35 Burst results for "Uc Berkeley"

Biden Heads to California to Campaign for Newsom in Final Stretch

5 Things

02:03 min | Last month

Biden Heads to California to Campaign for Newsom in Final Stretch

"President joe biden will be in california today to support democratic governor gavin newsom. A day before his recall election recall efforts came after the governor faced stiff criticism over the past year for his handling of the corona virus pandemic and other issues. it's been well funded and supported by big name. Republicans like mike huckabee and newt gingrich but polling earlier. This month showed new. Some would likely remain in office. Numbers from the public policy institute of california found that thirty nine percent of likely voters in the recall would vote to remove some but fifty eight percent would not not surprisingly those opinions varied by party with eighty two percent of republicans in favor of ousting newsom compared to just seven percent of democrats that polling data mart day major change from earlier this summer a uc berkeley pool. As recently as late july found that fifty percent of likely voters wanted to keep new some compared with forty seven percent who supported the recall. This month's polling found that larry elder still lead the pack of potential replacements for newsome. The right wing talk show. Host led the field at twenty six percent this month. Primary remind people why they were angry enough. For one point. Seven million people signed the petition in the first place. A quarter of them were independence. Democrats voted for him. Two years earlier. Majority of hispanics. Now want him out. I think the majority of people are going to vote to recall gavin newsom. And i think the majority and i think i'll get the greatest number of votes to replace it. The next closest candidate was former san. Diego mayor kevin falkiner with just five percent of respondents. Planning to vote for him. The only one in this race the experience who led our state's second largest city who brought republicans and democrats together to solve problems That's who i am known as a very pragmatic leader who gets results but newsome himself was still confident this

President Joe Biden Gavin Newsom Public Policy Institute Of Cal Mike Huckabee Newt Gingrich Newsom Larry Elder California Newsome Kevin Falkiner Diego SAN
"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

02:18 min | Last month

"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"That are businesses schools looking to improve indoor air quality there. There's obviously a lot going on. In the world. now related to airborne pathogens and the global pandemic with people are looking to clean their air and really our customer base is just about anybody. We are not limited to any particular market group or person. it's just people that are looking to improve their. Yes you know. We've had a lot of customers. Outlets dealing with the wildfires have a lot of customers who unfortunately are repeat customers. That are every year looking to buy another device because while you know they live in an area that's prone wildfire spoke just the average looking now to improve their air on because they're more conscious of the issues that corier quality in allergens in 'cause were packages. Were just some older. They're not particularly fond of you. Know i guess. I'm curious that we actually had a pretty big wildfire just in our mountains northwest here in tucson and rarely did we smell the smoke but that doesn't mean it was out there. Are there things that people do to sort of say all right. What's the air quality in my home. Bat all right. I am maybe i should consider purifier like i would be curious because i wasn't sure if i was getting exposed or not you. You probably were air. Quality is low. you know. That's that's getting everywhere. A few things that people can do win air quality in the area is bad is one have good air filters in your home if the problem in the sources outside the home doing things that somewhat tighten up own reduce the amount of air exchange with the outside trying to then have something like enviro cleanse air system in the home. That's been actively purifying the air in your home's environment so the introducing something like that wildfire smoke at bringing it in but what does get in then you at least have something in the home that is addressing that some people have even gone as far as trying to build like safe routes in homes. That were there really pretty well sealed up interior rooms. Doors windows all sealed up with air purifier zenit. So things get particularly bad. They can really close off all the air circulation outside in recent foresight. Yet your be safe but then having something in that owns it's actively addressing things naked is.

tucson
"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

04:43 min | Last month

"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"The cost of the removal. I think that could be a huge step because we could back then opened up a whole lot more area for treatment. So that's step one step two. I think is to simplify the planning process honestly on federal forests. There you know people would. Some people would freak out but me saying that. But i tell you i think there are. The important safeguards are in place leaving large trees. We've got diner limits. We're not gonna mess with those. We've got protections for watercourses in and some of the soil impacts like we talked about four. We have those in place. We're not talking. Ms messing with those were just talking about. I'm talking about streamlining the planning process so each thing. Each project doesn't take three to five years for one hundred thousand acre project. We need to be able to push those things out in a year. In my opinion. Lastly i think a a really strong commitment to prescribe bernie and i in prescribed burning throughout the year. Oftentimes what we do. Is we hire firefighters in the spring and they work through the season sometimes into the early fall and then they're laid off in a lot of cases for wintertime but if we were able to establish sort of a year round programme of work for these firefighters that took advantage of opportunities to burn in the winner there until there are opportunities now and i think there's actually a climate on that we have these periods. It seems like now over the last many years in january and february where there's no snow on the ground. It's really actually Optimal conditions for prescribed burning. But we don't have a crew in place to do that and then you know that crude weather's not burning opportunities could then do some of the scene work. You know we call hand-feeding. So i i think we. We had a real commitment to that as a professional track for jobs and so forth. I think that could be a a big difference but those are the top three things. I could conserve making a difference. Well some of these big bills. Climate funding coming through congress. One of them wants to establish a climate core. Boy that just seems like a perfect example like that. What kind of jobs would they be doing there. You go full-time wildfire staff. So all right any chrissy. Dc listeners and doing that kind of work on slip that into the appropriation. And i guess any sort of additional thing that i would like as part of that pushed a lot on the podcast is a communication strategy that needs to be coupled with fire management. I know the us forest service. They get a lot of funding to do a lot of really interesting research. and i know messaging and communications. That's out there but it's just you know maybe it needs to be better. That really had it made. They need a partner with different people but the messaging around force management just needs to ramp up. Because i think that's there's just a deficit there. I think you're right. And i think you know what i see at least on the research side of things which you know a lot of our research bridges into outreach which should include the messaging piece of it right but a lot of it is is kind of one offs just a particular group or a particular person is effective. Maybe through whatever means they're effective getting the word out but it's not it's not really a coordinated effort at a broader scale. And i don't i don't have a good sense of what that would look like but i think you're absolutely right if we could do something you know something. Better more streamlined for the west itself as the Like i said the inevitability of fire in our ability to start changing the characteristics. I think that could really take old. I think people have seen fire in the last several years that it's fresh on their minds and they're probably willing to hear that message brand into spin fantastic conversation. I encourage people. I'm going to have some links in my show. Notes checks papers with me. If people wanna dig into academic papers are actually. They're really compelling reads and some the the history of force management so they're actually really good. Reads one last question for you and i ask all my guests this if you could recommend one person to come on the podcast. Who would be so. I guess i'll stop my head. I can think of a couple. But i'll list rob york. Who is a colleague of mine. Three uc berkeley and robs got interesting background. Because he is a forester in used to manage our research forests near georgetown california and he is avid prescribe burner. He burns all the time including in the winter. You'll burn with two or three people. I know that you know he. Has this really interesting background of a very much on the ground management and the research side of things so rob could be very very interesting because he's got the burning and experience. He's got the forestry experience his got Shops as well all right. Great excellent recommendation. All right brandon. Thanks again for coming on and sharing your expertise in you know. Good luck your research is going to be more important in the years ahead. Thank you it actors. Welcome back joining me. Kyle nap.

two Kyle congress january five years february three three people One Each project one hundred thousand acre georgetown california one person four each thing one last question step one Three uc three things step two
"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

06:54 min | Last month

"uc berkeley" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"With insurance companies like urban planners city planners is that something. That's coming up more and more for you. I'm not interacting with insurance companies but what is different at least some of the groups that are they are asking us to speak at. I spoke at a something in one of the bay area towns around here actually a couple different events that had nothing to do with ecology or wild lands. These are different. You know these are groups that are just really social groups and they're just interested in fire enough to wanna learn about it so i think that's a pretty interesting development. Is that worse either by direct exposure. You know the fire. Some of the people like we had in twenty seventeen all the fires in in the northern area. But also the smoke that we've had over the last several years getting into the assembly's main population centers is really got people asking questions about fire and i think that's actually if there is an upside to all his bets. Upside is our ability to basically provide this information to much more willing audience audience audiences. Listen my next questions associated with how the public's responding and how the media covers fire to me it's the fire season and it's almost like groundhog day with these fires. And i'm sure you probably feel the same way. It's like all right. It's the wildfires in california flaring up again in this communities threatened not to minimize people. Actually their lives are at risk but it happens every year. And i think the media is getting much better in bringing in the climate change angle into a two that's a good development but at the same time it's alright. Let's dusted off. let's talk in. There's a sort of this urgency. But i guess my thinking well. This narrative will be repeated every year. So let's let me change our mentality about it. I mean what's what's your sense of sort of media coverage agree. I don't i don't blame them. Eat it all for what they're doing in terms of covering it i would think is by. Are we as land managers. Not doing something very significant. Change this you're right. It is groundhog day. Every year is the same thing. A disastrous fire facts in. Oh terrible winds and just can't get a hold of this fire. No matter how many people we put on it at some point. I would really like to see a major effort. Suit changed this on the front. On the pre fireside. We are actually going to do something significant advantages for us at large-scale to change the subject. But i i think we just can't get over the hump on some of these and it's always easier to respond to a disaster. I guess than it is to prevent one. I don't know what on twitter obviously fall a lot of climate handles and such and it just seems like there's always just trying to create a little bit new twist that oh here's the climate change angle. Whatever this new sense of urgency. And i just you know. It doesn't seem like a healthy approach to the long game of what europe to and you know i guess it's more resources or whatever but there's a fire deficit right. It may be one sort of explain what that term means. You've talked about in previous what we've been talking about here but we were gonna have fire indefinitely. How do we talk to the public about this. And how does the media. I guess do a better job than not every year that this is the turning point year did. I just don't think that's necessarily helpful. I agree and i think that maybe at some point we need to get very direct with landowners in fire prone environments and tell them that we may not be able to get there. We may not be able to stop a fire We shouldn't say we're not going to be able to stop a fire at some point from getting on your land. It's up to you with some assistance and some expertise. The governments can provide to prepare your land essentially. Don't rely on us to put it out but Prepare for it to happen. In essentially try to with let your your piece of ground withstand the fire sort of remain intact this might be urging instead of media strategies that you're talking about but i look at. I think a lot of people really want use the fires to sort of make a case that we need to do something on climate chains. I obviously i got a podcast. Climate change. i think we need to do it. You know sometimes you get this. Climate fatigue and people will look at these firestone. Well why are they living in the fires in the first place and i you know in some ways it might actually backfire as a way to create some that urgency around we gotta get our carbon emissions down and so i i mean the virgin. I worry that the media strategies are gonna backfire. It could you're right. I mean to a certain extent. If you if you just keep pushing the climate side. I think in a way people they will tend to accept the inevitability of offense okay. Well i guess it's just the new normal that we are just gonna have giant fires every training about. I worry about that over pushing that the climate narrative. It's absolutely a part of it. But like i said before her i think the climate only reinforces the inevitability of it. And that you know the the management side of it where we're dealing with of tree densities in the fueled entities. That's what we can change the effects of the fire. Not whether fires actually going to happen or not but just what it does when it does come. Yeah and. I don't wanna give the impression that we don't need. I think we need a massive climate change. Narrative communication push that everyone gets behind. But like when you hear these fire stories or these flooding stories a lot of a luck. They really made some bad decisions on where they're living. You know. sometimes that comes off more so in it can't decouple it from the overall cleanness. You've talked a lot about some of the things that we could do. But i i. I do want your professional advice in a perfect world with unlimited resources. What really would be sort. Let's let's just stay focused when california that like a really comprehensive approach to fire management to help deal with these long term issues. What should really happen. This is a this ideal world right. Where is this is this is of finger and make something happen. Is it okay. You'll end game but just sort of think. Well we're missing this. We're not focused here. It's just like what what really would just be. Budget is not even an issue or yeah. You know the funny thing is. I don't think that budget is the limiting factor right now but okay. Let me give this. I start so one thing that could be super helpful is if we were able to establish a market for biomass and that could largely what we're talking about. Here are the small diameter trees. That can't go to a mill. they're just too small. They're not worth it but must need to be removed from the standpoint of fire has right now all we can do with them. Generally is put him in a giant pile and burn when the snow. You know when there's a little bit of snow on the ground so we're not worried about escape but if we had a real mechanism a distributed network of these biomass facilities to take some at small diameter material offset. The cost of the removal. I think that could be a huge step because we could back then opened up a whole lot more area for treatment. So that's step one step two. I think is to.

twitter first california twenty seventeen one europe two step one one thing one sort step two couple different events last several years
Larry Elder: Will Enough Californians Vote for a Recall?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

Larry Elder: Will Enough Californians Vote for a Recall?

