20 Burst results for "Uc Hastings"

Lack of Paid Sick Time Could Be a Barrier to Vaccination

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Lack of Paid Sick Time Could Be a Barrier to Vaccination

"Of today everyone sixteen and older is now eligible to receive a covid vaccine in every single state more than two hundred million shots have already been given in the us so far about half of all adults have received at least one dose. The vaccine is free whether you have health insurance or not but even minus the massive logistics of distributing the vaccine there are logistics involved in getting it and some workers are having trouble getting paid time off to get their shots or to deal with side effects from the workplace culture desk. Marketplace's megan mccarthy carino has the story when washington dc software engineer lori. Barth got the vaccine last month Kind of kicked her but headache chills. brain fog. I don't think i could have read taxed on screen comfortably. Loan sit up in a chair. Barth didn't have to worry about working through the pain because she got her vaccine on a weekend and she has plenty of paid sick time. She could've used but not all workers do says vicki shavuot a senior fellow with new america. And you could very easily see how it would be financially impossible and potentially job risking for a worker to be able to get a vaccine. There is no national requirement that employers offer any sick leave much less a couple of days to get vaccinated and low wage. Essential workers are among the least likely to have paid time off says elite schools with the economic policy institute. They may not have a lot of power negotiate for when the best time is to have the vaccines that they make sure. They don't have to work the next day. In case there's side effects said that impact them thirteen states and several dozen cities do mandate some form of paid sick leave and many employers like mcdonald's starbucks and wal mart have offered paid time off for employees to get vaccinated doric rice a law professor at uc hastings. Says it's important. That workers have vaccine time off on top of their usual sick leave.

Megan Mccarthy Carino Barth Headache Chills Vicki Shavuot Lori New America Washington Economic Policy Institute United States Wal Mart Doric Rice Uc Hastings Mcdonald Starbucks
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ask your doctor, whether you actually need the medicine, ask your doctor, whether there are generics or other alternatives that are lot cheaper. You might try you as a consumer. We much more in control than people realize, well, those are some examples of things that consumers can do anything else, besides price comparisons price shopping. I think within that one of the most important things that I've heard people talk about is to figure out what you are taking. Is it necessary to take that are there other therapies that don't involve medications? I heard a an amazing study that a lot of patients, get on a medication. They continue taking it. They moved to a new doctor who refills that medication. And no one actually looks at whether the medication is still necessary. Maybe the conditions resolved, maybe the patients taking a new medication. That makes the old one no longer necessary. You have to think about your own healthcare, and figure out. Out what you need. Well, let's go to call a Ruthin and L. Cerita Hiroo fan. Good morning. I wanted to bring up or ask it has to do with the prices that can be negotiated when you buy in bulk have Medicare, I do not have a Medicare Part, D plan. So I have to pay cash for prescription, you know, out of pocket. There's a law in California, that was passed that has that everyone, who has a Medicare card and registers that pharmacy that pharmacy cast to provide prescription at medic Cal price and some of the differences aren't that big. But some of them are staggering and I just wanted to raise the issue that the medical prices for Medicare beneficiaries, which they're in titled two is way way less on some prescription. That is an interesting experience and it points again to the importance to consumers of being informed about the options that are there in also. Also, the problem of lack of transparency in the system. There is no reason why prices should vary from pharmacy to pharmacy in the same community across the state day to day. You may have different prices day to day. It's very difficult to understand all of the system and what's flowing in and out of it. Competition thrives on openness. And right now, this system is entirely shrouded in secrecy. He has a dope. Paik definitely. Let me remind our listeners that we're talking about the issue of high prescription drugs yesterday. There was a bipartisan effort in the house to pass legislation to address this but has little hope of getting through the Senate. And after the break, we'll dig into why. We'll also dig into other potential solutions that are being proposed including California's move to aggressively leverage, its size to better negotiate with drug makers and again, be one invite you to join the conversation. Tell us have the prices for your medications Ghana. Have you ever been unable to afford to fill a prescription for yourself or a family member? What are your questions for Robin Feldman professor of law? UC Hastings about how prescription drugs are priced and why they cost as much as they do the number to call is eight six.

Paik California Medicare Ruthin Ghana L. Cerita Hiroo UC Hastings Robin Feldman professor of law Senate
"uc hastings" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KCRW

