like, I have depression, and even if they don't know it you can just try to slowly explain like the symptoms and what we have. And maybe they'll be open to more understanding. But right now, they don't even want to hear the center. I feel like they don't really understand it 'cause like depression like, you don't really see it physically. Sometimes. Right. But then for me, it's all mentally. I don't really show it. So it's not like on the service. They don't see it. But I feel like like as time goes on. And if you talk about it, more and more the kind of like a little bit more open to it like a little shell. You can also give them some articles to read if they're open to that or welcome. I mean, if they're willing to do that there are a lot of articles that talk about mental health as being comparable, and it is under many rules of insurance and so forth. The physical health and has to be maintained talks about depression in terms of disease and affliction all of those kinds of things which it is question was also for you Natalie taught in types of parents, parents can do I think empowering parents to be involved in treatment and to ask questions, and then kind of sounds like the question was also about before treatment. I think just sitting down with your team letting them know that you're available letting them know that you've noticed some changes on want to kind of be available in track to be kind of as. Judgmental as possible. Just be just be available in advocate. I think the other cola Jacqueline that cold and was saying that she had to push hard for a child to get through the school. And so I waited encourage parents, you know, there's a lot of areas and difficulty accessing treatment to be as much of an advocate as possible. And here's Karen from Hillsborough. Karen, you're on the air. Good morning. Good morning. How are you? Good. Thank you. Good. I was calling the unfortunate to be an instructor at Panera junior college some county here, and I have a lot of student to suffer from depression, anxiety, all the time. And I teach interpersonal communication, so it's a wonderful way to open a discussion with students about that. But when it comes to really helping I think as instructors and educator. There's a little bit of a question. Like, okay, you're not trained in mental health. You know, all this all these tools that come from communication, but I'm just wondering how restricted we are in terms of maybe not providing mental health services, but some sort of communication interpersonal interpersonal support students and two other mental health professional. Thank you for that question occurrence good to hear from you. Tell you address. I mean, which is suggesting is really something more in place. Yeah. Yeah. I think if you want to read up on the warning signs as mentioned earlier, but also just know that you can be really supportive to students and your goal might be to help them access treatment situated talk to them and encourage them to seek help help them connect to me sources only so much. You can do if you don't have mental health background is really challenging to do that. So it's great that students are coming to you. And I think it's important to know when to okay, I really want to be able to you. I think that this is kind of beyond the scope of what I can help. You can I help you connect you to therapist, and that's an important role for those in teaching roles, and do, you know about this yelled program? I wanted to ask you about it. Because when you're talking about getting parents more involved, it's my relieve a with over yeller NPR story on it. And what they do is they especially with anxiety work with parents in working gradually to get their kids to face their fears. But they don't work with the kids. They work with the parents. Yeah, I think that's really interesting approach. Probably really helps with families where the we talk a lot about the parents having kind of stigma with being cultural barriers, but sometimes the kids may know once come into treatment to especially if have one of the kind of coal problems with anxiety is voidance. And so you mentioned of as you running wanting to avoid the time at end of that thought of that was overwhelming anxiety, anxiety provoking, so yes, whether it's helping the child to do exposure, helping the parent to then work with their child all of that sounds wonderful. I mean, the the kind of CBT approach for anxiety is exposure kind of in a hierarchical way starting with lower level exactly preventing situations and help people face them. And then that the kind of catastrophic event that they may be imagining either doesn't happen. If it does happen working with therapist to have a coke plant combat plan dealing with that. So whether it's helping the parents to kind of be a coach in that way, a working directly with the child both all of the. Above all, this wonderful Elliott, maybe diagnosing here. But maybe you need some coaching on not being able to adjust to the idea of mediocrity. Yeah. I actually just wrote a story in trail runner magazine about sort of facing mediocrity. And I think I'm somebody who is sort of a I don't know greatness complex. I wanna say like I have to be mediocre that doesn't mean. Yeah. I think that mediocrity and this goes into what we're talking about the culture in schools. I think me is something that is discouraged and in a way stigmatized itself because I think being elites on and being the best at what.