"La times poll came out uc. Berkeley poll came out And i have eighteen points. My next challenger has a ten points. caitlyn jenner has around three. And i'm not dissing by republican opponents because it's a two step real simple deal unless fifty percent plus one vote rules that govern distance should recall recalled. It doesn't matter what the rest of us have. I'm pretty confident. I'm gonna finish with a higher vote tally in my other republican rivals. The question is whether or not enough californians are gonna vote for the recall and this poll came out this morning shows. Forty seven percents are in favor of the recall. and fifty three percent are not That's almost within the margin of error and that's about a five point improvement on our side compared to just two weeks ago. People are mad about the crime. They're mad about the mandates you're mad about the crappy schools that people saw for the first is because of the virtual learning that was going on. They're mad about the cost of living. You add it all up and it's perfect storm for getting rid of this

Caitlyn Jenner La Times UC Berkeley
Google Plans to Expand Its Campus  Which Might Become Unsafe

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 3 months ago

Google Plans to Expand Its Campus Which Might Become Unsafe

"Google is expanding its campus in the san francisco bay. Area the companies. Planning to build offices as well as housing and greenspace near the shoreline which is at risk from rising sea levels. And that's raising the question of whether building there should happen at all. Npr's lauren summer has the story as a city planner in silicon valley. Michelle king. here's all about one of the biggest headaches in the bay area housing. Oh my goodness housing. Here is extremely expensive. Sunnyvale has very high cost of living in may the median. Home price in sunnyvale. Where king works was one point. Eight million so the city is looking at a different kind of housing higher density. That's walkable transit and greenspace. It would go into a part of town called moffett park right now. It's just offices lots of low rise buildings with wide parking lots one of the most sustainable things you can do is put people where they work and put people where transit is so. This is a huge opportunity. This isn't just sunnyvale vision. It shared by one of the largest landowners. Moffett park google over the last five years. The company has quietly bought more than seventy properties. Here worth almost three billion dollars. Jeff holtzman is google's director of real estate development for sunnyvale. We're incorporating sustainability into everything we do in our developments and we're doing it to support our employees but also the community and hopefully the environment. Sunnyvale is in the process of rezoning the land to allow google to build new offices and housing and just to know. Google is one of npr's financial supporters. And there's one more detail the city is looking at. This land is on the shore of san francisco bay which puts it right in the path of sea level rise sea level rises already happened. I we've seen about a foot over the last hundred years. Christina hill as a professor of environmental planning at uc berkeley. We're standing on the edge of the bay where a high tide is coming in. Hill says sea level rise will make these tides even higher by as much as seven feet by twenty one hundred. But that's not the only problem there's also seawater in the soil under our feet the groundwater and as the c rises that to- of saltwater under the soil is gonna rise also

Lauren Summer Michelle King Google Moffett Park Sunnyvale San Francisco Bay Jeff Holtzman NPR Silicon Valley Bay Area Headaches Moffett Christina Hill Uc Berkeley Hill
IGI Researchers Are Using CRISPR to Reduce Cyanide in Cassava

CRISPR Cuts

02:09 min | 6 months ago

IGI Researchers Are Using CRISPR to Reduce Cyanide in Cassava

"Like everyone took wrestler guts. Today's episode we're not covering medicine or science communication. It's something different but also equally important will covering chris boden agricultural. So today with us. We have jessica lions and michael gomez and they're going to talk about their work gain casella so when come guys please introduce yourself stewart audience. Hi i'm just. lions staff. scientists. In dan rockstars lab at uc berkeley and the pi of our project at the innovative genomics institute to use crisper to engineer. Cassava without sign wants michael gomez. I'm a postdoctoral scholar in the fast food lab. At the innovative john institute also working jess on cassava and other crops for disease resistance. Thank thanks can you talk a little bit about how you got into this space off. You know either being interested in agriculture and also getting into crisper in agriculture. Now maybe tied with the shirt. I come at this from the end of genomic so i i'd morning on cassava listens twenty twelve and twenty fifteen or something some really interested in using modern genetic approaches to facilitate the improvement of africa crops so As christopher became more of a a more of an option for sava thousand certified segue on into collaborating with golden brian. On using chris burton december. I entered grad school in dozen twelve really strong interest in diseases. How they work how that plays host and at that time crisper urge and it has been a roller coaster. seeing how this technology has been applied. It's been a lot of fun. And i'm excited to apply for disease resistance but also poor consumer safety space.

Michael Gomez Chris Boden Jessica Lions Dan Rockstars Uc Berkeley Innovative Genomics Institute John Institute Disease Resistance Casella Lions Stewart Jess Golden Brian Chris Burton Christopher Africa
Interview With William Hung, Former American Idol Contestant

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

01:54 min | 6 months ago

Interview With William Hung, Former American Idol Contestant

"When we started this podcast in two thousand fifteen i compiled a list of what i call the white wales and these were guest that i hope to book someday. People like george decay and margaret show and sonar so forth. And we've actually had margaret and george decay on but one of the white. Whales did eluded me until this very moment is my guest. This episode william hung william. I want to welcome you to our show. Highly meet you oswal for some of our listeners. May have heard of some of these other people that i just mentioned. But maybe they're not familiar with you and and let me just briefly. Explain to the audience. Why you were on my must book on this back. When i wasn't even watching american idol. So this is i think. Season three of american idol. Early in two thousand four. You auditioned and i heard about the audition so not even watching the show. Your audition actually kind of went by role and it sets up the next seven years of your life and then even what you've kind of transition to so. Could you give our audience in idea about what led to the audition san francisco for american idol. And then what happened there. And then we'll talk about the next part sir. So i always enjoyed carry your in my life. I started singing karaoke. Gave the my parents. I was tenuous on the back in hong kong and then in college i studied at uc. Berkeley i studied zimmer engineering I wasn't doing at school. So i thought i needed to try something new then one day. I thought his poster for a school talent show. And i thought watching and studying the music videos from ricky martin's she bangs

White Wales George Decay William Hung William Margaret George San Francisco Zimmer UC Hong Kong Berkeley Ricky Martin
Jonathan Tsay on early-phase spinal cord injury clinical research

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

02:23 min | 7 months ago

Jonathan Tsay on early-phase spinal cord injury clinical research

"Today. I'll be speaking with dr jonathan cy about his recent paper in the journal neuro rehabilitation enrolled repair titled five features to look for in early phase clinical intervention studies. Dr tsai who goes by. Jt has a doctor of physical therapy degree from northwestern university. And he's currently working on his phd with dr rich ivory at the condition and action lab at uc berkeley and so in the interest of full disclosure jt. And i know each other already from his days. At northwestern where i'm on faculty i can you to discuss listeners. We're in for treats i know. Jt to be smart and an analytical thinker and so whether you are interested in spinal cord injury rehabilitation or neurologic rehabilitation or frankly any rehabilitation where motor learning is at play. I think you're gonna find something that you can use in today's discussion and so jt. Welcome to discuss. Thanks rachel and i do want to say a big part of analytical was attributed to my education and northwestern university they did not sponsor this show but i i do i do think a big part of my training and north western really helped me think through difficult problems especially in the credit. Well mine too. So i guess there we are So let's let's talk about your paper in this paper. Put forward a set of recommendations for how clinicians can identify early. Phase intervention studies that will bring immediate value to their clinical practice which is really important topic and so can you talk about what led you to put these recommendations forward In the first place why. Why do we need them. Yeah so when. I was reading the clinical literature and pt school Had a pain point and the pain point was that i wanted to quickly and efficiently and effectively evaluate papers that might not necessarily fall. as a clinical practice guideline a systematic review or a large scale randomized controlled trial. How do i evaluate quickly evaluate Papers that are more early phase had a lower and offer some novel insights that i can translate quickly To the clinic

Dr Jonathan Cy Dr Tsai Dr Rich Uc Berkeley Northwestern University Spinal Cord Injury Rachel
Can Language Models Be Too Big  With Emily Bender And Margaret Mitchell

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:21 min | 7 months ago

Can Language Models Be Too Big With Emily Bender And Margaret Mitchell

"Are at everyone. I am here with meg. Mitchell and a researcher and emily bender professor at the university of washington. And we are here to talk about their recent paper on the dangers of casting. Parents can language models. Be too big meghan emily. Welcome to this podcast. Thank you welcome. Thank super excited to jump into this conversation. Let's start out like we always do with. Having you share a little bit about your background meg. We'll have you go first. yeah. I basically studied as a computational linguists like emily i got my phd in computer science. And then i've worked at johns hopkins microsoft research And most recently. Google research worked on computer vision as well. As natural language processing computational linguistics and more recently issues of bias unfairness Awesome and emily. You are on the show too long ago when we talked about is linguistics missing from alpine research. Give us a little bit of your background. And maybe a catch up on what you've been doing for the past year so like you said. I'm a linguist. Studying linguistics at uc berkeley and then stanford and then. I got to come to washington and start the professional. Master's program in computational linguistics. Where meg was a student many years ago. Now i got over then. So i work in a largely in linguistics and competition linguistics but since about twenty sixteen have also been working in the space of. I've tried to avoid the phrase. Actually ethics sends people down these paths into philosophy that i find somewhat less helpful but societal impact of nlp and in that context a lot of the same discussions are relevant that relevant to other things that fall under the umbrella. What it's called a. And yet in the past year. I have continued that work and had this great opportunity to work with megan other members of her team and in particular dr timmy brew and a phd student of mine. engine mcmillan major on a paper looking at the impact of large language models. And we started this in september and submitted in october. And it's the first paper i've ever written. That has been far more work after it was finished than writing it in the first

Emily Bender Meghan Emily MEG Uc Berkeley University Of Washington Mitchell Johns Hopkins Emily Microsoft Stanford Google Washington Dr Timmy Brew Engine Mcmillan Megan
Doctor of Infectious Diseases speaks on the safety of Coronavirus Vaccines

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:56 sec | 7 months ago

Doctor of Infectious Diseases speaks on the safety of Coronavirus Vaccines

"About a month or so when the supply of covert vaccine in this country exceeds the demand for vaccinations. Surveys show that about 25% of the people who have not yet been vaccinated or still hesitant to get the shot. Many are skeptical because they believe the vaccine was rushed. The vaccine is safe. The vaccine is incredibly effective. Doctor John Schwartzberg is an expert on infectious diseases at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health Vaccine went through Phase one, Phase two and phase three trials exactly like every other vaccine. It wasn't rushed in terms of its production. A lot of the basic science that needed to be done received a tremendous amount of funding for getting this done very quickly.