"A law professor at UC Hastings. And the author of drugs money and secret hand shakes the unstoppable growth of prescription drug prices. So the price of insulin has has risen enormously in the past decade, you have also seen improvements in the drug itself. New methods of delivery new new ways to try to use insulin that have certain value. The question is is that value worth what what people are paying for it? The initial invention of the core. Chemical for insulin happened more than one hundred years ago. And if you look at the top insulin makers throughout the country, they have managed to pile protections onto their drugs over and over again. So some of them pilot as many as fifty five protections. That's what blocks cheaper drugs from competing and getting into the market. What about a generic option for insulin? I mean isn't insulin at this point, given the percentage of Americans that have type one or type two diabetes. Can't this be considered a medication that needs? Generic option generics. Are the best hope for competition the market. That's how the system is post to be designed we expect the pharmaceutical companies to get a handsome reward when they invent something. But after a period of time generic should come in and drive the price down if the deals blocked generics. From getting traction with any of the various middle players that drugs aren't going to get on the shelves. It's no good. If you develop a drug, and it's not being offered to people. Let's a little bit about pharmacy benefit managers or otherwise known as P B M's who are they? And how do they affect the cost of insulin? PM's are the middle players. The supposed to be working on behalf of the health plan that is supposed to be working for you and me the health plans clients and their job is to negotiate discounts with the drug companies in. And then also to help the plan set the terms on which you and I can access the drugs and how much we will get reimbursed for that. So the system is supposed to be set up. So that the PBS middle players are getting a good deal. But that's not how it's happened. Instead, the drug companies have turned this system on its head and figured out how to give lots of very attractive payments to the middle players in exchange for middle players preferencing, the more expensive drugs, obviously, we're talking about this given the congressional hearings that are happening right now about insulin pricing. What's happened so far there? I mean has congress learned anything from these hearings my sense in both was that the executives escaped pretty much unscathed. It is a complex area. Sometimes the terms they wave in front of senators are a hundred percent, accurate, and not helpful the things that are going on the secret deals the ways in which this is structured are very bad for consumers, and for you and me now, the PB M's and the drug companies like to say that there's nothing bad in our secret deals is all good. We're all doing our best to bring the prices down my answer to that is if there's nothing bad in their open up the deals, let the government see them, let the presi them if there's nothing behind the curtain opened the curtain, but is there any federal agency that is charged with limiting or or overseeing these drug companies and what they do. There is no federal agency that does this the different federal agencies involved. Nobody has the right mandate to get us. What we need. So at the patent trademark office. The question is. Just is this different. And not is this any better doesn't really have therapeutic value just as is it different in some way at the FDA. The question is safety and efficacy. That's a very important question. But they're not asking whether the drugs that are coming out and that we're getting pushed into in. This system are actually any better for patients or good value. At all there's nothing set up to watch out for your interests in mind. I do believe by the way that we do markets well in this country and that a good injection of competition. So that drug companies are exposed to market forces would go along way that the government can't keep putting its thumb on the scale and helping out the more expensive medications. Well, how can we expect the government to create policies or even during these hearings? How can we expect a trust them if the to make decisions on behalf of Americans versus their private interests? It's difficult question. The pharmaceutical industry is an extra. Drawer narrowly, powerful lobby farm industry spent two hundred seventy million dollars last year lobbying, and I believe they have one and a half lobbyists per member of congress. That's a lot of power out there. However, so many people are upset and frightened about access to life saving medications. Their voices may be heard we have seen some price. Reductions from some insulin manufacturers, Robin, so far do you expect that others will follow suit? So I am heartened to see prices come down. The question is what's going to keep this what's going to to to make it long term, a company can decide for public relations views that it would be good to have lower prices right now when the heat is on and then we'll let them slide up when congress gets tired of this and goes onto something else. Robin Feldman is a professor of law at UC Hastings and. The author of drugs money.

congress UC Hastings Robin Feldman professor PBS FDA professor of law two hundred seventy million do one hundred years hundred percent
"uc hastings" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The footsie in London is up six tenths of a percent down s and p futures are down less than a tenth of a percent. The Dow futures down eighteen points, NASDAQ futures up about a tenth of a percent and the ten year treasury yield is a two point five two percent. A jury has decided that one man's cancer was caused by Monsanto's roundup weed killer Monsanto and parent company, Bayer's liability is being decided in a separate case. But the trial has put a spotlight on how courts assess complex unsettled scientific questions. Marketplace's Michael Lipkin has more does roundup caused cancer. Scientists disagree on that regulators in different countries disagree. But jurors and San Francisco had to decide as weird as this case might seem there's really nothing unusual about it. Jennifer Lawrence is professor at the university of Texas school of law. There is debate over whether courts are equipped to handle complex or murky scientific questions. Judges usually decide which evidence is admissible, but they depend on lawyers arguments to do. So you don't have anyone in court whose actual function. It is to present evidence in an objective, light and courts. Do get ahead of the science example, Gatien evolving silicon implants. In the nineteen ninety s David Fagan is dean of the UC Hastings college of law five hundred thousand lawsuits were filed alleging silicone implants caused a tissue disorders where the research finally caught up. It turned out that it did not cause connective tissue disorders and the cases ended up being dismissed, but that can take years after a case is settled signs and the law are on very different timetables in New York, I Michael Lipkin for marketplace. Marketplace.

Michael Lipkin UC Hastings college of law David Fagan university of Texas school of Jennifer Lawrence Bayer San Francisco London professor New York five two percent ten year
"uc hastings" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

