35 Burst results for "Uc Berkeley"

How to Decide Who Should Get a COVID-19 Vaccine First

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:08 min | 1 d ago

How to Decide Who Should Get a COVID-19 Vaccine First

"State health officials rethinking their priority list for the vaccine rollout as the process runs into one logjam after another case, CBS is Keith Moon Cockney tells us why age could soon become a more prominent factor. That complicated priority list is an attempt to answer the very difficult question. How do you make sure that those who need the vaccine most get it. First Hui Equity would argue for the people in that group to get vaccinated. Early on, Dr. John Schwartzberg, emeritus professor of public health at UC Berkeley says, packing in all those extra rules and carve outs Has led to an awful lot of complexity logistically, how do you carry that out? It's very difficult and confusing. Now. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that state health officials are considering shifting to a system that would rely on age as its primary consideration. It's certainly a simpler rule. But the idea is already facing pushback from industries that employ younger, essential workers at greater risk of exposure, Schwartzberg says. Unfortunately, there are no easy answers here were left in a situation where is well being educated. Good. People are having trouble making decisions for how to prioritize things.

Keith Moon Cockney First Hui Equity Dr. John Schwartzberg Uc Berkeley The San Francisco Chronicle CBS Schwartzberg
The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself

Untangle

04:55 min | 6 d ago

The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself

"Welcome to untangle so happy to have you here today. Thank you pitcher. Share happy to be here. The i love your work. You've done such incredible stuff. And i just for our audience. I just think this first paragraph in your book was so interesting it starts like this in this incredibly competitive society of ours. How many of us truly feel good about ourselves. It seems like such a fleeting thing feeling good especially as we need to feel special or above average to feel worthy anything else. Seems like a failure. Tell me a little bit about that. And what led you to really do this. Work on self compassion. Yes so i started practicing self compassion. When i started learning mindfulness actually my last year in graduate school. Uc berkeley a man. I did two years post doctoral. Study with one of the country's leading self esteem racers. And i started really becoming familiar with all the research. Showing the downsides of self esteem. It's not a downside of having high self esteem but of pursuing it trying to get it the shenanigans. We go through trying to go good about ourselves compared to others and so i kind of thought that was practicing self compassion and seeing the incredible benefits my personal life and i just thought this is such a healthier way to think about. How did we late yourself. Positively themselves esteem. so that's kind of really would give me the. You might say that confidence to actually start researching self passion. But what's wrong with self esteem. So many parents today want their children to have self esteem and self competence. Tell us a little bit about the difference between self esteem and self compassion right. So there's absolutely nothing wrong with self esteem feeling. You're a person of worth in value. And we definitely want people have a sense of high worth as opposed to 'having themselves and and that's the wellbeing goes about question really. The problem is how people go about getting their high self esteem so for most people s steam involves a process of social comparison. Right so i mean again. If i said patricia your podcast yet savage. How would you feel. You probably feel good about that. Evaluation right asked this kind of the way. The system is stacked against us. We all have to feel average at least in those areas that are important to us to feel like that's just like baseline minimum self esteem. And so we're always comparing ourselves to others. If someone else does something better than we do. We often feel inadequate comparison. The really big problem with self esteem. as it tends to be contingent in other words we only have self esteem roomy succeed. We lose it when we fail so when things are going well for sure we lacquer cells we feel we have value but what happens when we fail. We blow that big job assignment or get rejected soon as fail ourselves esteemed desserts us which is actually precisely when we need that. Self confidence. The most self compassion. It's not about judging yourself positively. It's not saying. I'm a good person. Or i'm better than other people i most great is just about relating to yourself kindly so there is a sense of self worth inheritance self compassion but self worth comes from just being a glide human being where the like all other flawed human beings as opposed in necessarily succeeding or on being better than others. So you're done research showing the sense of self worth linked to self compassion as much more stable over time than just a simple self-worth judging yourself positively but how did we get in this culture to a place where we are so critical of ourselves and where we need to study something like self compassion where it's not a natural characteristic. I'm not convinced that it's just a western cultural phenomena. I mean i think definitely hard in the west because there's so much pressure to compete and succeed. Same thing in east asian cultures with as a lot of pressure to succeed and compete. But i also think there are some natural reasons while we tend to our jump to solve criticism immediately a mess. Basically that when we feel inadequate in some way or we fail at something we feel threatened and when we feel threatened we naturally have the threat. Defense response right. We want to attack the situation. Get rid of the problems of. You'll safe again. Unfortunately when the problem is ourselves when we attack the threat we actually attack ourselves. So i really do. Think at some level our tendency to to be self-critical is really desire to keep ourselves safe.

