35 Burst results for "Uc Davis"

2 gorillas at San Diego Zoo test positive for COVID-19

KCBS 24 Hour News

01:12 min | Last week

2 gorillas at San Diego Zoo test positive for COVID-19

"Focus is bringing this deadly pandemic under control in California. Doug Sovereign, KCBS several gorillas at the San Diego Zoo of tested positive for covert, which has prompted a state investigation. KCBS is Matt Boone spoke to an animal biologist about how the disease infects animals. The troop of eight gorillas live at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. According to the zoo. Two of the guerrillas started coughing, which prompted them to test fecal matter in their enclosure. Which came back positive. The state is now investigating how they got the virus. Governor Gavin Newsom currently confirming the source of the infection in the strain. There is some question that it come human animal that's being determined. The cases were not surprising to Kristen Gilardi with the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and the executive director of Gorilla Doctors. We have been operating on the assumption that great apes, gorillas, chimpanzees, ringtones. Are as susceptible to the virus is people those so far, she says. There are no known cases of wild gorillas catching the virus. According to the USDA. There have been at least 119 documented cases of animals with covert 19 in the U. S,

Doug Sovereign Matt Boone San Diego Zoo Safari Park Kcbs Kristen Gilardi Uc Davis School Of Veterinary San Diego Gavin Newsom Gorilla Doctors California Usda U.
All You Need To Know About Earthworm Castings

Plantrama

04:27 min | 2 weeks ago

All You Need To Know About Earthworm Castings

"Are going to talk about earth. worm castings aka earthworm poop. You know it's interesting castings as sort of a It's it's the standard term for the excrement from earthworms. It's what they cast aside. I guess that's where it comes from. It's a very interesting thing. It's like many manures and this is earthworm manure. Basically it was what we're talking about Like many manures. It has fertilizer value for plant. But earthworm castings turn out to have much more value as well. I feel like castings is a euphemism because nobody wants to say poop but there you go. I remember hearing about them. I probably ten or fifteen years ago. They're much more mainstream now. And at the time. I worried about using them in house plants and i realize now that that was an unfounded concern. Using the castings in in moderate amounts as a fertilizer is perfectly good for house. Plants isn't it. I mean this time of year. That's what people are thinking about. It is wonderful for houseplant. Wonderful for for most plant. Its first of all one hundred percent organic humus all right but the basic thing that makes it different from many other Fertilizers i guess. You'd say organic fertilizers is. There's a rich microbiological community going on in earthworm castings. That is good for your plants. Well tell me more about this microbiological community. Do you mean micronutrients or do you mean. Living things in the castings well. I mean Bacteria first of all But good bacteria right. That's number one number two. In terms of fertilizing value they are rich in iron sulfur calcium nitrogen phosphorus and potassium right but they also are believe it or not not all readily available to plant apparently in the process of going through the earthworm the castings get coded with something that makes the ingredients available to plants very slowly. Wait a minute. This is like nature's time release. Fertilizer is what you're telling me exactly. That's exact- that's fascinating. What is it nature this time. Release that is a wonderful thing. The people who have studied this and by the way earthworm castings have been extensively. Studied at ohio state at cornell. University uc davis and one study at cornell demonstrated earthworm castings suppressed damping off disease in seedlings. Wow all right. And they naturally degraded the protective covering of some insect pests so they dissolve the insect pest from the in. Yes so love that yes. At ohio state university they found that earthworm castings enhanced seed germination plant growth flower and fruit production. They curb to certain plant diseases. Including root rod and crown rot and inhibited. Insect pests including mites aphids. And mealy bug. This is like way more than just a fertilizer. Then it's kind of a magic pill a one thing you know. I wondered about is. How do you know how much to apply. And from what i've read. Apparently it's it's difficult to add too much. I mean you don't want you don't want a plant in solid worm castings but but it's something that you can apply regularly without worrying that you're going to burn the fine roots of your plants. Which is concerned with a with a commercial fertilizer. Yeah i think you know for the general rule that i use for house plants and we're thinking now in the middle of winter about plants indoors but the general rule that i use is about a quarter of a cop cop four a container that somewhere between six and ten inches in diameter.

Cornell Ohio State University Davis Ohio
Toni Bernhard on Self-Compassion and the First Noble Truth

The Wisdom Podcast

04:38 min | Last month

Toni Bernhard on Self-Compassion and the First Noble Truth

"Because it is so great to have you with us on the wisdom comcast. I'm really happy of asia. Thanks daniel think we might start off with you know so in about two thousand and one is when you you got sick. I believe in and seems. Then you've found inspiration in buddhist teachings and practices for learning how to be sick and we're gonna get into that in detail. But i wondering if you could tell us a little bit about how you initially came across these teachings and actresses okay. Well it was an about ten years before. I got sick so approaching thirty years. This may is nineteen year of my suffering from chronic ghana's so when i was in my early twenties i developed some interest in spiritual matters a lot of alan watts. I got my mantra from the maharishi. And then my husband. And i raised kids. All of that was put aside and when they Either late high school or had left home. When i had my wartime to myself. I started Looking back into spiritual practices and maybe only academic would do this. I bought like six copies of the dow teaching. Maybe five and i read the same verse in each one and then wrote my on verse based on my understanding of those translations and i have no idea were any of that is but it's relevant because one of the translations was by stephen mitchell and i found myself it was a great translation but i've found myself really interested in the footnotes because he can't there may have been some other people but he noted several times quoted this Somebody called master sung son. Who i subsequently learned was a korean zen master who when he first arrived in the states. I was fixing washing machines but then developed a Songa in providence rhode island and now is worldwide. His quantum school is in. And i just love the the quote senate came across one that that said no south. No problem i thought whoa. Whoa sounds no problem. I didn't know what it meant. But i also note was jam. He fascinated me so much. These footnotes that i went to the library at uc davis campus shields library and it went to the card catalogue and looked up sung sun and discovered that in the dr day basement of shields library were rows and rows of buddhist books and i found his dropping ashes on the buddha but i found a treasure trove and i started leading mostly tree traditions zen tibetan and tear baden. I couldn't get enough. Just taking him out piles and That's how i. I learned a lot about the buddhist teachings but i thought what am i supposed to do and so i wrote just stephen mitchell and i don't remember what i said but i remember what he wrote back to me. He said looking at an painting of an orange is not the same as eating orange. And then he recommended to possible dharma centers that i could go to from. I live in davis which is near sacramento so that central valley and they were both in marin county bay. Area was john. Toronto sonoma's zen center. I think and the other one was called spirit rock meditation center and he recommended jack cornfield and i don't remember why i chose that have no. I've just been thinking. How did i get there.

Stephen Mitchell Alan Watts Comcast Ghana Shields Library Daniel Asia Providence Rhode Island Uc Davis Senate Baden Marin County Bay Central Valley Spirit Rock Meditation Center Sacramento Davis
Trump administration moves ahead on gutting bird protections

KCBS Radio Weekend News

03:47 min | Last month

Trump administration moves ahead on gutting bird protections

"Ah, longstanding federal protection for the nation's birds is being gutted by the Trump administration, with former federal officials and scientists saying billions more birds will likely die because of this move. You hear more about it Case CBS News anchor Jennifer Hunt has spoke with Richard Frank, professor of environmental practice and director of the California Environmental Law and Policy Center at UC Davis. What protections were in place for these birds. And what does that have to do with the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act? Well. Congress passed that law in 1918 over a century ago, basically the implement treaties that the United States had initially with Canada and now Mexico, Japan and Russia to provide international protection and now domestic protection to migratory bird species. A wide variety and about 800 of such species are currently listed under federal law here in the United States. Some of the Trump administration says the action apply only to birds killed or harmed intentionally, and the Fish and Wildlife Service says the change would quote improve consistency and efficiency and enforcement. So what do they mean by this? Well, I think they're trying to reduce the scope of the traditional application of this statue, which is provided very important protection for a variety of migratory bird species. It would Reverse a policy that Republican and Democratic administrations have followed for at least a half century of including as violations of the statute industry activities whose practices have the effect of killing Wildlife and, uh, wildlife Biologist currently predict that this reduction in the scope of the law will will really cause about one half billion to over a billion birds. Additional bird deaths Per year. So is there any way of avoiding that? I mean, two opponents have the time any time at all in order to try and reverse it. Yes, sir. A three policy options that opponents of this regulatory initiative can pursue. They consume challenge the Trump Administration regulation. I understand that a number of organizations like the National Audubon Society Defenders of Wildlife. And perhaps joined by the state of California will suit to block the regulation. It's possible that Congress could intervene in January by invoking the Congressional Review Act and can nullify regulatory programs from the executive branch doesn't like and third and finally, of course, the incoming Brydon an administration could initiate its own rulemaking proceeding to reverse this new and in my view, ill advised policy of the Trump Administration, but that That is the alternative that would take the longest amount of time to implement. So tell our listeners in urine in your opinion, why it is ill advised. Well, the way it is well documented that the actions of a variety of regular regulatory industries like coal and gas industry, uh the electric utility line operators, telecommunication kennel communication towers, wind turbines cause devastate populations of these migratory. Bird populations, and there are a variety of existing well known technologies that can dramatically reduce or eliminate those those bird kills. And this regulation, of course, removes all incentives of members, the regulated community to adopt those needed and environmentally benign reforms. That's Richard Frank, professor of environmental practice and director of the California Environmental Law and Policy Center. At U C.

Trump Administration Richard Frank Jennifer Hunt California Environmental Law A Cbs News Uc Davis United States Congress Fish And Wildlife Service Russia Mexico Japan National Audubon Society Defenders Of Wildlife Canada Brydon California
Stemina's CEO on diagnosing autism earlier using biological markers