John Schwartzberg Uc Berkeley School Of Public H
Fed’s Corporate Bond Buying Foresaw a Year of Covid Pain

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:33 min | 7 months ago

Fed’s Corporate Bond Buying Foresaw a Year of Covid Pain

"A year ago. The twenty third of march twenty twenty early. On as you're know in the days of this pandemic when maybe not all of us understood how much trouble we were gonna be in public health wise mental health wise certainly and economic health wise as well and we begin today of last year because we marked two milestones on this tuesday first of all the stock market low of the pandemic. It's been basically straight up since then. I know not the economy. Thank you we offer that. Just as a marker also a year ago today the federal reserve said it was going to step in and start buying up corporate bonds. That was and is a big deal. The fed getting into corporate dead didn't because the market for that debt just frozen and the fed was helping those companies borrow at lower rates which can be conducive to business and borrow they did. Corporate debt had records in twenty twenty but with rising interest news of late. As we've been telling you corporate debts been getting a little bit more expensive. Marketplace's justin ho gets us gone. Investors think about corporate bonds. Kind of like how they think about government bonds. If you're going to lock up my money for years you better pay me enough interest to make it worth my while. They want to be earning a rate of return that is higher than expected inflation. That's winnie caesar. at wellsfargo. She says many investors expect inflation to pick up this year. People are likely to spend more and that spending good drive up prices not just for regular consumers but for companies to it could be that accompanies cost of labor is increasing. It could be that. A company's cost of just raw materials and commodities is increasing. Those expectations are causing. Corporate bond yields to rise. But they're also signs of an improving economy says kathy jones chief fixed income strategist at charles schwab. Which underwrites this program. Jones says corporate borrowing costs are historically low and even though they're currently rising that shouldn't be an impediment to them investing and continuing to grow the business. The concern says stephen davidov salomon uc. Berkeley is if rates continue to grow into next year or the following if rates get too high. He says companies won't be able to borrow as much to a fun. Projects investment will slow because investment becomes more costly fed chair. J. paul said today although he expects prices to creep up this year he doesn't think that will have a big or lasting impact on overall inflation.

FED Justin Ho Winnie Caesar Kathy Jones Stephen Davidov Salomon Charles Schwab Jones Berkeley J. Paul
Applying RL to Real-World Robotics with Abhishek Gupta

The TWIML AI Podcast

04:35 min | 7 months ago

Applying RL to Real-World Robotics with Abhishek Gupta

"Gupta aspect is a phd student at uc berkeley. Where he works with folks. Like peter l. and sergei levin who've had on the show before abstract. Welcome to the terminal podcasts. Thanks forward to digging in and learning more about your work and your background. What got you interested in. Studying our al and robotics. Yes so so. I think my first experience with robotics was actually This first lego league that bump additions where we would like make these lego robots than they would like do these challenges and when we first did it we made the robots just by heart goading all the different primitives and programs to do everything and that works to some extent but i think when i came to berkeley it was really exciting to see that people had more sophisticated techniques to control. Robots was also the only thing that had ever done before then in terms of project experience and so i reached out to a number of professors I called the projects cool and beater specifically had a lot of research at that time on folding laundry and flying helicopters and i was like wow this is this is really amazing so at least to him as a freshman and and then he you know. He hired me as an assistant in his lab to kind of help out with some software engineering projects in some research projects. And kinda got started on research from there and so then like the first set of experiences that i had there. Were kind of like helping grad students and post docs on their research projects which were largely related to folding laundry in dying noughts and folding thousand things that peter was excited about at the dime and from there i think click grad school my research and interest under a lot more towards enforcement learning and learning based ideas. Oh cool so within that of of our and our alpha robotics. And i guess maybe that's broad from a tomato perspectives. Since we've had a bunch of conversations on your where do you focus like what are what are your research interest within those fields. Yeah so i guess. Since i am a person who was really excited about robotics and i wanna get robots to work because i think they have a lot of impact and i see. Rls a great dual to enable robotics more so than exploring rl for the sake of water. And so what i specifically think about a lot is like what are the things that prevent us from applying reinforcement learning robotics problems in the real word. So for instance if we want a robot the like operating kitchen and being up your kitchen or make a meal what is it. That's preventing the algorithms at work on. I'll go out for star. Whatever for being applied to these types of systems. And so i specifically think about like. There's a mismatch assumptions between what these algorithms typically assume and what's actually available in the real world. It's like i think about. How do we bridge these mismatched assumptions. So specifically what i mean by that is for instance in a game or in a in a video game or a board game. You'd assume that the score is provided so that award function it's daily easily available but in the vale where there's no score. Which tells you what you're doing. That are for instance in video game. You can collect millions of samples but in a physical robot if you do that with random expiration. You're gone either. Break yourself for the environment and then also just like. There's a lot of assumptions that we make where we can hide are gertie laundry in simulation. So we can like reset the wherever we want or we can like magically set the state of the world in some ways and a lot of our algorithms are critically reliant on these assumptions but in the real world. You just can't do that and so kind of been thinking about. How do we bitch mismatched assumptions. In that way and the problems. That are most interesting to the one that you mentioned earlier that you can cut your teeth on with peter in saturday like folding laundry and not tying and that kind of thing or you have some other When you think about your work. Do you have some set of canonical problems. That come to mind. Yeah that's a great question. So i think it'd be great if we could fold our laundry at byron ought to do the things that we used to do but i don't think we're quite there yet so i think we're still getting objects to be pushed at on and picked out and more basic skills before we can get to the more complex ones that so there's like more averages paradox which would which indicates that like learning low level skills can often be harder than learning the higher level ones and. I think we're kind of stuck in battery him but we're making a lot of progress. I think

Gupta Aspect Uc Berkeley Peter L Sergei Levin Berkeley Peter Byron
Michael Friend Advocates For Diversity In CRISPR

CRISPR Cuts

04:34 min | 8 months ago

Michael Friend Advocates For Diversity In CRISPR

"Can you talk about what that role endangered so as a minority being part of minority coalition. How does that actually would say you're planning. Events are one out of the types of responsibilities. you're kind of involved in shore. What for chris. Carr my role on is on of the committee and really is to help develop strong. And broad foot trenton. Targeted monastic communities by by really joe trying to facilitate interactions with community based organizations to include aftermarket universities. Darkly restore cabrera colleges. Hvac us that had a very long standing history of mistrust to some extent. And so i kind of summit up just to really increase bernardi representation in these conversations around christopher and engagement with a very strong focus on making sure we have diverse forces some of our listeners. Who may not know exactly. What could a split on this. Can you just in a few lines. Dealers about guzman on absolutely or christopher is is an organization that really focused on the compensation crispin and they do it from the perspective where they're not be. The four or guest technology did not pro con but to really have conversations as it relates to this technology in house being utilized many ways and the benefits and risks down a bowl and started out by uc berkeley in conversations. There which later a year after moved to boston and she'll hope these. These conversations are kind of women around the country at really sparing Lotta interests around. Christopher and i can say that they've been very diverse voices after just faded indiscretions discussions. That's a very interesting role in vegas to learn more about your experiences by doing this. Just one question before that. How did you get into you. Know the crisper fields specifically was your background and christopher. How did that come to be that. You are involved in organized crisper con is. It's all started. President obama launch of the precision medicine issue which was pm. I in two thousand fifteen. I was invited to be a part of that much and that pm. I initiative is a multi year multi million on effort that was developed to keach around creating a diverse cohort to trutv by disease treatment for all but that program is currently known as all of us program and so from that launch. I started the minority coalition for position mets. So you're speaking under the bit of audio experiences. As an event organizer being part of that rising committee on crisper con- you had mentioned that when pulling together some event it was really impossible for you to find black researchers in the area. So could you elaborate more on the garden. Status stakes are the neck of diversity that you are seeing in the field. Well just to be honest. You know this is that i think at this point is kinda shameful in subsets. Your article article that you've written highlighting some of top companies in fear. Know as you look at even these compromises need couples this leading the work around crisper. You can see most senior today. Shes clearly the lack of diversity that so evident in these companies. And i think what is sometimes hurtful. Is that in this crisper in some ways to successive crisper. Really an johnny outcome A black disease sickle cell disease which is driving an has driven a lot of interest at of course financial investments. And so i would say at this point. It's not looking very good chance of diversity

Christopher Uc Berkeley Bernardi Trenton Cabrera Carr Guzman Crispin Keach Minority Coalition For Positio Chris JOE Boston President Obama Vegas Sickle Cell Disease Johnny
Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission, Israeli studies show

Pacifica Evening News

03:19 min | 8 months ago

Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission, Israeli studies show

"To Israeli studies have found that Fizer Cove in 19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission. Shedding light on one of the biggest questions of the global effort to quash the pandemic. Data analysis and a study by the Israeli Health Ministry and Visor found the Fizer vaccine developed with Germany's beyond Tech. Reduces infection, including an asymptomatic cases by 89% and in symptomatic cases by 94%. The findings air from a pre published study not yet peer reviewed but based on a national database that is one of the world's most advanced a separate study. By Israel's Sheba Medical Center, published Friday in The Lancet medical journal found that among 7200 hospital staff who received their first dose in January There was an 85% reduction in symptomatic covert 19 within 15 to 28 days with an overall reduction of infections, including asymptomatic cases detected by testing of 75%. More research is needed to draw a definitive conclusion. But the studies are among the first to suggest a vaccine may stop the spread of the novel coronavirus and not just prevent the people vaccinated from getting ill. Dr Jon Swartz and Burn cold clinical professor emeritus of infectious diseases at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. The implications of this are enormous Republicans standpoints in vermin individual standpoint. If if the If these numbers are even numbers significantly less than this hold true, that is that once fully vaccinated. Well, first of all we know once fully vaccinated. It's Very, very, very, very unlikely. We're going to get seriously all and there's no evidence that you'll die after you being fully vaccinated. So we know that. But what if after you're fully vaccine, you get reinfected. We know you're not gonna get sick, but you could spread it. But what if you can't spread it? Or what? If it's very unlikely for you to spread it? It's gonna really mean that our masks they're going to come off sooner that we're gonna be hugging her loved ones a lot sooner right now. I'm fully vaccinated have been fully vaccinated now for this Just actually, three weeks today, um If I knew that I couldn't transmit this virus to my loved ones, I would My strategy would be very different. If I may ask you really come off. I could be hugging. Uh huh. But I don't know that yet, And so I have to still remain vigilant. And that is where a mask and social distance to be absolutely certain that I can't do that and think about all the health care workers. If the health care workers knew that they didn't it once they're fully vaccinated, they wouldn't transmit that would make an enormous difference in the hospitals. And think about just Transportation. It's just goes all the way down the line. So the implications are

Fizer Cove Israeli Health Ministry Sheba Medical Center The Lancet Medical Journal Dr Jon Swartz Uc Berkeley School Of Public H Germany Israel
Interview With Evan Kuo