Uc Berkeley Patricia
Healing from the root cause with mindset work, with Lana Shlafer

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

04:49 min | Last week

Healing from the root cause with mindset work, with Lana Shlafer

"Tell the audience a little bit more about you and your personal story. And i know you mentioned you've had a difficult past with your relationship with food in your body so talk about that so i mean i think that for a lot of people You know their health. Their eating their exercise their self-identity really stumps from things they experienced in childhood. Because that's where we learn how you know what is appropriate quote unquote way to behave. And how we form our priorities and ways of looking at the world so for me. I grew up in russia. And i came to the us when i was twelve. And so for me the big like shift and the pain point was that i was sort of ripped off from everything i knew in all my relatives and came even though life in russia was very difficult. It's what i knew. And i had friends and i was great at school. And you know all the things. And i get plopped in a country where i don't speak the language where i'm just here with my mom dad and brother and that's all the people i know and this entire site of the world and as i sort of tried to adjust to life here it was also middle school and a lot of teenage and body changes and troll norms and so for me and ended up manifesting that i started controlling food as the way i think to just feel like i've some control over my life and it was subtle at first where i just had a lot of emotions looking back. I didn't know that. At the time. I didn't know what to do with them. I obviously had hormonal. Thanks happening as well and a starting in high school. Where i just found that if i just eat less and i'm thinner i would get more attention and i also felt like i was more charge of my life and then it progressed through college way turned into binge eating and it got really bad when my parents got divorced so that my little world which was already not very stable totally apart even though was a great thing overall it was a challenging time. Being in a school a lot of pressure. I went to one of the top universities uc berkeley. I was taking a full load of classic. It was a lot of pressure. And so i feel like the eating and exercising was. It's always a double edged sword. And i talk about that in my books so and my philosophy often that it was the thing that was the weakest link that was sort of showing me the cracks. But it's also what brought in so much light. Rumi has great quote that it's through the cracks of the light enters and for me. It was this thing that i wanted to get rid of a body that i didn't like try to control the anxiety that i had the controlling be having my day in fifteen minute increments and everything that i need to eat to be planned out and it was so painful. I realized that it was a problem. I told my parents i should get checked into a like a facility. Because i'm not doing okay. And then being the the kind of russian culture. They're like you're fine. Just get through school. You know i. It led me to start therapy to learn about intuitive eating. Just start yoga to like it. Took me in the direction that now. I've been moving in for the rest of my life. But at the time i couldn't see the whole picture so was very painful. And it's one of my greatest accomplishments to this day and i have a lot of things that i described as miracles. My book is called manifest miracle. Because i literally could not imagine that at the time which is that i have not only completely healed whatever that means quote unquote my eating disorder. I have such a loving supportive relationship with my body. I eat what i want. When i want i move how i want. It's all about taking care of myself. And having had the pregnancy that a twin pregnancy on the single pregnancy all of that has taken deeper into honoring myself and creating a relationship with my reality. That really feels like it is based on love and support and understanding so the fact that i can say that from where i was seemed like a miracle like i thought that for the rest of my life. I'm going to have these issues. And i'm just going to try to manage them and it's really easy to feel that way when you're in it right so when you were in it. What were some of the things that you either experienced or you saw like. What were your on. The one hand motivating factors to get you out of that cycle. And then how did you start to get out of it. I mean honestly. I feel like all the emotional work was by far. What got me to the root of it more than even the intuitive books that i was reading and doing a lot of mindfulness practices. It all started really in college for me. I felt like they all got

Russia Rumi Berkeley United States
California reports record 585 coronavirus deaths in single day.

