35 Burst results for "Uc Davis"

Who Is (the Now Infamous) Dr. Robert Malone?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:02 min | 6 months ago

Who Is (the Now Infamous) Dr. Robert Malone?

"First. Doctor Malone, welcome to the Salem radio network. Thank you very much, mister gorka and thank you for the opportunity to speak to you and to your audience today. Well, I could spend the next hour just rattling off your curriculum vitae and your various qualifications in the scientific world for those who didn't see your hours long interview with Joe who haven't seen all the interviews you've given with my friend and my former colleague Steve Bannon. Would you mind would you indulge us for a second for those across the country for whom you are a new name just to give us a prey see of your background and your relationship, for example, to the mRNA vaccines that are so in the news currently? Well, for your audience, I have been vetted and have secret clearance with Department of Defense. I've won over $8 billion or managed them for in government grants and contracts. I typically work very closely with the Department of Defense defense threat reduction agency. Kim biodefense group and have for decades, I have been a vaccine developer and innovator for well over 30 years as when I was a graduate student, I had a series of discoveries that led to 9 issued U.S. patents and numerous international patents that include all of the core technology for what we call RNA and DNA vaccines, including the first proof of concept reduction to practice using an RNA vaccine in a mouse model to produce immune responses against the envelope glycoprotein of aids. So an aids vaccine candidate my first major contract was with as a newly minted MD intern at UC Davis was with the Department of the Navy for development of an aids vaccine. I am trained at northwestern university for my NDI hold a license in the state of Maryland. I'm trained in my graduate studies at the salk institute and UC San Diego undergraduate biochemistry UC Davis multiple research fellowships at UC Davis in the department of pathology was an academic for well over a decade reaching associate professor level at the uniformed services university of the health sciences. So that's the DoD medical school. In D.C., I have been involved in way too many outbreaks intimately. I spearheaded for DoD for quite a while. The development of their Ebola vaccine candidate, which eventually I brought murk in. It was licensed to American. It's now the licensed Ebola vaccine. I've worked on flu vaccines. I've worked on literally all the biodefense vaccines used to work under contract directly for DoD at dying port vaccine company.

Doctor Malone Salem Radio Network Mister Gorka Steve Bannon Department Of Defense Defense Kim Biodefense Aids Department Of The Navy For Dev Northwestern University For My Department Of Defense Salk Institute JOE Uc San Diego Undergraduate Bio Department Of Pathology Uc Davis Dod Medical School U.S. Uniformed Services University
California Food Recycling-Food Intro and Wrap

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | 8 months ago

California Food Recycling-Food Intro and Wrap

"A a mandatory mandatory food food recycling recycling program program takes takes effect effect starting starting next next month month in in California California it it means means things things like like leftover leftover veggies veggies banana banana peels peels and and chicken chicken bones bones won't won't be be allowed allowed in in most most trash trash bins bins in in California California homeowner homeowner joy joy Kleinberg Kleinberg says says it it will will take take some some getting getting used used to to but but it's it's really really easy easy I I mean mean all all your your changing changing is is where where you're you're throwing throwing things things it's it's just just another another band band that's that's bang bang with with the the food food loss loss and and waste waste collaborative collaborative at at UC UC Davis Davis says says the the goal goal is is to to turn turn food food scraps scraps into into compost compost or or energy energy methane methane is is released released to to me me put put organic organic waste waste into into landfill landfill so so that's that's the the portion portion that that I'm I'm looking looking at at because because a a lot lot of of the the organic organic way way so so we we put put in in landfills landfills is is actually actually food food waste waste in in yolo yolo county county California California waste waste management management director director remain remain Yazdani Yazdani says says the the recycle recycle food food will will be be marketing marketing used used as as compost compost please please just just all all bury bury and and forget forget about about it it we're we're actually actually taking taking responsibility responsibility and and not not leaving leaving it it for for the the next next generation generation to to do do something something but but major major cities cities in in California California like like Los Los Angeles Angeles won't won't have have their their programs programs ready ready to to go go by by January January I'm I'm at at Donahue Donahue

California Kleinberg Kleinberg Davis Davis Yolo County County Yazdani Yazdani UC Los Los Angeles Angeles Donahue Donahue
Who Is Dr. Robert Malone, Inventor of mRNA Vaccines?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:58 min | 9 months ago

Who Is Dr. Robert Malone, Inventor of mRNA Vaccines?

"And he is the president of the international alliance of physicians and scientists, doctor Malone, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thank you. Thanks a lot for the opportunity to be here and talk to you and your audience. So let's get on it. So I'm an admirer and fan of yours. I first was made aware of you and your work when you join Brett Weinstein on his podcast all the way back in April or May or June if I remember correctly. In the back in the 20th century. It feels like yeah, that was a different world. And I was very interested in that conversation and I've watched hours of your footage since because it seemed that you were confirming some of the suspicion that I had and skepticism in my head towards the current rollout and the vaccine that we are now being in some ways forced to take. Please establish your background in vaccine technology, the original inventor of MR MN RNA and DNA vaccines and talk about why and how you got concerned about this. And we'll go from there. Let's see. So briefly, the bona fides. Let's see, you see Davis, biochemistry, bachelors and science. You see San Diego and the salk institute masters in biology, MD from northwestern university in Chicago. Fellowships, research fellowships at UC Davis and a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School for global clinical scholars research training that was just a few years ago to kind of tighten up all of my credentials having to do with clinical research regulatory affairs and all that stuff also completed a internship medical internship at UC Davis. I'm a licensed physician in the state of Maryland. I did invent the core platform technology that gave rise to these vaccines. I did not invent these vaccines. And I'm a little aggravated at what's been done with these vaccines as what's happened to the technology. But I had a extensive academic career top pathology at UC Davis and new Maryland Baltimore and also was an associate professor at the uniformed services university of the health sciences. You could look up all the papers and the many patents through if you look on Google scholar is a site so you can just Google scholar and I'm having trouble with that just like you were with the mRNA. With my name on it. And you'll see the over hundred papers and 12,600 plus academic citations for the work blah,

International Alliance Of Phys Charlie Kirk Brett Weinstein Salk Institute Malone Harvard Medical School For Glo Uc Davis Northwestern University Davis San Diego MD Chicago New Maryland Maryland Uniformed Services University Baltimore Google
Why Doesn't California Build Big Dams Any More?

Bay Curious

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Why Doesn't California Build Big Dams Any More?

"Been talking about how most of our water comes from a system of dams and reservoirs set up to capture the states precipitation so one logical solution here is more dams right. Not so fast says jay lund a professor of civil and environmental engineering at uc davis story. I tell people is if you were the first engineer in california and you were going to build the first reservoir where would you put it. You had put it the cheapest place that gives you the most water. Where would you put the reservoir the next best place. We've done this fifteen hundred times. What do we have left. Expensive places that don't give you much water. He says with fifteen hundred dams in the state all the good damn spots are taken heck. Even a lot of the bad spots are taken but that doesn't mean that there aren't smart things we can do with our reservoirs as david romero takes it from here with four big ideas so the first big idea has to do with managing those fifteen hundred reservoirs differently. I learned how lake mendocino along the russian river. That's where i met. Nick mala savage in the middle of the mostly dry lake bed. He helps manage the lake for the us army corps of engineers in two thousand nineteen. The water was about forty feet over our heads. He says lake mendocino could go dry by the end of the summer mar lake levels here at lake. Mendocino are the lowest they've ever been for this time in the year even though this lake is nearly dry it's on the leading edge of science around reservoir management in the past. Water was let out of the reservoir whether or not storms were in the forecast. They wanted to make room for more water. They expected would come but because of climate change. Those storms are becoming less frequent malice. Savage is helping pilot a new approach at lake. Mendocino conserve wait until a major rainstorm is coming and then let water out of the reservoir. It's called forecast informed reservoir operations. We can sit on this water. We can continue to watch the forecast and then you see that big boomer of a storm conham then you can make the decision. Hey the sun's still shining. We need to put water into the river. Generate that airspace for the next storm. And we're good

Lake Mendocino Jay Lund David Romero Nick Mala Us Army Corps Of Engineers Uc Davis Summer Mar Lake Mendocino Russian River California Savage SUN
Interview With Rapper, Ruby Ibarra

Asian Enough

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Rapper, Ruby Ibarra

"Thanks so much for joining us. Ruby johanna hi jan. Thank you so much for having me. it really is an honor for me to be in this conversation especially with asian american pacific islander heritage month coming up. I'm pretty sure you know the conversation that we're about to have is is gonna be relevant to what's been going on in this country. Yeah definitely. we're really excited to have you here. speaking of being asian american. You know you're known around the world as rapper rubio barra you know ruby bar in the belleek. Byron's that's the name of your band and so much of your music is centered on not just your philippine identity but this concept of being a and for listeners. Who don't know what that is. It's it's basically generally speaking of a filipino. Ex pat but there is this sort of larger obligation to feeling the need to give back to your home country or your family because you've left the country and sought out you know better economic opportunities and things like that but you came here when you were really young. At what point did you decide that this was something that you wanted to focus your music gone. And and what is being a buy into you. Those are really great questions to start for conversation to. I answer how. I got to the point in my artistry where i knew that i wanted to discuss or focus on you. Know my background and my heritage. My culture honestly. I don't think that really became a thought until my cirque ninety one album i think prior to that when i was making music a lot of it really involved just me trying to find my voice when we think about identity a lot of it really gets muddled and these thoughts of who am i and how. How do i belong in the space. That i'm in these her constant thoughts that i had in my head even as a young child. I never really felt that. I belonged in the us and at the same time. I never really felt that i belonged in the philippines because i grew up over here and so i think my journey in finding my voice. It's really started in college. I attended uc davis. And even though i majored in biochemistry i took it on myself to take classes that were outside of the scientists and one of them being asian american studies.

Ruby Johanna Hi Jan Rubio Barra Ex Pat Philippines Byron Uc Davis United States
Imperiled Freshwater Turtles Are Eating Plastics

60-Second Science

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Imperiled Freshwater Turtles Are Eating Plastics

"What happened is i started cutting open. These specimens that had been preserved sitting in the same collection for five or six years. And i just started took a dribble cut off. The shell opened up. You know looked at the stomach. Contents and i was shocked to find that in the ten animals that i looked at two of those animals had plastics in their stomach. Gregg polly's original plan was to compare the diets of western pond turtles. Native to the creeks of the uc davis meriem with those of redbeard sliders that have been introduced but that all changed when the herpetologist from the urban nature research center at the natural history museum of los angeles county began to look inside the sliders. And then suddenly. I thought oh man. There's a much bigger story here. Which is that. they're ingesting plastics. And we know almost nothing about plastic ingestion freshwater turtles we know. It's a huge issue marine turtles. But no one's looking at this and freshwater turtles. Plastic ingestion has been reported over and over again in each of the world's seven types of sea-turtles. But there is another three hundred and fifty two types of turtles and only five studies have ever concerned themselves with plastic ingestion in those species. That's despite the fact that more than half of all turtle species are considered threatened with extinction. Turtles are among the most imperilled groups of animals on earth freshwater turtles around the world are declining in. So you're not in a researchers aren't going out in euthanizing turtles and putting them into the museum collections on a regular basis. You know we do that for lots of other species but we're not people are going to be doing it fraternals because it's just not the right thing to do from a conservation perspective.