09:53 min | 2 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Can come in. But they have to come in through the force of entry. That is a very important thing. Again. I reiterate we need democratic votes. You immigrated laws because they're flooding our country. But they're trying to flood our country. We need the wall. We're building the wall built at one time and quickly. The asylum section of the immigration and nationality act says any person may apply for asylum for up to a year, regarded this how they entered the United States Aaron Reichman Melnik is a lawyer for the American immigration counsel. He says Trump may be emboldened after the supreme court upheld the revised travel ban. But the law will not support this move. What the president had attempted to do is essentially to through a two step process. Get around the law. I the government is publishing a regulation that creates a new bar to asylum for individuals who violate any presidential proclamation. And then Secondly, the president has issued a proclamation barring asylum seekers from entering the United States along the southern border between a port of entry in this way. This partially recognizes that the president can't just stand asylum wave of a hand. Instead he's trying to get around it with a by saying. On not barring asylum. I'm just banning people from entering and then someone else's and then the department of homeland security has created this regulation that states that individuals subject to a ban may not apply for asylum. So it's a it's a two step process to sort of get it something that the law doesn't allow him to do according to the government's indicators the current numbers of illegal crossings over the southern border our storage, low, but Trump railed against migrants and asylum seekers in the lead up to the midterm elections. He described caravans of people from Central America, slowly, approaching the United States, many of whom intend to seek asylum as invaders. Legal aren't is one of the lead lawyers who brought the American Civil Liberties union lawsuit against Trump. He describes the president's move as patently unlawful and says it is the administration's larger effort to dehumanize immigrants. What lawsuit notes is that? Not everyone knows where the ports of entry are and may go to apply between ports of entry not realizing they're not supposed to do that. Sometimes they're forced by criminal gangs to cross the border between ports of entry. There's all different reasons. Why people cross between ports of entry at the end of day. Congress consistent with international law has made clear that if people are genuinely endanger, it doesn't matter where they crossed the border. And so that's what we will be trying to get across to the court administration officials say those denied asylum under the proclamation maybe eligible for similar forms of protection. If they fear returning to their countries that they would be subject to a higher threshold to prove they would be in danger uniquely is the legal director of the center for gender and refugee studies at UC Hastings college of law. She says what the administration is trying to do is incredibly insidious at the same time that they've issued this proclamation to supposedly banned people from accessing our silences, STAN if they arrived between ports of entry. They have also slowed down and turned away people who do come to ports of entry seeking to enter and apply for asylum that way. You know, you blankly seemed there are long lines of people and asylum seekers had been forced to camp out on the streets or find shelter in Mexico for days or even months at a time while waiting in line to be processed at a point of entry and US officials have just turned them away in violation. Again of our own lives by issuing this proclamation at the same time is training away. People from ports of entry what the Trump administration is trying to do is to affectively shut down our southern border to silence seekers completely and that is a legal under our laws. According to official figures released late Friday, the number of migrants taken into custody along the Mexico border soared to the highest totals of the Trump presidency in October family, detention centers are largely capacity, and it's not clear how additional migrants will be held. For KPFA news. I'm Nick, Alexandra, a US appeals court has ruled that the DACA program shielding young immigrants from deportation must remain in effect. A three judge panel of the ninth circuit court of appeals kept in place. An injunction blocking President Trump's decision to cancel the Obama era program. The ruling said California and other plane of sword likely to succeed with their claim that the decision to end DACA was arbitrary and capricious California. Attorney general havi are bizarre leading a legal challenge to the Trump administration's action. He said the young people notice dreamers are an essential part of the states economic engine, California is home for more than two hundred thousand Cremers one more than one of every four in the nation. This fight is personal for so many communities in California. And I must say has a son of immigrants by self. This fight is personal to me to lawsuits by California and others challenging the Trump administration's decision will continue in federal court. While the injunction remains in place residents of border communities are along the southwest are protesting the presence of the US military at the border. They're saying it's a political move not based on actual security concerns in Arizona group of residents from our vodka and the Tahoe no nation came north to Phoenix to denounce the military presence in their communities and how it hampers their ability to go about their daily lies. Why are you going? I on where I'm coming from back there. In El Paso, Texas. Activists are planning a rally this weekend to protest the deployment of troops. The mayor of Laredo, Texas, denounced the move saying it would harm morale and hurt the region's economy. President Trump has deployed more than five thousand six hundred troops to the border in response to a caravan of Central American migrants who are headed for the US. The caravan is composed of many families with children fleeing violence in their homelands, Matthew Whitaker's future as the head of the Justice department appeared uncertain today's President Donald Trump denied even knowing the man he had named acting attorney general just two days ago. The senate's top Republican predicted a permanent replacement could be named soon for Whitaker who is now overseeing the Trump Russia probe the comments from Trump and Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell came as Whitaker's pass business ties and remarks on special counsel, Robert Muller's Russia investigation and other topics were drawing scrutiny from Democrats and ethics group's speaking to reporters today. Trump said, I don't know Matt Whitaker that contradicted. Trump's remarks on Fox News last month when he called Whitaker, a great guy and said, I know Matt Whitaker McConnell. Meanwhile, said he thought Whitaker's. Tenure as interim attorney general it would be very brief. And another Republican Senator Susan Collins of Maine said she was concerned by some of Whitaker's pass comments and called for legislation that would place limits on his ability to fire special counsel Muller that would include specifying that only a Senate confirmed Justice department official which Whitaker is not could dismiss Muller Whitaker, a Republican party loyalists and chief of staff for just ousted attorney general Jeff Sessions was elevated Wednesday after his boss was forced from his job by Trump the new position handed Jim oversight of Muller's investigation into possible ties between Russia and Trump's two thousand sixteen presidential campaign since Wednesday Whitaker's face pressure from Democrats to recuse himself from overseeing Muller based on critical. Comments. He made about the investigation before joining the Justice department last year. Legal. Scholars are also debating the constitutionality of his appointment with some lawyers saying it's illegal because he's not been confirmed by the Senate despite Trump's current distancing himself from Whitaker to Republicans close to the president said he had enjoyed Whitaker's television appearances and the two had struck a bond. There's TV appearances included one on CNN in which Whitaker suggested that the Muller probe could be starved of resources. According to these Republicans who spoke only on condition of anonymity. Trump told associates that he felt Whitaker would be loyal and would not have recused himself from the Russia probe as sessions had done..