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:21 min | 3 weeks ago

California reports record 585 coronavirus deaths in single day.

"California Broken other covert 19 record asked. CBS is making Goldsby reports the single day death toll hit another high. There were 585 more covert 19 deaths in the state on New Year's Eve, which is a new single day record for deaths in California during the pandemic. It's tragic, but it is exactly what experts were expecting. Because so many people traveled and gathered for Thanksgiving. You go back to Thanksgiving, which was on the 25th of November. We expect to start seeing the deaths rise sometime right after Christmas, and that's exactly what we're seeing here on New Year's Day. So John Sorts Berg, clinical professor emeritus at UC Berkeley School of Public Health and the Division of Infectious Diseases, says We can extrapolate that the same thing will happen about a month from now. Have you seen the Christmas effect? So what we might see is that the death might start to drop a little bit. For a few days or maybe a week. But then, unfortunately, they're going to start rising again sometime in the third week or so of the of January of this month. He says he believes, as do other experts. That January will be the very darkest period of the pandemic, with cases easing by February because there are no major holidays in January and then really dropping off, he says in March When more people will be vaccinated, Making gold

Goldsby John Sorts Berg California Uc Berkeley School Of Public H CBS Division Of Infectious Disease
Applications and Impact of CRISPR/CAS9 in Bioprocessing

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

05:48 min | 3 weeks ago

Applications and Impact of CRISPR/CAS9 in Bioprocessing

"Today. I'm joined by fanling. Wong director of cell line development and protein sciences and zane starkey wolf director of corporate development from wishy biologics. I'm excited to be speaking with both of you. Today about crisper cast nine technology and its possibilities in the discovery and development biopharmaceuticals. We will also conduct a deep dive on its potential impact on bioprocessing and bio manufacturing. Welcome fanling and zane to the podcast. Zinke randy glad to be here. Thank you brandy before we get too far and because of our audience is quite diverse with regards to their experiences in life sciences. Fenland could you please provide some background on. Crisper cast nine as molecular biology. Gene editing tool. Yeah sure so christmas. Nineteen action system is actually adapted from a natural procure arctic defense mechanism to bacteria to simplify. What could spec assistant can do is took leave the face she and i was. It has been incorporated into the bacteria routine on so that to keep the fate from reproducing. Crisper is actually akron stands for clusters servers regularly interspace. Shot had a dramatic repeats and kissed by the most well well-researched variant of the class outcasts nucleus. Which has been used within the gene editing function. So i think the research community have actually adapted this mechanism to revolutionize how we perform the genetic modifications Not only in pro arctic. But or so. You can arctic sales since the system was first published and zane i know from our previous conversations that you were saying that crisper casts has an intriguing origin. Would you be able to elaborate. Yes interesting research can be found on crisper that dates back to the late. Eighty s Other work has been conducted throughout the first decade of the two thousand however it wasn't until two thousand twelve that two pivotal research papers were published in the journal. Science one by jennifer down nov uc berkeley and manual shopping chair of the university of vienna and then another pianist by doctors cross unanimous and sickness at vilnius university. All demonstrating the use of bacterial. Crisper cast nine as simple programmable. Gene editing jewel. But i know that the story doesn't stop there does it no. It certainly does not in less than a year in two thousand thirteen. The labs of dr fung jong and will chong of the burden student. Mit dr george. Church's lab at harvard reported success in adapting. Crisper cast nine for genome editing in your area cells and both mouse and human cells. And i know that we could really spend an entire podcast. Just on the history of crisper so i wanted to stay focused on the technology here. There's been a lot of excitement since discovery about this molecular biology tool. Can you explain why. Sure the remarkable functionality of this tool is that it allows scientists to target specific locations within the genetic code of an organism to cut out or replace a segment of dna due to the high specificity and exactness of utility. The applications have far reaching potential. And it has already become a much to walks game changer. In many fields of life science because it enables efficient cost effective and precision gene. Editing that has a wide utility for development of biological therapeutics including so and gene therapy disease modeling diagnostics agriculture industrial biology and more. And this has me thinking just about alternatives to crisper casts altogether Are there other ways to edit genomes. And if so what makes a crisper cast so much better. Great question brandy many of the other gene editing systems utilize today such as zinc finger. Nicholas's talons the use of mega nick. Liaises or other by all vectors like a. Iv compared with christopher cast nine are in the end very complex and time intensive often requiring many more steps and thus are more costly as well also and this may be greatest benefit. Is that crisper chess. Nine as a low off target affects profile which again makes it an ideal gene. Editing tool justify along with that. I've read many Recent advances using crisper technologies. Could you elaborate a little bit on those. The advances are extensive and continuous. We speak one example includes crisper a crisper i which are techniques to up and down regulate gene expression using dead cast nine dead cast nine removed the nucleus capability of cast nine but still allows for the targeted binding to a double stranded. Dna sequence of interest using the highway. Specific guide are a that is one of the cornerstones of crisper genome editing. I'd like to add that another application. It's a using crisper for hamas directed repel or so called a the are so this technique in simple terms can repel a double stranded. Dna break which is very important for genus ability. But what does the crisper made. Sdr can do is that. It cannot only to repel a break. But or so crew. Eight the break and then replace it with a small mutation or as elijah sequences so this techniques have actually substantially opened ability or researchers to make gino added more quickly and more efficiently