Bitcoin Radio

06:04 min | 9 months ago

Interview With Evan Kuo

"Welcome back to imagine twenty twenty. I'm yonaha coutts and today. I'm glad to join by co co founder of ampleforth ebonics of joining. The i'm glad to be here. And i see you're wearing a costume for this halloween themed interview necessary. I i know it's not a very scary costume but this is what had around the house so you'll have to forgive me right. It might be scary if you stand up. Exactly i'm gonna sit. I'm gonna sit camera token upward for those who haven't seen any your past interviews. Who might not know. You wanna give a background kind of who you are and how you got the blockchain. Yeah totally so On my background is in engineering. School at uc berkeley to study kind of mechanical engineering and also computer science got more and more pulled into that direction of robotics but then you know after graduating quickly went into the startup world and eventually kind of Teamed up with my co-founder brandon aisles. He's also kind of a computer scientist. Said he's more of a a google search engineer And the time of a twenty seventeen after therion was really taking off We started to kind of think. About what sorts of applications block chain. Technology might be interesting to explore We had both been introduced to bitcoin years prior. We both kind of didn't fully believe you know it would be as revolutionary as. It wasn't about an interesting and anyways we kind came to this mutual conclusion. That the most salient application of blockchain technology degree the be monies and then began a journey asking what sorts of new monies ought to be created are can be created with this new technology and in particular. We're interested in non. Collateralized currencies like bitcoin as opposed to redeemable collateralized currencies like tether anyways Ampleforth is a cryptocurrency like bitcoin. Except for the number of units in your wallet can increase or decrease does so each day based on price exchange rate so it accepts a price as an input as a proxy for demand. If there's more demand and supply than increase the total supply of ample directly to use our wallets and proportioning there's less A demand and supply than we decrease the quantity of units proportionately from user wallets and the design of this crypto currency was actually meant to address the limitation of fix supply commodity. Money's like gold and bitcoin and along the way We kind of we were. We were funded by a you know. Really kind of reputable leasees were also advised by two members of the hoover institute which is a political and economic thing at stamford in their independent capacities and anyways long story. Short upon further analysis We also realize that this new kind of incentive mechanism or protocol Might introduce a different movement patterns to the space and so that's really interesting because most of these cryptocurrencies very very tightly correlated And it makes it difficult to kind of make them useful. In baskets of collateral assets or to construct you know robust systems on top of it and so two things one we designed it to address the limitations in fix apply money and two we noticed that And hypothesized that it might have novel movement pattern. That could allow to decouple for mass. It's like bitcoin. Which makes it useful for. Diversification at basket of of crypto assets. So that's kind of ampleforth in a nutshell okay. Well it does seem like a like a great idea does addressing those problems. You mentioned You know obviously knipling. The price fight supply and demand. Classic out it's an economic officials. But how do you actually change the amount or the value in actual you can hold it in a in a special wallet. And what a flip on keeping my ample in foot. How does your network right. That's a really great question. Actually that's the kind of the one technical breakthrough here That we take advantage of its The the the ampleforth protocols able to increase or decrease apply across all wallets proportionately without a transaction between pierce and the way that happens is but we adjust this kind of global coefficient of expansion if you will And by adjusting that single variable once every day. It's actually not we do it. But the protocol does so once every day automatically You know the number of units in all wallets whether they're in cold storage or not an increase or decrease now if your wallet your ankles being held on an exchange in the exchange tends to pool these wallet addresses so the jane wallet Quantities will automatically increase in decrease according to the protocol But if somebody's custody in your assets in pulled it then it's the responsibility of the custodian to make sure that the accounting is up to date. Because if you're if you're are in exchange really what's being reflected near-balanced might be just some entry in the database not what's actually directly connected to a wallet because they pull wallet addresses and therefore the certain exchanges that integrated ample have essentially propagated that accounting Into into the wall balances or the balances that are displayed to users. But yeah kind of happens automatically. So that's kind of the novel thing would never in the past people to do that. Like increase or decrease the quantity of units in people's wallets without a transaction between pierce and. That's what allows us to happen in a scalable way with just a single transaction per day And so yeah it's cool. It's elastic and it's also. Non diluted mentioned this earlier like bitcoin.

Yonaha Coutts Uc Berkeley Brandon Aisles Co Co Hoover Institute Bitcoin Knipling Stamford Google Pierce
Ali Ghodsi on The Past, Present, and Future of Big Data

Invest Like the Best

07:47 min | 9 months ago

Ali Ghodsi on The Past, Present, and Future of Big Data

"I'd love to start our conversation at the end. With what data bricks is today to level set for the audience. Exactly what you do what. Your focuses in what the business does for customers. Could you just walk us through as we sit here at the end of twenty twenty what the company looks like in the service or problem it solves for customers or seven year old company. We have about seventeen hundred employees and we help enterprises massive amounts of data and machine learning a and the data most enterprises. They've seen how silicon valley for tech companies have used data in a really strategic way to disrupt industries. They wanna do the same thing. But they don't have thousands of engineers that can help them build data apart from custom for their use case. We've built out and we enable them to do that. I would love to go all the way back into retell the history of distributed computing because everybody will have heard the term big data. This was a really popular term. Five seven years ago and i think that concept that term. The fact that he was being talked about in normal business circles was the result of progress in the world of distributed compute and storage. I'd love you to rewind however far back you'd think is appropriate to go. Maybe it's back to the two thousand six yahoo days tell the modern history of distributing computing. What it means and why so interesting and important. I think what happened. Is that around two thousands. We hit this wall because moore's wall in figure out how to make computers faster so everything started moving into these data centers new computer and it was a new data center in this data centers. Where you had under the thousands of genes people started collecting more and more data and the reason for this with multiple one was the price of storage kept going on so he became cheaper and cheaper to store all this massive amounts of data and no one wanted to throw it away and they heard there were some more that companies like we will have gone a lot of value out of data so they wanted to do the same thing secondly more and more people were connected on the thirties sites that had millions of users attached to it that were coming visiting decides those this aspiration that collect all the data. Maybe we can do great things with it. I think around two thousand and five doesn't six people still gonna know before. Take his new. They had typically an ad business the reflecting date other optimizing how to show ads the people the residents prices didn't really know what to do with it so this big data revolution sort of entered its first phase which is let's collect data on their amazing things we can do at once we get there. It's cheap wanna do it. So that's kind of what started on that time and people started collecting these things into data lakes. Massive massive data sets back then the measurement of success was. How much data do you have. We are very accessible. One pedal bike to data are where even more data go. They don't like has grown from one. Part of this is amazing. So i kind of the first dinner. What exactly was going on almost down to the hardware that was revolutionary. Back in the early to mid two thousand. That made some of this possible so people are used to having their own data on their own computer of rinse familiar with the term cloud. But i think early on everyone would think of clouds someone else's computer a computer somewhere else not under my desk somewhere else. What literally was happening from the hardware or software standpoint in the early to mid two thousands to make some of this possible in early two thousand. You would buy a big supercomputer as a lot of problems. In fact i remember berkeley. Who is the twitter and boever gay. Just they have one giant machine with process all the tweets. I don't remember how much memory but it was some gigantic amounts while. How did you get machine without much memories. That was the way it would get very expensive. Super-computer it would do all your competitions for you but as hit this moore's wall and it couldn't scale these computers are onto ninety five. The cpu speed stagnant computers. Getting faster and more computers are basically being three gigahertz since system. So that's kind of started meeting. We probably have to distribute. Our needs are not going on on the data. We have is not going down. The number beating processing capacity we need is just increasing exponential. We probably need more machines. So that's when. I started distributing ounce into data centers it soon became infeasible for every organization to manage thousands of thousands of machines on their own on prime so the cloud revolution kind of off said. Hey this is a utility. Why don't we manage august thousands of chance for you in the cloud. You can just use them. This also accelerate thinks 'cause now anyone could pretty much would credit cards start reading thousands of machines. This new computer in the cloud started storing things on very cheaply and get started. What was the harder. Challenge back then between hardware and the software needed to coordinate putting stuff into those systems and then accessing and pulling it out in a timely fashion what was the most innovation that happened to make that possible. Well actually if you think changed in the very early days the problem was there was so much data and the networks. Were not fast enough so in the cloud or whether your own bill center that you had the big innovation of map reduced the big thing. If you go back to a time was we have to move the computations close to the data you specify what you wanna do your data but then you had to sink all map produce which was really clever about. Let's move the code that runs on the state are closed today. Because there's so much data. We can't transferred over the network. We try to transfer it over to meth or the whole network will collapse. That was the name of the game back then and there was a lot of research on how to avoid. That turned up. You don't have need to do that anymore. Qc a little bit more about that. So i just wanna make sure i understand. So let's make the stupid simple. I've got a terabyte of data sitting somewhere on actual hardware and whatever it is. It's customer data or something. If i wanna do some sort of compute on top of that data run a query or produce some output. The network was the limiting factors. Just getting the data from there somewhere else to do. The computer was hard so some innovation was just do the compute and the same data center or something. Getting that right yeah. Let's take an example. Let's have data on how people have clicked on a website since you can't buy supercomputer anymore. You've probably distributed that over many machines. We have one hundred machines that drives and started on the horizon sheen's the the pedophile of how people have clicked on your website. But now you wanna compute something simple example. We just wanna see what's the average number of books on a particular link. Twenty years ago would be described the code the takes all those numbers in averages them and then go over all of the data sets but here to do that but would have to move all the data from these hundreds of machines through the machine. That's doing the competition. And i would just crashed in it. In fact we did that at uc berkeley. We were developing of spark. We crashed parts of networks. They called us up. What are you doing was transferring all this data from all these machines every other machine so that was name of the game in the early days. How do we avoid that. How do we actually move pieces of the competition. The average just while he's hundred machines let them compete at locally and send some kind of aggregates to you mentioned that originally that was a unique solve but then today. We no longer have to do it that way. So what's changed networking technology. Unlike some of us have just gone faster ambassador investor and they've also come up with dick needs is actually research that started at ups t they figured out how to configure the networks in his data centers in a way such that any two machines can completely at full speed communicate with each other. You can no longer collapsed and work with these heavy computations and in some sense these days the network has been completely merchandised. And it's no longer in your way so we no longer need to actually move the code close to the data and that's happened around. Two thousand nine doesn't ten eleven today. Virtually everyday center every public cloud provides. You really really fast networks. That just won't get in your way.