TechNation Radio Podcast

05:24 min | 2 months ago

Stemina's CEO on diagnosing autism earlier using biological markers

"From the outside. We often know autism through observation of behavior. but are there biological markers for autism. Despite an average diagnosis at four years old stamina biomarker discovery has developed a blood test for autism spectrum disorder for as young as eighteen months. Beth tonle is its ceo. I want you to tell us if you could about autism so much has happened over the years. People have forgotten about what this means to be on the autism spectrum. What this exactly means today. Well i'll tell you the prevalence of autism is the first issue. We now have one in fifty eight kids in the united states that have autism and that's a new statistics from the cdc previously. It was one in sixty nine so almost everyone knows someone or has someone in their family. That has autism Obviously autism is a behavioral disorder. sometimes characterized by social shoes. Repetitive behavior cognitive issues. We're actually looking at it from a biological perspective and trying to sort of peel back the onion and understand What is the biology. That is autism and their multiple. Biology's that manifest then and the behaviors that we see. Well we should say right away. The your the mother of someone who is on the autism spectrum. And he's in college yes. He is so the idea that the these are not functional. People put them in some special class and not deal with them anymore. It's just not true. There's so much that can be done but you have to have knowledge. That's true and autism spectrum disorder. It's a spectrum disorder from cognitive behavioral and biological perspective. Jack is pretty high functioning. But he's had a lot of interruption over the years Lots of behavioral therapy ot pt speech. Language you know tutoring We've tried modified diets and dietary supplements and vitamins. Attention deficit medicine three kinds I think your study and your cell we are. We are like many parents. You go to the internet and you read about these things and There isn't any precision around how they're applied so parents. Try everything And that's what we're trying to bring at stamina. Neuro point is some precision about what's different about the biology of these kids. And how do we order our thinking around how to intervene. Obviously behavioral therapy. Every child should get. But how do we prioritize some of the other choices to address the biology. So there's a major study out there. Eleven hundred children. what have you studied. And what have you available still to continue to study So the children's autism metabolism Project or camp took place at eight sites across the country led by our head of our sab. Dr david amaral. Who's at the mind. Institute at uc davis. We recruited eleven hundred and two children to be specific Children with autism typically developing children and also children with developmental delay but not autism and we collected i of the morning plasma. It's important to have a fasted sample when studying metabolism as we do because just like you don't need a sweet roll before you go get your glucose or cholesterol tested. We can measure that to. This is an enormous resource. That's allowed us to identify the first set of biomarkers that Show a dysregulation in amino acid metabolism. That may be addressable through a supplement. it describes about seventeen percent of the kids and we publish that in biological psychiatry back in september of two thousand eighteen We have a second paper in progress which we hope will be submitted by the end of the month which looks at mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. And this is an area that's been known in the literature in smaller studies of thirty or forty or even a hundred children. This is an opportunity to look at an eleven hundred and two kids and so we really get a chance to kind of dissect some of these hypotheses and bring forward some additional biology. That could be addressable through specific treatments if we know this. Can this become a diagnostic. Do we know enough that it will be. Yeah so that's a great question. We are going to start offering this as a i would call it a prognostic so it will screen for whether or not the child has a metabolism subtype that we've seen has highly associated with autism. And then they would be referred to a developmental specialist to would screen them using traditional behavioral assessment that will be necessary for insurance coverage for. Iep's at school for behavioral therapy etc. But we hope it will do because our kids are eighteen months to forty eight months. Is that child. Re- referred sooner right now. The average age of diagnosis is over four years. My son was seven in fact when he was diagnosed with pervasive developmental delays not otherwise specified. Pdd s which used to be a form of autism. That's been rolled up into the regular autism diagnosis as part of the dsm. Five and we didn't. We were not told it was autism and we knew he had pervasive developmental delays. So a lot of time is lost. Where if we can diagnose as young as eighteen months with our test and get a child referred they can get into behavioral therapy and that can be critically important to the outcome In addition the insights into the metabolism that we can give as i mentioned. We'll give opportunities to sort of prioritize all those different different interventions that parents try and take the most innocuous one first and see if you can make a difference

Autism Autism Spectrum Disorder Beth Tonle Dr David Amaral CDC Uc Davis United States Jack
How to Create Organizational Culture Change Using Social Media

Social Pros Podcast

06:14 min | 2 months ago

How to Create Organizational Culture Change Using Social Media

"Ladies and gentlemen here. She is sally poge. Who's the director of social media for the university of california. Davis coincidentally located in davis. California sally welcome to social pros. My absolute pleasure to be here with you. The university of california system is very very large. A little bit about davis and what kind of campus it is. What kind of school. What you specialize in give folks who aren't familiar with uc davis maybe west coasters. Gimme little a frame up on the institution absolutely well. I think the first thing that we want to focus on his where we are. We're in northern california so East of san francisco in our sister campus uc berkeley and actually uc. Davis is. I would say we're one of the last college towns in california so we're in a small town called davis and we really specialize in research around climate change. We have a hospital and the number one vet. Med hospital in the world actually is located at uc davis agriculture. How we feed our world how we care for our world and climate change are kind of our bailiwicks at uc davis so We have a very big very active student community. We have about forty. Five thousand undergrad students on campus. And then another twenty to thirty staff faculty and grad students So we serve a really large community. We're pretty we're known for being kind of a little. I would say little wonky we're close to sacramento the capital We're northern california's there were outspoken about our values Which leads to a lot of protests social justice discussions It's a very lively community or my best friend's daughters the recent graduate of davis and also the school One of his best known programs commercially is. Is your wine education program. Many many of the best known winemakers not only in the united states but actually in the world have gone through the davis wine program. Some day in my retirement years. I may just have to matriculate there davis and go through that program would allow welcome you with open arms jay and i know how could i not talk about our wine and beer and t. programs Big deep. that's cool off every beverage. Beer wisely tequila program. I might come now. You're in charge pizza. That's funny because i was thinking like i love cnc. But i'm really like maybe i should start doing some google searches. I love line a little beer to. Yes we me. Scholarship that we could Art for and get after the after the program. Tell you a little bit about your team. We've had on the program this year. Who runs social media for duke university. fro- Mit we've had a couple of other higher ed. Social media genius is on social pros over the last year or two as well and it's always fascinating especially because our team can giver. Does fare better work in higher. Ed how different. The team structures are and even the reporting structures for social media inside different institutions. So talk a little bit about kind of how your team gets. Things done there at davis yet jay. Thank you for that question because I came into higher. Ed from outside i used to be in the agency. World is too. And i was so struck by how much structure plays a role in what you success that you can have with social media and As i've been I've only been hired for about five years now and this does have a either make or break. A team is what i really learned. So at uc davis. I'm lucky enough to have a really supportive director of communications. She oversees the whole office and she reports directly to the chancellor and she has a very big vision and really understood in a really valued. What social media brought to the table. But when i came in into the structure Social media is reporting under news Which i think is i think said social media kind of like a newer Been around for ten plus years and everybody was kind of arguing about organizationally where it fell under right like. Oh it's a marketing thing. Oh it's a web thing. No now it's a new thing and what i was able to do it Alongside the support of my director was really carve out a space for social media to stand alone so we are our own unit underneath the department of strategic communications meaning. We operator own budget. We have our own team members. We set our own strategy in coordination with all of our other colleagues news web marketing and visual end that gave us a really great in a pure peer to peer. Kind of seat at the table Which has been really empowering for our team because we actually service all of those communications verticals. We don't we're not like we don't belong to. We don't belong to news. We belong to everybody and what that was Allowed us to do is our mission. Our mission is really about building community. And how we can be helpful. Those are value statements and so So yeah. I think that that has been really helpful and Undermine team where team of five total and we overseas the uc davis flagship channels. So schmunity annals in all the strategy and then we also set a lot of policy for the rest of the university about hundred fifty social media communicators across the campus That we know of is probably more than that out there. and then. I also oversee executive social media communications for chancellor may and undergrad admissions social media as well so we have a large

Davis Sally Poge University Of California California Uc Davis Sally JAY Berkeley ED San Francisco Sacramento Duke University MIT Department Of Strategic Commun United States Google
Climate change surprise: Deadly dog ticks moving to humans

KYW 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Climate change surprise: Deadly dog ticks moving to humans

"The immeasurable impact of climate change on human life is immense. But now another consequence. That is worrisome for man and his best friend to Beyonc level rise in worsening climate catastrophes like wildfires and hurricanes, scientists that UC Davis have discovered yet another threat to humans from climate change a deadly take that bites dogs is 2.5 times more likely to feed on people than dogs in hotter environments. The bike can cause a fatal fever and humans and dogs may think they're off the hook. But who will feed them? Louisiana? CBS NEWS LOS

Beyonc Uc Davis Fever Louisiana Cbs News
New rapid test for COVID-19, flu set to roll out at UC Davis

Bryan Suits

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

New rapid test for COVID-19, flu set to roll out at UC Davis

"Davis will soon roll out a new rapid test for that will test for both the flu and Cove in 19, the school's urging people to take that dual threat of both viruses seriously as the risk of death is twice as high if an individual contracts them both. The doll test should be available next month. White

Davis
California court says Uber, Lyft drivers are employees, not contractors

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

04:24 min | 3 months ago

California court says Uber, Lyft drivers are employees, not contractors

"Like some some bad bad news news for for uber uber and and lift lift on on appeals appeals court court here here in in California, California, said said Yeah. Yeah. You You guys guys are are losing losing this this one. one. And And so so they they need need to to comply comply with with reclassifying reclassifying their their drivers drivers as as employees employees within within 30 30 days days of of a a formal formal ruling, ruling, which which could could happen happen in in the the next next few few weeks, weeks, so so realistically, realistically, probably probably around around your your end. end. Yes. Yes. So So I I think think a a timeline timeline here here is is important. important. So So back back on on January, January, 1st 1st Assembly Assembly Bill Bill five five became became law. law. That That was was the the one one that that basically basically required required all all of of these these companies companies that that provide provide contract contract type type work, work, such such as as uber uber and and lift lift but but also also a a few few others others to to reclassify reclassify those those workers workers as as employees employees in in May, May, a a lawsuit lawsuit Filed Filed against against Uber Uber lift lift for for not not complying complying in in June. June. There's There's another another injunction injunction to to immediately immediately classify classify them. them. This This went went through through Superior Superior Court. Court. They They lost lost the the lawsuit lawsuit it it back back in in August. August. The The continued continued to to appeal appeal this this and and now now this this ruling ruling basically basically gives gives them them 30 30 days days like like you you said said from from the the ruling, ruling, which which Again Again could could happen happen in in the the next next couple couple of of weeks. weeks. It It could could take take longer, longer, but but yeah, yeah, you're you're looking looking at at year year end end for for uber uber lived. lived. I I can't can't imagine imagine this this was was a a massive massive surprise. surprise. I I think think they they held held hopes hopes that that they they would would win win on on appeal. appeal. But But I I can't can't imagine imagine as as a a huge huge surprise. surprise. I I think think it it all all comes comes down down to to proposition proposition 22, 22, which which is is a a ballot ballot initiative initiative that's that's being being voted voted on on on on Election Election day. day. And And that that to to me me is is the the big big chance chance that that uber uber left left still still have have here. here. There There hasn't hasn't been. been. I I haven't haven't able able to to find find a a ton ton of of polling, polling, but but there there is is pulling pulling done done by. by. I I think think it it was was UC UC Davis Davis back back in in September, September, it it found found that that 39% 39% of of voters voters supported supported the the ballot ballot measure, measure, which which would would keep keep Uber Uber contractors contractors as as contractors. contractors. 36% 36% were were opposed. opposed. A A full full quarter quarter of of people people were were undecided undecided on on this this one. one. Do you know, by the way how easy it is to get something on the ballot in the state of Palestine. Oh, easy. How many signatures do you need? Like 30? No, it's so it's It's actually more than I thought, but it's still like California's a state of over 55 million people. You need in order. So this is again what I'm seeing here, According to the California Constitution article to you need 623,000. It's nothing But that's that's literally like that's 1% of the state's population needs to agree with you to get something on the about. Yeah, There's so much that sucks about California. Voting is one of them because you get these from what I understand you get these things, and there's like 50 ballot questions depending on what city you live in. I think this year it's it's somewhere in that ballpark. It's It's just ridiculous. So, um, yeah, this year. You know, this is a tough one because I am a firm believer that Uber and lift both deliberately structured their business in the way they did the skirt, labor laws. So on one hand, I'm like you guys have something coming to you. On the other hand, I look at this nice say there's going to be a lot of uber and lyft drivers that aren't gonna be able to drive on the platform anymore. They're going to lose that income, and that's gonna hurt way have to be honest about that. It's going to hurt an awful lot of uber and lyft drivers. The remaining ones. Are going to end up coming away, probably with better wages and definitely with better benefits, and and that's kind of that's the trade off that ends up being made here. What I hope that does then is maybe spur some additional competition in the space saying Hey, This is you know, now a service where the prices have come up to where they're competitive or in some cases more expensive than taxis. Hey, let's see if we could generate some real innovation to actually drive those costs down instead of just trying to save on our labor costs by not covering health insurance. Yes, I mean one. I'm not so undecided on this or you know you're not decided on obey. You see both sides of it. I'm pretty firmly in the camp that All of these people need to be classified as employees. If we're going to treat them the way that they do on DH uber left several of these different companies need to be reclassified and need to have payroll taxes and benefits. In my view that is going to drive up costs. It's going Tio make taxis more favorable again, which the uber industry was able to completely skirt all the rules around the taxi industry and just kind of bankrupt them. Granted, there are plenty of taxi problems to begin with. I think the real thing that this drive when we talk about that innovation that would bring down costs again, I think the endgame for all of these guys is getting rid of the drivers entirely, whether their employees or contractors.