Gregg Polly Davis Meriem Urban Nature Research Center Natural History Museum Los Angeles County
Jasmine Green Talks Plants And Cities

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Jasmine Green Talks Plants And Cities

"All right. Jasmine green thank you. So much for coming on the podcast. How about we start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is. You do sir jasmine green. I am a pg candidate at uc davis. And i studied plants in vacant. Lots and more broadly plants in cities and generally urban ecology so. I definitely didn't start out as a plant person per se and so it's been an incredible journey. I think in grad school mostly as far as getting really introduced to plant and all the cool things that they do. Ecosystem is the collagen wise largely. I would say. I was more interested from a landscape perspective of what could deal and my in my department of plant sciences department which has a real focus on the people side of research. I would say more like applied research. And that's where our lab which does urban ecology work really fit in because as you mentioned urban districts are really complex and large part of that complexity comes from them being designed for people so a lot of you know the traditional kind of theory of like how communities are structured or how ecosystems are formed in succession in. That kind of stuff is really really different. People are the ultimate like each constructors. You know they can. They've designed this entire system. That is really in the interest of this one species which humans so from from my point of view. I started as a masters student. And i was looking at yard. Transformation so looking at lawns like in like single family homes and so in california. Which is very i go to school where you live right now. One of the main ecological issues in environmental issues drought and saving water. For you know for those drought times to make sure enough water considered for people years for there to be used in agriculture and also to maintain for environmental quality

Jasmine Green Sir Jasmine Green Department Of Plant Sciences D Uc Davis California
Feeding cows a few ounces of seaweed daily could sharply reduce their contribution to climate change

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:57 min | 1 year ago

Feeding cows a few ounces of seaweed daily could sharply reduce their contribution to climate change

"Are big contributors to global greenhouse gas emissions in the form of methane produced as part of their digestive process. But there's a new study from UC Davis that finds supplementing cattle feed with red seaweed may reduce the amount of methane they produce. KQED is Caroline Equation are is here to tell us about it. Carolina What happened in the study? This is actually the first study of its kind. Other studies have looked at the effects of red seaweed on dairy cows and sheep. But this is the first study to study the effects of red seaweed on beef cattle. So 21 beef cattle were given freeze dried powdered red seaweed mix in with their food for around five months, they were separated into three groups, depending on the percentage of seaweed in their diet. And the further along in the experiment, they were the less Hey, alfalfa and greens. They were fed. And what did they find? So our minds cup? Rob and a graduate student in his lab, Brianna Roque, did this study Both are animal biologists at U. C. Davis. And they found that the cattle produced up to 82% less methane after they ate a diet with red seaweed and low amounts of Hey, alfalfa and greens. Cattle that were eating more Hey, alfalfa and green. But the same amount of seaweed had a less dramatic decrease and their methane production where it was up to 68%, so the seaweed was really effective at reducing methane. But the amount of reduction was really affected by how much alfalfa hay and greens the cattle eat. And how did these animals taste? In the end? Did the seaweed affect the flavor or the texture of the beef? There was virtually no difference in the flavor, texture or juiciness of the seaweed Fed beef and its nutritional content was pretty much the same. So does all see, We'd have this effect on cattle. No red seaweed is a type of algae that traps methane and converts it into something else, so it doesn't cause the cattle to burp. While some ranchers do feed help as a supplement, they're used for nutritional value and don't have an effect on methane production. So beyond reducing the carbon footprint of beef production. Is there a financial incentive for ranchers to feed their cattle? Red seaweed? Yes. So one unexpected finding was that red seaweed actually helped the cattle gain weight because all the carbon that would normally be burnt out. Ended up being used to make more muscle in their body. Also, the amount of methane produced was proportional to amount of seaweed they ate, so the more seaweed they ate the less methane they produced. If the practice of feeding seaweed to beef cattle is widely adopted, there's going to be a huge demand for this type of seaweed would that be possible and would be sustainable? For now, This seaweed isn't commercially available, but it is native to many coastal areas around the world. For example, the seaweed from this study came from Australia, and there are also several companies trying to figure out a way to grow more of the seaweed so that it might be more commercially available in the future.

Caroline Equation Brianna Roque U. C. Davis Kqed Uc Davis Carolina ROB Australia
UC Davis Health debuts plans for hospital tower project

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

UC Davis Health debuts plans for hospital tower project

"Major plans unveiled today for a new U. C. Davis, California tower. At the medical center is going to be 16 stories high a million square feet of space. Most of the rooms could be easily transferred to become ICU room if rooms if necessary. Another major addition to our own kind of healthcare corridor over there by the UCD Medical Center. The expectation is to have it all done well before 2030. Because that's a deadline regarding earthquake preparedness and safety for a lot of hospitals around the state,

U. C. Davis Ucd Medical Center California
Anti-vaccine protest briefly shuts down Dodger Stadium vaccination site

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

01:01 min | 1 year ago

Anti-vaccine protest briefly shuts down Dodger Stadium vaccination site

"Look pretty Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles has become one of the biggest covert vaccination centers in the nation. But over the weekend, protesters blocked access for a while and prevented people from getting in gave because Greg Fishman tells us it's just the latest issue slowing the vaccination rollout, in addition to real shortages of the vaccine and confusion over who is eligible and how to get it. There's also new UC Davis research showing as many as 38% of people are hesitant or unlikely to get the covert vaccine. After Dean Blumberg is a Children's epidemiologist with UC Davis health. It's an intellectual decision as well as an emotional decision, and when you're vaccinated it, it feels good. Speaking from personal experience, Anthony Wright is with health access California and he says, yes, it's a personal choice for those who don't want to get the vaccine And for those who do, there's obviously room for protest and for free speech, but it shouldn't be by blocking people from getting lifesaving healthcare. State Senator Richard Pan, a medical doctor issued a statement calling the protesters who blocked access to the vaccination site.

Greg Fishman Dodger Stadium Dean Blumberg Uc Davis Health Uc Davis Los Angeles Confusion Anthony Wright Senator Richard Pan California
New Results From Monkeys Infected With SARS-CoV-2 Suggest COVID-19 Vaccines Will Be Successful

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

New Results From Monkeys Infected With SARS-CoV-2 Suggest COVID-19 Vaccines Will Be Successful

"The success of covered 19 vaccines, Researchers at UC Davis have discovered monkeys that developed immunity to the virus gave because Angelica Rubio hot tells us more, and the study carried out of the California National Primate Research Center. The races macaque monkeys were infected of the stars. Kobe to virus specifically the California strain studying these so inhuman challenging because they're typically not found in the blood as this in professor at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Smith higher, says animals These are critical because they indicate a which immune cells triggered by the vaccine are protective vaccine then simulates this very same immune response, It is unlikely to induce long lasting protective immunity. The researchers followed immune responses in the animals over two weeks and found that they produce various anti bodies, including those associated with long term immune protection. Angelico be Oh ha!

Angelica Rubio California National Primate Re Uc Davis School Of Veterinary Davis Kobe California Smith Angelico
All You Need To Know About Earthworm Castings

Plantrama

04:27 min | 1 year ago

All You Need To Know About Earthworm Castings

"Are going to talk about earth. worm castings aka earthworm poop. You know it's interesting castings as sort of a It's it's the standard term for the excrement from earthworms. It's what they cast aside. I guess that's where it comes from. It's a very interesting thing. It's like many manures and this is earthworm manure. Basically it was what we're talking about Like many manures. It has fertilizer value for plant. But earthworm castings turn out to have much more value as well. I feel like castings is a euphemism because nobody wants to say poop but there you go. I remember hearing about them. I probably ten or fifteen years ago. They're much more mainstream now. And at the time. I worried about using them in house plants and i realize now that that was an unfounded concern. Using the castings in in moderate amounts as a fertilizer is perfectly good for house. Plants isn't it. I mean this time of year. That's what people are thinking about. It is wonderful for houseplant. Wonderful for for most plant. Its first of all one hundred percent organic humus all right but the basic thing that makes it different from many other Fertilizers i guess. You'd say organic fertilizers is. There's a rich microbiological community going on in earthworm castings. That is good for your plants. Well tell me more about this microbiological community. Do you mean micronutrients or do you mean. Living things in the castings well. I mean Bacteria first of all But good bacteria right. That's number one number two. In terms of fertilizing value they are rich in iron sulfur calcium nitrogen phosphorus and potassium right but they also are believe it or not not all readily available to plant apparently in the process of going through the earthworm the castings get coded with something that makes the ingredients available to plants very slowly. Wait a minute. This is like nature's time release. Fertilizer is what you're telling me exactly. That's exact- that's fascinating. What is it nature this time. Release that is a wonderful thing. The people who have studied this and by the way earthworm castings have been extensively. Studied at ohio state at cornell. University uc davis and one study at cornell demonstrated earthworm castings suppressed damping off disease in seedlings. Wow all right. And they naturally degraded the protective covering of some insect pests so they dissolve the insect pest from the in. Yes so love that yes. At ohio state university they found that earthworm castings enhanced seed germination plant growth flower and fruit production. They curb to certain plant diseases. Including root rod and crown rot and inhibited. Insect pests including mites aphids. And mealy bug. This is like way more than just a fertilizer. Then it's kind of a magic pill a one thing you know. I wondered about is. How do you know how much to apply. And from what i've read. Apparently it's it's difficult to add too much. I mean you don't want you don't want a plant in solid worm castings but but it's something that you can apply regularly without worrying that you're going to burn the fine roots of your plants. Which is concerned with a with a commercial fertilizer. Yeah i think you know for the general rule that i use for house plants and we're thinking now in the middle of winter about plants indoors but the general rule that i use is about a quarter of a cop cop four a container that somewhere between six and ten inches in diameter.

Cornell Ohio State University Davis Ohio
Toni Bernhard on Self-Compassion and the First Noble Truth

The Wisdom Podcast

04:38 min | 1 year ago

Toni Bernhard on Self-Compassion and the First Noble Truth

"Because it is so great to have you with us on the wisdom comcast. I'm really happy of asia. Thanks daniel think we might start off with you know so in about two thousand and one is when you you got sick. I believe in and seems. Then you've found inspiration in buddhist teachings and practices for learning how to be sick and we're gonna get into that in detail. But i wondering if you could tell us a little bit about how you initially came across these teachings and actresses okay. Well it was an about ten years before. I got sick so approaching thirty years. This may is nineteen year of my suffering from chronic ghana's so when i was in my early twenties i developed some interest in spiritual matters a lot of alan watts. I got my mantra from the maharishi. And then my husband. And i raised kids. All of that was put aside and when they Either late high school or had left home. When i had my wartime to myself. I started Looking back into spiritual practices and maybe only academic would do this. I bought like six copies of the dow teaching. Maybe five and i read the same verse in each one and then wrote my on verse based on my understanding of those translations and i have no idea were any of that is but it's relevant because one of the translations was by stephen mitchell and i found myself it was a great translation but i've found myself really interested in the footnotes because he can't there may have been some other people but he noted several times quoted this Somebody called master sung son. Who i subsequently learned was a korean zen master who when he first arrived in the states. I was fixing washing machines but then developed a Songa in providence rhode island and now is worldwide. His quantum school is in. And i just love the the quote senate came across one that that said no south. No problem i thought whoa. Whoa sounds no problem. I didn't know what it meant. But i also note was jam. He fascinated me so much. These footnotes that i went to the library at uc davis campus shields library and it went to the card catalogue and looked up sung sun and discovered that in the dr day basement of shields library were rows and rows of buddhist books and i found his dropping ashes on the buddha but i found a treasure trove and i started leading mostly tree traditions zen tibetan and tear baden. I couldn't get enough. Just taking him out piles and That's how i. I learned a lot about the buddhist teachings but i thought what am i supposed to do and so i wrote just stephen mitchell and i don't remember what i said but i remember what he wrote back to me. He said looking at an painting of an orange is not the same as eating orange. And then he recommended to possible dharma centers that i could go to from. I live in davis which is near sacramento so that central valley and they were both in marin county bay. Area was john. Toronto sonoma's zen center. I think and the other one was called spirit rock meditation center and he recommended jack cornfield and i don't remember why i chose that have no. I've just been thinking. How did i get there.