Moore Yahoo Berkeley Twitter Uc Berkeley Dick
The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself

Untangle

04:55 min | 9 months ago

The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself

"Welcome to untangle so happy to have you here today. Thank you pitcher. Share happy to be here. The i love your work. You've done such incredible stuff. And i just for our audience. I just think this first paragraph in your book was so interesting it starts like this in this incredibly competitive society of ours. How many of us truly feel good about ourselves. It seems like such a fleeting thing feeling good especially as we need to feel special or above average to feel worthy anything else. Seems like a failure. Tell me a little bit about that. And what led you to really do this. Work on self compassion. Yes so i started practicing self compassion. When i started learning mindfulness actually my last year in graduate school. Uc berkeley a man. I did two years post doctoral. Study with one of the country's leading self esteem racers. And i started really becoming familiar with all the research. Showing the downsides of self esteem. It's not a downside of having high self esteem but of pursuing it trying to get it the shenanigans. We go through trying to go good about ourselves compared to others and so i kind of thought that was practicing self compassion and seeing the incredible benefits my personal life and i just thought this is such a healthier way to think about. How did we late yourself. Positively themselves esteem. so that's kind of really would give me the. You might say that confidence to actually start researching self passion. But what's wrong with self esteem. So many parents today want their children to have self esteem and self competence. Tell us a little bit about the difference between self esteem and self compassion right. So there's absolutely nothing wrong with self esteem feeling. You're a person of worth in value. And we definitely want people have a sense of high worth as opposed to 'having themselves and and that's the wellbeing goes about question really. The problem is how people go about getting their high self esteem so for most people s steam involves a process of social comparison. Right so i mean again. If i said patricia your podcast yet savage. How would you feel. You probably feel good about that. Evaluation right asked this kind of the way. The system is stacked against us. We all have to feel average at least in those areas that are important to us to feel like that's just like baseline minimum self esteem. And so we're always comparing ourselves to others. If someone else does something better than we do. We often feel inadequate comparison. The really big problem with self esteem. as it tends to be contingent in other words we only have self esteem roomy succeed. We lose it when we fail so when things are going well for sure we lacquer cells we feel we have value but what happens when we fail. We blow that big job assignment or get rejected soon as fail ourselves esteemed desserts us which is actually precisely when we need that. Self confidence. The most self compassion. It's not about judging yourself positively. It's not saying. I'm a good person. Or i'm better than other people i most great is just about relating to yourself kindly so there is a sense of self worth inheritance self compassion but self worth comes from just being a glide human being where the like all other flawed human beings as opposed in necessarily succeeding or on being better than others. So you're done research showing the sense of self worth linked to self compassion as much more stable over time than just a simple self-worth judging yourself positively but how did we get in this culture to a place where we are so critical of ourselves and where we need to study something like self compassion where it's not a natural characteristic. I'm not convinced that it's just a western cultural phenomena. I mean i think definitely hard in the west because there's so much pressure to compete and succeed. Same thing in east asian cultures with as a lot of pressure to succeed and compete. But i also think there are some natural reasons while we tend to our jump to solve criticism immediately a mess. Basically that when we feel inadequate in some way or we fail at something we feel threatened and when we feel threatened we naturally have the threat. Defense response right. We want to attack the situation. Get rid of the problems of. You'll safe again. Unfortunately when the problem is ourselves when we attack the threat we actually attack ourselves. So i really do. Think at some level our tendency to to be self-critical is really desire to keep ourselves safe.

Uc Berkeley Patricia
Healing from the root cause with mindset work, with Lana Shlafer

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

04:49 min | 10 months ago

Healing from the root cause with mindset work, with Lana Shlafer

"Tell the audience a little bit more about you and your personal story. And i know you mentioned you've had a difficult past with your relationship with food in your body so talk about that so i mean i think that for a lot of people You know their health. Their eating their exercise their self-identity really stumps from things they experienced in childhood. Because that's where we learn how you know what is appropriate quote unquote way to behave. And how we form our priorities and ways of looking at the world so for me. I grew up in russia. And i came to the us when i was twelve. And so for me the big like shift and the pain point was that i was sort of ripped off from everything i knew in all my relatives and came even though life in russia was very difficult. It's what i knew. And i had friends and i was great at school. And you know all the things. And i get plopped in a country where i don't speak the language where i'm just here with my mom dad and brother and that's all the people i know and this entire site of the world and as i sort of tried to adjust to life here it was also middle school and a lot of teenage and body changes and troll norms and so for me and ended up manifesting that i started controlling food as the way i think to just feel like i've some control over my life and it was subtle at first where i just had a lot of emotions looking back. I didn't know that. At the time. I didn't know what to do with them. I obviously had hormonal. Thanks happening as well and a starting in high school. Where i just found that if i just eat less and i'm thinner i would get more attention and i also felt like i was more charge of my life and then it progressed through college way turned into binge eating and it got really bad when my parents got divorced so that my little world which was already not very stable totally apart even though was a great thing overall it was a challenging time. Being in a school a lot of pressure. I went to one of the top universities uc berkeley. I was taking a full load of classic. It was a lot of pressure. And so i feel like the eating and exercising was. It's always a double edged sword. And i talk about that in my books so and my philosophy often that it was the thing that was the weakest link that was sort of showing me the cracks. But it's also what brought in so much light. Rumi has great quote that it's through the cracks of the light enters and for me. It was this thing that i wanted to get rid of a body that i didn't like try to control the anxiety that i had the controlling be having my day in fifteen minute increments and everything that i need to eat to be planned out and it was so painful. I realized that it was a problem. I told my parents i should get checked into a like a facility. Because i'm not doing okay. And then being the the kind of russian culture. They're like you're fine. Just get through school. You know i. It led me to start therapy to learn about intuitive eating. Just start yoga to like it. Took me in the direction that now. I've been moving in for the rest of my life. But at the time i couldn't see the whole picture so was very painful. And it's one of my greatest accomplishments to this day and i have a lot of things that i described as miracles. My book is called manifest miracle. Because i literally could not imagine that at the time which is that i have not only completely healed whatever that means quote unquote my eating disorder. I have such a loving supportive relationship with my body. I eat what i want. When i want i move how i want. It's all about taking care of myself. And having had the pregnancy that a twin pregnancy on the single pregnancy all of that has taken deeper into honoring myself and creating a relationship with my reality. That really feels like it is based on love and support and understanding so the fact that i can say that from where i was seemed like a miracle like i thought that for the rest of my life. I'm going to have these issues. And i'm just going to try to manage them and it's really easy to feel that way when you're in it right so when you were in it. What were some of the things that you either experienced or you saw like. What were your on. The one hand motivating factors to get you out of that cycle. And then how did you start to get out of it. I mean honestly. I feel like all the emotional work was by far. What got me to the root of it more than even the intuitive books that i was reading and doing a lot of mindfulness practices. It all started really in college for me. I felt like they all got

Russia Rumi Berkeley United States
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 10 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"African students at UC Berkeley, one here and one studying remotely. It's an especially tough time. Quds, Chloe Veltman reports when the UC Berkeley campus shuts down for the winter break a door as his sandal Tan Coulibaly usually returns home to spend the holidays with his family in the western Ivory Coast City of Mom followed the traditional We just like getting some chicken and some meat and, you know, cook and it together, but not this year. 23 year old doctoral students and engineering is stuck in Berkeley because of the pandemic, it has been held. Coulibaly has beena Berkeley for a while, he says he made many friends while there is an undergrad. They've all graduated and moved on. He stayed behind. So starting the grad program like I really felt isolated life at Berkeley has never been easy. Coulibaly has a generous scholarship, but he's had to work side jobs. He sends the extra cash back home to his family in the Ivory Coast. At the same time, he's been dealing with the racism he's encountered on campus. But the time he overheard a couple of students say they would never date a black guy. I never experienced that before coming to the United States, he says. It's also being tough to fit in with the school's black student groups. Even with the people that look like you, you don't really understand the struggle that they have been through being in this country. He says He's reached out to his campus counselor and psychiatrist for help, But he wishes he could get more emotional support from his family. He says there's a lot of stigma surrounding mental health issues in his home country. And the way mental health is also taken back home. You know, just like you would be fine or is gonna pass and stuff like this, So I had a lot of like breakdown. Other than going out for occasional runs and bike rides. Coulibaly is spending most of his time indoors, he says. He's just focused on getting through the holiday locked down with a little help from.

UC Berkeley Coulibaly Ivory Coast City Ivory Coast Chloe Veltman Quds United States
Applications and Impact of CRISPR/CAS9 in Bioprocessing

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

05:48 min | 10 months ago

Applications and Impact of CRISPR/CAS9 in Bioprocessing

"Today. I'm joined by fanling. Wong director of cell line development and protein sciences and zane starkey wolf director of corporate development from wishy biologics. I'm excited to be speaking with both of you. Today about crisper cast nine technology and its possibilities in the discovery and development biopharmaceuticals. We will also conduct a deep dive on its potential impact on bioprocessing and bio manufacturing. Welcome fanling and zane to the podcast. Zinke randy glad to be here. Thank you brandy before we get too far and because of our audience is quite diverse with regards to their experiences in life sciences. Fenland could you please provide some background on. Crisper cast nine as molecular biology. Gene editing tool. Yeah sure so christmas. Nineteen action system is actually adapted from a natural procure arctic defense mechanism to bacteria to simplify. What could spec assistant can do is took leave the face she and i was. It has been incorporated into the bacteria routine on so that to keep the fate from reproducing. Crisper is actually akron stands for clusters servers regularly interspace. Shot had a dramatic repeats and kissed by the most well well-researched variant of the class outcasts nucleus. Which has been used within the gene editing function. So i think the research community have actually adapted this mechanism to revolutionize how we perform the genetic modifications Not only in pro arctic. But or so. You can arctic sales since the system was first published and zane i know from our previous conversations that you were saying that crisper casts has an intriguing origin. Would you be able to elaborate. Yes interesting research can be found on crisper that dates back to the late. Eighty s Other work has been conducted throughout the first decade of the two thousand however it wasn't until two thousand twelve that two pivotal research papers were published in the journal. Science one by jennifer down nov uc berkeley and manual shopping chair of the university of vienna and then another pianist by doctors cross unanimous and sickness at vilnius university. All demonstrating the use of bacterial. Crisper cast nine as simple programmable. Gene editing jewel. But i know that the story doesn't stop there does it no. It certainly does not in less than a year in two thousand thirteen. The labs of dr fung jong and will chong of the burden student. Mit dr george. Church's lab at harvard reported success in adapting. Crisper cast nine for genome editing in your area cells and both mouse and human cells. And i know that we could really spend an entire podcast. Just on the history of crisper so i wanted to stay focused on the technology here. There's been a lot of excitement since discovery about this molecular biology tool. Can you explain why. Sure the remarkable functionality of this tool is that it allows scientists to target specific locations within the genetic code of an organism to cut out or replace a segment of dna due to the high specificity and exactness of utility. The applications have far reaching potential. And it has already become a much to walks game changer. In many fields of life science because it enables efficient cost effective and precision gene. Editing that has a wide utility for development of biological therapeutics including so and gene therapy disease modeling diagnostics agriculture industrial biology and more. And this has me thinking just about alternatives to crisper casts altogether Are there other ways to edit genomes. And if so what makes a crisper cast so much better. Great question brandy many of the other gene editing systems utilize today such as zinc finger. Nicholas's talons the use of mega nick. Liaises or other by all vectors like a. Iv compared with christopher cast nine are in the end very complex and time intensive often requiring many more steps and thus are more costly as well also and this may be greatest benefit. Is that crisper chess. Nine as a low off target affects profile which again makes it an ideal gene. Editing tool justify along with that. I've read many Recent advances using crisper technologies. Could you elaborate a little bit on those. The advances are extensive and continuous. We speak one example includes crisper a crisper i which are techniques to up and down regulate gene expression using dead cast nine dead cast nine removed the nucleus capability of cast nine but still allows for the targeted binding to a double stranded. Dna sequence of interest using the highway. Specific guide are a that is one of the cornerstones of crisper genome editing. I'd like to add that another application. It's a using crisper for hamas directed repel or so called a the are so this technique in simple terms can repel a double stranded. Dna break which is very important for genus ability. But what does the crisper made. Sdr can do is that. It cannot only to repel a break. But or so crew. Eight the break and then replace it with a small mutation or as elijah sequences so this techniques have actually substantially opened ability or researchers to make gino added more quickly and more efficiently

Cell Line Development And Prot Zane Starkey Zinke Randy Arctic Dr Fung Jong Dr George Wong Vilnius University University Of Vienna Zane The Journal Berkeley Jennifer Harvard Nicholas Christopher Chess Hamas Elijah Gino
Unlocking the Black Box of Pricing: Why Pricing is So Easy in Theory but Not in Real Life with Alessandro Monti

Impact Pricing

04:34 min | 10 months ago

Unlocking the Black Box of Pricing: Why Pricing is So Easy in Theory but Not in Real Life with Alessandro Monti