California Superior Superior Court Bill Bill Davis Davis Palestine
California court says Uber, Lyft drivers are employees, not contractors

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

04:24 min | 3 months ago

California court says Uber, Lyft drivers are employees, not contractors

"Like some some bad bad news news for for uber uber and and lift lift on on appeals appeals court court here here in in California, California, said said Yeah. Yeah. You You guys guys are are losing losing this this one. one. And And so so they they need need to to comply comply with with reclassifying reclassifying their their drivers drivers as as employees employees within within 30 30 days days of of a a formal formal ruling, ruling, which which could could happen happen in in the the next next few few weeks, weeks, so so realistically, realistically, probably probably around around your your end. end. Yes. Yes. So So I I think think a a timeline timeline here here is is important. important. So So back back on on January, January, 1st 1st Assembly Assembly Bill Bill five five became became law. law. That That was was the the one one that that basically basically required required all all of of these these companies companies that that provide provide contract contract type type work, work, such such as as uber uber and and lift lift but but also also a a few few others others to to reclassify reclassify those those workers workers as as employees employees in in May, May, a a lawsuit lawsuit Filed Filed against against Uber Uber lift lift for for not not complying complying in in June. June. There's There's another another injunction injunction to to immediately immediately classify classify them. them. This This went went through through Superior Superior Court. Court. They They lost lost the the lawsuit lawsuit it it back back in in August. August. The The continued continued to to appeal appeal this this and and now now this this ruling ruling basically basically gives gives them them 30 30 days days like like you you said said from from the the ruling, ruling, which which Again Again could could happen happen in in the the next next couple couple of of weeks. weeks. It It could could take take longer, longer, but but yeah, yeah, you're you're looking looking at at year year end end for for uber uber lived. lived. I I can't can't imagine imagine this this was was a a massive massive surprise. surprise. I I think think they they held held hopes hopes that that they they would would win win on on appeal. appeal. But But I I can't can't imagine imagine as as a a huge huge surprise. surprise. I I think think it it all all comes comes down down to to proposition proposition 22, 22, which which is is a a ballot ballot initiative initiative that's that's being being voted voted on on on on Election Election day. day. And And that that to to me me is is the the big big chance chance that that uber uber left left still still have have here. here. There There hasn't hasn't been. been. I I haven't haven't able able to to find find a a ton ton of of polling, polling, but but there there is is pulling pulling done done by. by. I I think think it it was was UC UC Davis Davis back back in in September, September, it it found found that that 39% 39% of of voters voters supported supported the the ballot ballot measure, measure, which which would would keep keep Uber Uber contractors contractors as as contractors. contractors. 36% 36% were were opposed. opposed. A A full full quarter quarter of of people people were were undecided undecided on on this this one. one. Do you know, by the way how easy it is to get something on the ballot in the state of Palestine. Oh, easy. How many signatures do you need? Like 30? No, it's so it's It's actually more than I thought, but it's still like California's a state of over 55 million people. You need in order. So this is again what I'm seeing here, According to the California Constitution article to you need 623,000. It's nothing But that's that's literally like that's 1% of the state's population needs to agree with you to get something on the about. Yeah, There's so much that sucks about California. Voting is one of them because you get these from what I understand you get these things, and there's like 50 ballot questions depending on what city you live in. I think this year it's it's somewhere in that ballpark. It's It's just ridiculous. So, um, yeah, this year. You know, this is a tough one because I am a firm believer that Uber and lift both deliberately structured their business in the way they did the skirt, labor laws. So on one hand, I'm like you guys have something coming to you. On the other hand, I look at this nice say there's going to be a lot of uber and lyft drivers that aren't gonna be able to drive on the platform anymore. They're going to lose that income, and that's gonna hurt way have to be honest about that. It's going to hurt an awful lot of uber and lyft drivers. The remaining ones. Are going to end up coming away, probably with better wages and definitely with better benefits, and and that's kind of that's the trade off that ends up being made here. What I hope that does then is maybe spur some additional competition in the space saying Hey, This is you know, now a service where the prices have come up to where they're competitive or in some cases more expensive than taxis. Hey, let's see if we could generate some real innovation to actually drive those costs down instead of just trying to save on our labor costs by not covering health insurance. Yes, I mean one. I'm not so undecided on this or you know you're not decided on obey. You see both sides of it. I'm pretty firmly in the camp that All of these people need to be classified as employees. If we're going to treat them the way that they do on DH uber left several of these different companies need to be reclassified and need to have payroll taxes and benefits. In my view that is going to drive up costs. It's going Tio make taxis more favorable again, which the uber industry was able to completely skirt all the rules around the taxi industry and just kind of bankrupt them. Granted, there are plenty of taxi problems to begin with. I think the real thing that this drive when we talk about that innovation that would bring down costs again, I think the endgame for all of these guys is getting rid of the drivers entirely, whether their employees or contractors.

California Superior Superior Court Bill Bill Davis Davis Palestine
Uber, Lyft must classify drivers as employees: US court

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

01:45 min | 3 months ago

Uber, Lyft must classify drivers as employees: US court

"Some bad news for uber and lift on appeals court here in California, said Yeah. You guys are losing this one. And so they need to comply with reclassifying their drivers as employees within 30 days of a formal ruling, which could happen in the next few weeks, so realistically, probably around your end. Yes. So I think a timeline here is important. So back on January, 1st Assembly Bill five became law. That was the one that basically required all of these companies that provide contract type work, such as uber and lift but also a few others to reclassify those workers as employees in May, a lawsuit Filed against Uber lift for not complying in June. There's another injunction to immediately classify them. This went through Superior Court. They lost the lawsuit it back in August. The continued to appeal this and now this ruling basically gives them 30 days like you said from the ruling, which Again could happen in the next couple of weeks. It could take longer, but yeah, you're looking at year end for uber lived. I can't imagine this was a massive surprise. I think they held hopes that they would win on appeal. But I can't imagine as a huge surprise. I think it all comes down to proposition 22, which is a ballot initiative that's being voted on on Election day. And that to me is the big chance that uber left still have here. There hasn't been. I haven't able to find a ton of polling, but there is pulling done by. I think it was UC Davis back in September, it found that 39% of voters supported the ballot measure, which would keep Uber contractors as contractors. 36% were opposed. A full quarter of people were undecided on this one.

Superior Court Uc Davis California
Dr. Joan Palmiter Bajorek CEO of Women in Voice on Linguistics and its Place in Voice

The Voicebot Podcast

06:12 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Joan Palmiter Bajorek CEO of Women in Voice on Linguistics and its Place in Voice

"Know that's now I. I. Kinda WanNa. Go back a little bit because you're a linguist. And I mean I don't know how you characterize yourself to characterize yourself as a linguist. Yeah. Usually when people ask me say I consider myself primarily a linguist and researcher those are the two core identities that I inhabit most of the time. Okay. Great. So What originally got you interested in linguistics Yeah, I mean I think. I. Consider Myself as being linguist when I was little I like played with code things and you know babbling around I started taking French quote unquote foreign language. In Middle School, I would have been like eleven and. I just thought an unlocked, the coolest world's travel and culture, and you know my parents have always really prioritize travel instead of like buying a big screen TV's let's run off to Thailand So that kind of interesting language culture has always been there for me. Actually, my mom found his old document of mine working career stuff for high schoolers where you like plan out potential career directions. Apparently on this document, I circled linguistics French, and photography as the three things I was interested in which ended up being my undergraduate degrees, my master's degree. Topics right there. In my teenage years, I knew. That's perfect. Yeah. Well, maybe maybe we do. I. Say there's a sense that we ask college students to make decisions about the rest of their lives. You know it's such a young age but maybe we know at least some of us know much younger. I feel like I got really lucky I feel like. I. Don't necessarily know the names of the topics but I feel like there's a light at the end of the horizon that I'm walking towards at all times sometimes running a mostly walking in just knowing that directionality and honestly the privileged to be able to pursue the things that I'm so passionate about. Now given the you've spent so much time. Going into linguistics study research have you had time to keep up with your French photography? My I I taught French previously to pay the bills in my graduate studies and I worked in France between UNDERGRAD and graduate school. So I'm was very proficient I mean, my dad hopes one day become famous photographer. You know as a retirement career but no, I have A. Busy schedule today and those things take away backburner. Got It. Okay. So you started out French in photography you moved into linguistics and why don't you share with listeners? What some of the areas of study you focused initially and then how that evolved. Yes. So I don't masters in linguistics from UC Davis. And they did a really phenomenal job of forcing you to take all the courses. In the range of things I was always really interested in phonetics and sociolinguistics, but taking morphology and Syntax and typology natural language processing was of course it was very new at that time. And really. It's when I started actually studying to a link goes interfaces from a LP phonetics standpoint that I felt like I had a moment of like wait a minute. This is a big data multi-lingual back end. Used by millions of users worldwide. Like who is deciding what good enough means for the Audio You know At that time I focused a lot on ed tech but I think the multi lingual multi modal interfaces that I was looking at Babbel Rosetta. Stone presented at Rosetta Stone really thinking about the research that space blew my mind that was back in two, thousand, fourteen, two, thousand, fifteen. Yeah. So When you think about those systems because they've been around for a while and some of them very good is that a stone has been doing this a pretty high level for a long time before we had cloud computing to new redoing this office CDs. Because I remember. At least one of my daughters maybe both of them took a couple of full programs you know through. through his stump Are there elements of that that of of the language learning process? You think that help move the industry forward or was that always just sort of a fork in on its own I think. Educational Technology has such power especially in twenty twenty. You know anyone who has kids I don't finds this stuff wonderful I think Rosetta stone you're right I think back in the day was really innovative software I haven't seen significant innovation in the last decade I can't I'm under NDA can't tell you what I told her engineering team but my research that is public I mean the. The back end with they're doing the acoustics in the visuals that they show users and most users aren't linguists. An most users aren't fun additions like me. Or mostly incomprehensible. So I felt like there was a huge mismatch between what the back end was doing in the educational pieces of it. Could you actually learn and get better at your pronunciation from these tools? Right. So that's that's a critique on the application of the technology though correct? Yeah. Is opposed to the core technology in terms of being. Listen and. and. That's what I. Mike Critique is the scaffolding or like how it's structured could be significantly rated and their companies like Elsa and blue canoe that are doing the work to make it interpreted. Because we do have back ends that should be able to do this very well.