Stephen Mitchell Alan Watts Comcast Ghana Shields Library Daniel Asia Providence Rhode Island Uc Davis Senate Baden Marin County Bay Central Valley Spirit Rock Meditation Center Sacramento Davis
Stemina's CEO on diagnosing autism earlier using biological markers

TechNation Radio Podcast

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Stemina's CEO on diagnosing autism earlier using biological markers

"From the outside. We often know autism through observation of behavior. but are there biological markers for autism. Despite an average diagnosis at four years old stamina biomarker discovery has developed a blood test for autism spectrum disorder for as young as eighteen months. Beth tonle is its ceo. I want you to tell us if you could about autism so much has happened over the years. People have forgotten about what this means to be on the autism spectrum. What this exactly means today. Well i'll tell you the prevalence of autism is the first issue. We now have one in fifty eight kids in the united states that have autism and that's a new statistics from the cdc previously. It was one in sixty nine so almost everyone knows someone or has someone in their family. That has autism Obviously autism is a behavioral disorder. sometimes characterized by social shoes. Repetitive behavior cognitive issues. We're actually looking at it from a biological perspective and trying to sort of peel back the onion and understand What is the biology. That is autism and their multiple. Biology's that manifest then and the behaviors that we see. Well we should say right away. The your the mother of someone who is on the autism spectrum. And he's in college yes. He is so the idea that the these are not functional. People put them in some special class and not deal with them anymore. It's just not true. There's so much that can be done but you have to have knowledge. That's true and autism spectrum disorder. It's a spectrum disorder from cognitive behavioral and biological perspective. Jack is pretty high functioning. But he's had a lot of interruption over the years Lots of behavioral therapy ot pt speech. Language you know tutoring We've tried modified diets and dietary supplements and vitamins. Attention deficit medicine three kinds I think your study and your cell we are. We are like many parents. You go to the internet and you read about these things and There isn't any precision around how they're applied so parents. Try everything And that's what we're trying to bring at stamina. Neuro point is some precision about what's different about the biology of these kids. And how do we order our thinking around how to intervene. Obviously behavioral therapy. Every child should get. But how do we prioritize some of the other choices to address the biology. So there's a major study out there. Eleven hundred children. what have you studied. And what have you available still to continue to study So the children's autism metabolism Project or camp took place at eight sites across the country led by our head of our sab. Dr david amaral. Who's at the mind. Institute at uc davis. We recruited eleven hundred and two children to be specific Children with autism typically developing children and also children with developmental delay but not autism and we collected i of the morning plasma. It's important to have a fasted sample when studying metabolism as we do because just like you don't need a sweet roll before you go get your glucose or cholesterol tested. We can measure that to. This is an enormous resource. That's allowed us to identify the first set of biomarkers that Show a dysregulation in amino acid metabolism. That may be addressable through a supplement. it describes about seventeen percent of the kids and we publish that in biological psychiatry back in september of two thousand eighteen We have a second paper in progress which we hope will be submitted by the end of the month which looks at mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. And this is an area that's been known in the literature in smaller studies of thirty or forty or even a hundred children. This is an opportunity to look at an eleven hundred and two kids and so we really get a chance to kind of dissect some of these hypotheses and bring forward some additional biology. That could be addressable through specific treatments if we know this. Can this become a diagnostic. Do we know enough that it will be. Yeah so that's a great question. We are going to start offering this as a i would call it a prognostic so it will screen for whether or not the child has a metabolism subtype that we've seen has highly associated with autism. And then they would be referred to a developmental specialist to would screen them using traditional behavioral assessment that will be necessary for insurance coverage for. Iep's at school for behavioral therapy etc. But we hope it will do because our kids are eighteen months to forty eight months. Is that child. Re- referred sooner right now. The average age of diagnosis is over four years. My son was seven in fact when he was diagnosed with pervasive developmental delays not otherwise specified. Pdd s which used to be a form of autism. That's been rolled up into the regular autism diagnosis as part of the dsm. Five and we didn't. We were not told it was autism and we knew he had pervasive developmental delays. So a lot of time is lost. Where if we can diagnose as young as eighteen months with our test and get a child referred they can get into behavioral therapy and that can be critically important to the outcome In addition the insights into the metabolism that we can give as i mentioned. We'll give opportunities to sort of prioritize all those different different interventions that parents try and take the most innocuous one first and see if you can make a difference

Autism Autism Spectrum Disorder Beth Tonle Dr David Amaral CDC Uc Davis United States Jack
How to Create Organizational Culture Change Using Social Media

Social Pros Podcast

06:14 min | 1 year ago

How to Create Organizational Culture Change Using Social Media

"Ladies and gentlemen here. She is sally poge. Who's the director of social media for the university of california. Davis coincidentally located in davis. California sally welcome to social pros. My absolute pleasure to be here with you. The university of california system is very very large. A little bit about davis and what kind of campus it is. What kind of school. What you specialize in give folks who aren't familiar with uc davis maybe west coasters. Gimme little a frame up on the institution absolutely well. I think the first thing that we want to focus on his where we are. We're in northern california so East of san francisco in our sister campus uc berkeley and actually uc. Davis is. I would say we're one of the last college towns in california so we're in a small town called davis and we really specialize in research around climate change. We have a hospital and the number one vet. Med hospital in the world actually is located at uc davis agriculture. How we feed our world how we care for our world and climate change are kind of our bailiwicks at uc davis so We have a very big very active student community. We have about forty. Five thousand undergrad students on campus. And then another twenty to thirty staff faculty and grad students So we serve a really large community. We're pretty we're known for being kind of a little. I would say little wonky we're close to sacramento the capital We're northern california's there were outspoken about our values Which leads to a lot of protests social justice discussions It's a very lively community or my best friend's daughters the recent graduate of davis and also the school One of his best known programs commercially is. Is your wine education program. Many many of the best known winemakers not only in the united states but actually in the world have gone through the davis wine program. Some day in my retirement years. I may just have to matriculate there davis and go through that program would allow welcome you with open arms jay and i know how could i not talk about our wine and beer and t. programs Big deep. that's cool off every beverage. Beer wisely tequila program. I might come now. You're in charge pizza. That's funny because i was thinking like i love cnc. But i'm really like maybe i should start doing some google searches. I love line a little beer to. Yes we me. Scholarship that we could Art for and get after the after the program. Tell you a little bit about your team. We've had on the program this year. Who runs social media for duke university. fro- Mit we've had a couple of other higher ed. Social media genius is on social pros over the last year or two as well and it's always fascinating especially because our team can giver. Does fare better work in higher. Ed how different. The team structures are and even the reporting structures for social media inside different institutions. So talk a little bit about kind of how your team gets. Things done there at davis yet jay. Thank you for that question because I came into higher. Ed from outside i used to be in the agency. World is too. And i was so struck by how much structure plays a role in what you success that you can have with social media and As i've been I've only been hired for about five years now and this does have a either make or break. A team is what i really learned. So at uc davis. I'm lucky enough to have a really supportive director of communications. She oversees the whole office and she reports directly to the chancellor and she has a very big vision and really understood in a really valued. What social media brought to the table. But when i came in into the structure Social media is reporting under news Which i think is i think said social media kind of like a newer Been around for ten plus years and everybody was kind of arguing about organizationally where it fell under right like. Oh it's a marketing thing. Oh it's a web thing. No now it's a new thing and what i was able to do it Alongside the support of my director was really carve out a space for social media to stand alone so we are our own unit underneath the department of strategic communications meaning. We operator own budget. We have our own team members. We set our own strategy in coordination with all of our other colleagues news web marketing and visual end that gave us a really great in a pure peer to peer. Kind of seat at the table Which has been really empowering for our team because we actually service all of those communications verticals. We don't we're not like we don't belong to. We don't belong to news. We belong to everybody and what that was Allowed us to do is our mission. Our mission is really about building community. And how we can be helpful. Those are value statements and so So yeah. I think that that has been really helpful and Undermine team where team of five total and we overseas the uc davis flagship channels. So schmunity annals in all the strategy and then we also set a lot of policy for the rest of the university about hundred fifty social media communicators across the campus That we know of is probably more than that out there. and then. I also oversee executive social media communications for chancellor may and undergrad admissions social media as well so we have a large

Davis Sally Poge University Of California California Uc Davis Sally JAY Berkeley ED San Francisco Sacramento Duke University MIT Department Of Strategic Commun United States Google
New rapid test for COVID-19, flu set to roll out at UC Davis

Bryan Suits

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

New rapid test for COVID-19, flu set to roll out at UC Davis

"Davis will soon roll out a new rapid test for that will test for both the flu and Cove in 19, the school's urging people to take that dual threat of both viruses seriously as the risk of death is twice as high if an individual contracts them both. The doll test should be available next month. White

Davis
Uber, Lyft must classify drivers as employees: US court

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Uber, Lyft must classify drivers as employees: US court

"Some bad news for uber and lift on appeals court here in California, said Yeah. You guys are losing this one. And so they need to comply with reclassifying their drivers as employees within 30 days of a formal ruling, which could happen in the next few weeks, so realistically, probably around your end. Yes. So I think a timeline here is important. So back on January, 1st Assembly Bill five became law. That was the one that basically required all of these companies that provide contract type work, such as uber and lift but also a few others to reclassify those workers as employees in May, a lawsuit Filed against Uber lift for not complying in June. There's another injunction to immediately classify them. This went through Superior Court. They lost the lawsuit it back in August. The continued to appeal this and now this ruling basically gives them 30 days like you said from the ruling, which Again could happen in the next couple of weeks. It could take longer, but yeah, you're looking at year end for uber lived. I can't imagine this was a massive surprise. I think they held hopes that they would win on appeal. But I can't imagine as a huge surprise. I think it all comes down to proposition 22, which is a ballot initiative that's being voted on on Election day. And that to me is the big chance that uber left still have here. There hasn't been. I haven't able to find a ton of polling, but there is pulling done by. I think it was UC Davis back in September, it found that 39% of voters supported the ballot measure, which would keep Uber contractors as contractors. 36% were opposed. A full quarter of people were undecided on this one.