depression Elliott Jennifer Jacqueline ADHD Natalie UCSF Lincoln high school Lexi Elliot lake Wilmer dang clinical director Karen KC Nellie iden Inouye Chris congressman
"ucsf" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Be a sensual one for providing good healthcare and two for being able to deal with the finances of healthcare. So really when we think about value, we have to be thinking about the people who are sickest and how we're gonna provide care that really aligns with what's important to them. What are their values? What their goals, I'm very often in that setting? It's not coming to the hospital, and it may or may not be receiving a lot more interventions than it may be care that really allows them to be at home to focus on their symptoms and other goals and values that they that are more important to them. So really thinking about that challenge. And how do we design systems to do? That if you look at the world the way it is now, and I think the good news when you look back compared to a decade ago is how many more palliative care services. There are and recognizing that there's an increasing evidence base for the role of palliative, Karen, increasing the quality of care for people with serious illness. So when you look at the data, and you look back over the last decade or two even there's so many more palliative care services. So many more people receiving palliative care. And yet the reality is that it's still pretty much random event, whether you get palliative care or not so even in our own system, I could have to patients in the clinic to patients in the ICU with identical problems one is getting palliative care from our specialty palliative care team. And the other is not and has very little to do with the patient and everything to do with how the doctor or nurse thinks about whether this patient is right, and whether the doctor nurse or comfortable talking about palliative care. Introducing it and making the referral, and that's not a system of care. That's a random event. And if we're really going. Change care. First thing we need to do is make palliative care routine. And in order to do that we have to be screening people to understand what their needs are do they have pain? Do they have shortness of breath? Do they things -iety? What are the caregiver needs that? They have do. They have the help that they needed home. Do. They have an advanced directive are their decisions coming up that they will be facing. And that is important to address in advance until the first step that we're beginning to implement here at UCSF is really trying to understand. How do we scream large populations of patients using information from our electric health record and other information that we could gather from patients really understand what those needs are. So that's a first step. And then once you know, what their needs are then we can design systems to really address those needs recognizing that it's not all going to be specialty palliative care. Just like not every patient with heart. Failure is going to need to see a heart. Failure specialty cardiologists, for example, and not every patient with diabetes each to CNN to chronologies. But if you don't know who has diabetes in your system is going to be. Very hard to improve care for that group of patients with diabetes..

diabetes UCSF CNN Karen
"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"ucsf" Discussed on KCBS All News

"UCSF. Researchers studying the deadly rise offense in street drugs. Went out and interviewed more than one hundred people who use them what they found KCBS as gentlemen reports is that few drug users want the extremely potent opioid and almost none. No. When they're getting the researchers whose work appears in the latest issue of addiction found a real lack of product information for drug consumers, it's not being sold as so. They didn't go to the dealer and say you have heroin offense. No today. I'm choosing fence. No. And then this applies to think oh this an rush on. We'll get more federal into the supply. They don't know. They don't have that choice. That's why Sarah Mars and her colleagues believe cracking down on low level dealers and people who use drugs would do little to slow what they call a fennel poisioning epidemic. Instead Maher says it makes sense to focus on wholesale suppliers who seemed to choose fennel because it's cheaper and easier to make than heroin, and she says Chinese leaders recent pledge to better control sentinel produced in their country is an encouraging sign. The aim seems to be a good one. But whether the implementation will be affected if we we don't yet know, gentlemen, KCBS news insurance Commissioner has quickly taken control of the Mercedes property and casualty company in atwater. This after the company warned losses from the campfire were driving. It into insolvency KCBS is Rebecca corral explains. The process it turns out the small, but well established Mercedes property and casualty company has a large concentration of customers in Butte county, fourteen thousand homes lost and eighty five people tragically died in this fire. There's just been nothing like it and the loss of their staggering to the point that they overwhelmed this small company and his left them in the state of insolvency Nancy can Cade with a state insurance. Commissioners office says this is exactly why years ago legislature created the California insurance Guaranty association to make sure policyholders are protected should something like this happen, but Commissioner moved very quickly to take over the company security the assets and transferred to the insurance Guaranty association. And that allows them to come in and start paying the claims for the people who are affected by this up in the campfire..

KCBS Commissioner California insurance Guaranty heroin Mercedes Maher Butte county Rebecca corral Sarah Mars UCSF. Nancy atwater
"ucsf" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"ucsf" Discussed on Science Friday

"To support failed. Kidneys vats, these mechanical pumps that take the place of the heart and for many patients, these machines have been truly miraculous. They have kept them alive. Maybe it's not the same life they had before, but it's life. But for other patients, it's a life they didn't want. And that's what were Jessica in the days. After the code, we may have have a guy who. The best that we could hope for will be a persistent vegetative state where he will be living on a machine for the rest of his life, which could be quite a long time. Actually, he's a young guy and we didn't know anymore. What what his outcomes were likely to be. But then this happened. I'm just looking at my text messages, Tom, the cardiologists. He'd been texting with Dr Klein the doctor over at UCSF asking has her patient and he starts getting these messages back back from doctor Klein saying he's alive which was not a given, but still no heartbeat still with no cardiac function. But then a little bit later another message from UCSF and now there is a heartbeat, holy crap. I mean, he he spent fourteen hours in v v no more bag of worms. This man's heart is beating. Jessica gets the news in the middle frowns I keep calling Tom, what's going on with that guy. I was shocked. It got more and more on believable a few days later, a colleague of Dr Klein's timezone with this little bit of information. He seems to be responding, and I said, what say, what? What are you talking about? Any says, well, you know, the news. Tell me he's responding to commands and I think he is too. It just eats step. It just seemed like I kidding you've gotta be kidding. It kept on like that for a few weeks. The man was being moved down to the step down unit, his breathing tube coming out. He was going to rehab and guess what he went home..

doctor Klein Tom persistent vegetative state Jessica UCSF fourteen hours