Rosetta Stone Researcher Babbel Rosetta I. Mike Critique Middle School Stone Educational Technology Thailand Uc Davis France LP
UC Davis conducting clinical trials of experimental drug that Trump took for coronavirus

Peak Financial Freedom Hour with Jim and Dan

00:16 sec | 3 months ago

UC Davis conducting clinical trials of experimental drug that Trump took for coronavirus

"Covert 19 experimental antibody treatment are going to take place in Sacramento at UC Davis doctor say the treatment may provide a therapeutic substitute for the naturally occurring immune response. It's the same antibody cocktail president Trump was treated with after getting his positive diagnosis. U S

Uc Davis Donald Trump Sacramento President Trump
How the North Bay Became 'Wine Country'

Bay Curious

03:48 min | 4 months ago

How the North Bay Became 'Wine Country'

"To answer Michael's question about when wine country got start and how it became. So popular, we brought in reporter Christopher Beale Hey Christopher Hay alluvia. So let's start with when wine grapes were first planted in the North Bay. When was that all the way back in eighteen twenty three the Spanish created a mission in Sonoma's. It's the first place where grapes were intentionally planted in wine country but the wine made from these grapes was Sacramento Kinda like alcoholic. Grape juice used in church, not what we would recognize as wine, and then in eighteen thirty s some of the early European settlers in the NAPA sonoma valleys would have grown some basic wine grapes as well. Now, when does the wine country that we think of today start to take shape for the sake of the story let's start in eighteen forty California is ten years from entering the Union and this guy named Charles Krug arrives in San Francisco. Crew was a German after the revolutions of eighteen, forty eight in Europe the comes into San Francisco. It was the editor of a German language newspaper in San Francisco. That's Jim Lapsley he managed agricultural continuing education at UC Davis for more than thirty years with focus on wine-making. Now, after a few years in San Francisco Charles Krug gets married and ended up as a dowry getting quite a bit of land. This is the area just North of Santa Lena where the Charles Krug winery is located considered. It'd be the first commercial winery in Napa Valley. The wine country story is really one about marketing and innovation, and this Guy Charles crew gets credit for a lot of the early innovation and wine country including being the first to use a cider press, which is kind of like a slotted barrel to press wine grapes before that grapes were generally crushed by people's feet. When California entered the union, it was a place where we could grow grapes because the climate was quite similar to the southern Mediterranean. It was dry during the summer it had wet winters and differ grew very well here in California. For, is a species of grapevine. It's used to make wine after the early success of pioneers like Cruyff people began to plant grapes and produce more wind and the NAPA and sonoma valleys. But this was still considered low quality table wine and it continued to represent only a fraction of the US market mainly because it was still cheaper for east coast consumers to import wine. From Europe by boat, then from California by train. But that all changed in eighteen, seventy five, the US government stepped in and increase the tax on imported European wines to twenty cents a gallon which leveled the financial playing field for California's wine producers, and as a result, the wines dig it imported from Europe can be much more expensive wines and oak wine that was everyday drinking. That became the from California. Now. It wasn't a linear march from this moment today. The wind industry suffered a few major setbacks over the years but one way or another managed to survive them. Here's a few of the important ones I wine country was almost destroyed by bugs in the eighteen seventies. This is a microscopic bug that eats the roots of wine grapes. It's related to an eighth fit in it's called. PHILOXENIA. And when it arrived in wine country, it destroyed the vineyards to kill the vineyards and the only way could really come up with a solution was to plant on grafted vines the bottom, the rootstock would be a native variety and then on top graft with Vida's Benifica.

California San Francisco Charles Krug Europe Napa Charles Krug Winery Union Sonoma United States Guy Charles Napa Valley North Bay Christopher Beale Michael Reporter Jim Lapsley Christopher Hay Santa Lena Cruyff Vida
Managing Wildfire Through Cultural Burning

Short Wave

06:18 min | 4 months ago

Managing Wildfire Through Cultural Burning

"So Lauren. You were telling us about how in February. You were heading out with a group of tribes from Northern California conducting a cultural burn very cool. But I, tell me how cultural burns are different from say. Or prescribed burns something I know the Forest Service does yeah. The service and other fire agencies they set controlled fires to, and that's for the vegetation they WANNA, get rid of it so that there's not too much that builds up because overgrown vegetation can make fires more extreme. Cultural burning it does that too but the tribes also do it to encourage certain plants to grow. Like the first thing that team did that day was actually a harvest, Oh yeah. They headed out to some tall bushes sour berries, which is also known as three Samak and you know this was winter. So there were these long spindly branches that were totally bare of leaves. So my mom is basket lever. That's why I meant Ragu Taras I'm reggae tears. Mahu Newnan Rageh Tears He. He's clipping. The longest straightest branches are used in traditional basket weaving and then after being harvested, the plant is burned to encourage more growth like that. All our basket material needs to be tended to in some way. So they need to be burned and then next year we'll probably have sticks that are sick seventeen, tom one year. fired. Oh. So does the fire burn the plant completely? Yes completely to the ground, and it really actually happens pretty fast but the rootstock stays alive. So you know after the spring rains come the plant will re sprout got in the harvest can kind of happen again. Yeah and I know some plants in California they're kind of used to being burned regularly. Yeah. Yeah. I, mean I think a lot of. People forget this but they're adapted to regular fires I mean historically, those are both naturally caused fires by lightning, and then there were fire set by tribes and Ron says they burned like this for Millennia to encourage plant growth also to shape the landscape to attract certain game for a lot of reasons when I was a kid I learned from my mother. My mother got in trouble when she burned because the fire department you know didn't want her doing what we're doing today. As you probably know white settlers had a very different take on fire they came with their concepts of being afraid to fire. Then, you didn't understand fire in the sense of the tool that it could be. To create and what it did to help, generate and rejuvenate the land. And let's not forget. There's a bigger history here when when white settlers arrived in California in the eighteen hundreds there was an intentional and violent campaign to destroy their tribal culture I spoke to Beth rose Middleton manning about that She's Professor of Native American Studies at UC Davis, and she brought her students that day to be part of a ceremony. There was actually a a bounty on California. Indian people The governor had announced a war of extermination. So you have all that. and. It really fostered removal settler ownership of indigenous lands. So tribal burning basically stopped and fast forward a couple of decades to the early nineteen hundreds, and that's when the federal government began an era of fire suppression. Please be careful with fire. That's the whole smokey the bear era, right? Yeah. Make, sure your fire is dead. Remember only you can prevent forest fires. Yeah. It's just interesting that the legacy of this idea that fire is always something that's bad and that has to be put out continued from settler colonialism onwards. Yeah. Definitely I mean up until the nineteen seventies the forest service had this rule they called the ten am rule it was basically that all fires should be put out by tanning him the next day but all that suppression, you know it caused a lot of vegetation to build up in California, the force became denser and that set the stage for extreme destructive fires. So fire matters of realizing that has to change and they started embracing prescribe burns a now we're slowly being open to cultural burning too. So that brings us to today where western states are grappling with how to manage wildfire season, and you're going to talk about how cultural burns kind of fit into that right and so ron and other tribal leaders have been trying to restore cultural burning for a while and you know not just teaching the concepts of people but actually bringing out the land to practice it, and that's not easy to do when the land is. No longer legally there's as as Beth rose described to me I think it's really important that we don't think about traditional burning as what information can we learn from native people about how they care for the land and then exclude people and move. On, with non natives managing the land, but the native people are at the forefront and our leading. Okay. So this event is maybe a way to do that. Yeah which is why Ron invited these government officials to participate and kind of get their hands dirty during the ceremony You know like Jennifer Montgomery she directs California's Forest Management Task. Force. So it's her job to figure out how to deal with all these overgrown for us and she was there helping light this fire in a big grassy field using a drip porch that was super empowering. I mean I think every woman should get a chance to use a drip torch is that like a flame thrower or something? Not Not. Quite It's it's like a watering can lighter thing that basically spilled out fire instead of water. That's pretty cool. So yeah yeah I mean by the time she was done there was this kind of giant line of fire that that kind of spread out pretty quickly across this entire field but remember this was February winters. So it the fire burned itself out pretty quickly. and. Then all that dried brushes

California RON Forest Service Northern California Lauren Federal Government Samak Professor Of Native American S Beth Rose TOM Beth Rose Middleton Uc Davis Jennifer Montgomery
Prehistoric Marine Reptile Died After A Giant Meal

60-Second Science

01:56 min | 5 months ago

Prehistoric Marine Reptile Died After A Giant Meal

"Of millions of years ago. Reptilian predators called it. Swam the sees their fossils look fearsome but paleobiologist real SUITCA. Motani. Of UC, Davis says, they may have looked more like friendly dolphins maybe in life he feels might have been cute. But at least the smaller ones Martinis team studied one such specimen found in southwest China. It was two hundred and forty million years old fifteen feet long but it seemed to have some extra bones in it, which Montana's team termed to be the remains of a thirteen foot long the ladder sore or see lizard the this or had swallowed and spoiler alert the only reason they were able to see this animal in the belly of the or is that this gigantic meal never got digested the sword died soon after swallowing it. Motamed is careful to say they're not sure exactly why the theus or perished, but the specimen has a broken neck. So he gave a speculative play by play. Perhaps he says the source snapped at the C. Lizard, but the Lizard fought back and the Pike in between the two fierce probably. So the the or fought to subdue its prey damaging its neck in the process then it had dislodged the praised bony head entail from it's juicy midsection. Now, the have to do it through jerking. And twisting like the crocodiles do also bad for the neck and finally the sore had to swallow the animal perhaps using inertia show or gravity to shove the prey down its gullet and the two things are by the kind it was ingested maybe the neck damage was accumulated to certain level and maybe the Knicks could not support the head details of that ancient battle appear in the journal Science. In the reason why this analysis matters is you can only and I so much about who by looking at teeth this fossil offers direct evidence that these ancient beasts sometimes bit off a whole lot more than they could chew.