President Trump United States Matthew Whitaker Trump administration president Trump Trump Russia Matt Whitaker McConnell Robert Muller California Mexico attorney Texas senate official American Civil Liberties union Congress UC Hastings college of law KPFA Senator Susan Collins
"uc hastings" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Litzinger. There may well be fireworks next week in Washington DC, political legal and cultural her lawyers say Christine blassie for the woman accusing supreme court nominee Brett cavenaugh. Sexual assault has agreed to share information with the Senate Judiciary committee. Kevin cirilli chief Washington correspondent for Bloomberg news Republicans urging Dr forward to testify, but whether or not she dies ultimately remains decision. Now, I spoke with a source earlier. This week is suggested that all of these Republican source that all of these deadlines that the judiciary committee is putting on the latest one being with Justin a few hours are quote, unquote, arbitrary KCBS reporter gentle as Republicans are frustrated things aren't moving faster. It's clear to UC Hastings college of the law. Professor Rory little that Republicans would not have gone back and forth with Christine Blasi Ford's legal team so much and avoided issuing her a subpoena. If they felt they had. It enough votes to get red Kavanagh's nomination out of the Senate Judiciary committee. This is unprecedented. And and we just need to recognize that we are in a situation that really feels like a mess to everybody. Nobody is quite sure what to do congresswoman Jackie speier's been calling on Ford to testify. It is putting yourself out there. But you are doing this on behalf of the American people, and particularly all the women of this country economic research firm estimates hurricane Florence is caused about forty four billion dollars in damage and lost output Moody's. Analytics is that would put the storm on par with California's Northridge earthquake back in nineteen Ninety-four. CBS news correspondent Jim Krasula says the emotional toll is also high flood waters from Hurricane Flora salt. But destroyed the Starlight motel in spring lake North Carolina not far from the army sprawling Fort Bragg, the motel was not only their income. It was the home of key shore. And spit of depan my mind is working when I see this. Working on Bill. The couple who came here from India in two thousand seven and became US citizens still have a five hundred thousand dollars mortgage on their business that is now worthless. Jim chrysalis CBS news, spring lake North Carolina. Also flash flooding after heavy rains in parts of Oklahoma and Texas make Stevens was at a lodge for a friend's wedding stayed on the second floor balcony and watched the water rise up to waste deep within thirty minutes some downtime for one of rock's bass guitarist, Dickey Betts who became a star with the Allman brothers band. Has had successful surgery after slipping and hitting his head while playing with his dog in Florida the operation relieve.

Senate Judiciary committee Christine Blasi Ford Washington Starlight motel CBS Jim Krasula Christine blassie Bloomberg assault India Kevin cirilli Brett cavenaugh Jackie speier UC Hastings college Dickey Betts spring lake North Carolina Hurricane Flora North Carolina Professor Rory Florence
"uc hastings" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Litzinger. There may well be fireworks next week in Washington DC, political legal and cultural her lawyers say Christine Blasi for the woman accusing supreme court nominee Brett Cavanaugh. Sexual assault has agreed to share information with the Senate Judiciary committee. Kevin cirilli chief Washington correspondent for Bloomberg news Republicans urging Gawker Ford to testify, but whether or not she dies ultimately remains hard decision. Now, I spoke with a source earlier this week suggested that all of these Republican source that all of these deadlines at the judiciary committee is putting on the latest one being with Justin a few hours are quote, unquote, arbitrary KCBS reported as Republicans are frustrated things aren't moving faster. It's clear to UC Hastings college of the law. Professor Rory little that Republicans would not have gone back and forth with Christine Blasi Ford legal team so much and avoided issuing her a subpoena. If they felt they had enough votes to get wrecked Kavanagh's nomination out. Of the Senate Judiciary committee. This is unprecedented. And and we just need to recognize that we are in a situation that really feels like a mess to everybody. Nobody is quite sure what to do congresswoman Jackie speier's been calling on Ford to testify. It is putting yourself out there. You are doing this. On behalf of the American people, particularly all the women of this country economic research from estimates hurricane Florence has caused about forty four billion dollars in damage and lost output Moody's. Analytics is that will put the storm on par with California's Northridge earthquake back in nineteen ninety four CBS news. Correspondent Jim Krasula says the emotional toll is also high flood waters from hurricane Florence salt. But destroyed the Starlight motel in spring lake North Carolina not far from the army sprawling Fort Bragg, the motel was not only their income. It was the home of key showroom. Smith depan. My mind is. See this. My mind is looking. On. The couple who came here from India in two thousand seven it became US citizens still have a five hundred thousand dollar mortgage on their business that is now worthless. Jim chrysalis CBS news, spring lake North Carolina. Also flash flooding after heavy rains in parts of Oklahoma and Texas make Stevens was at a lodge for a friend's wedding stayed on the second floor balcony and watched the water.

Senate Judiciary committee hurricane Florence Christine Blasi Ford Starlight motel Washington Christine Blasi Ford Jim Krasula CBS Jackie speier Brett Cavanaugh Bloomberg India assault UC Hastings college Kevin cirilli spring lake North Carolina Professor Rory Gawker North Carolina
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Partly cloudy day along the coast today with sunny skies inland. We're expecting highs ranging from the mid sixty s to the low nineties, we'll have south westerly afternoon. Winds from ten to twenty miles per hour. The time is eight fifty one. This is the California report. Good morning. Tim Johnson hall vigneault Jamali fireworks this morning at the confirmation hearing for US supreme court nominee. Brett Kavanagh, California. Senator Dianne Feinstein is joining her fellow Democrats and sharing content from documents that have been deemed committee, confidential that means that members of the Senate Judiciary committee can see them. But the public can't Feinstein says Republicans didn't consult Democrats when classifying the documents such and that's a problem. So it becomes a way. If there's no rule for them, the Geordie to essentially put all information through a stranger, should we let this go out be public or should we not? And I don't think that's what this committee is about. I spoke to UC Hastings law. Professor Rory little earlier this morning and asked him to weigh in on this move by Senate, Democrats, what you're watching is the Senate Judiciary committee. Basically dealing with a totally unprecedented situation and their processes really broken down. And they don't know what to do. So you're saying even Senator Feinstein who has a lot of tenure on that committee. A lot of seniority is one of the reasons I think she's so valuable for California, you know, she she generally follows the roles in his collegial, and here, she is saying, you know, I support Senator Booker who has released a document which has invasions committee confidential because there's no agreed upon process for even stamping document committee, confidential. There is no precedent for doing that without the national archives involved and this time for the first time the national archives is not involved this morning, Senator Feinstein quoted from emails that were not to be released. How significant is that? Well, she's not the only one Cory Booker is also done that. I what significant. Is that the democratic senators are so frustrated that they have decided not to go along with this process? One of the senators call that a sham it's certainly not a process for which there is any precedent arose. So the fact that even Senator Feinstein is in some sense breaking this confidential designation. Simply shows that the process is broken down in the Senate Judiciary committee. They do not know what to do in this unprecedented situation, if you can back it after this hearing closes they're gonna shut rewriting rules. You're going to see further proceedings you're going to see her the revelation of documents. This is really I think just the beginning. Professor little you resist this idea that these documents are indeed confidential tell me more about that. There is no process that has identified that is confidential other than a one sided unilateral designation by a private lawyer who is representing President, George W Bush. You know, a Senator Booker today revealed another document about racial, profiling, no confidential content whatsoever. But it was stamped on. I I wouldn't call it confidential documents. I would call them documents that have been designated confidential through a process that there's precedent for now is Rory little he's law professor at UC Hastings support for.

