35 Burst results for "Uc Berkeley"

"uc berkeley" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:45 min | 2 weeks ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on WTOP

"News. The Maryland General Assembly is back at work concerned over how students are doing academically, a major part of their agenda. In terms of education, I think, number one issue is going to have to deal with learning loss from post pandemic. Marilyn Senate president Bill Ferguson says there are a number of strategies to deal with fallout from the pandemic in the state's blueprint for Maryland's future, the state education reform plan. What matters most is academic achievement. We know that the pandemic had a hugely negative impact on that and we have to find a way to catch back up. He's putting another idea out there. I'll be putting forward a bill that is a statewide grant competition for all schools to participate in to apply to do extended day or extended years and have some pilot demonstration projects of what schools can look like with a different schedule. Kate Ryan, WTO P news. Politico tonight reporting The Pentagon might provide back paid a former service members who were discharged because they refused to get the COVID vaccine, that mandate has since been repealed the Defense Department formally rescinding the mandate on Tuesday lawmakers directing The Pentagon to do so in the annual defense policy bill that passed in the December, providing back pay would be a win for Republicans who rallied against the vaccine mandate. Prince Harry is saying he had enough material for two memoirs telling the British newspaper the telegraph today that he held back on a second book saying he didn't think his father and brother would ever forgive him. Harry also revealed that he worries about Prince William's children saying, he felt a responsibility knowing that at least one of them would end up like him, the spare, prince Harry's candid autobiography spare, selling 1.4 million copies on its first day that was published this week. The man named as the most durable DJ has died at the age of 98. Here we go with song by cliff ball. Great Cordero spent 6 decades on Hong Kong radio, interviewing everyone, including The Beatles, the fab four spoke with him in 1964 after he had taken a study course in London with the BBC and John Lennon talked about the group's early days in Germany when they played in clubs before becoming a public broadcaster Cordero worked as a bank clerk and prison Gordon. His all the way with ratio featuring easy listening music was on the radio for 51 years until his retirement. Says even after he stepped down, his audience listened to him on the Internet. Was 98 years old. Allison keyes, CBS News. A human skeleton discovered Tuesday in an unused building on the Cal Berkeley campus. It's unclear how long the remains had been there, they were found in a shuttered building on the Clark Kerr campus that is a residential hall complex, and event space about a mile from the main campus, university police say that there is no authentic cases of missing persons from the Berkeley campus community, the building has not been occupied. They say, for years

Marilyn Senate president Bill Kate Ryan Maryland General Assembly COVID Prince Harry Pentagon Politico cliff ball Great Cordero Defense Department WTO Maryland Prince William Harry Allison keyes Cordero The Beatles John Lennon Hong Kong Cal Berkeley campus
"uc berkeley" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:44 min | 2 weeks ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on WTOP

"Asking for the guns to go down. We gotta put them down. Surrounded by religious leaders and community leaders, D.C. council member Janice Lewis George said she's fed up with what's been happening lately. She says kids can't even walk safely to and from school. It is incredibly disappointing. Specifically, she referred to the fact that in the last two weeks, three kids, 6 8 and 9 years old, have been hit by stray gunfire. Killing and shooting in our neighborhoods is unacceptable, especially when our babies are getting shot. In the district Nick island, Ellie doubled news. We'll ask people what you might find buried in the muck at the bottom of New York City's east river and they'd likely say mob boss before thinking, mammoth bones, but several groups of treasure hunters have taken to the waterway in recent weeks after hearing a guest on comedian Joe Rogan's podcast claim a boxcars worth of potentially valuable prehistoric mammoth bones was dumped into the river back in the 40s. Despite no evidence, treasure seekers using boats diving apparatus and technology like remote operated cameras have gone searching in hopes the murky waters are hiding yep, some woolly mammoth tusks. A human skeleton is discovered in an unused building on a University of California Berkeley campus, officials say it's unclear how many years it remains were in that shuttered building on Clark campus, which is a residential hall campus and events space. It's about a mile away from the main campus. The Alameda county coroner will determine the cause of death. The university is about ten miles from downtown San Francisco. Coming up on WTO P, a hate crime, and Indiana University student, targeting an Indiana University student riding a boss, it's four 43. Football fans call your own plays

D.C. council Janice Lewis George district Nick island east river Joe Rogan Ellie University of California Berke New York City Clark campus Alameda county Indiana University WTO San Francisco Football
"uc berkeley" Discussed on a16z

a16z

05:32 min | Last month

"uc berkeley" Discussed on a16z

"All right, let's start by introducing Peter, cofounder and CEO of charm industrial. You might also recognize him as the founder of several other companies, including segment, which was acquired by Twilio for $3.2 billion. I started by asking Peter why of all the spaces he could operate in, he's now chosen carbon removal. It's segment in 2015. I was trying to figure out how we should offset our emissions and was working with some folks on the team to figure out what our emissions were and what was available to offset those emissions and how we could reduce them. And we implemented a lot of the reductions first. Swapping out beef for chicken and lunches and trying to encourage a commuting by training bus and so on. But ultimately, we had some emissions from flying salespeople around and so on that we couldn't get rid of. And so we went out and we bought some offsets of Indonesian rainforest and Brazilian rainforests like the stuff that was available. And we did that in a year later, I was like, wait a second. What happened when we made these purchases? And the deeper that I dug into what was going on there, I was like, oh, no, this is bad. I'm not convinced that anything could happen here. I'm not convinced that any carbon impact happened at all. And so as we continue to dig in there, I became pretty convinced that just a good product didn't exist for carbon offsets and carbon removals. I think that's been borne out. Over the last few years in research that's come out of UC Berkeley and carbon trading project and others where basically like 90% plus of the offsets that are out there are garbage. They really don't have any carbon impact. They do other wonderful things for ecosystems and humans who live in other places, but in terms of carbon impact pretty minimal. So in 2000 17 that it inspired me to spend Saturdays and working with some friends trying to figure out if there was a carbon removal pathway would be higher quality and unprofitable and then in 2018 we started charm focused on doing that. Now, the idea that carbon offsets can vary in efficacy is not new.

charm industrial Twilio Peter UC Berkeley
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:46 min | 2 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Up on KCB. I'm Alice wertz at UC Berkeley, art history and science intercept for a long-term project. Speaking of UC and also Stanford, it's Saturday college football 125th big game between those two schools set for two 30 this afternoon further south USC will take on UCLA at 5 p.m. hockey, the San Jose sharks face the New York rangers at 7 30. Here's Steven Langford with more sports. Baseball's most coveted free agent Aaron judge will be making a life-changing amount of money to off season, and he will do so with an MVP award to his name. Judge received all but two first place votes to become the American League MVP earlier this week. This after a historic season that was highlighted by his 62 home runs, shattering the American League record set by Yankees legend Roger Maris in 1961. This will be the first off season in which judge is a free agent with multiple teams, including the Giants, clamoring to sign the 30 year old. After the announcement, judge was asked how he's enjoying free agency so far. Yeah, so far so good. So far so good. It's a different, it's a different process, but hoping to get the job done here soon and we'll see what happens. Audio courtesy of MLB network Yankees general manager Brian cashman was asked about judge at a charity event and says that they have already made him a new offer and have been in constant communication since the end of the season. Now judge technically has all off season to make his decision, but players typically sign with teams after Major League Baseball's winter meetings, which start in December. At the sports desk, Steven Langford K CBS, the sports line sponsored by the Jim ursa collection at the Bill Graham civic auditorium on December 10th. Mornings were made for better things than rheumatoid arthritis or

Alice wertz UC Berkeley Steven Langford American League San Jose sharks MLB New York rangers UC Stanford UCLA USC Yankees Roger Maris hockey Aaron football Giants Brian cashman Jim ursa Major League
"uc berkeley" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

07:54 min | 3 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on People of the Pod