Davis Knicks China Montana UC Motamed
Covid-19 Data Reporting System Gets Off to Rocky Start

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:13 min | 5 months ago

Covid-19 Data Reporting System Gets Off to Rocky Start

"Lab test reporting system exposed just how archaic much of the state's digital infrastructure really is. KCBS political reporter dug seven talk to the expert who says California needs a serious upgrade to survive, not only this pandemic, but what's ahead of Inter Newsome takes responsibility for the meltdown of the cow already system Undercounting Cove in 19 data for a week or more, but also said the state has neglected its information technology infrastructure for years. Dr. Brad Pollock, chairman of the Department of Public Health and associate dean of the UC Davis School of Medicine, says that's true. It just took the Corona virus pandemic to expose its flaws. The system, the cow already system is quite old and was in need of Of infrastructure developments quite quite a long time ago before the governor took office. It's been recognized as being kind of a weak link. So this is Function of not having up to date systems that have been maintained at the level we need to be maintained at and the extra load added by this pandemic, which is certainly taxed. Pollack is confident the glitches fix short term and says other data do confirm with the governor's been saying that California's Cove in 19 picture has improved on our show, the state of

California Uc Davis School Of Medicine Undercounting Cove Inter Newsome Dr. Brad Pollock Department Of Public Health Associate Dean Reporter Pollack Chairman
The Bull that (probably) Sires Mostly Bulls

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:13 min | 6 months ago

The Bull that (probably) Sires Mostly Bulls

"Breakthroughs in biotechnology. So our guest today is someone who's been with us a number of times probably five or six times. Now, one of our original guests is Dr Alison Venenum and she's a cooperative extension specialist in the Department of Animal Science at the University of California Davis Welcome back Dr. Venenum thank you. Kevin thanks nice to be back. From my bedroom and Davis. I'm working from home to you know and it's it's just really It's been crazy times. But this has been a you're the news from your laboratory is always exciting and it's really cool because I always invite guests at the end of the episode that next time you have something. Cool happen. Let me know we'll get you back up and a few people take me up on that. You have a of times. Today we really WanNa talk about cosmo the ball, and so usually start with the question that you're trying to answer. But let's talk about the punchline who is cosmo in what is so special about him. So cosmo Isabel cough that was born back in April here on UC Davis campus and he is actually a crisper. Bull. So we have been working for about five years now to try to do a gene insertion in bovine embryos and. The result of all of that work and basically represents. The culmination of a lot of effort to. Use a genome editing to do a targeted insertion of Jane in the one cell embryo of of cows, and of course, with cows, you do your experiment, and then you have to wait nine months for the pregnancy. he just happened to time his arrival with a with a global pandemic, and so that added an extra level of excitement to the whole project, which was kind of ironic. But anyway, that's basically who he is and he is a targeted gene knockin of a particular Gene Code S R Y which stands for the sex determining region on the Y chromosome and your listeners probably familiar with the fact that Jen that sex in mammals is determined by inheriting a Y chromosome from. Dad which makes you a boy or an x chromosome from dad, which makes you go and the reason for that is this Jane Lasry, which is the sex determining region on the Y chromosome basically triggers development down the male pathway, and so that's why when you get a Y chromosome, you go to the mail pathway and what we did was actually moved that Jane using crisper cast nine and made education and copied it onto another Jane with the idea of saying whether or not. The inheritance of that Gina Learn in an ex- ex-. Gina typic-. Individual would result in in an individual that has a a male appearance and we know that in some species like, Mike Tyson infect humans and horses is being observed translations of the lasry on shoes. The X. Crime is I'm and that's resulted in ex ex lasry positive male appearing individuals, and so we think based on our understanding of biology that that likely that gene is sufficient to basically trigger the mild developmental pathway and we want more boys in beef production. In the same way, we want more girls for chicken and egg production. because. The males are more efficient at converting to gain and tend to finish it a heavier white and so If there was a choice, they'd be the preferred animal for based production. So why do kind of thing with a cow? Why start there it seems like this could have been

Jane Lasry Dr Alison Venenum Davis Cosmo Isabel Gina Typic Uc Davis Department Of Animal Science Kevin University Of California JEN Mike Tyson
"uc davis" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KTOK

"Any dealings with UC Davis except this is that the that county is the west county in the United States in a in California's fifty eight counties that still allows Pouncey issue which is the animals go from the pound to research facilities so they're they're not a shiny bright they got they got a really dark history and they continue to have it and we've eliminated and stop in fifty seven counties it's the only county in California where because it's UC Davis and and I've and I've been in a primary absolutely place many years ago as well as many other primates facility places and it's pretty horrendous and with the fact that these animals don't have any so social interaction with one another or they don't have any any toys or anything to play with sometimes I got an old TV that's on in there and that's about it yes this social enjoyment so no ID say he just distillates we can use apps absolutely accurate about it and it said it said that you know you and I I commend him for the night not taken it any further and becoming given the sector and getting away from the obviously is it something that bothers them enough to make this call and we need more people like that we really had more people like that as a publicly funded university UC Davis publicly funded research on these animals so wildcard line Laura in New York hi Laura I'm hi thank you for taking my call Chris I just wanted to thank you for the work that you do very very much like thank you thank you Chris great work I've been on eating the way you do for forty four years now I also to animal rescue the last thirty years and I just it you probably know everything I'm going to say but I just want to address it to the audience with the audience know there are anti business vivisection societies that people can donate to they're doing a lot of work to take the monkeys and chin side of the lab and also I want people to know that the flag rock industry is really horrendous also and also the lobster industry really horrendous the harm that gets done to these animals are boiled alive and to let people know they have a little bit more consciousness about the choices they make about what they eat and then also for health reasons what becoming really popular is the paleo diet and the keto diet and that's all about eating meat meat meat and it's just all really disgusting and I disorder have lower thank you for the call we're running out of time so I thank you for the I'm gonna get let Chris comment on that the diet part for example well if you your issue definitely right and it with will learn now that the obesity which killed people in this country is out of control I mean is there any hit differ statistics anyway if I hear from fifty eight to ninety percent she is going to be that oral beach and that stitch discussing at one time in now now the the kid in the class that's then there is the one that stands out and is if he's athletically stand where is it one time is who's a kid in this school that was overweight that was it now it's the norm it's the norm and it's dangerous and it's it's it's on hell so this is why these new different kind of is alternative each that are coming out of the way to go which doesn't have the hormones and managers and the antibiotics it's hell your school for the kids get a watch use so better watch what how much you eat the question still will mail comfort food well ye it but it's far better than eating me and any kind of products and injected with hormones and this is why a young girls of developing faster and than they normally would have back in the time when I was a kid so it's it's all what they're putting into the animals and it's concentrated and then we take this one for you to the kids at luncheon schools we're setting up these kids to become big dollars strange sort of biomedical research community and sort of what it is we should big pharma industry because they're gonna be you'll be staying on the fact that the tide is still in a change on that people become aware of it finally finally did come aware of it I want to take action I thank you for your work I thank you for being here if you get arrested or if you get hit with one of these the gag laws and need some help I hope you'll come back here in your face the.

UC Davis west county United States California Pouncey
"uc davis" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Dealings with UC Davis except this is that the that county is the west county the United States in a in California's fifty eight counties that still allows pounds sees you which is the animals go from the pound to research facilities so they're they're not shining bright they got they got a really dark history and they continue to have it and we've eliminated and stop in fifty seven counties it's the only county in California where because it's UC Davis and and I've and I've been in their primary that facility place many years ago as well as many other primates facility places and it's pretty horrendous and with the fact that these animals don't have any so social interaction with one another or they don't have any any tool use or anything to play with sometimes I got an old TV that's on and there and that's about it yes this social enjoyment so no he said he just distillate speaking yeah that's absolutely accurate about it and it said it said that you know you and I I commend him for the night not taken as any further and becoming given the sector and getting away from the obviously is is something that bothers them send us to make this call and we need more people like that we really had more people like that as a publicly funded university UC Davis publicly funded research on these animals so wildcard line Laura in New York hi Laura I'm hi thank you for taking my call Chris I just wanted to thank you for the work that you do very very much like thank you thank you Chris great work I've been on eating the way you do for forty four years now I also to animal rescue the last thirty years and I just it you probably know everything I'm going to say but I just want to address it to the audience with the audience know there are anti business there's a section societies that people can donate to they're doing a lot of work to take the monkeys and chin side of the labs and also I want people to know that the foreground industry is really horrendous also and also the lobster industry really horrendous the harm that gets done to do the animals of will to live and to let people know to have a little bit more consciousness about the choices they make about what they eat and then also for health reasons what's becoming really popular is the paleo diet and the keto diet and that's all about eating meat meat meat and it's just all really disgusting and I just wanna have Laura thank you for the call we're running out of time so I thank you for the guy I'm gonna get let Chris comment on that the diet part for example well if you're issues actually right and he will will learning now that obesity which killed people in this country's age out of control I mean is there any difference statistics anyway if I hear from fifty to ninety percent she's going to be that or beach and that states discussing at one time in now nowadays the kids in the class that's missing is the one that stands out and he is if he's athletically skin where is it one time this was a kid in the schools that was overweight that was it now is the norm it's the norm and it's dangerous and it's it's it's on hell so this is why these new different kind of is alternative each that a common now the way to go which doesn't have the hormones and managers and the antibiotics it's still your school for the kids gonna watch you can still go to watch what how much you're reading the question still will mail comfort food well ye it but it's far better than eating and any kind of products and then injected with hormones and this is why a young girls of developing faster and than they normally would have back in the time when I was a kid so it's it's all with the putting into the animals and it's concentrated and then we take this phone features to the kids at luncheon schools were sitting up these kids to become big dollars signs sort of biomedical research community and sort of sort of a lease reform the industry because they're gonna be you'll be staying on the set but the tide is going to change on that people become aware of it finally finally did come aware of it I want to take action I thank you for your work I thank you for being here if you get arrested or if you get hit with one of these gag laws and need some help I hope you'll come back here.

UC Davis west county United States California
"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"UC Davis is collaborating with the world were not with a world renowned shaft and food activists Alice waters to research sustainable crops waters institute for edible education will be at the new Aggie square development in Oak Park it'll serve as a center for research and sustainable crops and environmentally conscious agriculture that takes climate change into consideration the institute will also provide hands on activities to teach students and teachers about the role food plays and health police are reminding drivers at some roads will be closed for the women's March in Sacramento this weekend the fourth annual women's March Sacramento will be held tomorrow it'll start at ten thirty AM go from southside park up night street to the state capitol there will be road closures around southside park starting at eight thirty AM March team this year women rising and Sacramento state graduate is making history as the first full time female assistant coach in the history of Major League Baseball San Francisco Giants are adding Alyssa knack into Gabe Kapler coaching staff that can former softball coach Kathy straight hand remembers the three time all conference first baseman as an exceptional young woman I just knew early on that she was going to probably be a trailblazer and she was going to go out there do something great she was going to make an impact but even in my wildest dreams I never exactly four saw this one coming the giants a national folk focus her talents on helping build a winning culture in the clubhouse traffic and weather together is Brian nobles at the limit on everybody's all the way around Sacramento govern fender Bender westbound I. eighty at Madison but it doesn't appear to be slowing anybody down still have chain controls up in the high country right now on I eighty of the mind I acted the state line fifty its twin bridges to Myers traffic on the tens every ten minutes mornings and afternoons fry nobles leaves.