Senator Dianne Feinstein Senate Judiciary committee Senator Booker California Senate Professor Rory Tim Johnson UC Hastings Brett Kavanagh professor George W Bush US Professor President
Concern spreads over White House ethics lawyer stepping down

All Things Considered

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

Concern spreads over White House ethics lawyer stepping down

"East Bay congressman marked as Sonia says he's alarmed by the news that President Trump's top lawyer is stepping, down Trump, announced yesterday. On Twitter that White House counsel Don Mcgann is leaving the Sonya. Has worked with Mcgann in his capacity as a member of the house oversight committee he says Mcgann defended attorney general. Jeff Sessions and special counsel Robert Muller and that made him a target. Of the, president this is, really unfortunate again is unquestionably, a conservative. Republican but, he's also a person principle and The ladder doesn't work well in this. Administration disown, Yay says he supports legislation to better protect the special counsel, from being fired by the executive branch in a. Tweet Trump says his. Decision to fire him again had, nothing to do with Muller or

President Trump California Sam Harnett Don Mcgann Robert Muller Special Counsel California Chamber Of Commerce Dynamex Oakland Mike Zampa San Francisco Jeff Sessions Twitter Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez Congressman White House Staff Attorney Sonia Uc Hastings
Starbucks, others must pay California workers for tasks done after clocking out: court

1A with Joshua Johnson

04:28 min | 3 years ago

Starbucks, others must pay California workers for tasks done after clocking out: court

"Five sets of remains thought to be those of Americans missing from the Korean war as the BBC's Laura bicker reports from Seoul, a u. s. warplane has transported the remains to an airbase in South Korea there around five sayers and US soldiers unaccounted for a North Korea felt have been killed in action. Some of those remains have been repatriated over the years, but obviously as as heightened tensions grew, it became difficult for any kind of process such as to take place. But this is the first step since certainly since Singapore that we've seen that perhaps President Trump's summit with Kim Jong is yielding results. The BBC's Laura bicker in Seoul. President Trump gave a rousing defensive, his tariffs on imported steel and aluminum during a stop in southern Illinois, Thursday as Saint Louis public radio's, Jason Rosenbaum reports Trump spoke to workers at a recently reopened steel plant during a speech at granite city. Works Trump contended that his tariffs will end up helping workers who have struggled with foreign competition we have the worst trade deals ever made in history but now that, becoming good again while steelworker William Mullin conceded that agriculture may take a temporary hit he adds that tariffs could bring lasting prosperity to granite city not everyone's going to be happy. You can't make everyone happy I think over time we'll, find a happy medium US steel opened, a Blast Furnace at granite city works soon after Trump announced his tariffs. For NPR news I'm Jason Rosenbaum and Saint Louis Russian hackers try to breach computers in Missouri US Senator Claire mccaskill office NPR's Jessica. Taylor reports that mccaskill is one. Of the most vulnerable Democrats and, the upcoming fall elections the Daily Beast first reported the failed hack making, mccaskill the first new target of, the Kremlin's plot interfere November's midterms after already targeting the US in the two thousand sixteen presidential election in In a, statement mccaskill said she would not be intimidated by the attempts all of which occurred around August twenty seventeen she called Russian President Vladimir Putin a thug and a bully and. A press conference last week following his summit with Putin, President Trump appeared to believe the Russian leader's denials at the country did not try to interfere in. The US elections over the conclusions of America's own intelligence agencies, but Trump later tried to walk. That back Trump is set. To chair a meeting of the national Security Council. On Friday to discuss election security Jessica Taylor NPR news Washington a fire in northern California Shasta county has. Killed one person injured three others, and burned. Dozens of homes a fire crews spokesman says the blaze is moving so fast that there was little time for evacuations major fires are burning across California one of. Several states in. The grips of a heatwave this is NPR news from news I'm Jeremy Siegel two teenage girls one from Honduras and one from Guatemala who had been taken from their families At, the US Mexico border and held at a. Facility and contra. Costa county have been reunified with their families Ted Goldberg reports last month pleasant hill officials confirmed that the two adolescent. Girls were being held at a shelter run by the. Federal contractors southwest key in their. City they were, among fifty separated, children who at one point we're living in seventeen state license homes in California Families. Opposed to the Trump administration's no tolerance immigration policy held a protest right in front. Of the pleasant hill facility and eventually. Congressman Mark to Sony took a tour of the shelter the contra Costa county Representative announced today that, he has learned from the department of health and human services that. The two girls were reunified with their families in the last five days I'm Ted Goldberg news, the California, Supreme Court today ruled, that Starbucks has to pay employee's for routine work they do when they're off the. Clock a federal court rejected a lawsuit by Starbucks employees who argued he should be paid for his duties closing out the store after he had clocked out for the evening but the. State high court has ruled, that California is more protective of worker rights UC Hastings associate law professor Vena do ball and it wouldn't make, sense to allow workers to. Go uncompensated for periods of time even if under federal law that time is considered insignificant hours do at Up in a statement Starbucks says it's disappointed with the decision and..