Superior Court Uc Davis California
California court says Uber, Lyft drivers are employees, not contractors

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

04:24 min | 1 year ago

California court says Uber, Lyft drivers are employees, not contractors

"Like some some bad bad news news for for uber uber and and lift lift on on appeals appeals court court here here in in California, California, said said Yeah. Yeah. You You guys guys are are losing losing this this one. one. And And so so they they need need to to comply comply with with reclassifying reclassifying their their drivers drivers as as employees employees within within 30 30 days days of of a a formal formal ruling, ruling, which which could could happen happen in in the the next next few few weeks, weeks, so so realistically, realistically, probably probably around around your your end. end. Yes. Yes. So So I I think think a a timeline timeline here here is is important. important. So So back back on on January, January, 1st 1st Assembly Assembly Bill Bill five five became became law. law. That That was was the the one one that that basically basically required required all all of of these these companies companies that that provide provide contract contract type type work, work, such such as as uber uber and and lift lift but but also also a a few few others others to to reclassify reclassify those those workers workers as as employees employees in in May, May, a a lawsuit lawsuit Filed Filed against against Uber Uber lift lift for for not not complying complying in in June. June. There's There's another another injunction injunction to to immediately immediately classify classify them. them. This This went went through through Superior Superior Court. Court. They They lost lost the the lawsuit lawsuit it it back back in in August. August. The The continued continued to to appeal appeal this this and and now now this this ruling ruling basically basically gives gives them them 30 30 days days like like you you said said from from the the ruling, ruling, which which Again Again could could happen happen in in the the next next couple couple of of weeks. weeks. It It could could take take longer, longer, but but yeah, yeah, you're you're looking looking at at year year end end for for uber uber lived. lived. I I can't can't imagine imagine this this was was a a massive massive surprise. surprise. I I think think they they held held hopes hopes that that they they would would win win on on appeal. appeal. But But I I can't can't imagine imagine as as a a huge huge surprise. surprise. I I think think it it all all comes comes down down to to proposition proposition 22, 22, which which is is a a ballot ballot initiative initiative that's that's being being voted voted on on on on Election Election day. day. And And that that to to me me is is the the big big chance chance that that uber uber left left still still have have here. here. There There hasn't hasn't been. been. I I haven't haven't able able to to find find a a ton ton of of polling, polling, but but there there is is pulling pulling done done by. by. I I think think it it was was UC UC Davis Davis back back in in September, September, it it found found that that 39% 39% of of voters voters supported supported the the ballot ballot measure, measure, which which would would keep keep Uber Uber contractors contractors as as contractors. contractors. 36% 36% were were opposed. opposed. A A full full quarter quarter of of people people were were undecided undecided on on this this one. one. Do you know, by the way how easy it is to get something on the ballot in the state of Palestine. Oh, easy. How many signatures do you need? Like 30? No, it's so it's It's actually more than I thought, but it's still like California's a state of over 55 million people. You need in order. So this is again what I'm seeing here, According to the California Constitution article to you need 623,000. It's nothing But that's that's literally like that's 1% of the state's population needs to agree with you to get something on the about. Yeah, There's so much that sucks about California. Voting is one of them because you get these from what I understand you get these things, and there's like 50 ballot questions depending on what city you live in. I think this year it's it's somewhere in that ballpark. It's It's just ridiculous. So, um, yeah, this year. You know, this is a tough one because I am a firm believer that Uber and lift both deliberately structured their business in the way they did the skirt, labor laws. So on one hand, I'm like you guys have something coming to you. On the other hand, I look at this nice say there's going to be a lot of uber and lyft drivers that aren't gonna be able to drive on the platform anymore. They're going to lose that income, and that's gonna hurt way have to be honest about that. It's going to hurt an awful lot of uber and lyft drivers. The remaining ones. Are going to end up coming away, probably with better wages and definitely with better benefits, and and that's kind of that's the trade off that ends up being made here. What I hope that does then is maybe spur some additional competition in the space saying Hey, This is you know, now a service where the prices have come up to where they're competitive or in some cases more expensive than taxis. Hey, let's see if we could generate some real innovation to actually drive those costs down instead of just trying to save on our labor costs by not covering health insurance. Yes, I mean one. I'm not so undecided on this or you know you're not decided on obey. You see both sides of it. I'm pretty firmly in the camp that All of these people need to be classified as employees. If we're going to treat them the way that they do on DH uber left several of these different companies need to be reclassified and need to have payroll taxes and benefits. In my view that is going to drive up costs. It's going Tio make taxis more favorable again, which the uber industry was able to completely skirt all the rules around the taxi industry and just kind of bankrupt them. Granted, there are plenty of taxi problems to begin with. I think the real thing that this drive when we talk about that innovation that would bring down costs again, I think the endgame for all of these guys is getting rid of the drivers entirely, whether their employees or contractors.

California Superior Superior Court Bill Bill Davis Davis Palestine
"uc davis" Discussed on GGPP Podcast @ Independence High School

GGPP Podcast @ Independence High School

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on GGPP Podcast @ Independence High School

"I'm happy i so yeah. We'll move back because most people listening probably yeah so on house like during high school like which. Abc table at like. How would you say tips. I guess on each or something Karnal order to human jarvi freshman year. It was interesting. I enjoyed the class. I didn't think the exam. Because i didn't think i'd do that. Well on it. But looking back. I probably should have because it. Because the examiners that hard you really think about it like they're important but they're not that hard so i probably should have done it. It's worth the money like the unit are with the money only ninety five. Yeah like they're not wrong. Though it's ninety five. Seems like a big number now but like each quarter. Davis is a five thousand life. I kind of i would take the ninety five over that any day So that was fun. But i didn't take them so i have nothing to say about that. One i wish i grover. I think she's still teaches. I liked her Yeah teachers is really fun. I enjoyed it a lot. software year took physics. Ap physics with a mislead. I read that class too. I mean i was a physics major at the beginning so it must have been something i don't know i just kind of liked it. Like physics was kind of fun but it was really like the basics of physics. Like i didn't really get a good deal of but yet until college and then That's the rest of it. Yeah no but for that class. Understanding the concepts really helps a lot. They're not that hard either. You just think about it. It should be fine junior year. I took psychology and calc. Ab and lang. Yeah english competition language at that one lang. I don't know much of that. Had owing it was all right. That one was kind of just what i learned there. But i guess it's just knowing vocabulary kind of helped. How would you say is knowing like those rhetorical devices and like stuff like that. I think that's important..

Karnal Abc grover Davis lang
"uc davis" Discussed on Beekeeping Today Podcast

Beekeeping Today Podcast

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on Beekeeping Today Podcast

"It. And you gotta you gotTa hand it to the almond growers. It's it's Cya All the problems of bees are having what happens if we don't have keys. Well I gotTa have something in the in the background. That says okay. I can still pollinate my almond trees but so the beekeepers need to pay attention to this also and we're going to be looking at some of these Sucking to Kirstin the other day. I bought her next issue over magazine. And we're going to be exploited more than one way and there's more than one crop that are looking at op pollination with with mechanical pollination not using BS so yeah it's I don't I'll be honest. I don't know how I feel. I have mixed emotions about that that the Techie Geeky part of me says wow we cooled and the other part of me Says No. I don't like that. Yeah it'll be interesting to see what what becomes of all of them. Yeah the techie part. You're exactly right How can here's a heck of a challenge? How can I solve this? At the same time. Every tree that gets pollinated by a drone is a tree that didn't get pollinated by bees. So there's some beekeeper out there looking for another tree and and it's GonNa be fun to watch but maybe not fun to watch. I don't know but yeah I was GonNa say a word the fun. Oh boy so we have coming up in February. Our promise series of special shows on beginning beekeeping. Well you're right are beginning are beginning. Our series on beginning beekeeping is coming up and you know. Who's joining US Jeff? Well why don't you let everyone know who's joining us? We got Dr Jim to be part of the show for this series and maybe more afterwards. He's looking at his schedule and seeing what he can do. And we've got Another sponsor coming up for the series. Better be out of New York is going to be One of our sponsors for this too. So they're going to have a part of this. Jim Who's going to be a part of us. And you and I and and beginning beekeeping I gotTa tell you the challenge of explaining how to keep peace without being able to show how to keep. These is for me a real challenge. I'm looking forward to it. Well it's going to test us all for sure and just to let you listeners. Know that that the desire for this course anybody who's a beekeeper even sitting at the coffee shop or wherever someone finds out to own season. You'll always have someone come up and say I've always thought about getting into bees. How do I do that? What's involved? What does it take? And so the the purpose of our series of podcast in February will be how what what it takes to become a hobby. Beekeeper what does it take to get started B.'s? What are the things they need to consider? And we'll just kinda provide that high level information and provide some where they can take their next steps. I think think you're a comparison of two two people sitting in a coffee shop me trying to explain to you. How do you get started? Keeping Bees Is a good analogy in terms of what we're GONNA do because it's a challenge but if you do it right that person Lisa coffee shop on their way to be store To buy their equipment so We'll get that done right. Yeah and I'm excited that Jim will be joining us and he would become a regular if not a frequent if not regular contributor and member of the beekeeping. Today's podcast with Night so it's a it's going to be a good season coming up and we're looking forward to. It should be Jeff. You bet well that about wraps up for this podcast. Podcast before we go. I want to encourage our listeners. To RATE IS FIVE STARS ON APPLE. Podcast wherever you download and stream the show. Your vote helps other beekeepers find us wicker. We want to thank this episode sponsored Global Patties. Check them out at. Www DOT global patties dot com? And while you're there giving shot out for sponsoring this break show the doctor Julia find and finally we. WanNa thank you the beekeeping today podcast listeners. We wouldn't be doing it to work for you. Feel free to send US questions and comments questions of beekeeping.

Kirstin Dr Jim Jeff Jim Who WanNa New York Julia Lisa
"uc davis" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KTOK

"Any dealings with UC Davis except this is that the that county is the west county in the United States in a in California's fifty eight counties that still allows Pouncey issue which is the animals go from the pound to research facilities so they're they're not a shiny bright they got they got a really dark history and they continue to have it and we've eliminated and stop in fifty seven counties it's the only county in California where because it's UC Davis and and I've and I've been in a primary absolutely place many years ago as well as many other primates facility places and it's pretty horrendous and with the fact that these animals don't have any so social interaction with one another or they don't have any any toys or anything to play with sometimes I got an old TV that's on in there and that's about it yes this social enjoyment so no ID say he just distillates we can use apps absolutely accurate about it and it said it said that you know you and I I commend him for the night not taken it any further and becoming given the sector and getting away from the obviously is it something that bothers them enough to make this call and we need more people like that we really had more people like that as a publicly funded university UC Davis publicly funded research on these animals so wildcard line Laura in New York hi Laura I'm hi thank you for taking my call Chris I just wanted to thank you for the work that you do very very much like thank you thank you Chris great work I've been on eating the way you do for forty four years now I also to animal rescue the last thirty years and I just it you probably know everything I'm going to say but I just want to address it to the audience with the audience know there are anti business vivisection societies that people can donate to they're doing a lot of work to take the monkeys and chin side of the lab and also I want people to know that the flag rock industry is really horrendous also and also the lobster industry really horrendous the harm that gets done to these animals are boiled alive and to let people know they have a little bit more consciousness about the choices they make about what they eat and then also for health reasons what becoming really popular is the paleo diet and the keto diet and that's all about eating meat meat meat and it's just all really disgusting and I disorder have lower thank you for the call we're running out of time so I thank you for the I'm gonna get let Chris comment on that the diet part for example well if you your issue definitely right and it with will learn now that the obesity which killed people in this country is out of control I mean is there any hit differ statistics anyway if I hear from fifty eight to ninety percent she is going to be that oral beach and that stitch discussing at one time in now now the the kid in the class that's then there is the one that stands out and is if he's athletically stand where is it one time is who's a kid in this school that was overweight that was it now it's the norm it's the norm and it's dangerous and it's it's it's on hell so this is why these new different kind of is alternative each that are coming out of the way to go which doesn't have the hormones and managers and the antibiotics it's hell your school for the kids get a watch use so better watch what how much you eat the question still will mail comfort food well ye it but it's far better than eating me and any kind of products and injected with hormones and this is why a young girls of developing faster and than they normally would have back in the time when I was a kid so it's it's all what they're putting into the animals and it's concentrated and then we take this one for you to the kids at luncheon schools we're setting up these kids to become big dollars strange sort of biomedical research community and sort of what it is we should big pharma industry because they're gonna be you'll be staying on the fact that the tide is still in a change on that people become aware of it finally finally did come aware of it I want to take action I thank you for your work I thank you for being here if you get arrested or if you get hit with one of these the gag laws and need some help I hope you'll come back here in your face the.