"And, you know, I went to law students for justice in Palestine events last year. So that a, I know what they're saying and know what I might be up against. B, maybe there's actually some common ground, which would be great if we can find common ground maybe they agree with me on something that I didn't know about and we can run from there. And see, like, quite frankly, what a great way to sharpen my tools. I can't possibly prepare to advocate for something I care about if I have no idea what other people are saying. Ethan, I want to turn that to you. I mean, how are you seeing issues of, of course, balancing free speech. But having whether it be social implications, whatever it is, limiting students ability to be proudly Jewish or proudly support Israel. How are you seeing that manifest within your work? Yeah, I mean, I think Charlotte nailed a lot of it. The fact is, we're living in an age where a whole slew of actors across the political spectrum and also in our own Jewish community in different perspectives have a very hard time with robust debate about issues that are dear to them. And the impetus for the creation of that task force was the feeling among certain of our Jewish colleagues pretty far to the left that certain conversations about antisemitism on campus more from the right were making them feel they could not be critical of Israel without being called anti semitic. And I know Palestinian voices are very upset about some of those efforts to shut down conversation. I think justifiably so. So of course it is really the height of irony and misfortune to then see the same tactic deployed by a pro Palestinian organization to say we can't harbor any kind of real conversation either. I think it's important to note, I mean, we all have, I think, some sympathy for the fact that organizations want to create so called safe spaces for those in solidarity with their causes. But these bylaws are not bylaws that say unless you support the right of the Palestinians to a state who won't be allowed to speak or unless you recognize the Palestinians are a people who won't be allowed to speak. Those, I think, whilst they would be controversial with some people, most Jewish students would not be offended by those. And I think we would all understand those more as really a matter of sort of visceral sense of safety for Palestinian students. This is so much more sweeping than that. And it really is to just silence the vast majority of Jewish students effectively and to silence any kind of live debate on these issues. And one of the things that I'm concerned about and I hear Charlotte's concern. And then many of us are concerned about is that we will become so kind of siphoned off from each other in our own echo chambers. And that doesn't help anyone's fault. I know that there are immense challenges, but they're also both of you highlighted these in the articles. You wrote, there's a lot of opportunity and a lot of positivity happening on campus. So I want to turn to both of you, Charlotte, you are about a lawyer. So you see both sides of the coin and Ethan given your professional pervy. You have a long lens of Jewish history. You have seen the many ups and downs of our people. So I want to pose to both of you. What makes you hopeful about the Jewish student experience at Berkeley today and more broadly about Jewish life today? Maybe Ethan will start with you. Well, very honestly, I think one of the things that makes me hopeful and what young Jews today in many cases are doing to pursue challenging and complex conversations on these and a host of others. We can always find examples of shrill voices and people who don't want to listen to each other. But there are a lot of examples that I think are quite inspiring. I very much appreciate the article that Charlotte and other law students wrote in The Daily Beast. And the clarity with which they have repeatedly said, we're not against ends. We're not against the notion of the rights of Palestinians. What we really want is the opportunity to be engaged in conversation and to feel that we as Jews are identities are able to have a space there also for their full expression. And I think there are a lot of people across the country, particularly young people who are doing this kind of work to try to push back on multiple extremes. The way that the bylaws have played out on our campus has, for people who don't really know much about the topic, made it look really, really bad to be a zionist. And I think that's really scary. And a lot of students don't want to engage with that. And identify themselves as somebody who supports Israel, but a lot of students have. And undergraduates, other graduate students, graduate students at the law school, have come out in a really respectful and I guess proud way to engage in this and I was feeling bad for myself before young Kapoor are like, oh, you know, I'm spending so much time on this. I'm not having as much time to work on school. This is such a bummer. And you know, I did some reflecting on the holiday, which I suppose is what it's for. And I was like, you know what? What a great group of Jewish students that I have the privilege of working with and great Jewish professors. And a fantastic Jewish dean and rabbi Adam at hoel has been phenomenal. And I just, I feel really lucky and encouraged to be surrounded by and working with really great people who share a common goal to just be good and make the world a better place. And so that's been really nice. And then, you know, in terms of Jewish life more broadly, I somehow got swept into the Jewish graduate student initiative last year and did like a 6 week Jewish learning ethical learning class online and it was amazing. And I just was so blown away by how many young Jewish people there were who wanted to engage with the text and debate about what we're supposed to be taking away from these and how I can apply them to our lives. I am learning about an aspect of Judaism that is so rich and meaningful and I do think is making me a better person and that feels really good and I think it's doing the same for other young Jewish people and that gives me hope about the future. Thank you both for making time to share your wisdom with our audiences for the activism and the leadership you're showcasing at Berkeley and we wish you the best for the rest of the semester. Thank you. Thank you. If you missed last week's episode, be sure to listen to my conversation with Holly Hough nagle, AJC's U.S. director for combating anti semitism. She helps unpack the origins of Kanye West's conspiracy theories and stereotypes and why the rappers hateful words matter to all of us. Thank you for listening. This episode is brought to you by AJC, our producer is atara lacritz, our sound engineer is TK Broderick. You can subscribe to people of the pod on Apple podcasts, Spotify, or Google podcasts, or learn more at AJC dot org slash people of the pod. The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC. We'd love to hear your views and opinions or your questions. You can reach us at people of the pod at AJC dot org. If you've enjoyed this episode, please be sure to tell your Friends, tag us on social media with hashtag people of the pod and hop on to Apple podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us. Tune in next week for another episode of people of the pod.

Charlotte Ethan Israel Palestine rabbi Adam Berkeley hoel The Daily Beast Kapoor Holly Hough nagle dean atara lacritz TK Broderick AJC Kanye West U.S. Apple Google
"uc berkeley" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

08:12 min | 3 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on People of the Pod

"So Charlotte, I want to focus in more and that you mentioned that heartbreak and I think sadly that is something that certainly in different scenarios and other campuses, there have been instances where Jewish students who feel that exclusionary, I guess, kind of heartbreak. I want to focus in on kind of the timeline that Ethan painted of this initially kind of being adopted months ago. And then having greater coverage brought in recent weeks. So as a student as a member of the Jewish law student association, at Berkeley, what did students feel? What are they feeling now? Or did they even know about it? Initially, months ago, when this was passed, and you kind of talk about those two stages. Yeah, so I will say that it was initially really challenging for the Jewish student association because we work in continue to work really, really hard to be an organization that is welcoming of all Jewish students regardless of their perspectives on this issue. We issued the board of the Jewish student organization, published a letter, we first sent it to our members, and then to the organizations, to all the student organizations who were invited to add the bio law to their constitutions, basically saying, look, this hurts Jewish students because it forces them to choose between either denying a part of who they are or to be part of an organization or to exclude themselves and we're not asking our members to do that. And we hope that you guys also don't ask your members to do that. After that, the Jewish student organization kind of stepped back, mostly because we don't want to be an organization about Israel and that's not our purpose, our purpose is to be there for all Jewish students. So that organization stopped engaging in this issue. As individuals, there are four of us who still were very concerned about what happened and we're continuing to work behind the scenes on how to best address this because it's a really challenging issue. And we wanted to make sure three out of four of us are board members. How are we going to do this in a way that doesn't make it look like our organization is taking a stance. That was a really big concern to the two other board members who don't want our organization to take a stand. Switch none of us do. But the optics of that were very challenging. So we are navigating that. Do we start a new organization? Are we trying to write a letter? Are we directly reaching out to these students? How do we do that? The dean has been super supportive and offered to help us. But what can he actually do? Like, what do we want him to do? These were really hard questions. And so even before the article came out, the four of us were thinking about these things and meeting and talking and we went to the Palestine one O one event. That was put on and we had students coming up to us. At Jewish events, not a Jewish events saying that they were individually concerned about what had happened. And this was even before the article came out. So yes, it drew public attention, but I do think that students were still quite concerned about what was going on. It just wasn't, you know, vocalized. So I want to get to some of those responses once that article came out and there was greater coverage. So Ethan, you wrote a piece that has been widely shared that in a very eloquent way express your frustrations. With how some of these incidents were being portrayed in the broader media. What led you to pen that piece? In the most basic sense, I think the claims May as a headline of that article were false. I share the deepest concerns about what's happened at the law school. And we're doing a lot of we're trying to do more. And Charlotte, as you know, we're having a meeting this afternoon. And there have been a lot of meetings. And so there's no question that what's happened needs to be addressed. In the most effective way possible. We're not on a campus where the administration or large numbers of students are trying to ban cues from large portions of the campus, which I believe was the implication of such a headline. And so we wanted both to express the fact that we were really disgusted by these bylaws and that they are unquestionably nakedly discriminatory and many of us believe anti submitted. But to say that this kind of coverage, it paints a false picture of the campus and that it's fundamentally unhelpful there, right? We started the antisemitism education initiative that I helped to run three years ago. We put on a lot of programs on campus. We do trainings. We respond to incidents. We created a training module of training video. A lot of other campuses draw on the resources that we've created. And we do that to support students, and we do that based on conditions on the ground. If people from outside want to support your students here, that's fantastic. But part of what we're trying to say is we have this program already in systems. We have this Israel studies program. And we have Jewish studies. We have really strong community organizations. Come talk to us and say, how can you best support our efforts rather than effectively throwing a grenade from one side? And I have to say, I mean, you know, what happened most recently last week on campus, which I think many people have heard about by now, was a truck going around the campus with a hologram on it of Adolf Hitler saying something like, you know, if you believe that Jews should be banned from Berkeley race, you're right hand. This was done by an organization that claimed to be looking out for Jewish students and to be very concerned. And just like that initial article raised a lot of alarm among Jewish students both off campus and on campus, this of course scared many Jews on campus and I know that it wasn't the intention of the articles that have been written. But by now 5 articles have been written continuing to claim their church free zones accordingly without those articles, those trucks would never have been circling our campus. So we remain alarmed by the effect of this. And we don't think it's actually helping us respond the most effectively to what's taken it. So along with the response on campus, there is kind of an inherent issue or I would say challenge that is always trying to be examined in situations like this. You had mentioned Charlotte earlier dean turmeric, who himself wrote a piece in The Daily Beast. And in it, he acknowledges this tension. He talks about the need to honor free speech, which takes, I think, renewed importance at a law school, honor free speech, but also acknowledge that some of these tactics, including those of banning students who identify as zionists, are indeed at odds with free speech and can fracture student discourse. So these are tough questions, but my question and maybe Charlotte will start with you and then Ethan, I'd love your perspective. Do you see this manifesting at Berkeley beyond just this incident? And have you seen these trends in academia more broadly? I do think free speech is an issue. When I was a student at brandeis, I was the undergraduate representative on a university task force for free expression and the purpose of the task force was to create a set of policies or principles that the university would abide by to ensure that every student felt like they could have their voices heard and share their perspectives and I'm a firm believer that more speech is how we get to the right answers and if people have really extreme opinions on the left, the right, up, down, and aren't sharing those, then they can never be addressed. And I mean, I think that this is a perfect example of that, that only one narrative is being heard, hopefully from this and I think it's sad that what I am Adam Billy and Noah are trying to do is being portrayed as silencing Palestinian voices because what we're trying to do is quite the opposite

Jewish law student association Jewish student association Jewish student organization Ethan Charlotte Berkeley Israel Palestine dean turmeric Adolf Hitler The Daily Beast university task force for free brandeis academia Adam Billy Noah
"uc berkeley" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

07:20 min | 3 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on People of the Pod