Myers fender Bender Kathy softball Alyssa Sacramento state Madison Brian nobles UC Davis Gabe Kapler San Francisco Giants Sacramento Oak Park Alice waters
"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"At UC Davis may have found a solution to a disease plaguing grapes that is cost California wine makers millions of dollars winter break is officially started kids out of school so what now we have some ideas to keep kids busy coming up here this morning but let's head out to the rose right check in with Brian normalcy got a got a foggy drive getting around Sacramento this morning all the way around if your route is one of those I can get in on days like this expected this morning very dense at times still no accidents along the way on our freeways eighty from Roseville nine minutes to the cap cities but another nine on the cap city freeway gets heated downtown thirteen minutes in from elk Grove on five ninety nine fifty looks good all the way in from fall some that's an eighteen minute drive thirteen if you got twenty one rather it be coming in from woodland on I five thirteen if you coming in from Davis he's down AT across the causeway if you head up in the high country right now got a chain up to get over the mountain passes eighty it's king bail to Donna like highway fifty it's carvers to Myers we do have one problem Jack not big rig reportedly westell corn Boulevard at sage view Dr C. H. being offered in crews on the scene speed sensors indicate a little bit of a backup going both ways in that spot if you spot something on the road in front of you want to pass it along call the KFBK traffic tip line dial pound two fifty intake traffic traffic on the tent every ten minutes mornings and afternoons Ryan nobles news ninety three point one K. F. B. K. dense fog for a while this morning that low clouds and fog will give way to some sun this afternoon with a high of fifty four to fifty eight patchy clouds early tonight then clouding up late tonight with little thirty five to thirty nine mostly cloudy tomorrow with a high of fifty to fifty four I've accu weather meteorologist Joe Lundberg news ninety three point one KFBK I am currently in San Francisco had that way forty three degrees if you're going to Tahoe twenty eight degrees and in Sacramento it is forty two degrees that news ninety three point one K. if the K. so the travel day in Sacramento International Airport is back up and running this morning travelers there were hit with delays and flight cancellations over the weekend after a car crashed into a utility pole knocking.

UC Davis California Sacramento Roseville elk Grove Donna Myers Jack Dr C. H. San Francisco Tahoe Sacramento International Airpo Brian Ryan nobles K. F. B. Joe Lundberg
"uc davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Maria Manetti Schramm founders of the minute he Schramm UCM of art at UC Davis through June fourteenth twenty twenty the museum presents a new era the gate cans immersive installation that pushes the limits of perception carbonite offering data protection of businesses including email spreadsheets calendars and more carbonite data protection for small businesses hi Marco Werman lately we hear the word Ukraine and we think corruption next time on the world Ukrainians talk about corruption in their country and beyond why Ukrainians may be the experts on corruption our story from Kiev on the world we'll bring you the world thirty minutes from now it starts at two o'clock when KQED public radio this is fresh AIR I'm David Bianculli in for Terry gross back with more of Terry's twenty twelve interview with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas he's among this year's recipients of the Kennedy center honors for lifetime artistic achievement which are given out this week when we left off Terry was asking about Michael Tilson Thomas is grandparents Boris and Bessie Thomas shifty who were stars in the Yiddish theater they emigrated to the US from Ukraine in the eighteen eighties so I want to play a recording by your grandmother the late Bessie Thomas Chesky singing a song and I'm gonna have you introduce at this is actually from a D. V. D. out take from your shell so tell us about this song and when you think it was required this is a little introduction to a song called mink as song because monologue one of best sees most famous parts in which she's playing a girl from a little village whose country United States and is on the eve of a huge adventure a pig million like experimented which she will be elevated from her lowly parlor maid status to being the lady of the house okay so this is Betty Thomas shifty recorded approximately one nineteen twenty something well okay here we go yeah thank right I wanted thank you so that was the late Bessie Thomas shifty singing and she and Boris commissions are the lake grandparents of my guest conductor Michael Tilson Thomas so what kind of music did your grandmother introduce you to I was lucky enough to hear her deliver a lot of her biggest numbers right there at our living room since she would arrive every weekend to our house and we would put on a little show together which I would accompany her and some of her songs and she would do recitations and we did little scenes together so although it my parents fondest hope that I would become some kind of scientist a mathematician I realize that she was already getting me into the whole theater experience right there a whole that's really interesting and one of the things she says one of things you describe her having said to you in your area yes you are more like me than your parents are there more conventional and you have more of what which is a like a creative spirit or something that she said your parents are very lovely people but terribly conventional your like me you're an adventurer you'll have to prove something did you take that to heart I paid attention to it I didn't know quite what it meant as I listen to her tell all the stories of her life from her childhood through her stardom and then even her reflections on the way fashions changed and the way she was in her late life of quite lonely person I took it all in and what I kind of understood from her was that it had been a very interesting ride but she really was proud of what had been accomplished and when she saw somebody very successful entertainer coming up and she could see in them something that had come from the kind of things that they have done in the theater she was very proud of it she recognize them and appreciate them so when your grandmother died and you were under sixteen or seventeen was there music at her funeral there wasn't much music at my grandmother's funeral there were a few prayers and there were very few people there and her plaque just says Bessie Thomas have ski Yiddish theatre pioneer star which is exactly what she wanted to say but of course there's a whole repertory of songs that we played at home all the time whenever we thought about her and that I still play it was a very big moment of big right of passage in my life the first day that I took over playing her songs instead of my father playing and measuring the way I was playing them against the wonderful nuances that he and my grandmother had brought to the music I was lucky to hear my family play that music for me I wanted to keep in my ear is exactly the way they had sung the songs and played with all the Iranian Morton C. and snappy little gestures and comebacks so you mentioned some advice in in in your show that your grandmother gave you about when you're on stage you have to remember that the people in the uppermost balcony for the people who pay the least but enjoying at the most and you have to even if you're whispering you have to make sure that those people can hear you how has that affected you as a conductor my way of expressing what she said to me is what is it like for people beyond the sixth row that we play in such a big hall sometimes in classical music in their their halls designed to be very rich which is on the one hand very nice the gorgeous sound it's there but to get the sound to be distinct it is difficult and I sometimes tell my students that playing classical music is like making an announcement in an airport that you hear someone say passengers on flight three ninety one the golden rule I immediately please so you're trying to make every single moment completely distinct another way Bessie had of saying that you said listen venha blowing on accident you gotta watch out for the nine Floyd this the night Floyd that stains of us could just saying I was giving to the park one day and I noticed the most beautiful suddenly a dog around that you'll suddenly dropped the axe at your job but you got to keep the contour of it all the way going through same thing in music that's really great my cousin Thomas thank you it's been great as always thank you conductor Michael Tilson Thomas speaking to Terry gross in twenty twelve he's one of the honorees who will be saluted at this weekend's Kennedy center honors the annual salute to the arts will be televised on CBS December fifteenth after a break we remember child advocate merry preppy as the director of the.

Schramm UCM UC Davis Maria Manetti Schramm thirty minutes one hand one day
"uc davis" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Three researchers at UC Davis have developed a breath test for opioids and other drugs Dr Michael Schiavo with UC Davis tells KNX he sees the technology being used by first responders at even Lehman who are dealing with possible overdose victims of a ride one so it may be I'll be alright but it may also be marijuana and maybe other drugs of abuse or maybe other normal medication date and private they take an overdose we envision that the cast like then it could accurately and quickly discerned every single medication a cake and just in a few simple grass the test relies on capturing human breath which would be analyzed under a variety of conditions while it is still likely a few years from going to market Skibo says it could eventually be used by law enforcement agencies and doctors potentially helping everyone from people while with diabetes two people who have mental illness a new report about vaping reveals that lung damage to people that have become ill resembles chemical burns like those caused by mustard gas the majority of patients report vaping with T. H. C. the pro active ingredient in marijuana but some do say they have used only nicotine Dr Yasmeen but who is one of the study's lead author is at the Mayo Clinic says they are not able to identify exactly what's causing the long damage or even how many harmful substances are involved due to the intrinsic variability of what people are they being and the concentrations that they're vaping it's really hard to pin down which ones are are the problems and it and it may just be that some people are more intrinsically susceptible to developing lung injury from baby just like many people that smoke are susceptible to developing lung cancer not more than eight hundred cases of lung illness links to vaping have been reported nationwide and there have been some deaths as well coming up.

UC Davis Dr Michael Schiavo KNX Lehman marijuana Skibo lung damage T. H. C. Dr Yasmeen Mayo Clinic vaping nicotine
"uc davis" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Ahead on KCBS UC Davis researchers announced their strawberry lab has produced a handful of new variety Oakland for look at traffic now with your dress we're still slow through the downtown area both directions though it appears as though the incidents that precipitated the backups are mostly cleared from the roadway the slow going between fifth and free bail is slow is below the limit now and the end both directions eastbound traffic on interstate eighty through Elsa Bronte Richmond still slows where the right lane will be shut down until this afternoon sometime later this afternoon they're estimating five o'clock for Caltrans to repair guard rail that was damaged in an early morning fatal crash that virtually shut down the eastbound lanes for several hours and there's a new problem for the westbound highway for ride through Antioch let's go to the chilled not a body collision Kaman Bob prior I'm looking at west bond for comparable mobile of our three to four cars involved in a crash there was blocking the right lane those cars being moved to the shoulder while a traffic break is in progress a about a third of a mile slowly and I'm seeing some slowing now on interstate two eighty through the Los Altos hills were north of el Monte a brush fire is been burning off to the east side of the freeway your next update twelve eighteen on the traffic leader KCVO beautiful weather around the base sunny and warm it's getting hot inland this afternoon temperatures their eighties lower ninety sixty seventies at the.

Oakland Elsa Bronte Richmond Caltrans Kaman Bob UC Davis el Monte KCVO
"uc davis" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"uc davis" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"He's the UC Davis professor, who, let's read some of his quotes is our is charming land. Yeah. Here's just some of the things he's tweeted talked about an interviews. I'm thankful that every living cop will be dead. One day somebody their own hand. Some by others too many of old age has shag. Let's not make more. So he tweeted that in two thousand fourteen. I don't I don't see a world where I would tweet that I don't see a world where many listening right now with tweet that. But you say, hey, five years ago, one tweet. Do we let it slide? What there's some more quotes here. I mean it's easier to shoot cops when their backs are turned no tweeted that the next year, and then in two thousand sixteen people think cops need to be reformed. They need to be killed. He said in an interview. So again, UC Davis professor, we were talking in the first segment how screwed up the college system is. You could love this all in there together. Right. You can put this all in the same situation. This is what's going on. So Paul, Yes, What's going on with him? What do you? He was condemned. Not by employer. That's for sure. He's still teaching. I mean, unless unless I missed something. Nope. Let me read as Wikipedia, he's a writer and a professor of English and comparative literature at UC Californian Davis. UC davis. So yeah, you know you got condemned so that should at least make us feel good. It's honestly, it's laughable, because you should cry. In the biggest thing here. Right. Let's, let's go with Joshua clovers thought right? He wants no more police officers. Okay. What would that look like? What a world would that look like because right now as it is with this Bill, you're already hearing. And maybe the this is not saying this publicly, but police officers, especially in Chicago are saying on not going into the bad neighborhoods, because what's the point? I'll let him shoot it out. And I'll just go collect the bodies when it's over. I'm not going in the middle. When I going to do I'll either get shot get killed or I'll shoot someone and get in trouble. So I might as well just let it go. I mean you see you see what's going on here. And you've got to UC Davis professor, saying, yeah, I wish cups got killed. Okay. That's our state though, if, if, if I were running for. Well, let's take to if I was running for political office, or elected office, especially here in California, one of my top things that I would run on would be to reform the tenure system. Oh oh, yeah. And you know what you would be you're dead, right, Dan? And I would lose a heart but I guess. Basically, political suicide. Yeah. No, you're definitely right? I was thinking about this the other day, if you were to run if his teacher union is so strong, but you're right there. I was saying if I was a local official right now and this'll be a nice transition into this story. I would run on. Hey, I don't know. No more bike lanes. No more bus lanes cars. How about that? Slogan. Just just cars. But what about clemency? Yeah. I we need to get it to work. We need cars. But what about the trolley? Yeah. No, nobody's on it cars. Which leads me to San Dan. I'm going to go here. Now, thanks so I'm going to keep talking about this because this is a pressing issue. Honestly, it is realize right now. Right now. Three and a half percent of San Diegan 's use public transit, as their means of transportation me me say that again three and a half percent. Use public transportation. This is despite sixty six percent. Of the new tax money going to public transit. So something often hear from the bike lovers or the public transit lovers as well. Yeah. But if you just would spend money on it, then people would use it, and I'm saying they're spending money on it and not using it..