UC Davis west county United States California Pouncey
"uc davis" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Dealings with UC Davis except this is that the that county is the west county the United States in a in California's fifty eight counties that still allows pounds sees you which is the animals go from the pound to research facilities so they're they're not shining bright they got they got a really dark history and they continue to have it and we've eliminated and stop in fifty seven counties it's the only county in California where because it's UC Davis and and I've and I've been in their primary that facility place many years ago as well as many other primates facility places and it's pretty horrendous and with the fact that these animals don't have any so social interaction with one another or they don't have any any tool use or anything to play with sometimes I got an old TV that's on and there and that's about it yes this social enjoyment so no he said he just distillate speaking yeah that's absolutely accurate about it and it said it said that you know you and I I commend him for the night not taken as any further and becoming given the sector and getting away from the obviously is is something that bothers them send us to make this call and we need more people like that we really had more people like that as a publicly funded university UC Davis publicly funded research on these animals so wildcard line Laura in New York hi Laura I'm hi thank you for taking my call Chris I just wanted to thank you for the work that you do very very much like thank you thank you Chris great work I've been on eating the way you do for forty four years now I also to animal rescue the last thirty years and I just it you probably know everything I'm going to say but I just want to address it to the audience with the audience know there are anti business there's a section societies that people can donate to they're doing a lot of work to take the monkeys and chin side of the labs and also I want people to know that the foreground industry is really horrendous also and also the lobster industry really horrendous the harm that gets done to do the animals of will to live and to let people know to have a little bit more consciousness about the choices they make about what they eat and then also for health reasons what's becoming really popular is the paleo diet and the keto diet and that's all about eating meat meat meat and it's just all really disgusting and I just wanna have Laura thank you for the call we're running out of time so I thank you for the guy I'm gonna get let Chris comment on that the diet part for example well if you're issues actually right and he will will learning now that obesity which killed people in this country's age out of control I mean is there any difference statistics anyway if I hear from fifty to ninety percent she's going to be that or beach and that states discussing at one time in now nowadays the kids in the class that's missing is the one that stands out and he is if he's athletically skin where is it one time this was a kid in the schools that was overweight that was it now is the norm it's the norm and it's dangerous and it's it's it's on hell so this is why these new different kind of is alternative each that a common now the way to go which doesn't have the hormones and managers and the antibiotics it's still your school for the kids gonna watch you can still go to watch what how much you're reading the question still will mail comfort food well ye it but it's far better than eating and any kind of products and then injected with hormones and this is why a young girls of developing faster and than they normally would have back in the time when I was a kid so it's it's all with the putting into the animals and it's concentrated and then we take this phone features to the kids at luncheon schools were sitting up these kids to become big dollars signs sort of biomedical research community and sort of sort of a lease reform the industry because they're gonna be you'll be staying on the set but the tide is going to change on that people become aware of it finally finally did come aware of it I want to take action I thank you for your work I thank you for being here if you get arrested or if you get hit with one of these gag laws and need some help I hope you'll come back here.

UC Davis west county United States California
"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"UC Davis is collaborating with the world were not with a world renowned shaft and food activists Alice waters to research sustainable crops waters institute for edible education will be at the new Aggie square development in Oak Park it'll serve as a center for research and sustainable crops and environmentally conscious agriculture that takes climate change into consideration the institute will also provide hands on activities to teach students and teachers about the role food plays and health police are reminding drivers at some roads will be closed for the women's March in Sacramento this weekend the fourth annual women's March Sacramento will be held tomorrow it'll start at ten thirty AM go from southside park up night street to the state capitol there will be road closures around southside park starting at eight thirty AM March team this year women rising and Sacramento state graduate is making history as the first full time female assistant coach in the history of Major League Baseball San Francisco Giants are adding Alyssa knack into Gabe Kapler coaching staff that can former softball coach Kathy straight hand remembers the three time all conference first baseman as an exceptional young woman I just knew early on that she was going to probably be a trailblazer and she was going to go out there do something great she was going to make an impact but even in my wildest dreams I never exactly four saw this one coming the giants a national folk focus her talents on helping build a winning culture in the clubhouse traffic and weather together is Brian nobles at the limit on everybody's all the way around Sacramento govern fender Bender westbound I. eighty at Madison but it doesn't appear to be slowing anybody down still have chain controls up in the high country right now on I eighty of the mind I acted the state line fifty its twin bridges to Myers traffic on the tens every ten minutes mornings and afternoons fry nobles leaves.

Myers fender Bender Kathy softball Alyssa Sacramento state Madison Brian nobles UC Davis Gabe Kapler San Francisco Giants Sacramento Oak Park Alice waters
"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"At UC Davis may have found a solution to a disease plaguing grapes that is cost California wine makers millions of dollars winter break is officially started kids out of school so what now we have some ideas to keep kids busy coming up here this morning but let's head out to the rose right check in with Brian normalcy got a got a foggy drive getting around Sacramento this morning all the way around if your route is one of those I can get in on days like this expected this morning very dense at times still no accidents along the way on our freeways eighty from Roseville nine minutes to the cap cities but another nine on the cap city freeway gets heated downtown thirteen minutes in from elk Grove on five ninety nine fifty looks good all the way in from fall some that's an eighteen minute drive thirteen if you got twenty one rather it be coming in from woodland on I five thirteen if you coming in from Davis he's down AT across the causeway if you head up in the high country right now got a chain up to get over the mountain passes eighty it's king bail to Donna like highway fifty it's carvers to Myers we do have one problem Jack not big rig reportedly westell corn Boulevard at sage view Dr C. H. being offered in crews on the scene speed sensors indicate a little bit of a backup going both ways in that spot if you spot something on the road in front of you want to pass it along call the KFBK traffic tip line dial pound two fifty intake traffic traffic on the tent every ten minutes mornings and afternoons Ryan nobles news ninety three point one K. F. B. K. dense fog for a while this morning that low clouds and fog will give way to some sun this afternoon with a high of fifty four to fifty eight patchy clouds early tonight then clouding up late tonight with little thirty five to thirty nine mostly cloudy tomorrow with a high of fifty to fifty four I've accu weather meteorologist Joe Lundberg news ninety three point one KFBK I am currently in San Francisco had that way forty three degrees if you're going to Tahoe twenty eight degrees and in Sacramento it is forty two degrees that news ninety three point one K. if the K. so the travel day in Sacramento International Airport is back up and running this morning travelers there were hit with delays and flight cancellations over the weekend after a car crashed into a utility pole knocking.

UC Davis California Sacramento Roseville elk Grove Donna Myers Jack Dr C. H. San Francisco Tahoe Sacramento International Airpo Brian Ryan nobles K. F. B. Joe Lundberg
"uc davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:18 min | 2 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Maria Manetti Schramm founders of the minute he Schramm UCM of art at UC Davis through June fourteenth twenty twenty the museum presents a new era the gate cans immersive installation that pushes the limits of perception carbonite offering data protection of businesses including email spreadsheets calendars and more carbonite data protection for small businesses hi Marco Werman lately we hear the word Ukraine and we think corruption next time on the world Ukrainians talk about corruption in their country and beyond why Ukrainians may be the experts on corruption our story from Kiev on the world we'll bring you the world thirty minutes from now it starts at two o'clock when KQED public radio this is fresh AIR I'm David Bianculli in for Terry gross back with more of Terry's twenty twelve interview with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas he's among this year's recipients of the Kennedy center honors for lifetime artistic achievement which are given out this week when we left off Terry was asking about Michael Tilson Thomas is grandparents Boris and Bessie Thomas shifty who were stars in the Yiddish theater they emigrated to the US from Ukraine in the eighteen eighties so I want to play a recording by your grandmother the late Bessie Thomas Chesky singing a song and I'm gonna have you introduce at this is actually from a D. V. D. out take from your shell so tell us about this song and when you think it was required this is a little introduction to a song called mink as song because monologue one of best sees most famous parts in which she's playing a girl from a little village whose country United States and is on the eve of a huge adventure a pig million like experimented which she will be elevated from her lowly parlor maid status to being the lady of the house okay so this is Betty Thomas shifty recorded approximately one nineteen twenty something well okay here we go yeah thank right I wanted thank you so that was the late Bessie Thomas shifty singing and she and Boris commissions are the lake grandparents of my guest conductor Michael Tilson Thomas so what kind of music did your grandmother introduce you to I was lucky enough to hear her deliver a lot of her biggest numbers right there at our living room since she would arrive every weekend to our house and we would put on a little show together which I would accompany her and some of her songs and she would do recitations and we did little scenes together so although it my parents fondest hope that I would become some kind of scientist a mathematician I realize that she was already getting me into the whole theater experience right there a whole that's really interesting and one of the things she says one of things you describe her having said to you in your area yes you are more like me than your parents are there more conventional and you have more of what which is a like a creative spirit or something that she said your parents are very lovely people but terribly conventional your like me you're an adventurer you'll have to prove something did you take that to heart I paid attention to it I didn't know quite what it meant as I listen to her tell all the stories of her life from her childhood through her stardom and then even her reflections on the way fashions changed and the way she was in her late life of quite lonely person I took it all in and what I kind of understood from her was that it had been a very interesting ride but she really was proud of what had been accomplished and when she saw somebody very successful entertainer coming up and she could see in them something that had come from the kind of things that they have done in the theater she was very proud of it she recognize them and appreciate them so when your grandmother died and you were under sixteen or seventeen was there music at her funeral there wasn't much music at my grandmother's funeral there were a few prayers and there were very few people there and her plaque just says Bessie Thomas have ski Yiddish theatre pioneer star which is exactly what she wanted to say but of course there's a whole repertory of songs that we played at home all the time whenever we thought about her and that I still play it was a very big moment of big right of passage in my life the first day that I took over playing her songs instead of my father playing and measuring the way I was playing them against the wonderful nuances that he and my grandmother had brought to the music I was lucky to hear my family play that music for me I wanted to keep in my ear is exactly the way they had sung the songs and played with all the Iranian Morton C. and snappy little gestures and comebacks so you mentioned some advice in in in your show that your grandmother gave you about when you're on stage you have to remember that the people in the uppermost balcony for the people who pay the least but enjoying at the most and you have to even if you're whispering you have to make sure that those people can hear you how has that affected you as a conductor my way of expressing what she said to me is what is it like for people beyond the sixth row that we play in such a big hall sometimes in classical music in their their halls designed to be very rich which is on the one hand very nice the gorgeous sound it's there but to get the sound to be distinct it is difficult and I sometimes tell my students that playing classical music is like making an announcement in an airport that you hear someone say passengers on flight three ninety one the golden rule I immediately please so you're trying to make every single moment completely distinct another way Bessie had of saying that you said listen venha blowing on accident you gotta watch out for the nine Floyd this the night Floyd that stains of us could just saying I was giving to the park one day and I noticed the most beautiful suddenly a dog around that you'll suddenly dropped the axe at your job but you got to keep the contour of it all the way going through same thing in music that's really great my cousin Thomas thank you it's been great as always thank you conductor Michael Tilson Thomas speaking to Terry gross in twenty twelve he's one of the honorees who will be saluted at this weekend's Kennedy center honors the annual salute to the arts will be televised on CBS December fifteenth after a break we remember child advocate merry preppy as the director of the.