"At the start of this academic year, members of law students for justice in Palestine at the University of California's Berkeley campus persuaded 9 student groups to adopt a bylaw banning speakers and members that support Zionism. 35 Jewish organizations, including AJC, wrote an open letter to the university, pointing out the discrimination and demanding action. When Jewish student leaders expressed their gratitude to AJC this week, CEO Ted deutch assured them that AJC's efforts would not end there. For this week's episode, we invited two Jewish activists from the Berkeley campus to discuss what the exclusionary policy means for Jewish students and faculty at Berkeley. They sat down with my occasional co host, meggie, fredman, AJC's director of the Alexander young leadership department, negi, the Mike is yours. Joining me today on people of the pod, doctor Ethan Katz associate Professor of history and Jewish studies at UC Berkeley. And Charlotte Aaron, who is a second year law student at UC Berkeley. Ethan and Charlotte, thank you for joining me. Thanks for having us. Thank you. In the last few weeks, there has been significant coverage about events at UC Berkeley law school in particularly about what appears to be exclusionary anti Israel adoptions made by a handful of student groups. So for our listeners who may not have the full story, Ethan, can you paint a brief picture for us of what has unfolded? In August, I believe it was actually maybe on the first day of classes. There was a decision by several student clubs, 8, I believe, at least Berkeley law, to adopt a set of bylaws that have been proposed to them by students for justice and Palestine at the law school, the law school. Now that was a proposal made to dozens of clubs at Berkeley law. So it was a relatively small number who adopted these biologicals, but the bylaws were very discriminatory in that they said these cults would not invite any speaker who had expressed continued to express support for Zionism or what the violence referred to as the apartheid regime in Israel or the occupation Palestine, what they clearly mean by that last clause is not what many observers refer to as the occupation of the West Bank. It is just the presence of Israeli sovereignty in portions of the historical land of Israel analysis. So these were met with tremendous concern by not only many Jewish law students, but many others of us who are involved in efforts on campus to support your students. I co run anything. Sandwiches and education program at Berkeley Berkeley law has a very large Israel studies program. And the dean of Berkeley law came out very strongly to say that he found these to be very problematic to be against the principles of community of the university to say that every club has the right to free speech, but that he becomes very concerned with students are excluded. And he said, I thought, forcefully, that himself, if these bylaws were to be followed to the letter, would not be able to speak at these clubs as someone who himself is zionist. He also reminded close of the fact that the Chancellor of the university has come out in writing multiple times against the BDS movement. We were sort of kind of waiting to see what was going to happen next in terms of what was going to be the full impact of these, and also what was going to hopefully be the impact of the dean's response in curbing this or maybe making some groups reconsider. We did not hear a lot more about this controversy after the initial week or so that it came out until an editorial published in the Jewish journal of LA, almost exactly three weeks ago, claiming in its headline. And in this content that Berkeley was developing so called Jewish freed. So this quickly ignited a firestorm in the media, a major controversy, and it brought the issue much more into focus, not only on campus but off. That had various impacts on campus. One of them was that we felt the need to try to explain what had happened. What we already have in place, which is considerable to try to support your students. And raise awareness about these sanitation. And also to try to better understand where things stood for the Jewish students and figure out ways that we had not sufficiently met their needs. I also think it's important to note that many Jewish undergraduate students who had been unaware or vaguely aware of the initial bylaws became very nervous and concerned in ways that they had not been before about Jewish life on campus. So the impact of the article was also to create a great deal more anxiety and fear. And when many students on campus despite the fact that Jewish life on campus generally speaking, I think is very robust and in many ways thriving in terms of the success of pillow and student kebab and the number of student clubs and studies in Israel studies. So that's sort of a rough timeline. Sorry, anything to add there. I think I'll just add the way I felt when I found out what had happened. It was I arrived at the library Monday morning, first day of school and sat down and 5 minutes into reading for class. I got a text message from my friend screenshotting. The fact that the women of Berkeley law organization had passed this by law. And I think it was a mix of heartbreaking and frustrating. I was heartbroken because I spoke to a lot of people on these boards after this happened and they acknowledged that they themselves didn't really know much about this issue and wanted to be supportive to their Palestinian classmates, which is incredibly important. And I so support that, but it was heartbreaking to me that we're at a place where people think that this is how you do that, which is just an indication of a lot of misinformation. And for the last decade, almost I've been worried about social media and it's especially ramped up in the last 5 years and how information is spread and shared. And I think particularly with this issue, there's a lot of misinformation and this was like a clear demonstration of that and the impact of that, that law students who theoretically are pretty informed of what's going on in the world and what issues are complex and which ones are not and how to handle those types of issues weren't even able to take a moment and recognize like, oh, maybe we should do a little bit of research or engage in this issue before we take such an extreme stance, which is what that bio law was. So I think that that was heartbreaking. And I was frustrated because the Jewish students weren't contacted about this. I would have hoped that they would have reached out or somebody would have reached out or I would have heard about it. And I didn't, and a lot of my Jewish friends didn't. And I think that was really frustrating that we weren't being included in this conversation, and it could have been a really great opportunity to engage before creating harm, and that didn't happen. But hopefully it's a learning experience

UC Berkeley AJC Berkeley Palestine Israel Berkeley campus Ted deutch fredman Alexander young leadership dep negi Ethan Katz Charlotte Aaron UC Berkeley law school Ethan Berkeley Berkeley law meggie BDS movement Jewish journal of LA University of California
"uc berkeley" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:04 min | 4 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Weston from Bloomberg radio. Our very special contributor Larry summers of Harvard has stayed with us because we're going to bring in now Professor of economics from UC Berkeley. He's Brad to long. The author of a new book slouching toward utopia, an economic history of the 20th century. So professor, welcome for joining us. It's really good to have you here. I've read this fascinating and really sort of protein book. It's really quite a book. Let's set it up first because it's a history of the 20th century, but you don't necessarily define the 20th century as from 1900 to 2000. You start an 1870 unit, end up in 2010. Why? Well, the big thing that happens happens in 1870. Before 1870, the world's poor, and there's no prospect for the world being anything other than poor. After 1870, every single generation humanity's technical competence doubles. And then doubles again in the following generation. And such an enormous pace of technological advance raises the possibility for the first time of a world in which we can bake a sufficiently large economic pie for everyone to have enough. And that was nothing that humanity had ever seen before. One of the remarkable things Brad that you highlight is that it really wasn't very different to live in the United Kingdom in the 19th century than it had been to live in the ancient world 2000 years before. Say something about that acceleration of growth that you see is happening in the 20th century. You know, I mean, it was British economist John Stuart mill, right? He was writing in 1871 about how all the industrial revolution had done was it had created a somewhat larger middle class and it had allowed manufacturers and the rich to earn greater fortunes, but that the overwhelming mass of humanity was still confined to the same life of drudgery and imprisonment. Then they had been before that they had been in before. And before all the way back into deep time. It was very clear by 1900 that things had changed. John Maynard Keynes writing in 1919 looks back and says starting in 1870, we entered economic El Dorado. And that now our chief task after World War I was figuring out why we tried to blow it up and try to get desperately back to what was good was going on after 1870. Fortunately, we eventually did, and so things rolled through up until our day. First of all, gives a sense of what happened in 1870 that brought all this about. There were some three driving forces in your book. Well, you know, everyone has an idea about just what it is that's made us as a civilization so wealthy that makes our economy so productive. And the different people have different things and they all go back. Some of them back even to say the year ten 70 when it turns out that the law applies to a German emperor standing in the snow outside of the castle that a law is and his tool, but instead it could be that the law provides to everybody. But you get three things that fall into place in 1870 that set technological progress into a much higher gear than ever before. And they are the industrial research lab so that you can rationalize and routinized the discovery and development of technology. And then the corporation, as we know it. Which rationalizes the development and deployment of technology, you know, in combine that with the globalized economy with the telegraph and the I railroad in the iron hold ocean going steamship. And all of a sudden, the incentives to deploy technology worldwide for production are so overwhelming and people turn their minds to how to do this, that everything explodes in a way it never had before. Brad, much of the academic discussion

Bloomberg radio UC Berkeley Brad Larry summers Weston Harvard John Stuart John Maynard Keynes United Kingdom El Dorado
The 'Phallic Phobia' Argument

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 4 months ago

The 'Phallic Phobia' Argument

"Go to cuts. One 29, PhD from UC Berkeley. Laurel Westbrook talking about trans sports. Again, I'm picking on Berkeley just as an example, but I want to be very clear, University of Texas, Austin, university of Florida, university of North Carolina, Indiana University. They all have elements identical to this. It just so happens Berkeley is a little bit more brazen with this. It's an epicenter, but they're a little bit more cavalier. Andrew says a little. Yes, a little. Play cut one 29. This belief in the innate superiority and threat of male bodies account for why cisgender opposition to transgender inclusion, organizes predominantly around the presence of transgender women and not transgender men. This suggests that gender panics around transgender people might more accurately be termed penis panics as they are fueled by the terror of penises, particularly penises where they should not be. Because where they are in women's restrooms or locker rooms or sports teams is then dangerous to cisgender women and girls. I remember the first time I heard this argument, the first time I heard this argument, they said it a little differently. They said you have phallic phobia. I said, what? I mean, look, this last person doctor Laurel Westbrook. She should not be teaching a class. This is a very sick person. I mean that. She's a professor. And she says that this comes from phallic phobia, or it's because there are penises in places that they shouldn't be.

Laurel Westbrook Uc Berkeley Austin, University Of Florida Berkeley University Of North Carolina University Of Texas Indiana University Andrew Phobia
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:17 min | 4 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Peter, from Berkeley, California, Charlie, have you seen the latest news out of Berkeley when I thought it couldn't get more insane here it is. I make Christian conservative and I have to exist in the shadows here. Please shine a light on the treachery and the demonic activity, strong wording in Berkeley, California. So not exactly sure which part of this he's talking about. I would imagine though he's talking about the anti white racism that exists at UC Berkeley. When I'm talking to people that I call normies, we use that term sometimes normie as a term to describe someone who is not exactly enlightened on all these topics. I will commonly and frequently cite black only spaces on college campuses. So for example, if I'm talking to somebody and they say, oh, yeah, come on. America is not really going in a direction that is troubling. We've been through this stuff before. Now, mind you, I get this sentiment far less than I used to. I mainly get it from people over the age of 50, not all people, but just mainly. And they're usually well to do their well off. They're well established. They're economically anchored. And they'll kind of challenge me and not in a disrespectful way. It's sometimes at a donor event or I'm speaking at some other person's event. We do a lot of speaking, and they'll say, come on, Charlie, don't you think you exaggerate some things? Don't you think, you know, getting into hyperbole, America's not going in the wrong direction as badly as you say it is. Maybe we have to cut taxes and do some things, but come on, Charlie, America is always exempt from pain and suffering is basically the essence of their argument. I get it a lot. I get it less, especially in the last year and a half, but I get it a lot. And the example that I usually use to counter the normies, if you will, is talking about black only dormitories. Spaces that exist on college campuses where whites are not allowed. In one 42, Tucker starts off and he starts articulating this, that at University of California Berkeley, there's a housing co op where only people of color are allowed, and it's banning whites from common areas unless they have consent from the tenants, white people are not allowed in our spaces.