President Trump United States California Claire Mccaskill Laura Bicker Trump Administration Starbucks Seoul BBC Jessica Taylor Ted Goldberg Jason Rosenbaum South Korea Saint Louis Vladimir Putin Singapore North Korea NPR Kim Jong
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Palestinians have sharp divide in this country i mean between republicans or democrats as you see things more sympathy perhaps for the palestinians from the democrats well polling evidence suggest that to be the case and i think that is you know increasingly you know the divide is beginning to grow but it's still pretty minimal they're still pretty you know bipartisan support for for for israel and even you know during president obama's years you know where there was a during which there was more visible friction between the us government and and the israeli government we basically enabled israel to do anything that it wanted to do and you know the in the pace of settlements was was was very high during the obama you're so you know we think people forget about the obama you're so was there were more arm salt israel during the obama administration than any price administration talking again if you've just joined us with george bisharat and he's professor emeritus of us you see hastings college of the law this peace process can what what would it take at this point to get something moving again to get the embassy out of the jerusalem to make some kind of a cord where the two can actually meet face to face what would be a first step even i mean you've been involved in these yes before well i don't think there are any prospects for a peace process and frankly if if if if we have in mind anything like the peace process that went on for twenty five years or so i'm glad that we won't have that because all that that peace process process did was to provide cover for everybody while the while israel's expansion into the west bank continued and and basically what we did in in we in the united states in our enabling of this was to preside over the over the extinction of the two state solution and again if you've just joined us we're talking to charge bisharat he is former legal consultant to the palestinian legislative council and professor emeritus at uc hastings college of the law will be talking on tomorrow's program in our ten o'clock hour with former israeli prime minister who barack and this is a fundraising period for public radio for more information about how to support cake you go to cake dot org i'm michael krasny funds for the production of forum are provided by the members of the public radio and the germanacos foundation and the generosity foundation and by jahn shrem and maria manetti shrem founders of the manetti shrem museum.

professor manetti shrem museum maria manetti germanacos foundation michael krasny hastings college president jahn shrem prime minister uc hastings college israel palestinian legislative counci consultant united states jerusalem george bisharat obama administration israeli government obama twenty five years
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Settlements we can add to that okay asian to i don't want to be misunderstood is is endorsing the the you know the embassy move but in certain respects what it did was to rip the band aid off the open sore into expose it we have you know we have been to you know to to recall aaron david miller a phrase from a number of years ago israel's lawyer he was then referring to the camp david negotiations in two thousand we we've been backers of israel and overwhelmingly so for decades being the united states of course and trump's decision to move the embassy is is a very bad decision it it is contrary to international law and resolutions of the united nations both security council and the general assembly but also takes away from what was at least presumably in the peace process one of the major things to be adjudicated her to be decided upon well it won't in i mean he he might be president trump might imagine that he's taken jerusalem off the table but it hasn't been taken off the table but the but the point i was making was that to some extent what president trump has done is to make more visible what was already true which is that we have never been honest brokers with respect to this conflict we have been partisans and we have i think often as in this move we have exacerbated tensions and we have made the situation and sorry to say we've proven ourselves incompetent managers of the socalled peace process if you've just joined us george bisharat is here with us in studio he's professor emeritus of law at uc hastings college law former legal consultant of the palestinian legislative council and i should mention that former prime minister of israel who'd barack will be our guest on thursday at ten o'clock you mentioned george about two thirds of the two million people being refugees in gaza and we're also talking about a blockade which has made for some serious privation but also you that a huge percentage of those in gaza unemployed impoverished.

israel united states trump united nations palestinian legislative counci prime minister barack gaza aaron david miller camp david president george bisharat professor uc hastings college consultant
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What do we really want to invest in the state how can we make the best possible decisions and i think that is also one of these things that's getting lost in the back and forth is that this isn't only about teachers right it's about kids teachers say tomorrow's protests in north carolina is meant to send a message if these lawmakers don't meet their demands voters will choose new ones in november who will this is npr news it's news i'm tara siler the city of oakland is considering appealing federal judges ruling today that struck down its ban on coal shipments us district judge bench to rea sided with a developer who wants to use a proposed marine terminal to transport coal from utah to asia city leaders approved the rail and marine terminal in two thousand thirteen as part of a makeover of the old oakland army base but the city council then voted to ban shipments of coal and petroleum coke the developer responded by filing suit claiming breach of contract david levine is a professor at uc hastings college of the law and professor this was a really strongly worded opinion against oakland why did the judge side with developer phil tagami in this case let's count the ways you hardly see an opinion that is so onesided in the sense of coming so out so strongly for one side of the other the main problem here is that the record that the city had before it when it made this decision to dan cole just was so bad the judge said the standard is not what could be out there but what was actually in front of the council and the problem was that there really was very little and what was there was very poorly done and so the judge just goes in chapter and verse explaining what was wrong and you could hardly make more mistakes it looks like then what was done here i want to just read from that opinion because he says quote in fact the record is riddled with an accuracy major evidentiary gaps erroneous assumptions and faulty analysis to the point that no reliable conclusion about health or safety dangers could be drawn from it that's pretty strong language that's when he was being nice to the city listen i spoke with eric mahar from the san francisco bay keepers which intervened in this case on the side of oakland and.