Schramm UCM UC Davis Maria Manetti Schramm thirty minutes one hand one day
"uc davis" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"He's the UC Davis professor, who, let's read some of his quotes is our is charming land. Yeah. Here's just some of the things he's tweeted talked about an interviews. I'm thankful that every living cop will be dead. One day somebody their own hand. Some by others too many of old age has shag. Let's not make more. So he tweeted that in two thousand fourteen. I don't I don't see a world where I would tweet that I don't see a world where many listening right now with tweet that. But you say, hey, five years ago, one tweet. Do we let it slide? What there's some more quotes here. I mean it's easier to shoot cops when their backs are turned no tweeted that the next year, and then in two thousand sixteen people think cops need to be reformed. They need to be killed. He said in an interview. So again, UC Davis professor, we were talking in the first segment how screwed up the college system is. You could love this all in there together. Right. You can put this all in the same situation. This is what's going on. So Paul, Yes, What's going on with him? What do you? He was condemned. Not by employer. That's for sure. He's still teaching. I mean, unless unless I missed something. Nope. Let me read as Wikipedia, he's a writer and a professor of English and comparative literature at UC Californian Davis. UC davis. So yeah, you know you got condemned so that should at least make us feel good. It's honestly, it's laughable, because you should cry. In the biggest thing here. Right. Let's, let's go with Joshua clovers thought right? He wants no more police officers. Okay. What would that look like? What a world would that look like because right now as it is with this Bill, you're already hearing. And maybe the this is not saying this publicly, but police officers, especially in Chicago are saying on not going into the bad neighborhoods, because what's the point? I'll let him shoot it out. And I'll just go collect the bodies when it's over. I'm not going in the middle. When I going to do I'll either get shot get killed or I'll shoot someone and get in trouble. So I might as well just let it go. I mean you see you see what's going on here. And you've got to UC Davis professor, saying, yeah, I wish cups got killed. Okay. That's our state though, if, if, if I were running for. Well, let's take to if I was running for political office, or elected office, especially here in California, one of my top things that I would run on would be to reform the tenure system. Oh oh, yeah. And you know what you would be you're dead, right, Dan? And I would lose a heart but I guess. Basically, political suicide. Yeah. No, you're definitely right? I was thinking about this the other day, if you were to run if his teacher union is so strong, but you're right there. I was saying if I was a local official right now and this'll be a nice transition into this story. I would run on. Hey, I don't know. No more bike lanes. No more bus lanes cars. How about that? Slogan. Just just cars. But what about clemency? Yeah. I we need to get it to work. We need cars. But what about the trolley? Yeah. No, nobody's on it cars. Which leads me to San Dan. I'm going to go here. Now, thanks so I'm going to keep talking about this because this is a pressing issue. Honestly, it is realize right now. Right now. Three and a half percent of San Diegan 's use public transit, as their means of transportation me me say that again three and a half percent. Use public transportation. This is despite sixty six percent. Of the new tax money going to public transit. So something often hear from the bike lovers or the public transit lovers as well. Yeah. But if you just would spend money on it, then people would use it, and I'm saying they're spending money on it and not using it..

professor UC Californian Davis UC Davis writer Davis Bill professor of English and compa Joshua clovers California Chicago San Diegan Dan San Dan Wikipedia official sixty six percent five years One day
"uc davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Mcadams. Thank you so much for joining me. It's great to be back. You're like it's been way too long then on a little bit of a hiatus in crazy, busy and speaking of busy are just returned from global pedic's, bro. Which any of you were not familiar is the biggest trade show in pet industry. So we got to see a week's worth of some really cool stuff. Alway greatest in the pet industry and was also involved who my company puck joy and a really cool process. It was the pet care innovation prize, which is put on by Purina, active, capital and cultivation capital. And they started out with group of a couple hundred applicants and narrowed it down to five finalists, and when it was down there and global pet. We got to go through a whole pitch process and has a lot of fun and my guest today. We're one of the five percents in contest with us. And they were the founders of company called animal bio animal by. Is really cool. It's an innovative company that helps put this in layman's terms, and let them explain it a little better, but improves the health of animals through genetic level, data diagnostic, tools and therapeutic remedies. So the two founders of their too with me today have really impressive backgrounds, and I want to read you their bios. So the first is Holly Geoghegan's and Holly is microbial ecologist. And she's got a undergraduate degree from George Washington University. She's got a masters from scripts in institution of oceanography just got a PHD from UC Davis so ton of educational background. She was also a post doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley prior to creating animal by she studied microbes in dogs and cats at UC Davis school that medicine and the UC Davis genome center, and her co founder car Goodman is a data. Scientist who studied biology at the university of Montana. Also got a PHD in post doc at UC Berkeley. And she did that in evolutionary.

UC Berkeley Holly Geoghegan doctoral fellow UC Davis genome center UC Davis UC Davis school Purina university of Montana Mcadams. George Washington University Scientist pedic Goodman co founder
"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

08:26 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Welcome back. It's the KF garden. Joe glad to have you along on this Sunday, April the seventh. Well, here she is from TV Instagram YouTube, the plant lady Marlene Simon's is here. Thank you. Hi, having me. Let me already made a mistake. It's Marlene Simon NAT Simon. That's fine. Glide forgive you. Thank you so much for that. How long have you been doing the Sunday morning gentle thirty one gardens? That's it. Yeah. You pointed out you're like, oh, it's been five years. I'm like, yeah. It's been five years gone fast. And you know, I say I'll stop it when I'm not having fun. I'm still having fun now. Sometimes if I have there are two TV monitors in here, and sometimes that monitor on the leftover there is sometimes on channel thirty one on Sunday mornings because they're the only ones doing news and catch a glance, and I'll see you in front of a green screen. Yes. Explain to people what it's like trying to talk about plants pointing to something that to you is totally green. So the it it's live. Yeah. I have three minutes. I think sometimes I have ninety seconds to answer questions and in the picture in the back of the green screen that is my garden my previous garden. So you know, when I first started doing it, the first segment was a phone, call and. Yeah. And quickly that went went away because you know, they could drag out with three minutes. So and then I remember not even seen pictures ahead of time. And I remember one was a an opened Hoya flour. No ide- this. And luckily grow Hoya, so yeah, I'm gonna have to see the picture at least five seconds ahead of time. So I could at least you know, what I'm talking about. Because the pictures are are so not everyone's a photographer. Right. Not everyone even knows how to get their picture and focus and everybody's photographer. These that's true. Or bad. See it's fun. It's I wish I had more time. But you know, I think I talk fast. You got a lot of time here today. Good now, I'm like, oh my gosh. Don't have too much time. You'll be with us here until ten o'clock. And then we'll both go over two ks t forget growing, and you'll be there from ten to eleven thirty. And did you know you'll be judging the garden grappler now? We'll see radio to very good at judging judge every. All right. Let's establish your credentials. You work at the university of her Nesto. UC Davis conservatory. Yes. So it's Davis botanical conservatory, which is been around over fifty years. And we still have people on campus who've been like, oh, I work here thirty years. I didn't know you guys existed. Actually why I went on good day. Everyone thought I worked at arboretum everyone always thought we were these Davis arboretum you. Haven't worn Roberts though. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Great guy. Yeah. Totally full knowledge. But you know, I wanted the conservatory to stand out one day. I'm just like this is it I need to promote us. How can I promote us? So I contacted good day. And they just happened to be looking for a plant person. And I, you know, I'm comfortable speaking publicly. So that's how it got started. But yeah, the conservatory I was I went to UC Davis for school. And I was an intern at the conservatory, and I said man if I'm ever back in Davis. This is where I wanna work. So it wasn't a straight line to get their out. It's run by Ernest of Sandoval. I I like to say it's run by an. All right. We each have our own our own niches. But no her nest has been there for like twenty five years, quite a quite a long time. In fact, I think that's his only job besides working at thrifty and helping his dad and his landscaping business. So what now tell people about the conservatory till and they can visit it we're open Monday through Friday roughly nine to five. There's only two of us. We have student workers we house we think we have over about four thousand different species. Of plants various plants, we have tropical plants succulents. We're known for the corpse plant, right? Yeah. But that's that's a side story. Art hasn't bloomed in seven years. It's been a while. Then while Roseville high school as successful. Yeah. They called us because there's did not open me. But yeah. So I have my theories lay in lane awake at two in the morning. One night. I'm like why isn't our corpse lower. This is a whole bunch of blooming bachelor were I think cuttings of of ours. So I think Berkeley might have gotten there's from us sac state believe. I have a feeling the only thing we've changed was the soil. We went from a succulent mix, which would grow most of our plants in. But the corn was being puckered as it expanded. Because it had pumice in it and Ernest. Oh, okay. Let's move it into our carnivorous mix, which is a sand per light softer. My theory is just not getting enough nutrients. That's the only thing we've changed. So at Roseville high school, they determined that the reason they're corpse plant failed to fully open was an outdoor security. That's what. Yeah. That's a we. I think talking to them or Nesta might have come like, that's the only thing. Yeah. At bloom. So they're doing everything correct right in ours. Did get messed up when we one of us went by think like at one in the morning one time, and we realize our grow lights were still on. And so that did, you know daily definitely messes plants what's backup a little bit. You mentioned that the corpse plant is the stinky plant that always makes the news. Yeah. Titanium eram. Yeah. It's the titan Arum. I joke that it's the botanical name is a more full Fallas titanium this G rated program. So we can't explain what that is discussing beforehand that people should if you know any Latin. Yes, he could figure it out. Yeah. It's pretty impressive. We do have some other species that smell just as equivalent to death as I say, some of the stipulates, the desert milk weeds. They bloom a lot more off than and when I go in. Sometimes I'm like, oh, no, there's a dead rat somewhere. I got hunted. Our, but then all that great flowers blooming, but you know, fly pollinated flowers. That's it. That's why the corpse flower, smells, like a dead flies that crawl down in the flower can't get out. And then they eventually get out though. Do they? Yeah. Because they're pollinators. They gotta go to a different flower. Oh, yeah. So it's not carnivorous. Oh, yeah. I thought they were getting trapped net while they get trapped takes a while for them to find their way out. They find their way out. That's though. Yeah. It's like the sad story of the Smyrna fig. And the lonely was. Comes back. It's always fun telling people as they're eating. But it has to be a smarter. Yeah. Yeah. That's the only thing you could tell the after they've. Spit the fig out. It's fine. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. You realize you're eating awash. Protein. Yeah. Yeah. All right. But the conservatory is known for its tropical plants at the succulents. And of course, the current Everest plants to yes, we've been so lucky to have wonderful Barry rice, who's a professor at think American river, college or Sierra or American river. I forget in astronomy. But he's he's written books on carnivores, and he got her collection where it's at and that we have students who that's their thing. Like, if you're in a carnivorous plants that tends to be your little niche. So I appreciate them. I take care of them. But if you were to ask me, you know, specific species. You know, like. We have to take a break when we come back. Let's answer questions. People have questions we can make up answers because we speak with confidence nine one six nine.

Marlene Simon NAT Simon Roseville high school UC Davis conservatory Davis botanical conservatory American river Davis arboretum UC Davis Joe Davis Nesto Roberts Fallas intern Nesta Ernest Berkeley Everest Barry rice professor Sandoval
"uc davis" Discussed on Around the Rim

Around the Rim

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on Around the Rim

"Correct do and. Yeah. After noon, and I'm not talking. I'm talking less those time here. I know you're recent cost I'm sitting in central and my family's in eastern. But but yeah, I believe it's thirty. But you know, we've got we start out with with with dandy. I think you know, we have BYU who I covered I happen to be at the west coast conference and did their championship game. And Jeff Jenkins just a great job with that. And I say this is a very funding to watch one of the best freshman, plenty Shaly Gonzales is really fun to watch. But they got three guards it can really really kind of play the game. And it's so interesting because then you're going against Auburn and got coach flow. And you got I looked today. They call six hundred turnovers hundred overs in this season, you know, and they only turned it over four hundred they win that they went a lot of games, you know. But I'm I'm excited to watch these three guards go against that kind of pressure in that game. You know? And that to me is and then you got UC Davis and Stanford. Following UC? Davis has player that I think is just really a great great. Great snoring and that's mortgage. Birch oh got Oregon is a six four player inside is become the teacher player at UC Davis and had zero division one off, you know, she's a six four player that that that kind of came into own. But to me that I just love those stories where one school UC Davis was able to offer her a scholarship, and she turns it into a historic career. I love that man. Can't to me we talk about Smith. But boy, you wanna keep an eye on Yana way. Oh, Tian away hymns. She she grew up in San Antonio. And I was coaching then tell you went to high school, and so I've been aware watching her in when I lived in San Antonio for a long time and that one two punch right there. Stanford to me is a little bit of a dark horse in this tourney. It's hard to you know, Stanford with all this success. They've had car who does like unbelievably well preparing teams, but still to me there little dark horse. I started looking at who they beat on the on the schedule like an it'd be Baylor. You know, they'd be lot of these teams buffalo with further scheduled Tennessee that the win over Oregon. You know after the tough loss you happy. You know? Yeah. Not they went about. Yeah. And they won about eight or nine the row. So anyway, that's my field. It's going to be a lot of fun at least will be out there to do the gays. Well, coach you are. So well, prepared you could call the game right now with the information. You shared with us. I love your preparation, but that speaks to to why you've had such success in your career and fans will be too. I know I'll definitely be to din because we love your take, especially how you bring the WNBA women's college basketball. We need more of that. Then hughes. Thank you so much for your time. Please give your beautiful wife. My. Best. She is been. I mean, my opportunities to interact with you guys together around our game have been some very bright moments with your faith in just how you could yourselves, and she's such a kind person to please tell her I said, Hello. I will do it. She sitting there with the grandkids. So we appreciate the time. Well, enjoy staying furred and give van of your our best. We will do it. They coach good luck.