UC Berkeley marcuse Foucault Donald Trump derrida Tucker Trump California Berkeley school of Berkeley Berkeley develops Jewish free bell Charlie Kirk Jewish journal Germany Golan Heights Israel Hamas Jerusalem Abraham Iran
Charlie Unpacks UC Berkeley's New 'White Free Zones'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:17 min | 4 months ago

Charlie Unpacks UC Berkeley's New 'White Free Zones'

"Peter, from Berkeley, California, Charlie, have you seen the latest news out of Berkeley when I thought it couldn't get more insane here it is. I make Christian conservative and I have to exist in the shadows here. Please shine a light on the treachery and the demonic activity, strong wording in Berkeley, California. So not exactly sure which part of this he's talking about. I would imagine though he's talking about the anti white racism that exists at UC Berkeley. When I'm talking to people that I call normies, we use that term sometimes normie as a term to describe someone who is not exactly enlightened on all these topics. I will commonly and frequently cite black only spaces on college campuses. So for example, if I'm talking to somebody and they say, oh, yeah, come on. America is not really going in a direction that is troubling. We've been through this stuff before. Now, mind you, I get this sentiment far less than I used to. I mainly get it from people over the age of 50, not all people, but just mainly. And they're usually well to do their well off. They're well established. They're economically anchored. And they'll kind of challenge me and not in a disrespectful way. It's sometimes at a donor event or I'm speaking at some other person's event. We do a lot of speaking, and they'll say, come on, Charlie, don't you think you exaggerate some things? Don't you think, you know, getting into hyperbole, America's not going in the wrong direction as badly as you say it is. Maybe we have to cut taxes and do some things, but come on, Charlie, America is always exempt from pain and suffering is basically the essence of their argument. I get it a lot. I get it less, especially in the last year and a half, but I get it a lot. And the example that I usually use to counter the normies, if you will, is talking about black only dormitories. Spaces that exist on college campuses where whites are not allowed. In one 42, Tucker starts off and he starts articulating this, that at University of California Berkeley, there's a housing co op where only people of color are allowed, and it's banning whites from common areas unless they have consent from the tenants, white people are not allowed in our spaces.

Berkeley University Of California Berke Normie Charlie California America Peter Tucker
Off-Campus Housing Near UC Berkeley Bans White People

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Off-Campus Housing Near UC Berkeley Bans White People

"Oh, man, are we heading to a really ugly place in American history? Where you're segregating kids, there's a story we talked about over on the website. Todd stern's dot com. You got to see this. Sorry guys, that was me. We've got a story up and it's from UC California. It's the University of California Berkeley. So they have off campus housing specifically specifically for minority students. And the rules and regulations and we posted it so you could see it for yourself. And the rules and regulations, they tell the students, hey, if you have a white friend, they're not allowed to come into this dormitory. If you have, if you know somebody who is white, they're not allowed to come into this space just for minorities. Yeah, that's called segregation. I believe there was a civil rights movement that addressed that.

Todd Stern University Of California Berke California
Why Charlie Is an Opponent of Student Loan Forgiveness

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:59 sec | 9 months ago

Why Charlie Is an Opponent of Student Loan Forgiveness

"A huge opponent to student loan forgiveness. Let me tell you why. I do not believe that we should penalize young people that got scholarships, went to community colleges first, or did not go to college altogether. Forgiving student loan by loans by definition would be penalizing other students that made other decisions not to go to as expensive schools, going to community college, work their way through college. Academic scholarships took AP classes, took honors classes and managed their student let burden. The student debt burden. And so while it's attractive to say, yeah, let's just kind of forgive that debt. Let's just wipe it out. The moral question is, what kind of behavior do you want to reward, right? Now, I do not believe rewarding going to UC Berkeley to go study North African lesbian poetry while somebody got works of their hands to become a plumber electrician or Carpenter, how they look, they say, wait a second, why do they get the handout just because they went to Berkeley and took all those classes and I didn't. So it is by definition unfair.

Uc Berkeley Carpenter Berkeley
Live From the Halls of Berkeley... With a Side of Cynicism

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:21 min | 9 months ago

Live From the Halls of Berkeley... With a Side of Cynicism

"Couple of times. I spoke here four years ago. I want to say. There has been a couple of changes here and not just the masks and all that. But one of the changes is that there was a there was an overwhelming amount of cynicism from the students here at UC Berkeley. Cynicism about the political process, about the future of the country, cynicism just kind of about life in general. And it's not that that wasn't there four or 5 years ago, but when I first visited Berkeley, there was this insistence that utopia is just around the corner, right? That if we just kind of give government a little bit more power and we get rid of rich people or whatever, then heaven can kind of be brought on earth. And I didn't get that vibe as much today talking for over two hours with a lot of you. Instead kind of got this undertone that things are really awful. They're terrible and people like you are the reason why. And you know, there's really not a path forward to make it better, but just kind of don't tell me how to live my life and so be it. And I think we could unpack that because it kind of transformed from an outward utopian kind of promise to something that's outwardly dystopian. And there was just a lack of hope that I sensed today from a lot of students. We can talk about that today, which I think is really important and helpful and necessary. Something

Uc Berkeley Berkeley
Housing shortage, soaring rents squeeze US college students

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 9 months ago

Housing shortage, soaring rents squeeze US college students

"College college college college students students students students across across across across the the the the country country country country are are are are looking looking looking looking for for for for housing housing housing housing for for for for the the the the next next next next school school school school year year year year and and and and if if if if twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one is is is is any any any any indication indication indication indication it it it it won't won't won't won't be be be be easy easy easy easy for for for for some some some some colleges colleges colleges colleges the the the the housing housing housing housing crunch crunch crunch crunch was was was was related related related related to to to to the the the the pandemic pandemic pandemic pandemic but but but but in in in in many many many many places places places places a a a a lack lack lack lack of of of of housing housing housing housing both both both both on on on on campus campus campus campus and and and and off off off off has has has has been been been been a a a a long long long long standing standing standing standing problem problem problem problem UC UC UC UC Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley freshman freshman freshman freshman son son son son also also also also he he he he says says says says landlords landlords landlords landlords have have have have the the the the upper upper upper upper hand hand hand hand they they they they know know know know that that that that we we we we are are are are all all all all in in in in desperate desperate desperate desperate need need need need of of of of housing housing housing housing so so so so they they they they know know know know that that that that whatever whatever whatever whatever price price price price they they they they charge charge charge charge will will will will inevitably inevitably inevitably inevitably have have have have to to to to pay pay pay pay it it it it because because because because we we we we don't don't don't don't have have have have a a a a choice choice choice choice except except except except to to to to live live live live out out out out of of of of our our our our cars cars cars cars some some some some students students students students have have have have been been been been forced forced forced forced to to to to live live live live out out out out of of of of their their their their cars cars cars cars David David David David Garcia Garcia Garcia Garcia is is is is a a a a housing housing housing housing policy policy policy policy researcher researcher researcher researcher at at at at UC UC UC UC Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley many many many many of of of of these these these these college college college college towns towns towns towns the the the the universities universities universities universities or or or or the the the the market market market market where where where where these these these these universities universities universities universities are are are are haven't haven't haven't haven't created created created created enough enough enough enough housing housing housing housing to to to to really really really really support support support support and and and and growing growing growing growing student student student student body body body body last last last last fall fall fall fall the the the the demand demand demand demand for for for for on on on on campus campus campus campus housing housing housing housing was was was was so so so so high high high high that that that that the the the the university university university university of of of of Tampa Tampa Tampa Tampa offered offered offered offered incoming incoming incoming incoming freshmen freshmen freshmen freshmen a a a a break break break break on on on on tuition tuition tuition tuition if if if if they they they they deferred deferred deferred deferred until until until until fall fall fall fall of of of of twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty two two two two I'm I'm I'm I'm a a a a Donahue Donahue Donahue Donahue

Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley Ber College College College Colleg David David David David Garcia Uc Uc University University Universi Donahue Donahue Donahue Donahu
CNN Reacts to the Collapse of Joe Biden

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:49 min | 10 months ago

CNN Reacts to the Collapse of Joe Biden

"And their total collapse, CNN is also reacting to the collapse of Joe Biden. There's just a lot of collapsing happening. Joe Biden just collapsed he can't even walk upstairs, just kind of that's a theme, I think, from now to November, collapse. Is this a great theme? Cut 98. They can't believe how unpopular Joe Biden is play cut 98. You know, there was always that thing. Oh, Donald Trump has the lowest approval rating at this point in his presidency. We did it over and over and over and over again. Well, at this point in his presidency, Donald Trump's number is actually his average approval rating is one point higher than Joe Biden's, which is a 41% Donald Trump at 42%. A first term president at this point in his presidency, this is the lowest. This is the lowest for anyone who is elected to the presidency and didn't get up there through the vice presidency. This is a really, really, really bad number. Was he elected to the presidency? That's the question. CNN continues cut 99. On Biden's approval rating, Joe Biden at this point is -23 points. That is the worst on record since they started asking about economic approval. Play cut 99. And I'll just note, if you don't believe that the economy is hurting the Democrats and Joe Biden, look at the net approval rating that's approval, minus disapproval, Joe Biden, at this point, -23 points. That is the worst on record since they started asking about economic job approval ratings back in 1978 with Jimmy Carter. I don't know who this guy is, but the funniest part of the clip I know in radio and podcasting you can't tell is he's trying to cut him off the other guy, the shell. He's like, enough, got it. Stop, stop. Who are you? Stop it. And he just keeps that going. You could just see he's

Joe Biden Donald Trump CNN Biden Jimmy Carter
Pizza Hut Teaches Kids America is Built on Slavery and Genocide

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 10 months ago

Pizza Hut Teaches Kids America is Built on Slavery and Genocide

"Pizza Hut teaches America, kids America is built on slavery and genocide. A fast food chain claims that America was founded on genocide. From front, front page mag dot com, Pizza Hut unsatisfied with making kids fat also wants to make them racist. They have an empowering educated tool box presented by the Pizza Hut foundation. Urging teachers to tell students that everyone is defined by race, not everyone has racial identity. And that race defines American life. That's what they say. They say race defines American life according to Pizza Hut. They say here, quote, America is a country built on a foundation of slavery, genocide, and white supremacy, a pamphlet for teachers stamped by the Pizza Hut logo declares. They say this is so well written by front page magazine. They say this, they say, challenging conversation says that police force quote is the 6th leading cause of death for black men. Now, of course, they don't talk about how black men are getting killed by police because they're committing crimes and a lot of that is done in self defense, but actually it's front page magazine comes back beautifully. They say, actually, it's diabetes. But it's understandable that Pizza Hut which makes millions of dollars giving black men heart disease strokes and diabetes wants to blame the cops who are the only people keeping underpaid employees of their struggling franchises alive. It's David Horowitz's great website, the great David Horowitz. Having destroyed pizza and its own company, Pizza Hut now wants to destroy America. So every day we have new companies going completely woke, it's happening at a record rate.