Cell Line Development And Prot Zane Starkey Zinke Randy Arctic Dr Fung Jong Dr George Wong Vilnius University University Of Vienna Zane The Journal Berkeley Jennifer Harvard Nicholas Christopher Chess Hamas Elijah Gino
Unlocking the Black Box of Pricing: Why Pricing is So Easy in Theory but Not in Real Life with Alessandro Monti

Impact Pricing

04:34 min | Last month

Unlocking the Black Box of Pricing: Why Pricing is So Easy in Theory but Not in Real Life with Alessandro Monti

"On march diving to his allesandro. Monte here are three things you wanna know about allesandro before we start. He is a professor for corporate management and organization at cologne business school. He's done stints at both s. Kp and wolters kluwer two companies. That i truly respect in rural the pricing and he went to uc. Berkeley as did i. Welcome alessandro i'm mark. Thanks for having me on the show. It's to be here they. How'd you get into pricing in the first place. Yeah we all have Have a story That we can tell and it's always interesting to know how we kind of entered into this adventure now. The first touch boy was of course during studies microeconomics on the train. Sort of a communist. Of course you get the standard pricing approach the supply and demand things there but the real id say management world touch point with pricing. Ause my first job which was at a skippy. and since then this s- topic while yeah caught my attention and all in topic. So that's that's the that's the story. So why do you stay. You're all in but why it's I think prices. In general. They i once i think once read wasn't article into quote woes welded the central hinges of the economy so the price at the end of the day clears markets. Price is something that you feel as a consumer immediately. it's sometimes pain and sometimes pleasure. So it has the behavioral component and yet. That's i think that's. That's what makes prices annual dealing with. I sing quite fascinating for me. At least so. I'll buy into the fact that it touches almost everything so it's so powerful and yet i love the fact that so few people understand it and which means that when we can advise them we can have huge impacts in their lives and their businesses. So definitely i that nice. So you got a phd in business history. I have never heard of that before. And then you went to work for escapee. How did a phd in business history. Help you in escapee while it helps out first of all from the let's say methodological perspective you know learning the same more scientific tools and techniques. So it really does help in then tackling all those pressing questions. that of course should be tackled from. Let's say a more profound way. Okay so i always go the fundamental way when it comes to pricing so it helps you know to to have the tools and techniques sort of this research perspective had so definitely helped while just on a side note when when i talked to my escape you partners because i actually did the phd wild being escapees. So they kind of allowed me on sabbatical end. When when i talk project say while hd and has a history component. Yeah i I i saw some some question marks there say well how does that now. Kind of translate into our everyday business and dan. I think at the end. The research the businesses. Phd helps you to understand. Probably the president and also get sort of a a hint on what will come eventually in the future and so is it a quantitative phd when you do business history. you're still doing a bunch of stats and quantitative research and things like that. Yeah while you can do both ways. You can approach both waist. Now what i did actually is i. I went into historical archives. So i really dig deep into the documents from the. Let's say early seventeenth century and had to research him and had to read them and had to understand how much let's say executive spec at that time decided on pricing pricing strategies. Of course you can do to quantitative approach. You need to have the data said so you need to have some numbers eventually for that period in history. It's already like a jackpot. Having documents at all so the point here was really to understand the decision making at that time. So it's a more qualitative. Approach the