north carolina tara siler oakland developer utah david levine professor uc hastings college phil tagami eric mahar npr oakland army dan cole san francisco
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You turning now to the courts this week a federal judge in washington dc ruled against the trump administration on daca the program set up to protect from deportation undocumented immigrants brought here as children in the ruling us district judge john bates called the move to end daca quote arbitrary and capricious the trump administration now has ninety days to challenge the ruling otherwise dhaka could be completely reinstated also this week the us supreme court heard arguments on the trump administration's travel ban joining us now with more on this and other legal developments is professor roy little with uc hastings college of the law professor little always nice to have you here happy to be here thanks well let's begin with dhaka with judge john based decision it goes further than to other prior rulings putting doc on hold because basically it's it orders the trump administration to accept new applications if it can't issue a new memo that satisfactory to the judge within ninety days so my question is what impact does this latest development have on all the various litigation out there over dhaka the most important thing may be that judge bates gave ninety days to the trump administration to revise its order and if they can come up with a better nation that sort of fulfils whatever his requirements might be then the revision or recission of dhaka would go into force so it's a it's a broad ruling because it says if you don't meet my requirements within ninety days we're going to accept new applications as well as do the old ones the current other two cases say just the old ones so this would be much broader he's giving them some leeway than the trump administration.

john bates us uc hastings college professor dhaka washington professor roy ninety days
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of k q e d series of storm systems and an atmospheric river aimed at the central and southern california coast will produce widespread rainfall across northern california today through thursday according to the weather service periods of heavy rain possible mainly along the big sur coast look for scattered showers this morning rain this afternoon in the bay area welcome to this morning's forum i'm michael krasny president trump yesterday announced his plan to combat the opioid crisis ravaging parts of the country the multi prong approach calls for preventing kids from using drugs in the first place by creating commercials that show the dangers of drugs cutting supply by shoring up us borders and getting tougher on traffickers by calling for the death penalty for dealers we're joined the segment by hadera whose law professor uc hastings and welcome to the program good morning good morning to you where we should say right off at you are opposed to the death penalty but the death penalty is a centerpiece of this and there are some real legal hurdles if the president wants to i mean just as a law professor looking at it from from the light of day very serious difficult hurdles to get over if he wants to do this oh issues of is this even affective is this fair and we can talk about those later the basic issue is that administering the death penalty for non homicide offenses has been repeatedly judged as disproportionate and unconstitutional by the supreme court so that's kind of a start and we have a drug kingpin law though the supposedly goes after homicides involving drug kingpins though i don't believe many drug kingpins have been prosecuted pretty much not none of them being being pursued you know as a capital case essentially what's going on is an and this goes back to the early seventy s back in furman versus georgia which is the case that will limit eliminated the death penalty in the early seventies the supreme court said not that the death penalty as a whole was unconstitutional but there were problems with the way it was administered at the time one of the problems was that many southern states would regularly put people to death for non homicide offenses robberies rapes things like that and.

california uc hastings president professor furman georgia supreme court michael krasny
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It what they perceived as a as a expected increase in federal immigration enforcement actions um so this is uh this this lawsuit uh these legal actions um while they may be perceived as as political people this is uh a matter of uh of great importance to the attorney general in terms of making sure uh public safety is upheld national security is protected uh and and frankly that the rule of law is is up a powell's uh we know we have uh in opioid epidemic that is not sweeping the country uh in in fy sixteen alone um dhs is uh hall man security investigating new uh investigations unit uh alone seat four thousand pounds of uh heroin and sentinel in california i mean that's that's a staggering amount uh so these policies that that undermine federal immigration law uh have a significant impact on the on the lives of all californians the only appreciate you being with us thank you so much michael i appreciate the opportunity thank you never know meligan his department of justice spokesperson he joins us from the nation's capital joining us now is scott schaefer senior editor for kqed's california politics and government desk got his in sacramento covering the protests outside the us attorney general sessions address and scott welcome good morning thank you michael let me tell you who else is here david levin in studio professor uc hastings college of the law welcome david good morning michael good morning to you and scott what's it like up there now well things are coming down now because that jeff sessions speeches over but that just about an hour and a half ago there were several hundred people protesters uh blocking an intersection that in downtown sacramento in front of the hotel were sessions of speaking he was peaceful and the police were there just sort of monitoring things that that may snaked down through several streets and then gathered in front of a hotel in their speeches by elected officials and activists and the others uh so things have calmed down now but there was a lot of intensity i think in terms of the speeches and the chanting a m a lot of anger directed of course toward to the trump administration but what about inside i mean uh.