Pizza Hut America Pizza Hut Foundation Heart Disease Strokes Diabetes David Horowitz
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:11 min | 10 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Beautifully. So you go to patriot mobile dot com slash Charlie or call 9 7 two patriot. People ask all the time. Charlie, what do I do? What do I do? Well, a good way to start is, you know, make your cell phone bill, whatever. If you see it on your cell phone statement, you get yourself on statement. You might as well just say, oh, that money's going to the DNC or that money's going to Christian conservative organizations. Or company like patriot mobile. So you get a free activation with the offer code Charlie. They also have special discounts for veterans and first responder heroes. It's patriot mobile dot com slash Charlie. Our call 9 7 two patriot. Join me in the Charlie Kirk show in our change to patriot mobile and forgetting all these woke awful, terrible cell phone companies. Portions of this program, the Charlie Kirk show, are brought to you in part by patriot mobile. It's patriot mobile dot com slash Charlie, patriot mobile dot com slash Charlie. Okay, let's go to some other thoughts here. And some other questions. Here's one. Charlie, how did you survive at Berkeley? What was it like, tell us more basically it's this long email from Sal from Oklahoma. Tell us more about what you learned there. So spoke at UC Berkeley and the more interesting part of my time at Berkeley was not even the speech at Berkeley, which was fine, despite some smart Alec people that call themselves satirists that just wanted to try to troll. I'll first just say this about Berkeley. What a dark city. And I don't mean just like the sun was shining, but spiritual darkness and just the principality of that entire oppression is just so prevalent over Berkeley. I just, I feel it every single time I go to Berkeley. When I tried to speak, there were literally kids that were coming and just knocking on Windows like The Walking Dead. But the more interesting part of my time there was the two hours I spent on campus speaking to left wingers and activists uninterrupted two hours. We're going to be releasing some of that footage. In fact, we're still contemplating whether or not what parts we might include and not include. The only ones we might not include are just kind of the stuff that my kicked us off get cooked off YouTube and Facebook. Just kind of vaccine stuff and all that, which was a topic. But kind of looking at the perspective of people at Berkeley, years prior at Berkeley, there was almost like a utopian undertone at Berkeley, if you will. Now it's very dystopian. A lot of the students at Berkeley do not believe things can or will get better. They don't. Instead, they're very cynical. A cynical country is not a healthy country. It's not. And they're kind of perspective is like, look, things are awful. We don't like the way they are. And you're kind of the problem, and like there is no truth, there is no beauty. There's nothing worth fighting for. Now the great Joe bob, who works for us at turning point USA, he went undercover at Berkeley and he decided to ask some people some questions. Let's enjoy that together,.

Charlie Berkeley Charlie Kirk UC Berkeley DNC Alec Oklahoma YouTube Facebook Joe bob USA
Everyone Asks Charlie: Trump or DeSantis?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:19 min | 10 months ago

Everyone Asks Charlie: Trump or DeSantis?

"Questions on our campus tour. In fact, we also have a lot of questions here for ask me anything. And Greg from Cincinnati and Carla from North Carolina and Cynthia from Arizona. They all have a very similar question. And I received this question at every single one of our campus stops, which is Charlie, Trump, or desantis, Trump, or desantis. And I answered it, I said, look, if Trump runs again, he's going to have my support. I said, he's earned it. He's been good to me. He's been good to the country. I consider him to be, I guess you could say a friend, and that's pretty cool to say. And he's been terrific. I also say though that Ron DeSantis has an opportunity at some point to be a once in a generation once in a century statesman. Ron DeSantis is hitting home run after home run after home run. Ron DeSantis has just now signed a pro life Bill that the left is losing their mind over. He signed the anti grooming Bill the parental rights education bill, he just signed a fatherhood initiative and on top of all of that, Ron DeSantis has bailed out the corrupt dumb and I would say double minded Republican establishment.

Ron Desantis Donald Trump Desantis Carla Cynthia Cincinnati Greg North Carolina Arizona Charlie Bill
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:32 min | 10 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"See similar things? What was your take? Also, my biggest, I think in line with what you're saying, I saw that on the campus walk when we were talking to people, but I think I saw that most when, remember, Berkeley California, the event was not only sold out, there were people outside the doors trying to get in. If that doesn't say exactly what we're all thinking of like, look, even people that are youthful and call themselves liberals and leftists, there's a growing population within them that are just fed up with it exactly what you're talking about. You saw the angst and the anger on the, but it's going both ways, Joe Biden. Yeah, yeah. It's the country becomes more divided, it's like, it's like choose your path. Which way western man, right? It's like, it's like, you're seeing the people that are searching out for hope and meaning and purpose. And then you're seeing this cynicism, this nihilistic pursuit, right? You're saying the winnowing fork of culture and it's like you could see the kids that are like curious and reaching out this way, it had a number of them pull me aside and be like, totally. Yo, there's actually a way more conservatives on campus than you would think. And I met kids that looked completely like they'd be liberal. I mean, I know that I don't mean to be presumptive. You look like a liberal. And they were pulling me aside. So you saw this in your point. I mean, we could have filled up an auditorium a 1500, and you know, they gave us 299 seats. Even the space that they did give us could have sat 600, they gave us 2.99. I don't know because of COVID. Yeah, like it was just ridiculous. And anyways, I mean, you're right though. There is a hunger, but I'm just saying it kind of like separate even further the haves and the have nots, man. You know what I think to kind of wrap up the point in the segment. The best thing that I think Charlie pointed out during the speech was how proud he was of the turning point volunteers that were there. Not feeding into the angst. There was a girl that popped a big unicorn balloon that it was a free speech unicorn, not like a unicorn fairy desk stuff. There were some stuff that got knocked over. There were some physical altercations and nobody on the turning point acted with anything other than respect. And I think that's going to hopefully start bridge this gap. Jovial, it was almost a jovial vibe amongst the turning point students. It really was fun and they were having a good time with it. And it was totally respectful. Great point, hats off to that team. Hey everybody, towels just don't seem to dry you anymore. They feel soft and lotion Y in stores, but you get them home and they don't absorb. Well, Mike lindell, at my pillow, found out that around 2006 towels changed forever. They started importing them and adding softeners and other things to the cotton that made them feel good, but they didn't work. He found the best towel company right here in America. They have proprietary technology to create tiles that feel soft, but actually work. They are all made with USA cotton and they come with a my pillow 60 day money back guarantee. It's a 6 piece set to bath to hand tiles to watch clause made with USA cotton, their soft get absorbent, regularly 109 9 9, not 39.99. Just go to my pillow dot com and click on the new radio listener specials and get deep discounts on all my pillow products, including the Taos, enter promo code Kirk, called one 808 7 5 zero four two 5 for these great radio specials that's my pillow dot com and click on the new radio listener square, my pillow.

Joe Biden Berkeley California Mike lindell Charlie USA
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | 10 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Your approach, by the way, because you were a sort of undercover, you were keep California weird or perfectly weird or something like that. And we have some clips here that we can show. Actually, you know what? That's what we'll do. We'll start with that. This will give people a good primer for what you were doing. Cut 90 is some of your handiwork, Joe bob. Let's go ahead and play cut 90. Well, tell me, what's his deal? Should we like, what's his deal? If you don't like it, you're literally talking them out. Wow. You know he just tweeted that Kamala Harris vice presidency was affirmative action. At this point. The guy that gave us this, and he seemed like, I feel like nobody wants to work with Russia. Like, right? Like that's amazing. So tell us what you were doing. What we just saw. So Charlie who set up doing his thing, which was hilarious and I wish I could have seen more of it because I think there was some substantial Duncan on leftist thought there going on at the table, but we were incognito, kind of going around milling around with my black beanie on my sunglasses, my black shirt kind of just confused and aloof of everything happening at the protest. I think there are people protesting, but I don't think there was definitely some Nazi name calling going on, yes. Well, so I was just asking questions. Like I wasn't going out there to like stump people on their dumb ideas. I was just asking questions and letting people talk themselves. And a lot of the footage that I think we're going to see eventually. They're cutting it up and making it look all nice and pretty. Is people talking themselves into circles. We had one girl, by the way, who was adamantly chasing us down afterwards saying, you need to delete my footage. I have the right to have you delete all of my footage. You don't have the right to film me. And you know, we didn't get into the stole her essence or something. Yeah, the legality of like, hey, you knew that you were being filmed, so no, we don't have to do whatever you

Charlie Kamala Harris Joe bob Charlie Kirk UC Berkeley Berkeley California Joe Biden Kirk Alabama Duncan bob Joe Russia Biden Bay Area
TPUSA's Jobob Reporting From UC Berkeley