professor UC Californian Davis UC Davis writer Davis Bill professor of English and compa Joshua clovers California Chicago San Diegan Dan San Dan Wikipedia official sixty six percent five years One day
"uc davis" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KTRH

"Jails? Now saw her face. Okay. So I just had this great reality. Check in my mind talking about. In you know, I was just joking mostly but move into Davis, California where you see Davis's UC Davis is a good agricultural school. But I loved all the the orchards you saw between Napa and Davis and up to Sacramento, just one or traffic or another right there off eighty and and then we pass in Davidson's, UC's, beautiful campus and everything and unlike colleague, my son to go there, and then I can work there part time, and I could do a radio show. A wait a minute UC Davis has big agriculture school. And then, of course, Napa SRA close by and they're all experts have viticulture. I'd be a little intimidated trying to do gardening show out there. I definitely would be a little intimidated. So speaking of Davis Rick says, he's got some Davis info for me on the west side. Rick good morning, Martin ready. Yeah. I lived in Davis California for about four years. And why would you leave jobs? Hi, ended up moving to Houston. But I'm not crazy. That place is is a great town, isn't it? It is fantastic. But area that I live in was a seventy two acre housing development called village homes. You need to check it out. If you end up out there the houses are all built in little street. So that they don't have big streets reflecting a lot of heat. The all the plans. Landscaping itself is edible as much as they could make it. They used to do a commercial grape harvest, but they're not doing it. Now. It's now the people who live in that development have access to their own vineyard. They still do a commercial almond harvest which helps pay some of the homeowners association dues the people that live in a six house little not houses, but they're responsible for maintaining the the trees and the fruit and and production there, and they get to pick whatever's there, but anybody that lives could pick up anything off the ground understand. They like tons of bicycle lanes there too. Davis bicycle capital of the world. Yeah. The bicycle is a symbol for Davis, California. He is a phenomenal place to be did you ever go to the that huge farmers market that they're famous for? They have one there. And there's also a an individual place called the Pedrick market, which is just west of babies on interstate eighty and he knows all the local farmers and gets the best produce at the best prices you'll ever find. Google all this just running out eighty from Napa to Sacramento to get on a flight. And of course, I'm like commenting on everything I say, my wife, probably got so sick of. Ooh, I wonder what I wonder what that is. I wonder what orchard that. Tomatoes tomatoes are the big cash crop for Sacramento too. It's got tomato fields. He's okay. Then I have a question for you is I guess west of because you have to come in west from Napa right or south from south west is south north. Yeah. Napa north west of the Davis the whole what is explain this is rice farming big in Sacramento outside of south. Yeah. Absolutely. That's what all those flooded fields. Were Cal rose. Cal rose. Right. That's the that's the big other big cash crop out there besides tomatoes. Very cool. I'm sorry. I'm making you feel bad about leaving Davis. Again. I love getting used to this event. I was really impressed with that area. I like in because it's only forty five minutes from nappa. I could see myself living there. It's like an hour into San Francisco fisherman's wharf, and you know, doing the tourists. That's true. But I'm I'm much rather. Just hang out in Napa. The village homes. They have their own little vineyard there. You can make your online. Mary cool. Appreciate that. Rick. Yeah. Well, good luck. With send me an Email. We'll stay in touch about this. I gotta wait till one of the kids gets college age, and we'll figure this out. Yeah. Great place to be thanks. Appreciate that. This is the garden line. I'm Randy lemon. And we got Sharon in Belleville coming up next, but you can get Rick's open line seven one three two one two KTAR h. Make sure I hit the right button again. Sharon, Belleville, good morning. Marning? Randy what's up? We bought a property in Belleville. And our neighbors have been warning us about severe grass Burs, and it's a very sandy soil, and the grass is a real fine. Grass is not fight Johnson grass when I'm used to in Houston, and I get we. Yes. But I haven't experienced grasp Burs yet. But I know they're coming and I have dog. Okay. We got it. We have a tip sheet on that. KTAR H dot com or Randy lemon dot com. Well, actually, K K KTAR H dot com is where you're gonna find it or you can just Google. Search Randy lemon and grass burgers, and you can actually Facebook. Search Randy lemon grass Burs we have a tip sheet that I can't give you all the details on air right now because it is a detailed tip. She. But if you follow the protocols in there for one full year, and you get ahead of this before they actually do come. Then you don't have a problem as much and it's going to take a higher nitrogen nice say higher nitrogen, but nitrogen only or nitrogen rich fertilizing program. It's gonna take humiliates lots of Hugh mates. We're going to add to the soil. Nitrogen, rich and a humid rich environment sand Burs grasp Burs won't prosper. If you ever do get to grasp Burs, you need to get out there and control them right away. And you need to stay on our schedule per the pre emergent herbicide. This schedule will talk this tip sheet. We'll talk you through that as well. But if you'll do all of those tricks of the trade, you don't have to worry about grasp errors in a sandy soil. But that Humaid enrichment will make it less, sandy overtime and the more humane. Rich, the more nitrogen rich, the soil of the less likely you'll ever have grasps. Will looking at and read it and hope I'd comprehend it. It's not that hard. It's just a matter of sticking to it. It it's not a quick fix. If you let's say, hypothetically, you had a big bad problem with grass Burs people want. You know, the magic the silver bullet the one magic solution. That's not how we get control of this. It's a cultural practice change over time. That will keep you grasp Burr free burger grass free. Unfortunately, the previous owners did nothing, and I don't believe they had dogs anyway. So, but we do and we want to protect their Paul's and take care of them. And it's well take care of our lawn. So I'll do my homework. I hear ya. Thank you, what kind of dogs, by the way. Okay. So yeah. You definitely don't on that kind of dog. You do not want grasp Burs out there. She stopped put your Paul's up and looks at me with those big Brown eyes and says help leash. Lee. She knows to stop. I had a a stupid lab mix as a dalmatian lab mix that when it got grasp Burs at our property down in Galveston. It's still keep trying to walk and then try to eat it out and log and eat it out. This is like just stop shadow com era. I will take care of it to stop..

UC Davis Napa Davis Rick Sacramento Randy lemon Davis California Davis California Google Houston Belleville Galveston Cal San Francisco Cal rose Sharon Davidson Paul Rich Facebook
"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Department is at the UC Davis medical center in critical condition after she was shot in the downtown area. Shots were fired at around seven o'clock this evening while police were looking into a three vehicle crash at fifth and d streets. The manhunt continues for a white man who police describe as in his twenties an average build wearing a baseball cap black jacket, bluer tan, jeans and black tactical boots a shelter in place. Order was issued and officials are blocking traffic at the Richards exit from eighty residents are being asked to avoid the downtown Davis area. If you have any related information, you are asked to call nine one one the brother of slain Newman police corporal renewal seeing spoke at a round table discussion during President Trump's border. Visit in Texas Reggie seeing sitting next to President Trump detailed his brother's journey to become a US citizen and finally accomplishing his dream of becoming a police officer Gustavo Perez. Who was in the country illegally was arrested in connection with renewal shooting death, corporal things brother went on to say his family supports any actions that will prevent what happened to renew and prevent any family from dealing with the same tragedy. Jordan Christmas, NewsRadio k s became now. Traffic. We go to Davis were that Sigler remains in place on the eastbound and westbound off-ramps at Richards boulevard, their close indefinitely due to police activity. In addition, the offramp olive drive is also shut down indefinitely and watch out Lincoln, a dense fog advisory on both northbound and southbound sixty five at Ferrari ranch road, it's fog in poor visibility. Hampering your drive. Your next report at ten I'm Steve Harare, NewsRadio camp K..

UC Davis medical center Trump President Davis Richards baseball NewsRadio Steve Harare Gustavo Perez Jordan Christmas Ferrari ranch Newman US Lincoln Texas Sigler officer
"uc davis" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"State Fullerton. Second UC Davis third in the preseason media poll. After the time out here. They will get to desert shorts cannot continue for the moment. So they can designate Shawn Miller designated free throw shooter. They were also exercising and insane mandate. When someone takes a blow to the head Verne Harris. The lead official is required by rule to look at the replay to make sure it was not an intentional fashion. And it was not so garrison good. We'll go to the free throw line. Sixty one percent shooter. And he's shooting these it's a one in one place of shorts. The senior out of river hills. Wisconsin makes the I will earn the bonus. Another guy that's played a lot of basketball game number ninety seven. In his career house were fouled, and he will shoot a second here with five twelve left. Good as well. Six points for garrison. Good. Too shy of his season high thirty four twenty three Arizona league trusted Coleman on top of the ball squire out there defensively feed it high left to Brandon Williams to Luther dribbles rights stops there. Need some help? Now. Coleman will catch the ball. Coleman writes skip it to jeeter down the lane with the left hand. Roll it in Arizona's Justin Coleman takes the screen, and drives it baseline that drew to Aggie defenders the trail man on that dry. Diving to the room was chased jeeter. Jeeter was twenty one against Montana eleven so far tonight. Snyder up to squire for UC Davis. Factor. Snyder briefly double team. Toback heart. Brit up hand the ball off the squire shot clock at nine to print up inside pump fake. Good turns shot over jeeter. Missed. Oh, good. Luther at one hand on the rebound. But couldn't hang on goes out of bounds. So it'll be UC Davis basketball. Well, the shot clock for eighteen showing here the first half and time out on the floor. We'll take the break as well. Cats thirty-six aggies.