UC Davis Stanford Auburn Tian Oregon UC San Antonio Shaly Gonzales Jeff Jenkins Yana WNBA Tennessee Baylor Smith basketball Birch hughes
"uc davis" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

06:36 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Good text about wisdom versus intelligence, the Wiseman avoids what the intelligent man can get himself out of. Wiseman avoided it in the first place. I get intelligence is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad. Indeed. And the very latest in rub and tug news point Robert Kraft to be arraigned in Florida court next month, and I saw a guy yesterday who got caught up in that sting who wasn't guilty. Finally got exonerated yesterday. Some poor regular working guy somehow got named as one of the people that they had video of going into that massage. Parlor, he's married with kids. He and he is horrified. I saw him yesterday giving the speech, right? How he's had his name ruined in the public and his kids. Don't look at him in the same way. And all these different things. We'll see just driving away from the he was he was in Chicago at the time on a business trip. How how his name got in there? He has no idea needed to seem to be anybody else. Excuse me, thinking overreacting with it. So get this note from a cop who like us was. Really stirred by this professor, Joshua clover. The university of California Davis who was openly in class. As well. As online advocating the murder of police officers. He would do interviews and he'd say, yes. Some people say police need to be reformed. They need to be killed. He's called for the abolition of all police as well. So he's obviously just not, but he's simplicity teaching Marxist poetry. Why I didn't think you'd get advocate murder and keep your job at anywhere doing anything. Well, yeah. You can't advocate specific murders of specific people. But rose read a class of people. None of this is yours. I'm trying to think of some roses are red so's the government parade. And so we've we've joined with various people to put pressure on the university, including a California assemblyman, we talked to earlier, and there are many thousands of electronic signatures now on a on a what do you call it? You know, the list of signatures. Petition petition to get this guy can shoved out, and you should know. We we don't we never do that. Their jobs, and that's way over done the modern world and because you're slightly annoyed. You think somebody should lose their job? If he had said that if he comes out and said, no, no, no, I you know, I got caught up in the whole, you know, somebody had been shot. I thought the police were wrong. I wait over the line. I shouldn't have said that. I don't think that. Okay. Fine. A forceful and intelligent argument for police need to be held to higher standards, etc. Are I find bounced off your jazzing that's honor that should be the standard for everyone in America. But this is this guy's solid hardcore beliefs, the police should be murdered Russia's crazy. So here's what accountabilities like in virtually any government bureaucracy. But certainly a university of the note from a very experienced cop. Who we will refer to as Al Nautilus who was going to sign the petition. But then thought, you know, I probably shouldn't for career reasons. And it's truly a sign of our times that the professor can publicly make unconscionable in dangerous statements while being supported by his employer and the government, but an officer who is impacted by those statements is fearful of departmental discipline in public records act response if I actually use my name, so I'd better not he says, but he says I called UC Davis. That's a good point. I call. I reached the UC Davis phone tree found out the Joshua clover has been removed from the directory. Second call I found that Gina bloom. Head of clovers English department has also been removed from the directory. She's the one that was really head is hesitant to answer any questions from well anybody, but the reporter that broke this story, look, I'm very busy. She said and said, you're you're questioning is flimsy. I'm not going to give you any of my time. We have quotes his own quotes from his own Twitter. He's standing by statements third. Call to the main English department number rang and went on answered with a message that said all calls between nine and twelve and one in three would be answered it was one forty five. It was not answered fourth. Call two main operator pleasant woman answered I advised I wanted to file a complaint against professor clover. She remained pleasant transfer me to another pleasant and helpful woman who transferred me to a third she explained that she was unaware of an act of her open investigation. But that she would research and call me back. She also provided me. The Email to the campus provost. Cetera. Hasn't heard back a thing naturally. Want you to know I work in the bay area, and the view that police should be disbanded for societal benefits is not hard to find at protests city council meetings and police oversight meetings. So he puts up with that we need to dismantle disband the police man, he puts up with that all the time. But he draws the line at calling for my murder as he writes, it was that man thing you did there sort of insinuating some sort of hippie lifestyle. If you can't follow my brilliant characterizations. I'm not going to slow down the show to explain them to good art puts the burden of interpretation on the on the consumer Jack O and this officer of the law. He has asked for and I think he gets credit for suggesting the podcast name for our long-form interviews Armstrong and Getty extra-large. He's the guy who suggested it. Thank you very much. So officer, Al okay credit? He demands ten percent of the bra. He profits. That's funny. Check out a professor that advocates cop killing you take his name off the the the register she gained call him. Sick leave 'em feeling under the weather. He says, and he gets to just not work. So week. I was thinking about the the idea of a sabbatical the other day how great with that. How alarium is that every single person listening who isn't in academia, I gotta get to disappear for six months or a year do other stuff. Recharge your batteries. Then come back to sell insurance. I got a couple of professor friends who'd sabbaticals just in the last couple of years, they loved it. How would you really? Why.

professor murder officer Wiseman Robert Kraft Joshua clover Chicago UC Davis California Florida Twitter university of California Al Nautilus Davis Russia America Gina bloom clovers English department reporter
"uc davis" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

06:35 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Good text about wisdom versus intelligence, the wise man avoids what the intelligent man can get himself out of. Wiseman avoided it in the first place. I get intelligence is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad. Indeed. And the very latest in rub and tug news homeboy Robert Kraft to be arraigned in Florida court next month, and I saw a guy yesterday who got caught up in that sting who wasn't guilty. Finally got exonerated yesterday. Some poor regular working guy somehow got named is one of the people that they had video of going into that massage. Parlor, he's married with kids. He and he is horrified. I saw him yesterday giving the speech about how he had his name ruined in the public and his kids don't look at him in the same way. And all these different things just driving away from the he was he was in Chicago at the time on a business trip. How how his name got in there? He has no idea needed to seem to be anybody else. Excuse me think he overreact anything with it. So get this note from a cop who like us was. Really disturbed by this professor Joshua clover. The university of California Davis who was openly in class. As well. As online advocating the murder of police officers. He would do interviews and he'd say, yes. Some people say police need to be reformed. They need to be killed. He's called for the abolition of all police as well. So he's obviously just not. But he's simplicity teaching is Marxist poetry. I didn't think you'd get advocate murder and keep your job anywhere doing anything. Well, yeah. You can't advocate specific murders of specific people. But roses, read a class of people. None of this is yours. I'm trying to think of some roses are red so's the government parade. And so we've we've joined with various people to put pressure on the university, including a California assemblyman, we talked to earlier, and there are many thousands of electronic signatures now on a on a what do you call it? You know, the list of signatures. Petition petition to get this guy can shoved out and and you should know we we don't we never do that. Don't call jobs that's way, over done the modern world and because you're slightly annoyed. You think somebody should lose their job? If he had said that if he comes out, and I said, no, no, no. You know, I got caught up in the whole, you know, somebody had been shot. I thought the police were wrong. I wait over the line. I shouldn't have said that. I don't think that. Okay. Fine. A forceful and intelligent argument for police need to be held to higher standards, etc. Are fine. But this is mouth off your apologizing. That's that should be the standard for everyone in America. But this is this guy's solid hardcore beliefs, the police should be murdered crazy. So here's what accountabilities like in virtually any government bureaucracy. But certainly a university was a note from a very experienced cop. Who we will refer to as Al-Anon Humous who was going to sign the petition. But then thought, you know, I probably shouldn't for career reasons. And it's truly a sign of our times that the professor can publicly make unconscionable in dangerous statements while being supported by employer and the government, but an officer who is impacted by those statements is fearful of departmental discipline in public records act response if I actually use my name, so I'd better not he says, but he says I called UC Davis. That's a good point. I call. I reached the UC Davis phone tree found out that Joshua clover has been removed from the directory. Second call I found that Gina bloom. Head of clovers English department has also been removed from the directory. She's the one that was really head is hesitant to answer any questions from well anybody, but the reporter that broke this story, look, I'm very busy. She said and said, you're you're questioning is flimsy. I'm not going to give you any my time. We have quotes his own quotes from his own Twitter. He's standing by statements third. Call to the main English department number rang and went on answered with a message that said all calls between nine and twelve and one in three would be answered it was one forty five. It was not answered fourth. Call two main operator pleasant woman answered I advised I wanted to file a complaint against professor clover. She remained pleasant transfer me to another pleasant and helpful woman who transferred me to a third she explained that she was unaware of an act of her open investigation. But that she would research and call me back. She also provided me. The Email the campus provost. Cetera. Hasn't heard back a thing naturally. Want you to know I work in the bay area, and the view that police should be disbanded for suicidal benefits is not hard to find it. Protests city council meetings police oversight meetings. So he puts up with that we need to dismantle disband the policeman. He puts up with that all the time. But he draws the line at calling for my murder as he writes, it was that man thing you did there sort of insinuating some sort of hippie lifestyle. If you can't follow my brilliant characterizations. I'm not going to slow down the show to explain them to good art puts the burden of interpretation on the on the consumer Jack. Oh, and this officer of the law. He has asked for and I think he gets credit for suggesting the podcast name for our long-form interviews Armstrong and Getty extra-large. He's the guy who suggested it. Thank you very much. So officer, Al okay credit? He demands ten percent of the. He profits. That's funny. Check out professor that advocates cop killing you take his name off the the the register she gained call him. Indonesia? Sick leave 'em feeling under the weather is this and he gets the just not work. So week. I was thinking about the the idea of a sabbatical the other day. How great would that? How hilarious is that? Every single person listening who isn't in academia, you just get to disappear for six months or a year do other stuff. Recharge your batteries, then come back to selling insurance. I got a couple of professor friends who did their sabbaticals just in the last couple years, they loved it. How would you? Why?.