heroin california david levin attorney michael scott schaefer senior editor kqed sacramento us attorney professor uc hastings college jeff four thousand pounds
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The table um who are living the kind of economic lives that you know we just don't think of as being possible in america and they are consumers have turned kind of a blind eye to that reality because it's so convenient an easy um so i guess for me the two things that are most devastating about what's happened in what douglas's death sort of shines a light on is one what's actually happening two workers and to people who are in this industry and who are in those people already know amongst the most marginal and society people who are carvedout voyage work and the second thing is our indifference to it you should the people who were involved in taking who ruined live me i think you were completion of oh absolutely i mean you know at this is this is long been the case in the garment industry we buy clothes from from companies who subcontract to factories in bangladesh where the conditions for child labour are just a grotesque and we are complicit there but at least those workers this child laborers are further away it's harder to imagine their plight here the people who are experiencing this plight are in the same car as us and we are still turning a blind june know the argument and i'm sure you've heard it they keep the rates down they have better service they keep their cars cleaner emmy you hear all these arguments and they're easier to actually yet and you say what i say you know there are ways to achieve the same things through regulation through um through safe uh good wage work that um that that leads to stable lives it doesn't we you know exploitation inconvenience are uh are not two sides of the same coin there um they don't necessarily go together to do boehner reached those who sued goes associate professor uc hastings college of law sam harnett also with us all on ravelli reporter who's been covering this may have heard of earlier this morning sam harnett let me go right to the cut right to the chaser we're talking about fewer medallions and we're talking about people in some cases who aren't even making would be minimum wage i mean i think it's really i mean i guess we i've i've always looked at this on one hand.

bangladesh reporter sam harnett america douglas boehner associate professor uc hastings college of law ravelli one hand
"uc hastings" Discussed on Life of the Law

Life of the Law

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on Life of the Law

"And this didn't go i think as planned it ended up with someone dying and as it turns out some of the folks involved in in this criminal act were also doing some other things that are illegal that involved shoplifting and selling things across state lines in a way that made this set of actions eligible for prosecution under racketeering laws which makes it a federal case and and this story traces from what was going on through the county level up through the federal level and how prosecutorial discretion really changed what folks could be sentenced foreign like really dramatically affected the outcomes for the people who are involved at various levels in in this set of incidents okay so what is prosecutorial discretion i'm i'm had dr i've a professor at uc hastings and i study criminal justice prosecutorial discretion is really important in america because we have an adversary will system that means that essentially every criminal trial is a competition between the prosecution and the defence the judge has a relatively less dominant role that in other countries and we have a lot of times the guilt and innocence of people decided by juries unless of course there's a plea bargain this means that prosecutors are crucially important because they're the ones that decide whether a case is going to go through and what shape that case is going to take it's also important to say that we have a lot of criminal laws both on the federal level end of the state level so prosecutors actually have a very rich menu to choose from think about one of those restaurants that has you know two hundred menu items of various sizes in various flavors and the prosecutors have all of that are there at their disposal not only can they decide what to charge you with but there are also offenses that sort of link with each other and i hope we'll talk a little bit more about about all of that later which is to say sometimes there are circumstances that sort of odd upgrade something upgrade and a fence into something much more severe would because there is a presence of some fact or some other factor that the legislature output their prosecutors have a crucial role there because not only do they push the case through but most of the time their initial decision of.

shoplifting professor uc hastings america legislature racketeering
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of form it's a prerecorded version of the time now is nine thirty one luna you're listening to forum michael krasny were talking with uc berkeley law professor john williams about her new book white working class overcoming class clueless nece america than so saying off hair this is often described that as a class conflict of america's murqos dirty secret but this is also a lot about the visions in terms of who were regarded as elites are who were seen as being in power and professionals in the poorer and so it goes a lot of fractures thought of divisions at a lot of resentment and things it ought to be a concern to most concerned american sir i mentioned police before we went to the break and again you can join us and we'll go to your calls and emails in just a moment but i want to get back to professor williams notion of what can be done about the two tour police especially given the fact that many of them come directly from this class serb your above that's right i want to mention with communities of color you reaction vessels of italy yacht my husband's at berkeley i'm at use proudly at uc hastings just to clarify what i say it uc lately said receive your secretly but i think i mean it's alajiz do you had your house there you go on i think it's important to realize there's thin racism in policing since policing was invented and i totally understand that on the other hand i've been thinking a lot about how we can talk about a situation for example where a citizen who was running away get shot in the back how do we talk about that situation and i think what we say is with fury often yeah yeah i think what we say his you know it's really hard to beat police you have to have nurses steel you have to have nurses steel in a context where you feel personally threatened and that's a really hard job and michael i couldn't do it we need people who can do it we need people who are just that coolheaded and just have just that those kinds of nerves of steel and if you have police who are shooting people who present no threat to them in that.

michael krasny america uc hastings professor john williams italy
"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"uc hastings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"His theory concrete political implications for example regulation is just another college kid who doesn't know crap about your job was telling you exactly how to do it i think that doesn't mean that we that i'm a democrat that we use democrats should abandon regulation far from it but we should understand that regulation sets up a cross class relationship and end risks triggering class anger so it's really kind of a class culture gap that you're writing about an john williams has written a book on the subject white working class over coming class clueless nece in america she's distinguished professor of laud uc hastings foundation cheer and also funding director for the center for work law which we've discussed with her on this program an moves discuss sir what is really also resentment against government itself for me in um solely maybe study knows kids who are in government who were making decisions and policies from the perspective of this classic writing about but also against their interests and maybe even baleful no um seena somehow evil uh there's the so there's a lot of reserves professional suits the government the lead it's the times trumpism yeah the poor and so forth and also have a worthy unions fit in this one of these are service people who presumably come other union backgrounds and have union affiliations and well the unions are the reason they don't vote democratic aleksa now there are at what is it five percent of private employment is unionized so partly what we see is that the winning strength of unions but you know a lot of union members this election also voted for trump much to the shock of the union leaders and i think what we need to recognize is that they're this deep disillusionment is with democrats as well as republicans a lot of people say why do these why these people voting against their own selfinterest it's because they don't see a difference between democrats and republicans because they look at what's happened to their economic future over the.

distinguished professor director john williams america uc hastings foundation five percent