"On march diving to his allesandro. Monte here are three things you wanna know about allesandro before we start. He is a professor for corporate management and organization at cologne business school. He's done stints at both s. Kp and wolters kluwer two companies. That i truly respect in rural the pricing and he went to uc. Berkeley as did i. Welcome alessandro i'm mark. Thanks for having me on the show. It's to be here they. How'd you get into pricing in the first place. Yeah we all have Have a story That we can tell and it's always interesting to know how we kind of entered into this adventure now. The first touch boy was of course during studies microeconomics on the train. Sort of a communist. Of course you get the standard pricing approach the supply and demand things there but the real id say management world touch point with pricing. Ause my first job which was at a skippy. and since then this s- topic while yeah caught my attention and all in topic. So that's that's the that's the story. So why do you stay. You're all in but why it's I think prices. In general. They i once i think once read wasn't article into quote woes welded the central hinges of the economy so the price at the end of the day clears markets. Price is something that you feel as a consumer immediately. it's sometimes pain and sometimes pleasure. So it has the behavioral component and yet. That's i think that's. That's what makes prices annual dealing with. I sing quite fascinating for me. At least so. I'll buy into the fact that it touches almost everything so it's so powerful and yet i love the fact that so few people understand it and which means that when we can advise them we can have huge impacts in their lives and their businesses. So definitely i that nice. So you got a phd in business history. I have never heard of that before. And then you went to work for escapee. How did a phd in business history. Help you in escapee while it helps out first of all from the let's say methodological perspective you know learning the same more scientific tools and techniques. So it really does help in then tackling all those pressing questions. that of course should be tackled from. Let's say a more profound way. Okay so i always go the fundamental way when it comes to pricing so it helps you know to to have the tools and techniques sort of this research perspective had so definitely helped while just on a side note when when i talked to my escape you partners because i actually did the phd wild being escapees. So they kind of allowed me on sabbatical end. When when i talk project say while hd and has a history component. Yeah i I i saw some some question marks there say well how does that now. Kind of translate into our everyday business and dan. I think at the end. The research the businesses. Phd helps you to understand. Probably the president and also get sort of a a hint on what will come eventually in the future and so is it a quantitative phd when you do business history. you're still doing a bunch of stats and quantitative research and things like that. Yeah while you can do both ways. You can approach both waist. Now what i did actually is i. I went into historical archives. So i really dig deep into the documents from the. Let's say early seventeenth century and had to research him and had to read them and had to understand how much let's say executive spec at that time decided on pricing pricing strategies. Of course you can do to quantitative approach. You need to have the data said so you need to have some numbers eventually for that period in history. It's already like a jackpot. Having documents at all so the point here was really to understand the decision making at that time. So it's a more qualitative. Approach the

Allesandro Cologne Business School Wolters Alessandro Berkeley DAN
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:49 min | 11 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

"The official bank of UC Berkeley, go bears. This'd California golden bears basketball on KGO 8 10 bears knockoff Northwest 86 to 61. The final of Gill Coliseum, joined now by the head coach of the Bears unleash a refreshing Citrus kick with Mountain Dew Charger Game with Mountain Dew, proud partner of Golden Bears basketball coach Fox. Thanks for taking the time your thoughts on this Thanksgiving Day basketball game Well, I'm thankful that we were able to win. Obviously, we played a lesser opponent today. And so we were able to get everyone some playing time and but, you know, after After a plus, you know, eight a half months away. Um, you know, way needed a game like this. Just, you know, just to start, you know, knocking off more the rust and and it was good to see a lot of guys get experience today. Other than the winning the experience. What what was most pleasing as far as your effort and or execution today? Well, I don't think we played great. I do think we made a A more concerted effort to share the ball today. Um, you know, I thought we thought we thought we played in a way where we try to help each other on guy thought we were more willing passers today. So I was pleased with that. But, you know, I think you know we'll go back and watch it to take and still see a boatload of mistakes and things that we can clean up but a twist. We can we can learn after a win today. What? You shook up the starting lineup and had some different people in there that seemed to crank up the defensive intensity. Right from the opening tip. Was that part of your plan that you wanted guys? We're gonna come out and compete from the beginning. Not just when you guys were down. Well, our defense in the first half last night was unacceptable. We gave up 50% field goals percentage. We give up 50% 3 point shooting percentage on. I wanted to make sure that that That we understand that for if we're going to change the trajectory of this program and turning into a winner, that there's gonna be a competitive maturity that's always evident and and so I thought we had a much better start tonight. Coach. Happy Thanksgiving safe travels that will see you on chat with you on Monday for the home opener. Thank you. And I wanna wish one wish our football team all the best tomorrow and let's keep that backs. Thanks, Mark, but talk to you Monday. Coach Mark Fox of the Bears. They knocked off Northwest 86 to 61. We're back with final thoughts. This is Cal basketball during by your Northern California 20 dealers from Lear Field. I am G college. Jai's Coburn lied but.

Bears Golden Bears Coach Mark Fox Mountain Dew Gill Coliseum California basketball UC Berkeley Lear Field official partner Northern California Jai football Coburn
"uc berkeley" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"What you're going to say And do you think That these anarchists are emboldened and maybe even surprised about the lack of pushback they've received in places like Portland, Seattle, three nights in Kenosha, and that sort of thing you know, they're not surprised. That's why they're doing it because they know they can get away with it, And they can't get away with it in City X. They go into city why we can see that here on a local level Wauwatosa. They've been able to push back because the elected leaders there have allowed them to do that. They tried that other cities. It doesn't work. They just move on to the different city to Matt's point a couple of minutes ago, about The social justice and how it's expanded to stealing Nikes on the mag Mile in Chicago. What the nasty with George Floyd. Nobody knows, but that's the point. It's a very generic title. It sounds good social justice. I'm for it. Reparations, but a good pair of Air Jordans reparations. Well, that's how they develop it in something hold hold onto Dunham's. Let's go. If that's all it's gonna cost me. I was going is the point of getting to whatever they left is looking for will change there, too. Remember how was climates or global warming? Global warming, global warming? No, that's not working. Let's experience a climate change, so we can move the goalpost to get the point across. We want whether it's agreeing to a deal, Whatever. It's the same thing with social justice, this very broad description that's never clearly defined so we can move it around. Based on what our needs are at that moment, I think then that the anarchists have been over the Continuum of time surprised and emboldened by the fact that they haven't gotten a push back. But it's not something that just happened this year that goes back to 2013 2014 2015 in places like Portland and UC Berkeley in places like that where these people were busting up buildings and breaking windows, and you know it. Got a little slap on the wrist. When was it that they chased? And Coulter out of one of the UC? Which time? Yeah, you know that Ben Shapiro tragedy what couldn't because of his own state. Yeah. UW Madison. How many times did these people stand up and scream inside of a classroom? How many times when these 20 somethings were in high school? Did they chained themselves to the flagpole for whatever we have? We've allowed our Children to radicalize themselves. And this is this gets back to social media. Where you Khun, Go. And when we went to our rooms, it was Led Zeppelin and maybe some light drugs. Now you get online and you get you get exposed all sorts of crazy craziness That makes sense It 15 or 18, but doesn't make sense in the real world. I think that these people have for years been ableto push the bar and I knew the minute they pulled down the Lady forward statue at the state capital that we were headed for a summer of violence when Governor Tony Evers didn't come Listen, you can be you, can you Khun hate the cops and, you know, stand in solidarity with the rights. But when you pull down the Lady forward statue that is supposed to celebrate Wisconsin as a progressive state. Then it just becomes about the destruction, and these people know it. And until they get either shot by somebody or have the cops really come in, they're going to continue to do so. I'm going to disagree with you on one quick point if I could, and that's only because you know, Ben talked about the way we are seeing our young radicalizing themselves, but they have the tools to radicalize.

Ben Shapiro Wauwatosa Dunham Governor Tony Evers Kenosha George Floyd Portland Wisconsin UC Berkeley UW Seattle Chicago Matt UC Coulter
"uc berkeley" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"The government didn't have the enforcement powers to actually enforce the rules in the laws they did have an. So for example, people just started building. Their little. Shacks or little food stands right on top of the highway. And so you try to drive on the highway in it wasn't a highway. They became like a little village road. And so I said well I wonder why they can't keep it a highway in these. Did you know the people won't let them the they? They will just protests and? New Problems. But also then like electricity, why can't we have more constable Trista the government's put a lot of money into it in buying the law he said, well, that's because people cut the lines in you know feed into them and so forth. You know I'm not sure I call that democracy I think I think you have to rethink what is democracy Because it was hard for the design companies to function in Bangalore. Right right. Yeah so You know that trucks Solis use that needs to be. Thought through? And you know from my perspective India slipping down a path. that could threaten You know it's sort of a democratic stats right? I mean you cannot have democracy with just one party. and so it'll be interesting to see what happens in the next few years I want to go into your book Glare. So Buddhist economics, what what exactly is? Okay I'm glad you asked federal way a terrible name My publisher decided to call because it grew out of a course that I teach at UC Berkeley Fall Buddhist economic sits seminar, but is this an undergraduate force? But it grew out of teaching ECON wine and to be honest economists we all know this we don't do a good job teaching econ one we don't we really sort of. Don't bother to explain how he ended up with so much equality. We don't bother to explain how we end up with so much pollution, which is an External Pasta society. We don't. We don't do a good job in explaining. The the two biggest problems we have which are inequality. And climate, change. And those are ongoing long term problems and there in related but we don't explain that will be Chichi Conway and so. The problem is in fact that we do teach free market economics Nikon one and is like this none of the assumptions are held. It's an idealized system that. Is Not. What goes on in the world? So I was walking along with my dog on the park by my house and I finally said, Oh, APP I'm a practicing Buddhist. To. Okay Tabet Lewis Acid D'Amato. Buddha teach ECON one. Set our friends at at Berkeley in the department is a great idea. Is that how interesting but it to is just based upon? Economics that's already out there in is really important. We just sort of ignored in undergraduate work. So thanks to point basically Amartya sends capabilities approach. And for which he got a Nobel Prize, which basically says how your life isn't determined by your income or consumption is determined by what can you do with your life? So how capable are you in your life? In so a lot of people think, oh, what's a full opportunity life? and then is also known as also based upon Joe. Stiglitz. In Anthony. Atkinson's work on any quality and how do we create an equitable? Economies..