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | 10 months ago

TPUSA's Jobob Reporting From UC Berkeley

"Your approach, by the way, because you were a sort of undercover, you were keep California weird or perfectly weird or something like that. And we have some clips here that we can show. Actually, you know what? That's what we'll do. We'll start with that. This will give people a good primer for what you were doing. Cut 90 is some of your handiwork, Joe bob. Let's go ahead and play cut 90. Well, tell me, what's his deal? Should we like, what's his deal? If you don't like it, you're literally talking them out. Wow. You know he just tweeted that Kamala Harris vice presidency was affirmative action. At this point. The guy that gave us this, and he seemed like, I feel like nobody wants to work with Russia. Like, right? Like that's amazing. So tell us what you were doing. What we just saw. So Charlie who set up doing his thing, which was hilarious and I wish I could have seen more of it because I think there was some substantial Duncan on leftist thought there going on at the table, but we were incognito, kind of going around milling around with my black beanie on my sunglasses, my black shirt kind of just confused and aloof of everything happening at the protest. I think there are people protesting, but I don't think there was definitely some Nazi name calling going on, yes. Well, so I was just asking questions. Like I wasn't going out there to like stump people on their dumb ideas. I was just asking questions and letting people talk themselves. And a lot of the footage that I think we're going to see eventually. They're cutting it up and making it look all nice and pretty. Is people talking themselves into circles. We had one girl, by the way, who was adamantly chasing us down afterwards saying, you need to delete my footage. I have the right to have you delete all of my footage. You don't have the right to film me. And you know, we didn't get into the stole her essence or something. Yeah, the legality of like, hey, you knew that you were being filmed, so no, we don't have to do whatever you

Joe Bob Kamala Harris California Charlie Russia Duncan
Gov. DeSantis Taking Initiative on Redistricting Battles

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:31 min | 10 months ago

Gov. DeSantis Taking Initiative on Redistricting Battles

Comparing Redistricting Battles in Democrat and Republican States

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:12 min | 10 months ago

Comparing Redistricting Battles in Democrat and Republican States

"So if you have paid any attention to this show, you know that we have been bemoaning the RNC's lackluster attempts at staving off this onslaught, which is exactly what it is led by guys like Eric holder that have been plotting this for a long time, Barack Obama at taking over the redistricting battle that they feel like they've been losing to Republicans for decades. So guys like Eric holder spent a lot of time raised a lot of money to say that he was going to push back at the Republican efforts at redistricting. And guess what? They were largely successful. Massive losses in New York, massive losses in California, anywhere where the Democrats stronghold was the machine, where they were running the political discourse from top to bottom where they controlled the House the Senate, whatever, the assembly, the governor's mansion, they took aim and they held nothing back. Now, what did we see in GOP states, GOP controlled states? We saw feckless leadership we saw a lack of resolve we saw hemming and hawing and guess what we got worked, we got totally owned.

Eric Holder RNC Barack Obama New York California GOP Senate Assembly House Hemming
Storms batter aging power grid as climate disasters spread

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 10 months ago

Storms batter aging power grid as climate disasters spread

"Power power power power outages outages outages outages from from from from severe severe severe severe weather weather weather weather have have have have doubled doubled doubled doubled over over over over the the the the past past past past two two two two decades decades decades decades across across across across the the the the U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. as as as as a a a a warming warming warming warming climate climate climate climate stirs stirs stirs stirs more more more more destructive destructive destructive destructive storms storms storms storms that's that's that's that's according according according according to to to to an an an an AP AP AP AP analysis analysis analysis analysis of of of of government government government government data data data data Alexander Alexander Alexander Alexander von von von von Meyer Meyer Meyer Meyer is is is is a a a a UC UC UC UC Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley electric electric electric electric grid grid grid grid researcher researcher researcher researcher it's it's it's it's a a a a vulnerable vulnerable vulnerable vulnerable infrastructure infrastructure infrastructure infrastructure and and and and it's it's it's it's going going going going to to to to feel feel feel feel the the the the effects effects effects effects of of of of changing changing changing changing climate climate climate climate changing changing changing changing weather weather weather weather Pacific Pacific Pacific Pacific gas gas gas gas and and and and electric electric electric electric sumit sumit sumit sumit Singh Singh Singh Singh says says says says they they they they know know know know the the the the dynamics dynamics dynamics dynamics are are are are changing changing changing changing the the the the system system system system so so so so that that that that not not not not only only only only does does does does it it it it address address address address the the the the climate climate climate climate risk risk risk risk work work work work today today today today but but but investors investors investors the the the program program program it it it was was was with with with a a a future future future customer customer customer Richard Richard Richard scaffold scaffold scaffold relies relies relies on on on PG&E PG&E PG&E to to to power power power his his his electric electric electric wheelchair wheelchair wheelchair among among among other other other things things things doesn't doesn't doesn't have have have confidence confidence confidence they they they haven't haven't haven't done done done the the the upgrading upgrading upgrading to to to level level level it it it should should should be be be and and and now now now we're we're we're facing facing facing the the the third third third wildfire wildfire wildfire season season season I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker

U. U. Ap Ap Government Government Governme Alexander Alexander Alexander Uc Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley Pacific Pacific Pacific Pacifi Sumit Sumit Sumit Sumit Singh Meyer AP Richard Richard Richard Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker
"uc berkeley" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:39 min | 10 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"As we come out of the pandemic what the future of the BioTech industry holds Well UC Berkeley professor and Nobel Prize winner Jennifer doudna is trying to level the playing field by launching a new program to help women founders in biotechnology joining us now to talk about all that and more professor doudna herself And doctor doudna I think the world most people would probably agree we need more Jennifer doudna's in this world Talk to us about this new program and what the impact would be Hi Emily We are so excited about this program at the innovative genomics institute We launched the wise program women in entrepreneurial science Founded by a wonderful female entrepreneurial philanthropist We have a incredible opportunity to recruit the best female entrepreneurs to the institute give them a head start to get their ideas launched and then found companies off of those ideas It's an extraordinary opportunity I'm delighted to be part of it Why do we need more women in biotechnology in particular I'm a big believer that the best science gets done by a diverse team We have to have people from all walks of life contributing to the future of BioTech In genome engineering with CRISPR technology we've seen over the last decade the extraordinary advance is made both on the innovative side and also on the applied side And I think that going forward we just want to have the most opportunity to recruit people from everywhere to come into this field and work on opportunities and genome editing What's your assessment of where we are at this phase of the pandemic moving into hopefully post pandemic and the role that CRISPR and gene editing will play in preventing the next pandemic from happening CRISPR is such an extraordinary technology I think as you know it came out of a study of a bacterial immune system So it naturally works in nature as a way of protecting cells against viral infection And going forward we're using it not only as a way to detect the presence of infectious agents but also to use it to make the kinds of changes in the genome that could be protective against future infection I think those are the two ways that we'll see CRISPR having an impact in the future to prevent the kind of pandemic that we've just been through Now there's been some controversy in the CRISPR world recently Berkeley recently lost a long and drawn out patent battle with MIT and Harvard's broad institute over the ownership of this technology What's been your reaction to this Well Emily you know I think this is a common theme in areas of technology where there is extraordinary opportunity There are always disputes about intellectual property and CRISPR is no different than not regard I'm proud of the fact that UC Berkeley University of California retains more than 45 issued patents that are not part of the interference So we have a very strong intellectual property suite around CRISPR And we continue to do our work at the innovative genomics institute and with our partner companies We're not impeded in any way by that ongoing dispute So on that note how does this impact your efforts to and your dream really to commercialize this technology and apply it to heart problems for generations to come Not at all You know I recently I had a wonderful conversation just last week with Victoria gray She was the first United States resident who received a CRISPR therapy for her sickle cell disease Just incredible to talk with her and hear about the impact on her family her life She's now enrolling in business school something she couldn't have imagined doing when she was dealing with the ongoing impacts of sickle cell disease And I think that's the future for CRISPR We're going to see more and more opportunities to change people's lives in better way for the better So talk to us about your near term goals and your long-term goals on the therapeutic road map Well near term I think we're on a path to continue expanding the kinds of applications that CRISPR will be used for not only for very rare disease but I think in the future using it as a way to protect against disease and they're already our companies for example verve comes to mind that are on that same path And I think then further down the road I think CRISPR eventually becomes a standard of care for certain types of disease I think that's something that I can envision It will only happen if it's developed with an eye towards sustainability It has to be affordable You know Victoria gray's treatment was close to $2 million So clearly we need to bring down the cost And we think that one way to do that is to do the kind of research that we have ongoing at the innovative genomics institute and then partner with companies when it makes sense And what's your outlook on the future of BioTech returns I mean for so many years this was an under invested in part of the tech landscape certainly when you compare it to consumer and enterprise technology Do you see a new era for BioTech investing being ushered in over the next decade I do and part of the reason one thing I think is driving that actually is the intersection of BioTech with other kinds of technologies hard tech for example computer science I think many of us see that there are amazing opportunities when these areas of technology converge And that's what we're seeing right now So I think the next decade in this area will be very very exciting for scientists and also for investors So where are the next big bets Where should investors be putting their money quickly Well one area I would recommend looking into is agriculture and synthetic biology These are areas where we need CRISPR And we need other technologies to address the challenges of climate change of a growing population on our planet How do we keep people fed with high nutritional value crops CRISPR will play a big role there All right Doctor Jennifer doudna Nobel Prize winner UC Berkeley professor always good to have you here on the show Thank you for joining us And that does it for this edition of Bloomberg technology tune in tomorrow for my exclusive interview with Uber CEO Dara khosrowshahi I'll be speaking with him at shop talk in Las Vegas.

Jennifer doudna innovative genomics institute doudna Harvard's broad institute UC Berkeley University of Cali sickle cell disease MIT Victoria Berkeley United States Dara khosrowshahi Uber Las Vegas
"uc berkeley" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on Untangle

"About writing ever since my 20s. It's really my way of dealing with the fact that I was born baffled. I love that you said that. The bafflement. So I think bafflement is a great driver of inquiry and inquiry is a great bastard. Knowledge, you just have to realize that just because you've been doing it for maybe 30 or 40 years, that doesn't mean you're at the end of the road. The road never ends. Did you always know you were going to be a writer? Because I think with your bafflement and curiosity and the questions, all these different areas of your life you're very lucky to be able to be such a brilliant writer. Thank you. I've never felt like a brilliant writer. And I think I can tell you why. So I was the first person in my family to go to college. I didn't have any great intellectual heritage. I mean, my parents were learners. They respected education, wanted me to get a good one, but I always felt like something of a fraud and academic settings at a very good liberal arts college or UC Berkeley where I got my PhD. I always felt like if they figure out a dumb I am, I'm out of here. That impostor syndrome, which affects a lot of people. So I started writing just privately and tentatively, I tell the story and let your life speak or some book I can't remember which about how my very first book was accidental. It was truly accidental. It came together in an amazing way, a collection of essays of the sort I had been writing for myself.