professor murder Joshua clover officer Robert Kraft Wiseman Indonesia Chicago UC Davis California Florida Twitter university of California Davis America Gina bloom clovers English department Humous reporter
"uc davis" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:06 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Benson show. Oh, my Lord. I was thinking about this is professor at UC Davis and think about the young generation that is getting indoctrinated in college. Right. And college used to be what the bastion of free speech free ideas, you're supposed to be a little bit more liberal. But you're not supposed to be to the point where you being doctor. You're supposed to be getting introduced to ideas, you go to maybe a business class, and maybe the guys a little bit more conservative, but you're hearing his views or her views, and then you go over to to humanities professors, you go over to your your English professors, and they're going to be a little bit more liberal, right? And you get you're getting the views and you talk them out. Right. You go out you're talking about. Hey, we're talking it out. This is good. We're learning these things, and when you're younger you're supposed to be a little bit more liberal. You're supposed to be a little bit more idealistic. You're supposed to be a little bit more of a person who is coming to your own. And and you're throwing in your ideas. And hey that sounds good man. We can all get together. Love peace dot. It's supposed to be that way. But I want you guys to understand this kind of stuff going on at UC Davis with with a college. Professor who is an absolute clown. Right. Professor clover. Who is advocating and saying, yeah, it's good. Yeah. Kill the cops. Good batch turns good time to shoot him. I mean, and let's get rid of all cops. You know, as if like what happens, then we just I is it the perch, right? Should we just get rid of all laws? I mean, I do I do I get to do that. Is it going to be a siren? And now we get to go out and do whatever we want. And there's no repercussions. I'm curious who do you call when something goes wrong? Where does it end? You know, what about the fire department? We get rid of them next because maybe they couldn't save somebody's house, and it was a person of color house. My God, they couldn't save time. So we've got to get rid of them because as we can tell through the patriarchy and through their sexism and the racism, we've got to get rid of them, and they were friends with the police so for the love of God. But I want you guys to understand where this is headed. I keep talking about this. I don't think people understand a younger generation coming out of college. And a good portion of them are more libertarian, and that's kind of the most conservative you're gonna get. There's a few in there that are conservative. But a lot of more libertarian, right? They're not insane. But there is a large group that has these feelings and somebody like AOC is a perfect example of somebody who is coming out and probably thinks maze. Professors onto something we really realized maybe he got he's gone to Ford. Some of the things he said. But there's a lot of people out there. The by that and those people will eventually be the ones coming in flooding into the workplace world flooding in to politics as you're seeing. And it's going to change a lot of things it really is. It really really is. I know a lot of people out there like a we should get rid of this guy. I'm a free speech guy. I'm all about free speech. But the problem is it's the people who get decide what the free speech is. Or isn't this professor, right? This guy. Who's just tweeted some awful things. It was getting a pass because you see Davis and a lot of other college campuses. They just. Well, he's supposed to be that way. It's okay for him to be controversial. It's okay for him to to push the bounds of stuff. And and you know, but they've got the faculty code, and you read some of the stuff, and I'm reading, and I'm like, well, I don't know if you could you could find a way to get rid of this guy. If that's what you really wanted to do. But we live in a world of fear to do things. Right. Fair to say anything. Fear to say anything because the out the backlash and the outcry. Of what may come? Could be huge. Even if it's the right thing to do. We can't get rid of them because people are going to freak out. People are going to go crazy. I'm afraid of the mob on the internet more than I'm actually afraid of of whether or not I'm doing the right thing. You know? So I'll just let them control I say it over and over if we let the fleet continue to wag the tail that can wag the dog. We're in trouble as a nation. We're in trouble as a nation, our founding fathers, never worried about outside destroying us. Right. We're protected in so many ways just from the natural barrier of people trying to invade us and stuff. They worried about us eating ourselves from within. And that is a fear. That is fear. Other professors have said things controversial and gotten fired for it. Right. But for whatever reason, you know. No, she's she's too. Busy chancellor, I got stuff going on busy and worried about this. You know, we got some things over here. They're supposed to be a decency towards all and a commitment to non-violent exchange in some of these things here that that are the principles of the community and the stuff that they're dealing with. I don't see that. I don't see any of that in these exchanges that this guy has it's ridiculous. Do I want him fired? That's not for me to say. My biggest issue at of all of this. Free speech. If a conservative had said something like this, even a libertarian. They'd be done. Right. If they would have said. I'm glad Trump's building the wall. If they would've won a maga- hat on campus. My god. What would have happened? The the the the insanity of it all. If a business professor on campus would have said look illegal immigration is bad. It drives wages down only a few people benefit from it. It's part of crony capitalism and the pressure. It puts on local communities is a negative thing. Xena Phob racist. Sorry. You can't say that. That's my biggest issue scumbag. He is what he is. He lives in academia, not in the real world. Most of these people do. The big issue. Besides that though is the people that they're funneling out a lot of these schools are pissed and angry as well. And have been told for years that. Hey. The world's bad, and you're going to change it, America's bad. You're going to change it America's evil, you're going to change it patriarchy. There racism everywhere, you're going to change it America's bad everything about America the way it was built everything about America's bad, bad bad. And you guys are going to change it. And that's what's coming out. It's something to think about kids it is. It really really is something to think about and my frustration as I've talked to a lot of people because I people yesterday tweeting and texting about this saying things like, well, maybe we should legislate. This is hate speech. We should legislative no legislate speech. I don't first of all if you do something like that. That means somebody gets to say Yay. Or nay on the speech side of things. Right. They get there gets to be the speech police who gets to be the speech police who's the one who gets to be the speech police who's the one who gets to do that..

professor UC Davis America Benson Davis AOC chancellor Trump Ford
"uc davis" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"You're supposed to be getting introduced to ideas, you go to a business class, and maybe the guys a little bit more conservative, but you hearing his views or her views, and then you go over to to humanities professors, you go over to your your English professors, and they're going to be a little bit more liberal, right? And you get you're getting the views and you talk out, right? You'd go out. You're talking about. Hey, we're talking it out. This is good. We're learning these things when you're younger you're supposed to be a little bit more liberal. You're supposed to be a little bit more idealistic. You're supposed to be a little bit more of a person who is coming to your own. And and you're throwing in your ideas. And hey that sounds good man. We can all get together. Love peace dot it's supposed to be that way. But I want you guys to understand this kind of stuff going on at UC Davis with with a college. Professor who is an absolute clown. Right. Professor clover. Who was advocating and saying, yeah, it's good. Yeah. Kill the cops. Good bags turns good time to shoot him. I mean, and let's get rid of all cops. You know, as if like what happens then we just is the purge. Right. Should we just get rid of all laws? I mean, I do I do I do that isn't going to be a siren, and we get to go out and do whatever we want. And there's no repercussions. I'm curious who do you call when something goes wrong? Where does it end? You know, what about the fire department? We get rid of them next because maybe they couldn't save somebody's house, and it was a person of color house. My God, they couldn't save at a time. So we've got to get rid of them because as we can tell through the patriarchy and through their sexism and the racism, we've got to get rid of them, and they were friends with the police cell for the love of God. But I want you guys understand where this is headed. I keep talking about this. I don't think people understand a younger generation coming out of college. And a good portion of them are more libertarian, and that's kind of the most conservative you're gonna get. There's a few in there that are conservative. But a lot of them were libertarian, right? They're not insane. But there is a large group that has these feelings and somebody like is a perfect example of somebody who is coming out and probably thinks as professors onto something we really we realize maybe he got he's gone to Ford. Some of the things he said. But there's a lot of people out there. The by that and those people will eventually be the ones coming in flooding into the workplace world flooding in to politics as you're seeing. And it's going to change a lot of things it really is. It really really is. I know a lot of people out there like a we should get rid of this guy. I'm a free speech guy. I'm all about free speech. But the problem is it's the people who decide what the free speech is. Or isn't this.

Professor UC Davis Ford
"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"And also fifty eight here in Sacramento, it's five oh three now at NewsRadio K F B K. And as the government shutdown continues to play out the nation's large and mid sized city. Mayors are gathered in Washington DC, while the national government remains in partial shutdown is congress and the president fight over a border wall. Mayors like Sacramento's Darrell Steinberg are quick to contrast local government with Washington in this age of federal government dysfunction. It's really up to the governors and the mayors also attending the conferences, well, Sacramento, mayor Cristobal dn who notes that the dysfunction in Washington could have voters looking beyond the nation's capital for new leadership for the first time in the history of the country. There are several mayors and several former mayors are serious contenders for the top office in the country. It just reflects the sense that mayors get things done. Mayors are discussing national problems with local impacts such as climate change jobs in the opioid crisis. George Sampson NewsRadio KPFK UC Davis is looking to fix its emergency alert system after a massive failure. On the night. Davis police officer Natalie corona was killed the warned me Aggie alert system fell. Well, short of expectations roughly two thirds of the seventy thousand students staff and residents who were supposed to get the alerts did not actually get them UC. Davis officials say the issue has been identified and corrected. The plaster county sheriff's department says they're wounded canine heroes is on the men that the sheriff tweeted that air handler says the dog's pain is under control as he continues to rest and recover from January fifteenth shooting the canine was thrust in the middle of a freeway gun battle in Roseville that ended in the death of a Montana, man. The ninety three year old Penrhyn woman also died during that suspects random shooting spree Aeros underwent immediate surgery for a gunshot wound to his hip flank area. A man died Wednesday night in north Sacramento ended appears carbon monoxide poisoning behind it. The man was discovered in an apartment were levels of the silent killer were forty times. What is considered safe a PG, and he worker was at the apartment complex online passes avenue on an unrelated call when he noticed one gas meter spinning faster than the others. The worker saw an unresponsive man inside that apartment and called nine one one police went in and discovered the man was dead and carbon monoxide levels were high over four hundred parts per million, which is a hazardous level. And if you're exposed to. That for a certain amount of time. It can cause serious injury. Indoor captain Keith Wade with Safire says anything about twenty five PPM is cause for concern. Unfortunately, the best kind of protection against this kind of death was not in play in this case, I can tell you. There was a carbon monoxide detector in this person's unit. It was on the wall. But there was no battery installed today. The coroner identified the victim is sixty one year old angel barrios till as John Brennan, NewsRadio K F B K. It is national drug and alcohol facts week, Dr Jack Stein at the National Institute on drug abuse explains. What the efforts all about a week long health observance connecting teams with our scientists and experts all over the country to literally shatter the myth around drug abuse and be able to make some informed decisions. Dr Stein's as drug and alcohol use among young people is down in all categories, except for vaping where it's way up. He says drugs and alcohol can hurt brain development. Doctor Stein adds that simply spending time with your kids can be a big deterrent to drug abuse. All right. Let's get a check of traffic. Trouble spot. Now. With Ray stone today, I five southbound no.

Sacramento Dr Jack Stein UC Davis Washington government Darrell Steinberg Cristobal dn congress George Sampson president Aeros Penrhyn Natalie corona Ray stone plaster county Keith Wade officer
"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"uc davis" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Department is at the UC Davis medical center in critical condition after she was shot in the downtown area. Shots were fired at around seven o'clock this evening while police were looking into a three vehicle crash at fifth and d streets. The manhunt continues for a white man who police describe as in his twenties an average build wearing a baseball cap black jacket, bluer tan, jeans and black tactical boots a shelter in place. Order was issued and officials are blocking traffic at the Richards exit from eighty residents are being asked to avoid the downtown Davis area. If you have any related information, you are asked to call nine one one the brother of slain Newman police corporal renewal seeing spoke at a round table discussion during President Trump's border. Visit in Texas Reggie seeing sitting next to President Trump detailed his brother's journey to become a US citizen and finally accomplishing his dream of becoming a police officer Gustavo Perez. Who was in the country illegally was arrested in connection with renewal shooting death, corporal things brother went on to say his family supports any actions that will prevent what happened to renew and prevent any family from dealing with the same tragedy. Jordan Christmas, NewsRadio k s became now. Traffic. We go to Davis were that Sigler remains in place on the eastbound and westbound off-ramps at Richards boulevard, their close indefinitely due to police activity. In addition, the offramp olive drive is also shut down indefinitely and watch out Lincoln, a dense fog advisory on both northbound and southbound sixty five at Ferrari ranch road, it's fog in poor visibility. Hampering your drive. Your next report at ten I'm Steve Harare, NewsRadio camp K..

UC Davis medical center Trump President Davis Richards baseball NewsRadio Steve Harare Gustavo Perez Jordan Christmas Ferrari ranch Newman US Lincoln Texas Sigler officer