Allesandro Cologne Business School Wolters Alessandro Berkeley DAN
Fears mount of post-holiday COVID-19 surge

Pacifica Evening News

02:29 min | Last month

Fears mount of post-holiday COVID-19 surge

"Confirmed. US coronavirus cases Top 13.4 million today, and deaths surpassed 267,000. That's according to statistics compiled by Johns Hopkins University. The U. S is posted Maura than four million cases in November alone, double the number in October. Record 93,000 people are hospitalized with covered 19 across the country, as hospitals all over are starting to buckle under the strain. White House Coronavirus Task Force coordinator Dr Deborah Burkes said on CBS that anyone who traveled over the Thanksgiving holiday should assume They were infected and get tested. So if you're young and you gathered, you need to be tested about 5 to 10 days later, but you need to assume that you're infected. Not go near your grand parents and ants and others without a mask. If you're over 65 or you have cobra abilities, and you gathered it Thanksgiving if you develop any symptoms. You need to be tested immediately. Infectious disease specialist Dr Anthony Fauci warned of the coming post Thanksgiving surge that she told meet the press. Local officials from around the country are telling him they're running out of hospital capacity and asking for advice. We might see a surge superimposed upon that surge that We're already in Holiday and Dr Jon Swartz burg of the UC Berkeley School of Public Health, sees a surge on top of a surge after Americans continue to ignore public health guidelines to celebrate the Syriza of holidays that began with Thanksgiving and continues with Christmas and Holiday season parties and then New Year's. You can know, Look it from Thanksgiving Day. We can expect to see hospitals that surge on top of the surge start to fill hospitals even more. About two weeks after Thanksgiving, and about two weeks after that, which takes us to So close to Christmas. We're going to see death increasing a surge of deaths on top of the surge of deaths were seeing the vaccines aren't gonna make a dent. Things until probably around March

Coronavirus Task Force Dr Deborah Burkes Dr Anthony Fauci Maura Johns Hopkins University U. Dr Jon Swartz Uc Berkeley School Of Public H CBS White House Infectious Disease United States
How to Create Organizational Culture Change Using Social Media