UC Berkeley
The Philosophical Fallacy in Bodily Autonomy

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 1 year ago

The Philosophical Fallacy in Bodily Autonomy

"Because if you're only pro choice up until the point when the baby can survive outside the womb, then medical advancements every few decades enable us to make the child viable at earlier and earlier stages. So are you saying that one's in trident intrinsic dignity and natural right to life is dependent on the external advancements of scientists and the ideas that they come up with to make children viable at earlier and earlier stages. That's a very strange political vision of natural rights. But of course, that doesn't make any sense because our babies fully viable. No, if you leave an infant in a crib they die. You know, and what if mom tells the judge in a court of law, Charlie? Well, you know, judge my lesbian dance theory professor at UC Berkeley. She told me I have bodily autonomy. She told me I have bodily autonomy my body, my choice. My breasts are part of my body. So I didn't nurse my infant because I have bodily autonomy. What judge would accept that form of argumentative? Baby yes, the fen for itself. Very few. 6 week old. Once boring is the fend for itself. That's right. Yeah. So obviously the viability one doesn't work. And if you really want to go that route, that you only have rights if you're not dependent on someone or something else. Everyone dependent on insulin heart pacemakers kidney machines life support caretakers would all be non personing and can be killed in people. And you know, it's funny Charlie with the left says that right. Mother earth. Mother, what did they say? We're all dependent on this mother earth goddess without which we can not continue to live. Oh, you mean like the baby can't continue to live apart from their dependency on their mother? So I guess all of us are not persons because we're dependent on the earth ridiculous. So viability doesn't work. Well, they're not developed enough so they don't have desires. Then this is a more fine tuning philosophical argument with Charlie. But you don't have to find will then you're not exactly or that you don't have a claim to act unless you have a desire for X and can understand that you've been denied X and so unless you're aware of your right to something and can articulate it or have a desire for it. I guess you don't meet that list. This is enlightenment thinking gone wrong. Oh, totally. Yeah, this goes right back to the enlightenment period. Yeah. And right back to misses Machiavelli, the beginnings of what became post modernism relatives. It all started with Machiavelli. That's exactly

Uc Berkeley Charlie Insulin Heart Pacemakers Kidne Machiavelli
The Science of Embryology

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:17 min | 1 year ago

The Science of Embryology

"Well, the other side will say Seth, look, it's the fetus is the size of a pebble. You can't possibly say that's the same thing as a 6 foot three person. Right, it's ageism, right? So that's what they say. We hate racism. We hate sexism in this country, but apparently ageism is not just acceptable, but it's been normalized. The child is not the same size as us simply in virtue of their development. So let's look at excuse me. Yeah, I got something. No, you're good. Let's look at what the science of embryology says. The type of science, by the way that you're not going to hear from UC Berkeley or from Fauci, the high priest of progressivism. The science of embryology has been basically uncontested for decades. And yet you don't hear this anywhere in the mainstream media or in universities. From the moment of conception, there's a distinct living in whole human being. Distinct because it's obviously not your DNA not your choice if you like to say the body and her body's not her body. And we know that because the baby could be a different gender than the mother. Obviously, pregnant women don't have male genitalia so the baby's distinct. The baby's living 'cause dead things don't grow. The unborn child meets all the requirements for a living thing. And the unborn child is directing her own internal growth from within. So right, I have two kids, Charlie, my wife never woke me up in the middle of the night, shaking me saying, babe, come here, come whisper to my uterus. Come remind baby to grow. 'cause unborn children actually, they develop themselves from within independent of the wishes of their parents. And the child is whole. A whole human being is simply a human being who already has everything they need to realize their full growth and development as a participating member of the human species. And this is where our opponents Charlie get very confused when they say, well, I mean, maybe it's like biologically human. Like it has like human DNA. It's like cellularly human, but it's not like a full human. Oh, you mean like lunchtime? You mean what the Nazis called subhuman? All right, not full human just kind of subhuman. Same type of bigotry with abortion. But they say it might be biologically human, but it's not a human like you and I. So this last concept is the most important for us to articulate to the next generation and to the pro choice moderates and pro choice activists in our country. A whole human being is similar to a Polaroid photo.

Uc Berkeley Fauci Seth Charlie Polaroid
Biden Heads to California to Campaign for Newsom in Final Stretch

5 Things

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Biden Heads to California to Campaign for Newsom in Final Stretch

"President joe biden will be in california today to support democratic governor gavin newsom. A day before his recall election recall efforts came after the governor faced stiff criticism over the past year for his handling of the corona virus pandemic and other issues. it's been well funded and supported by big name. Republicans like mike huckabee and newt gingrich but polling earlier. This month showed new. Some would likely remain in office. Numbers from the public policy institute of california found that thirty nine percent of likely voters in the recall would vote to remove some but fifty eight percent would not not surprisingly those opinions varied by party with eighty two percent of republicans in favor of ousting newsom compared to just seven percent of democrats that polling data mart day major change from earlier this summer a uc berkeley pool. As recently as late july found that fifty percent of likely voters wanted to keep new some compared with forty seven percent who supported the recall. This month's polling found that larry elder still lead the pack of potential replacements for newsome. The right wing talk show. Host led the field at twenty six percent this month. Primary remind people why they were angry enough. For one point. Seven million people signed the petition in the first place. A quarter of them were independence. Democrats voted for him. Two years earlier. Majority of hispanics. Now want him out. I think the majority of people are going to vote to recall gavin newsom. And i think the majority and i think i'll get the greatest number of votes to replace it. The next closest candidate was former san. Diego mayor kevin falkiner with just five percent of respondents. Planning to vote for him. The only one in this race the experience who led our state's second largest city who brought republicans and democrats together to solve problems That's who i am known as a very pragmatic leader who gets results but newsome himself was still confident this

President Joe Biden Gavin Newsom Public Policy Institute Of Cal Mike Huckabee Newt Gingrich Newsom Larry Elder California Newsome Kevin Falkiner Diego SAN
"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"That are businesses schools looking to improve indoor air quality there. There's obviously a lot going on. In the world. now related to airborne pathogens and the global pandemic with people are looking to clean their air and really our customer base is just about anybody. We are not limited to any particular market group or person. it's just people that are looking to improve their. Yes you know. We've had a lot of customers. Outlets dealing with the wildfires have a lot of customers who unfortunately are repeat customers. That are every year looking to buy another device because while you know they live in an area that's prone wildfire spoke just the average looking now to improve their air on because they're more conscious of the issues that corier quality in allergens in 'cause were packages. Were just some older. They're not particularly fond of you. Know i guess. I'm curious that we actually had a pretty big wildfire just in our mountains northwest here in tucson and rarely did we smell the smoke but that doesn't mean it was out there. Are there things that people do to sort of say all right. What's the air quality in my home. Bat all right. I am maybe i should consider purifier like i would be curious because i wasn't sure if i was getting exposed or not you. You probably were air. Quality is low. you know. That's that's getting everywhere. A few things that people can do win air quality in the area is bad is one have good air filters in your home if the problem in the sources outside the home doing things that somewhat tighten up own reduce the amount of air exchange with the outside trying to then have something like enviro cleanse air system in the home. That's been actively purifying the air in your home's environment so the introducing something like that wildfire smoke at bringing it in but what does get in then you at least have something in the home that is addressing that some people have even gone as far as trying to build like safe routes in homes. That were there really pretty well sealed up interior rooms. Doors windows all sealed up with air purifier zenit. So things get particularly bad. They can really close off all the air circulation outside in recent foresight. Yet your be safe but then having something in that owns it's actively addressing things naked is.

tucson
"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"The cost of the removal. I think that could be a huge step because we could back then opened up a whole lot more area for treatment. So that's step one step two. I think is to simplify the planning process honestly on federal forests. There you know people would. Some people would freak out but me saying that. But i tell you i think there are. The important safeguards are in place leaving large trees. We've got diner limits. We're not gonna mess with those. We've got protections for watercourses in and some of the soil impacts like we talked about four. We have those in place. We're not talking. Ms messing with those were just talking about. I'm talking about streamlining the planning process so each thing. Each project doesn't take three to five years for one hundred thousand acre project. We need to be able to push those things out in a year. In my opinion. Lastly i think a a really strong commitment to prescribe bernie and i in prescribed burning throughout the year. Oftentimes what we do. Is we hire firefighters in the spring and they work through the season sometimes into the early fall and then they're laid off in a lot of cases for wintertime but if we were able to establish sort of a year round programme of work for these firefighters that took advantage of opportunities to burn in the winner there until there are opportunities now and i think there's actually a climate on that we have these periods. It seems like now over the last many years in january and february where there's no snow on the ground. It's really actually Optimal conditions for prescribed burning. But we don't have a crew in place to do that and then you know that crude weather's not burning opportunities could then do some of the scene work. You know we call hand-feeding. So i i think we. We had a real commitment to that as a professional track for jobs and so forth. I think that could be a a big difference but those are the top three things. I could conserve making a difference. Well some of these big bills. Climate funding coming through congress. One of them wants to establish a climate core. Boy that just seems like a perfect example like that. What kind of jobs would they be doing there. You go full-time wildfire staff. So all right any chrissy. Dc listeners and doing that kind of work on slip that into the appropriation. And i guess any sort of additional thing that i would like as part of that pushed a lot on the podcast is a communication strategy that needs to be coupled with fire management. I know the us forest service. They get a lot of funding to do a lot of really interesting research. and i know messaging and communications. That's out there but it's just you know maybe it needs to be better. That really had it made. They need a partner with different people but the messaging around force management just needs to ramp up. Because i think that's there's just a deficit there. I think you're right. And i think you know what i see at least on the research side of things which you know a lot of our research bridges into outreach which should include the messaging piece of it right but a lot of it is is kind of one offs just a particular group or a particular person is effective. Maybe through whatever means they're effective getting the word out but it's not it's not really a coordinated effort at a broader scale. And i don't i don't have a good sense of what that would look like but i think you're absolutely right if we could do something you know something. Better more streamlined for the west itself as the Like i said the inevitability of fire in our ability to start changing the characteristics. I think that could really take old. I think people have seen fire in the last several years that it's fresh on their minds and they're probably willing to hear that message brand into spin fantastic conversation. I encourage people. I'm going to have some links in my show. Notes checks papers with me. If people wanna dig into academic papers are actually. They're really compelling reads and some the the history of force management so they're actually really good. Reads one last question for you and i ask all my guests this if you could recommend one person to come on the podcast. Who would be so. I guess i'll stop my head. I can think of a couple. But i'll list rob york. Who is a colleague of mine. Three uc berkeley and robs got interesting background. Because he is a forester in used to manage our research forests near georgetown california and he is avid prescribe burner. He burns all the time including in the winter. You'll burn with two or three people. I know that you know he. Has this really interesting background of a very much on the ground management and the research side of things so rob could be very very interesting because he's got the burning and experience. He's got the forestry experience his got Shops as well all right. Great excellent recommendation. All right brandon. Thanks again for coming on and sharing your expertise in you know. Good luck your research is going to be more important in the years ahead. Thank you it actors. Welcome back joining me. Kyle nap.