Tabet Lewis Acid D'Amato Chichi Conway Bangalore Trista India Solis Stiglitz Nikon Nobel Prize publisher Berkeley Atkinson Anthony Joe
"uc berkeley" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Started. My guest today is prefaced a player Brown who's a professor of economics at UC Berkeley. CARE has published research on many aspects of inequality and sustainability. book but this'd. And enlightened opposed to the smoke lines provides an economic framework that integrates global sustainability shared prosperity and care for the human spirit. Have listed team created the sustainable share PROSPERITY INDEX S S And volunteer with Fifty Bay area. Action Ratio co-chairs Legislative Committee the welcome passing key climate justice bills in California. Beckham care. It's wonderful to be here you. I want to start with the the sustainable shared prosperity index I find that. Interesting. So you have a paper on this I. Know that I got the Beatles version you're working on. Improving it changing some of the data of the data that might have come through. People creates a policy index. that. Measures the the system of national policies. So regulations and programs, and you look at fifty different countries whole swath of different scales and different continents and the sustainable Shayna Prosperity Policy Index as as Pi indicates clear killers, sustainability, market structure, and governance. That the present government functions of protecting the environment structuring markets and did getting programs and services. And you say that these pillars flooded divided into code in policy categories, which together contain fifty four policy indicators. Before we Scott Clare I want to. I want to sort of reveal my bias toward metrics you know coming from. The corporate world where there are typically a very large number of metrics that people track in different departments. And then the senior decision makers as I can deal with hundred mentally David combine all of them into one or two. Can make a decision. At that tend to be somewhat You know Ad Hawk of way. Of combining. Them. But in this in this paper, you know you basically saying that you did some sensitivity analysis that could be different base of combining them. But the gentle message remains the same your society that you know you this date is publicly available anybody who wants to look at it and maybe come up with a different way of combining information you're open to that you would love to see that as well. Right. So you want to talk a bit about, hug you been devout the Sei Index. Terrific I'm so glad that you found it interesting. And that the aggregation didn't drive over the cliff but A. Reason I ended up putting together research team at Berkeley to study policies is that from my book Buddhist Economics, which basically is based upon sustainability but also the wellbeing of people not just their consumption or their income, and then also looking at global suffering or POW countries were globally together. So I would give talks with about my book in the audience would say but just second the sounds like A La La land is there real neat. Economies that actually do this and I said yes actually we do know the policies. Joe Stiglitz Nobel Laureate already taught us that countries choose their level of inequality. Climate scientists gave us roadmaps for how to go from fossil fuel energy economy to a clean energy economy. So we have their roadmaps when on how to basically reach sustainability, and then the UN taught us with the Millennium. Goals..

Fifty Bay professor of economics Sei Index UC Berkeley Joe Stiglitz Nobel UN Beatles Brown Beckham Legislative Committee La La Scott Clare California Berkeley Buddhist Economics David
"uc berkeley" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"uc berkeley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Smith was the UC Berkeley student who was shot while taking a walk a mile away from his apartment his family believes he was caught in the middle of a random attack Orange County public health authorities are reporting a large number of new current affairs cases seen in one day since the pandemic began the OC health care agency confirmed four hundred thirteen new cases yesterday lifting the total number of cove in nineteen cases to nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight Burbank congressman Adam Schiff is on endorsing Los Angeles county district attorney Jackie Lacey is bid for reelection the chairman of the house intelligence committee tweeted yesterday that this is a rare time in the nation's history we have a responsibility to end systematic racism and reform criminal justice although they see is African American black lives matter often criticized her for failing to prosecute police officers in the shootings of unarmed black residents armor allowable on checking KFBK traffic elk Grove north bound by between Laguna Boulevard and pocket road do you have road construction so the roadway is reduced to only one lane for that work and that's not set to open until five o'clock on Monday five AM it's a part of the fix pack five project you also have the same project in Sacramento north bound five between Jay street and Richards Boulevard so expect to drop down to only two lanes in that area you also have multiple on an off ramp shut down including north bound five at I street and at Richards Boulevard and L. street as well Alden Jacob news ninety three point one K. F. B. K. for clear through the overnight low fifty nine to sixty three hot Sunday under sunshine high ninety three to ninety seven mainly clear Sunday night low fifty eight to sixty two sunshine Monday I ninety seven to one a one I make you weather meteorologist Carl Erickson a user three point one K. F. B. K. traffic is on the scene of and whether it's guys.

Burbank K. F. B. Alden Jacob Sacramento north elk Grove Los Angeles county congressman Smith OC Orange County Carl Erickson K. F. B. K. chairman Jackie Lacey Adam Schiff
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Been going to UC Berkeley but dropped out to attend the Berkeley psychic institute we traded readings I read is a row of cars and he read my aura so he went to her house and saw her standing at the top of these long Victorian stairs there was light beaming behind her from the open door and she remembers it being like a vision just feeling this one now it was a very strong impression and the first week with her I did more drugs than I've done in my life previously up until that point in time it was pretty wild they moved in together almost right away into a warehouse in the mission that had been a livery stable the whole thing was a total fire trap my dad joined sticky fingers brownies and by this time the brownies had completely overtaken the other baked goods they're producing something like ten thousand brownies per month and they made these hand drawn designs for the backs of the brownies came in to do their deliveries they would dress up in outrageous outfits there were a lot of hats there were Comeau knows spandex yeah that was that was really big in those days by this point sticky fingers brownies it was likely the largest cannabis edibles business in California which makes you wonder why would they draw so much attention to themselves if they're doing something illegal the way to be invisible in a situation is to stand out if you tiptoe around and hide it draws attention to your doing something suspicious but if you're bright and your flashy on your highly visible who would suspect something illegal was going on in my life overall my shield has always been ours and and part of the art was the dressing up and dressing up played really well on her newest route which was in the Castro name the men and women began leaving classes all across America in coming to Castro street there were.

Berkeley Berkeley psychic institute Comeau California America cannabis Castro
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Members believed responsible for a rocket attack that killed and wounded American and British troops at a base north of Baghdad and UC Berkeley graduate students have voted overwhelmingly to begin a wild cat teaching strike coming Monday from pacifica radio KPFA Berkeley KPFK Los Angeles this is the evening news with Christine on instead I'm Marc Maracle president Donald Trump today defended his decision to ban travel from most European nations it's a foreign virus he said in his national address last night one that can be fought by closing the nation's borders to dangerous foreigners carrying scary disease trump has turned to a familiar playbook as he tries to grapple with the spiraling corona virus outbreak blaming immigrants for the country's problems and casting the global health pandemic as another case of the U. S. against the world it's an approach that public health officials say nor is the new reality of the situation that is fueling panic and confusion and fundamentally altering the American way of life but it's business as usual for an isolationist president who seeks to bar Muslims from entering the country and has worked throughout his presidency to fortify the nation's borders and find novel ways to keep out those he deems unworthy disease store unsafe during trump's address to the nation last night he blamed Europe for fueling the virus and it's continued advancement in the country trump credited his decision to restrict travel from China and this only for keeping the U. S. case count low and then announced he would be extending his band of some of America's closest allies as he took the unprecedented step of sharply restricting travel from much of Europe to the United States trump said today sorry he didn't have time to consult with the European leaders but we had to make a decision and I didn't want to take the time of day and you know it takes a long time to make the individual calls and we are calling and we have spoken to some of them prior to.

Baghdad Los Angeles Christine president trump Europe China America UC Berkeley pacifica Berkeley KPFK Marc Maracle Donald Trump United States
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

"Of cal let let X. and by UC Berkeley optometry preferred optometrists of the cal bears now back to court welcome to the bears halftime show okay well the back inside halftime here between the doctor and the bears thirty two thirty two I hate to tell you Todd I'm I'm with you on that one and listen I I'm I'm not always right but I could I would I bet you whatever I have in my bill fold Pritchard at three thousand one hit two files where there was nobody else within twenty feet of it right the following grant there was nobody for boarding within twenty feet of him down the box at half court there was nobody within twenty feet of in and then the office of charge right it is what it is and so they're not they're probably not going to change it but that that would be a big deal hello life through that right but still it would have to weigh on a little bit it is what it is UPS my choice learn brought to you by UPS working together to achieve great things like California golden bears that's problem solving visit U. P. S. dot com to learn more well Oregon thirty two cal thirty two you know what at thirty two is not a bad number for the bears offense is really I mean double that one up you're looking at sixty four but for cal hang in toto stand right with the left three team country it's only the second time this year the bears have been a game where it's tied at the half they won the other one so that's a good omen right but you're exactly right and I think it's been that obviously timely shooting you've got to make shots and the bears no eleven of twenty three just under fifty percent and four of nine from downtown that's a great percentage and and these **** only this one shot is to prepare downtown to fifty with the free throw line so they may timely shots are quite frankly they've been open shots yes it's not like they're making a couple really tough protested separate had pretty good looks I guess this organ some of the press and it all started I think with a large people he had six early points in the paint I had to get that production for him he's got a good appetizers career high and so if you can get production from Lars inside and then you could knock out the breeze I mean you got it you got a chance against Oregon I mean the seventy four but they have played a lot of really close games so the the margin for error for them it's been pretty slim a lot of games and the bears plant well at home again and it's been great to see Richardson has ten for the doc to work day has thirteen Peyton Pritchard just two points on one of three shooting night get hot or you can fill out we know that but that is not standing job with by the bears the first twenty minutes okay as for guarded and how did by Paris Austin a fifty year senior a four year two point guards going after pretty good so that they can have a nice job of not giving you a lot of open looks and when he drives a product collapsed on it it's like the Venus fly trap and not giving him a good outlet angles to get rid of the basketball we're back with more of our halftime show and hostility in there and the dark side at thirty two pieces gal basketball driven by your northern California trailer dealers from the field I am G. calling let's say you just bought a house bad news is your one step closer to becoming your parents you'll trundling along ask if anybody notice to mow the lawn tell people to stay off the lawn compare it to your neighbor's lawn and complain about having to mow the lawn again good news is it's.

Berkeley bears
"uc berkeley" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"And that the Trump campaign was not briefed on the pro bar saying, I just want to satisfy myself that there was no abuse of law enforcement or intelligence power and Lindsey. Graham made the point yesterday. That why wouldn't why didn't they tell Trump the normal operating procedure in this would be, hey, we think we got to they're trying to get to somebody in your work. We're going to listen in on them and try to figure this out. They kept him in the dark on that. They thought he was in on Lindsey Graham, that's not usual behavior right right in a few years. There could be a hormone free birth control pill for women and men. Thanks to some Berkeley. Scientists team at your choice therapeutics lab at UC Berkeley has been developing a new hormone free birth control. That is not again just for women. Get birth control nailed down right at the point that human beings have stopped having sex, unlike traditional birth control pills. It doesn't prevent Saranac like rain on your wedding day. The in the Chardonnay exactly it doesn't prevent ovulation. Instead it targets for preventing them. From reaching the egg therapeutics hopes to be able to release it's over the counter drug in twenty twenty five and his sperm to play video games. And they just lose interest personalities always been my birth. Best birth control. Marshall. Phillips, starting Getty show, the conscience of the nation. So I was just mystified by this harshly critical Email, we got and I wanna read it to you. And see if to see what you think, and you said it speaks to MU Thurs, I think it speaks to the bubbles in which we all live in.

Lindsey Graham Trump UC Berkeley Berkeley Phillips Marshall
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

"UC Berkeley, scientists may be on the verge of curing blindness. A recently discovered form of gene therapy was able to restore sight and blind mice within a month of treatment. Researchers at UC Berkeley say the method could have the potential to restore a sufficient amount of vision for humans who have lost side due to retinal degeneration. Authorities are investigating two separate freeway shootings in as many days in the East Bay cagey. Terry rows tells us in the first incident police say a woman was found dead inside a car that had crashed in the willow pass road offer from highway four near concord on Saturday twenty five year old Antioch resident destiny Hillary reportedly drove off the roadway and collided with the center divide her driver's side door was riddled with bullet holes. But it's not clear if she died from the crash or from the gunshots in the second freeway shooting a passenger in a vehicle was hit by gunfire role riding along interstate five eighty and Livermore last night. The twenty four year old woman was hitting. In the leg. She is expected to survive. No details on a suspect in either case. Megan McCain is pushing back after President Trump's attacks on her late father, Senator John McCain for turning over a controversial report, alleging Trump ties to Russia. Correspondent Linda Kenyon has the story in a pair of tweets. He wrote he stepped forward to risk his life for his country served honorably under difficult circumstances. And was one of the most consequential senators in the history of the body and the late senator's daughter Megan McCain who has tangled with Trump in the past over his comments about her late. Father tweeted, no one will ever love you the way they loved my father. I wish.