Justin Coleman UC Davis Jeeter basketball Snyder Luther Fullerton Verne Harris Arizona league Shawn Miller Arizona Wisconsin Brandon Williams official Montana Sixty one percent one hand
"uc davis" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

"They fought their way just like so many asylum-seekers today who are being gassed on the US border. And so you came here. Absolutely nothing. You know, your family could've been considered parasites and look down on as as, you know, poor worthless people as as Trump space, and the Trump administration sees asylum-seekers now, and you came here, and and you're the classic immigrant story of fighting and making this country better as they say immigrants that get the job done. So you grew up in in the South Bronx, which very much shaped you and you and dad the move to California. Dada PG neuro science you started off his career. You know, being a dutiful wife of that generation at UC. Davis was a young professor at UC Davis you at that time had had milder sister known to the public as Alexander Chiluba who was her life, incurred expose Paul Manafort. So if you're wondering where my sister, and I get this from it's from my mother, we have my mother to blame for this sort of fearless determination to improve the world. And so your story of your sort of big moment came all hand the mic to us. You can talk through. This dad was at Cambridge for a year and Allie was around five years old two and a half. Well, I think the member why believed carseats were important. I just want to at that. My parents who helped me out they they moved when they retired moved to Davis, California and lifts couple of blocks away from me. I caught them a couple of times holding alley and the car seat cushion, the buck, and of course, I took her away from them. And I scored them, and I was very tough. I said you may not see my granddaughter again, you may not have her unless she buckled up. I don't know where I got that information because I just want to point out. All I knew was that car seats were important for infants but I didn't know all the facts yet. And then when we were living in Cambridge England someone told me when we were going to travel that in Italy the head a law that a child had to be buckled up in a car seat. It turned out Italy didn't have law, but I believe at did. And when we were traveling to the elps Ellie wanted to get out of her car seat. Choose crying, and I was going to put her in front and buckle her in with me, not knowing all the facts, for example, the she would have been on air Beth for me would have died. But because I believe there was a law. I said, no, the police will get rest your daddy, and your mommy, and you have to stay there. And and shortwhile later, it was raining, and there was some oil slick or something that you're father lost control of the car. And the car was totaled. The stick shift was gone my seat belt didn't function. Well, that I had was taken to hospital were nonce helped me down. Well, somebody sewed up a stitched up my scalp, but it was very bad accident. And, but when you're father night turned around we saw Audi crying, it was the happiest moment of our lives. It was like someone gave us a second chance. And I've met with thinking like this happened for reason. I didn't know what the reason would be. But it just felt very strongly that something would come out of it. Then when we return to the states, I'm going to skip. A lot here. I got into this organization called the California children's lobby. It's no defunct, unfortunately. But it was wonderful. It was bipartisan it had people on the board. That would be best friends of the governor's wife, for example, it had a members and committees that head headed hospitals, and they would all come in and Sacramento. This was all in Sacramento headquartered in Sacramento, they would come in takeoff. Whatever they were wearing professionally and talk about what the problem was with children. But the welfare is what can California do to improve it? And they had a sister organization called the California Children's Research institute, which got money from phone Gatien's to do research. So one was a lobbying arm and the other was the research..

California UC Davis Sacramento Ellie Trump US California Children's Research South Bronx Italy Davis Paul Manafort Audi Cambridge Cambridge England Allie Alexander Chiluba professor Gatien five years
"uc davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A professor of law at UC Davis. You've written a number of books and articles on a whole wide range of legal topics, including constitutional law and free speech law. Most recently or the author of a book called the myth of rights the purposes and limits of constitutional, right? So Dell is our our rights. Pirates of the Caribbean. The Bill of rights is more like guidelines. You have rights, but they need a lot less than most people think. Oh, how interesting as well. All right. Thanks very much. And can you tell us who your partner is like a rough, ladies and gentlemen. Please. Welcome Michael, rob. Michael Rah, welcome to intelligence squared. You are right in the middle of all of this. You are president of Wesleyan university. You're a public advocate for liberal education. You're the author of several books including beyond the university. Why liberal education matters you've met a professor of history. You still teach since nineteen Eighty-three that's thirty five years by our count. And you have described sort of your summing up scholarly interest is how people make sense of the past. What does that mean? Exactly I've been very interested in how people carry around their memories how they work within traditions. Sometimes how they deal with past traumas and extremely interested. As a teacher to understand when I have students in front of me how they bring not just that mornings breakfast with them. They also bringing their past their memories. Okay. Well, I see some relevance for tonight in that, ladies and gentlemen, the team arguing against the motion. And so to the debate we start with round one round one will be opening statements by each debater in turn speaking. I four the motion trigger warning say spaces are dangerous. Here is Suzanne also CEO of pen America. So the Oxford dictionary defines safe spaces, quote A place or environment in which a person or category. People can feel confident that they will not be exposed to discrimination criticism harassment or any other emotional or physical harm Kita that definition is freedom from emotional harm. If we're talking only about physical harm, no one thinks campuses should be places where assaults hazards or other physical harms can occur. I don't think anybody could argue against safe spaces, categorically, if I lie on a hammock reading rob in the backyard is my Pat, I'm not going to be exposed to discrimination criticism Aspen, rather emotional arm, attaches dinner on a college campus, and if tar celebration freedom from emotional harm might be virtually assured freedom of association mandates those groupings. Black house. Hilo house are perfectly permissible on campus clubs teams have religious associations are a vital and vibrant part of university life. The key is that students enter into those settings voluntarily and that the bonds that unite them in the span for disagreement. I thinks that the students navigate themselves the use of the term safe spaces that has provoked controversy, and what we're really here to discuss tonight has two elements. One is where it obtains is it too large swath of a university, hold dining hall residential college classroom, or even as some of argued a campus as a whole this second contentious element is the idea that administrators are institutions should be charged with policing or governing. What speeches permissive on what is out of bounds? It's those other elements of the definition exposure to criticism or any other emotional harm those distinguish enforcement of his safe-space from simply upholding legal protections. And that's really the crux of the matter tonight focusing on enforcing safe spaces is a dangerous distraction from the universe..

Dell Wesleyan university Michael Rah Caribbean professor of law UC Davis professor of history Hilo pen America partner harassment president Black house Aspen Suzanne CEO thirty five years
"uc davis" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Uc davis college he is an animal science professor and believe it or not feeding cousy we can help reduce methane emissions kcbs news time now is twenty five time for the financial news here's geoff colvin a new era of low cost spaceflight through reusable rockets just took a giant step toward reality i'm geoff colvin of fortune magazine with the fortune business update recently spacex successfully launched and landed the most advanced version of its falcon nine rocket for the first time that's a big deal because it represents a culmination of space is founding mission ceo elon musk says each rockette will be able to fly at least ten missions with minimal refurbishing and with as little as twenty four hours between launches doing so required landing the rocket's firststage back on earth which space x pulled off without a hitch after its latest launch the next step is to demonstrate the twenty four hour turnaround in any case this latest achievement should help the falcon nine qualify to carry humans into space nasa wants to see seven successful oh flights by the upgraded falcon nine which could then be used to ferry astronauts to the international space station i'm geoff colvin sleep number presents a bedtime story you know nine out of ten couples prefer a different mattress firmness yeah what's it the tenth couple maybe they've never known smart sleep or maybe they've never felt comfort like they don't have a bet that adjusts on both sides to their ideal firmness comfort and support their sleep number set we should help that good thing we got great sleep ted koppel we got you does your bed do that right now during our semiannual sale it's the last chance to find final clearance savings on the queen c four mattress only ten ninety nine save five hundred dollars lowest price ever and soon for more details and to find a store near you go to sleepnumber.

professor geoff colvin fortune magazine elon musk nasa Uc davis college spacex ceo ted koppel five hundred dollars twenty four hours twenty four hour
"uc davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"If you're tuning into the super bowl this weekend you might be watching the game with a pint of beer in your hand but about you don't know just how much water went into making that brew try eleven gallons just to grow the hops we're going to be to biologists now who wants to replace those hops with genetically engineered yeast would you drink gmo beer to save water sarah craig has our story charles denby and i walk into a steamy room filled with steel machines bubbling liquid were in the brewery uc davis here's a little beer 101 all beer is made from water thoroughly yeast and hops but instead of using hops denby secreted east that will mimic hoppy flavors he opens a box containing those sense and into four huge for months go the coolest thing about a set up like this is that you can make several batches of beer with the exact same recipe isolating a single variable in this case that variable is the east that were using the point of others hops are vulnerable to climate change and they need a lot of water most of the nation's hops in many of california as are grown in one valley in the state of washington and that area is expected to have less water because of higher temperatures and intense drought we could eliminate all large chunk of a hops that are used that would also eliminate trillions of leaders of water that are spent in the process of growing cops denby was never a big beer drinker but after his friend gave him a home brewing kick a few years ago he got into the science behind it his interest in brewing ended phd in genetics led him to make a discovery i was literally sitting in the bathtub i was reading this textbook about brewing science any he found out how to create the molecules that give hops they're happy flavor by using genes from meant and basil and then combining them with eastsouth i got really excited by that because i realized that i would easily be able to engineer these biocine that a pathways into the microbes that make beer right now he's the only scientist using gmo used to make beer but getting that beer to.

sarah craig uc davis california washington scientist charles denby engineer eleven gallons
"uc davis" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"Hey y'all thanks so much for joining me procession thirty three of the therapy for black girls podcast we've made it at that time of the year that you buy their been looking forward to our drifting for any number of reasons next week officially starts the holiday season even though some of the stores have had their christmas decorations up for at least a month now hitting into the holidays often brings up elaborate people so i wanted to spend some time today talking about the difference between the holiday blues and oppression ansa offers some tips on steadying yourself for the holiday season the holiday blues might best be described as increased sadness and anxiety during the holiday season for a variety of different regions an article from uc davis health indicates that some of the reasons we see an increase in san is in anxiety is related to a couple of factors the first is time change we know that we've just said are clocks back an hour which means we have few hours of daylight which can have an impact on our mood resulting in decreased energy loss of interest in pleasurable activities and sleep disturbances a second factor that may contribute to the holiday blues is increase alcohol use so we know that many times when we gather decelerate alcohol is often a part of the equation and since they are to be violeta gatherings for the holiday season we may be consuming more alcohol than usual and may not really be paying attention to actually how much alcohol we are consuming it's important to remember that alcohol acts as a depressing on the system so if you're already feeling a little down the increase alcohol may actually make your mood more depressed.

christmas uc davis health sleep disturbances
"uc davis" Discussed on The Body of Knowledge

The Body of Knowledge

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on The Body of Knowledge

"The one thing that threaten that though is i was the university during the early 90s and for listeners there are old enough to remember there is a recession at that time and that recession threatened athletics at a lot of different universities and at uc davis the then chancellor had decided to cut the f let it program and a group of us got together and said no we're going to form a referendum to not only keep the teams that we have but also add women's sports to comply with title nine which was a big deal back then nokia and so we were the first university to successfully create students deciding to willingly tax themselves to maintain the athletic program and add sports to the overall breadth of the uc davis leather not on you stop it for me cancelled you added we added and if so we had a very innovative group of students who led this and i was lucky enough to be part of this sort of leadership gould well that was just a cruiser to to create the referendum the sort of adjunct part of it that was really interesting and compelling at the time as we created this thing called the aggie pack and while we were fighting to maintain the athletic program we're also similtaneously fighting another thing which is we wanted to show the student a very academic oriented student population that hey grind to games is actually funded by something that like big universities yeah got the benefit of but davis it was like well we like her books and we're very academic right and some people do not necessarily go to sporting events and didn't feel that their funds so a few of us got together and said you know what let's get people do.

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