two Kyle congress january five years february three three people One Each project one hundred thousand acre georgetown california one person four each thing one last question step one Three uc three things step two
"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"With insurance companies like urban planners city planners is that something. That's coming up more and more for you. I'm not interacting with insurance companies but what is different at least some of the groups that are they are asking us to speak at. I spoke at a something in one of the bay area towns around here actually a couple different events that had nothing to do with ecology or wild lands. These are different. You know these are groups that are just really social groups and they're just interested in fire enough to wanna learn about it so i think that's a pretty interesting development. Is that worse either by direct exposure. You know the fire. Some of the people like we had in twenty seventeen all the fires in in the northern area. But also the smoke that we've had over the last several years getting into the assembly's main population centers is really got people asking questions about fire and i think that's actually if there is an upside to all his bets. Upside is our ability to basically provide this information to much more willing audience audience audiences. Listen my next questions associated with how the public's responding and how the media covers fire to me it's the fire season and it's almost like groundhog day with these fires. And i'm sure you probably feel the same way. It's like all right. It's the wildfires in california flaring up again in this communities threatened not to minimize people. Actually their lives are at risk but it happens every year. And i think the media is getting much better in bringing in the climate change angle into a two that's a good development but at the same time it's alright. Let's dusted off. let's talk in. There's a sort of this urgency. But i guess my thinking well. This narrative will be repeated every year. So let's let me change our mentality about it. I mean what's what's your sense of sort of media coverage agree. I don't i don't blame them. Eat it all for what they're doing in terms of covering it i would think is by. Are we as land managers. Not doing something very significant. Change this you're right. It is groundhog day. Every year is the same thing. A disastrous fire facts in. Oh terrible winds and just can't get a hold of this fire. No matter how many people we put on it at some point. I would really like to see a major effort. Suit changed this on the front. On the pre fireside. We are actually going to do something significant advantages for us at large-scale to change the subject. But i i think we just can't get over the hump on some of these and it's always easier to respond to a disaster. I guess than it is to prevent one. I don't know what on twitter obviously fall a lot of climate handles and such and it just seems like there's always just trying to create a little bit new twist that oh here's the climate change angle. Whatever this new sense of urgency. And i just you know. It doesn't seem like a healthy approach to the long game of what europe to and you know i guess it's more resources or whatever but there's a fire deficit right. It may be one sort of explain what that term means. You've talked about in previous what we've been talking about here but we were gonna have fire indefinitely. How do we talk to the public about this. And how does the media. I guess do a better job than not every year that this is the turning point year did. I just don't think that's necessarily helpful. I agree and i think that maybe at some point we need to get very direct with landowners in fire prone environments and tell them that we may not be able to get there. We may not be able to stop a fire We shouldn't say we're not going to be able to stop a fire at some point from getting on your land. It's up to you with some assistance and some expertise. The governments can provide to prepare your land essentially. Don't rely on us to put it out but Prepare for it to happen. In essentially try to with let your your piece of ground withstand the fire sort of remain intact this might be urging instead of media strategies that you're talking about but i look at. I think a lot of people really want use the fires to sort of make a case that we need to do something on climate chains. I obviously i got a podcast. Climate change. i think we need to do it. You know sometimes you get this. Climate fatigue and people will look at these firestone. Well why are they living in the fires in the first place and i you know in some ways it might actually backfire as a way to create some that urgency around we gotta get our carbon emissions down and so i i mean the virgin. I worry that the media strategies are gonna backfire. It could you're right. I mean to a certain extent. If you if you just keep pushing the climate side. I think in a way people they will tend to accept the inevitability of offense okay. Well i guess it's just the new normal that we are just gonna have giant fires every training about. I worry about that over pushing that the climate narrative. It's absolutely a part of it. But like i said before her i think the climate only reinforces the inevitability of it. And that you know the the management side of it where we're dealing with of tree densities in the fueled entities. That's what we can change the effects of the fire. Not whether fires actually going to happen or not but just what it does when it does come. Yeah and. I don't wanna give the impression that we don't need. I think we need a massive climate change. Narrative communication push that everyone gets behind. But like when you hear these fire stories or these flooding stories a lot of a luck. They really made some bad decisions on where they're living. You know. sometimes that comes off more so in it can't decouple it from the overall cleanness. You've talked a lot about some of the things that we could do. But i i. I do want your professional advice in a perfect world with unlimited resources. What really would be sort. Let's let's just stay focused when california that like a really comprehensive approach to fire management to help deal with these long term issues. What should really happen. This is a this ideal world right. Where is this is this is of finger and make something happen. Is it okay. You'll end game but just sort of think. Well we're missing this. We're not focused here. It's just like what what really would just be. Budget is not even an issue or yeah. You know the funny thing is. I don't think that budget is the limiting factor right now but okay. Let me give this. I start so one thing that could be super helpful is if we were able to establish a market for biomass and that could largely what we're talking about. Here are the small diameter trees. That can't go to a mill. they're just too small. They're not worth it but must need to be removed from the standpoint of fire has right now all we can do with them. Generally is put him in a giant pile and burn when the snow. You know when there's a little bit of snow on the ground so we're not worried about escape but if we had a real mechanism a distributed network of these biomass facilities to take some at small diameter material offset. The cost of the removal. I think that could be a huge step because we could back then opened up a whole lot more area for treatment. So that's step one step two. I think is to.

twitter first california twenty seventeen one europe two step one one thing one sort step two couple different events last several years
Larry Elder: Will Enough Californians Vote for a Recall?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Larry Elder: Will Enough Californians Vote for a Recall?

"La times poll came out uc. Berkeley poll came out And i have eighteen points. My next challenger has a ten points. caitlyn jenner has around three. And i'm not dissing by republican opponents because it's a two step real simple deal unless fifty percent plus one vote rules that govern distance should recall recalled. It doesn't matter what the rest of us have. I'm pretty confident. I'm gonna finish with a higher vote tally in my other republican rivals. The question is whether or not enough californians are gonna vote for the recall and this poll came out this morning shows. Forty seven percents are in favor of the recall. and fifty three percent are not That's almost within the margin of error and that's about a five point improvement on our side compared to just two weeks ago. People are mad about the crime. They're mad about the mandates you're mad about the crappy schools that people saw for the first is because of the virtual learning that was going on. They're mad about the cost of living. You add it all up and it's perfect storm for getting rid of this

Caitlyn Jenner La Times UC Berkeley
Google Plans to Expand Its Campus  Which Might Become Unsafe

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Google Plans to Expand Its Campus Which Might Become Unsafe

"Google is expanding its campus in the san francisco bay. Area the companies. Planning to build offices as well as housing and greenspace near the shoreline which is at risk from rising sea levels. And that's raising the question of whether building there should happen at all. Npr's lauren summer has the story as a city planner in silicon valley. Michelle king. here's all about one of the biggest headaches in the bay area housing. Oh my goodness housing. Here is extremely expensive. Sunnyvale has very high cost of living in may the median. Home price in sunnyvale. Where king works was one point. Eight million so the city is looking at a different kind of housing higher density. That's walkable transit and greenspace. It would go into a part of town called moffett park right now. It's just offices lots of low rise buildings with wide parking lots one of the most sustainable things you can do is put people where they work and put people where transit is so. This is a huge opportunity. This isn't just sunnyvale vision. It shared by one of the largest landowners. Moffett park google over the last five years. The company has quietly bought more than seventy properties. Here worth almost three billion dollars. Jeff holtzman is google's director of real estate development for sunnyvale. We're incorporating sustainability into everything we do in our developments and we're doing it to support our employees but also the community and hopefully the environment. Sunnyvale is in the process of rezoning the land to allow google to build new offices and housing and just to know. Google is one of npr's financial supporters. And there's one more detail the city is looking at. This land is on the shore of san francisco bay which puts it right in the path of sea level rise sea level rises already happened. I we've seen about a foot over the last hundred years. Christina hill as a professor of environmental planning at uc berkeley. We're standing on the edge of the bay where a high tide is coming in. Hill says sea level rise will make these tides even higher by as much as seven feet by twenty one hundred. But that's not the only problem there's also seawater in the soil under our feet the groundwater and as the c rises that to- of saltwater under the soil is gonna rise also

Lauren Summer Michelle King Google Moffett Park Sunnyvale San Francisco Bay Jeff Holtzman NPR Silicon Valley Bay Area Headaches Moffett Christina Hill Uc Berkeley Hill