Senator John McCain Megan McCain UC Berkeley Trump retinal degeneration senator concord Linda Kenyon Livermore Hillary Russia President twenty five year twenty four year
"uc berkeley" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"He was working on the campus of UC Berkeley on February nineteenth helping out some activists from turning points USA. And while he was there. He was operating was working at a table and advocating on behalf of turning points, which is a conservative organization, and they had a sign up that said that hate crime hate crime hoax is hurt real victims. Remember that? And so they have got to sign up and that was enough to draw the ire. Again of one Zachary Greenberg. I'm sorry Hayden's twenty-six Zachary Greenberg is twenty eight years old. Yes, now, we didn't know Zachary's name up until recently because people in the community there at Berkeley apparently were protecting him trying to avoid being helpful to police, and the reason the police were in pursuit of who. This person was was because Zachary came up to Hayden and clocked him he punched him multiple times. But one hit inspe- specifically was the big punch that left Hayden with a pretty good shiner one that he took on a national media tour that where he started having conversations FOX in front of us said we talked to him at CPAC. And he kind of relayed, look, I was just trying to be a polite conservative activists. I was having these conversations, and I was assaulted for it. By this guy won't we now know who this guy is Zachary Greenberg. Twenty eight years old. And he's a software engineer. He attacked. He clearly attacked Hayden. I realized a lot of the news coverage has to use the word allegedly attacked it's on video. It's about as transparent as it gets. He attacked this guy. I'm not saying that anybody's putting allegedly there is a way to. As a way to pretend it didn't happen. It's just kind of a journalistic obligation to not jump to the end of a legal case by saying it happened, but maybe Hayden orchestrated a hoax. Maybe this was all jussie smollet moment that Hayden orchestrated in the end. We'll all be eating crow. But for now, I don't feel that way. At all. I mean, it's pretty obvious that these two, so here's here's what we know. We've got charges now against Greenberg three felony counts and one misdemeanor account. He's got his mugshot out there. He's you know, he was placed under arrest. Cops have the mug shot of him. And the felony counts relate to assault and causing are intending bodily injury and criminal threats. Also the misdemeanors related to damaging Hayden's phone. He knocked out of his hands and throw it down. And that's that's a misdemeanor charge for that. So the the charges came five days after police arrested Greenberg for that attack on Hayden Williams. And the assistant vice chancellor of UC Berkeley, which I can't say has been all that helpful in all of this. They've been really disgusting when it comes to conservatives. This guy's name is Dan mogul off Mogadishu fosters go with that quote. We are pleased that the good investigative work of our police department has led to the filing of these charges. The university believes that those who violate the free speech rights of others must be held accountable and face the appropriate consequences. Well, this is not just the free speech rights, he downright assaulted him assaulted him. Yes. You violated his free speech rights, but he also physically injured this guy. Hayden Williams was on with Fox News is Laura Ingraham last night. And she asked why took so long to even find this guy in the first place. What it takes to find this guy? Well, I think due process was being followed which I appreciate that as a constitutional conservatives myself. But you know, I'm grateful that the police did their job and found this guy, but I remain disappointed with Berkeley. And the fact that they allow such a culture of intolerance and violence toward conservative viewpoints to grow at Berkeley. And even thrive. Amen. Amen. I mean, how many times we have to see this at Berkeley things being set on fire stings being smashed just because a conservative speaking. Yep. Well, and to his point in Hayden was wonderful. He was very his like we're going to follow the rule of law. I'm going to you know, I didn't hit him back because he he's he's just did everything you're supposed to do in these situations. I don't hit him back. I'm gonna let it all play out. We're going to do the right thing rental at the police do their thing. Almost too much restraint. Actually. Yeah. I I don't I would not have been as restrained as as he. But he's absolutely right. Yes. Yes. The president or the vice chancellor of UC Berkeley, Dan, Moga loop de come out and say the right thing where the university believes those who violate the free speech rights of others must be held accountable. But they've only been saying that recently they've allowed this problem to get to the point. They've allowed. Live allowed a culture of intolerance at Berkeley for so long to the point where it escalated out of control. Remember when I think it was Ben Shapiro was going to speak at Berkeley. And they were throwing things they were breaking things. There were trashing things on campus. It was all out riot because the students could not handle any kind of opinion with which they disagreed and Berkeley foster that they allowed it to grow. And now all of a sudden they're like over really sorry. Yeah. No. This is disgusting. All the way through. I'm really glad that this guy was actually caught. But the only reason he was caught was because Hayden had the wherewithal to record his face during this encounter. That's the only reason this happened. Were it not for that? And for the national media attention. We probably would have no arrests in Berkeley, would be honest Mary way, and this would keep continuing five forty three wwl froze. No getting the job done.

Hayden Williams Zachary Greenberg Berkeley UC Berkeley Dan mogul chancellor inspe USA. FOX assault Mogadishu software engineer Laura Ingraham Ben Shapiro Fox News Mary president Twenty eight years
"uc berkeley" Discussed on Bay Curious

Bay Curious

08:45 min | 2 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on Bay Curious

"Neely at UC Berkeley is hard to miss. It's three hundred feet tall. It's loud and clear days. You can see the distinctive white spike all the way from San Francisco. For a few bucks. You can even take an elevator ride to the top for a supreme view and rumor has it. But on the ride up you pass five floors of something strange hidden storehouse of dinosaur bones. This week on curious. We'll find out what's inside Berkeley's Campanile aka say their tower, aka that big point our on UC, Berkeley campus. I'm a price. Support for K Cutie comes from Penn host of the inaugural product craft conference. Join today's product management luminaries may ninth in San Francisco for day of inspiration and fun. Register now at product craft dot com podcast listeners get ten percent off with the code Pinto. Love. All right. We wanted to find out what's inside Berkeley's Campanile. It turns out that word is a talent for belltower science reporter, Daniel Potter. He met our question asker. Hi, kate. Hi, daniel. Good to meet, you can I get you to introduce yourself your name, and where we are. Shea. So hi, I'm Kate grocer. And right now, we are standing in front of the Campanile UC Berkeley clock tower on campus Kuce pitched candidate just a couple of buildings over I work on machine learning to analyse microscope. Images of nanoparticles cute heard a rumor from another student back when she was first torn campus around twenty fifteen the same year, Berkeley, celebrated the Campanile hundredth anniversary a rumor that the tower is full of dinosaur fossils. Hi, nice to meet. So we met up with two fossil experts. Dr Pat Holroyd I'm in charge of the vertebrate collections at the university of California museum of paleontology an professor Leslie Lusk oh, integrative biology. What are the rumors? You heard about the belltower? Basically that it's a huge store for dinosaur bones. It's always dinosaur bones. It's always dinosaur. But it's actually better really. Tire will. That's right. Game of thrones fans. Dire wolves were real free to the stock children. I will of your house Daryl's might extinct about ten thousand years ago. They're old but nowhere near close to dinosaur levels of old it probably not quite as scary and exciting as they have been made to be like the game of thrones. But they were definitely bigger than than wolves at around today. Dire wolves used to roam California more on them in a minute. There are also lots of other prehistoric bones in this belltower bird bones. Tiny shells, even parts of a big toothy swimming reptile called hydro thera Soroush which lived around the same time as the dinosaurs. But most of them are from more recent geologic times right here in California, the fossils that are here in the camp Neely are primarily from the libretto tar pits, which listeners may know from the museum in Los Angeles full of mammoths and sabertooth cats. It's the spot where underground tar has been bubbling to the surface for thousands of years, sometimes trapping and preserving wildlife the tar pits. A big interest for scientists in the early nineteen hundreds not long before the Campanile was built Berkeley, paleontologist went and started hauling back curious bones from extinct, horses and ground sloths all of which had to be stored somewhere. But around this time Holroyd says the Pilion tala department was relocated to a smaller building just as the Campanile was being completed. And they said, what are we going do with all our fossils? We need to have them here. They're active study could we use that space that empty space inside the Campanile to store the fossils. They wanted some place close by for students and faculty it worked out nicely. It turned out to be an ideal space to keep the fossils because there's not a lot else that could be house there without significant renovations to the Campanile itself spooky space. You wouldn't want your office in there? But fossil's don't care. One other reason to store these old bones away from anyone's office. You will definitely notice that there isn't a Roma there from a tar pit. And they were cleaned using kerosene the floors with bones, which are not open to the public have the smell and low industrial lighting of an old garage. So we're headed towards the dire workforce at right? Yeah. Two. So we're standing in a very tall concrete room. With you can see the basically, the skeleton of the campaign Neely itself all around old wooden shelves, featuring many many large lumpy bones on them of mammoths and marine reptiles and Wales there also old-timey wooden crates padded with hey and nailed shut like props from raiders of the lost ark. And some boxes were packed using newspapers. Dating back to win. A Roosevelt was in the White House. Kate what sticks out to you? There's just everything here. Like exactly like, I imagined it like giant bones? Like, I think is that a femur like, but it's like the size of my body as it turns out mammoth femurs are mammoths sore. These tarp fossils, the the blacker one. These actually are tarp it cost. So those are some vice and Joz giant bison. Not not the modern bison. But a extinct relative. A nearby the aforementioned predator that hounded them as part of the skull. With is that this is a dire. Yep. And when it's that that stained by the tar can has that nice threatening menacing feel. How far back in time. Do you reckon? They spend the oldest parts of the LA brea. Tar pits. Go back into the thirty thousand years ago, or whether dozens of skulls in this collection and also fragments, but you won't find much in the way of actual dinosaurs. In Berkeley's belltower dinosaurs weren't being found in excavated at the time that we first started putting fossils into the campaign. In fact, California's first dinosaur wasn't unearthed until some two decades later in the nineteen thirties, and they're somewhat rare in California to begin with a lot of what's now, California was underwater when dinosaurs roamed the land the bones in the Campanile tend to be more recent. Still as Holroyd and Lesko showed me and Kate to the upper floors. We did encounter one other charming denizen. What one of these goals over here? Camel? These are also another false Pam, wait frigging camels lives in California. Right. It turns out the state has a long history with camels there, even fossils found in southern California of a tiny ERC camel from around forty million years ago. Holroyd told us that one would have been pet sized. Indeed squeeze the skull of one of the first camels would be about the size of your hand. So it was a tiny animal, but with very very long legs. So it would maybe come up half way up your leg. So maybe it's head would be new your hip, but but just a very delicate tiny animal much larger Lum alight camels have turned up in the library. Tar pits. When we got to the top of the Campanile, we could just make out San Francisco in mount Tam through the fog. So what did you think? Amazing. The most like Indiana Jones I've ever felt to dire wolves. It sounds like despite the lack of dinosaurs. It was still worth the trip. Oh, yeah. Kate was not disappointed. No, not just as pointed at all. Yes. Dinosaurs are great. But. You know, all mammals cool to perr release old me on the camel, actually. Yeah, I'm feeling the camel like can I have a pet tiny camel? You know, drastic Park-style. That'd be cool. That would be cool. My dog would hate it.

Kate grocer Campanile Berkeley's Campanile California Berkeley Dr Pat Holroyd Campanile UC Berkeley clock to San Francisco Neely UC Berkeley university of California museu Daniel Potter Penn thera Soroush LA brea Shea camp Neely reporter Daryl Pilion tala department