Social Pros Podcast

06:14 min | 2 months ago

How to Create Organizational Culture Change Using Social Media

"Ladies and gentlemen here. She is sally poge. Who's the director of social media for the university of california. Davis coincidentally located in davis. California sally welcome to social pros. My absolute pleasure to be here with you. The university of california system is very very large. A little bit about davis and what kind of campus it is. What kind of school. What you specialize in give folks who aren't familiar with uc davis maybe west coasters. Gimme little a frame up on the institution absolutely well. I think the first thing that we want to focus on his where we are. We're in northern california so East of san francisco in our sister campus uc berkeley and actually uc. Davis is. I would say we're one of the last college towns in california so we're in a small town called davis and we really specialize in research around climate change. We have a hospital and the number one vet. Med hospital in the world actually is located at uc davis agriculture. How we feed our world how we care for our world and climate change are kind of our bailiwicks at uc davis so We have a very big very active student community. We have about forty. Five thousand undergrad students on campus. And then another twenty to thirty staff faculty and grad students So we serve a really large community. We're pretty we're known for being kind of a little. I would say little wonky we're close to sacramento the capital We're northern california's there were outspoken about our values Which leads to a lot of protests social justice discussions It's a very lively community or my best friend's daughters the recent graduate of davis and also the school One of his best known programs commercially is. Is your wine education program. Many many of the best known winemakers not only in the united states but actually in the world have gone through the davis wine program. Some day in my retirement years. I may just have to matriculate there davis and go through that program would allow welcome you with open arms jay and i know how could i not talk about our wine and beer and t. programs Big deep. that's cool off every beverage. Beer wisely tequila program. I might come now. You're in charge pizza. That's funny because i was thinking like i love cnc. But i'm really like maybe i should start doing some google searches. I love line a little beer to. Yes we me. Scholarship that we could Art for and get after the after the program. Tell you a little bit about your team. We've had on the program this year. Who runs social media for duke university. fro- Mit we've had a couple of other higher ed. Social media genius is on social pros over the last year or two as well and it's always fascinating especially because our team can giver. Does fare better work in higher. Ed how different. The team structures are and even the reporting structures for social media inside different institutions. So talk a little bit about kind of how your team gets. Things done there at davis yet jay. Thank you for that question because I came into higher. Ed from outside i used to be in the agency. World is too. And i was so struck by how much structure plays a role in what you success that you can have with social media and As i've been I've only been hired for about five years now and this does have a either make or break. A team is what i really learned. So at uc davis. I'm lucky enough to have a really supportive director of communications. She oversees the whole office and she reports directly to the chancellor and she has a very big vision and really understood in a really valued. What social media brought to the table. But when i came in into the structure Social media is reporting under news Which i think is i think said social media kind of like a newer Been around for ten plus years and everybody was kind of arguing about organizationally where it fell under right like. Oh it's a marketing thing. Oh it's a web thing. No now it's a new thing and what i was able to do it Alongside the support of my director was really carve out a space for social media to stand alone so we are our own unit underneath the department of strategic communications meaning. We operator own budget. We have our own team members. We set our own strategy in coordination with all of our other colleagues news web marketing and visual end that gave us a really great in a pure peer to peer. Kind of seat at the table Which has been really empowering for our team because we actually service all of those communications verticals. We don't we're not like we don't belong to. We don't belong to news. We belong to everybody and what that was Allowed us to do is our mission. Our mission is really about building community. And how we can be helpful. Those are value statements and so So yeah. I think that that has been really helpful and Undermine team where team of five total and we overseas the uc davis flagship channels. So schmunity annals in all the strategy and then we also set a lot of policy for the rest of the university about hundred fifty social media communicators across the campus That we know of is probably more than that out there. and then. I also oversee executive social media communications for chancellor may and undergrad admissions social media as well so we have a large

Davis Sally Poge University Of California California Uc Davis Sally JAY Berkeley ED San Francisco Sacramento Duke University MIT Department Of Strategic Commun United States Google
A Quest to Extend Life through Early Disease Detection

The Bio Report

08:09 min | 2 months ago

A Quest to Extend Life through Early Disease Detection

"Joe thanks for joining us here. We're gonna talk about quenching. Its effort to use technology to detect disease at its earliest stages. And it's audacious goal of extending life by ten years within a decade a i. I'd like to start with the u. Quenching grew out of a a lab that iran uc berkeley You have a masters in economics and a master's in psychology. Your career began in the advertising industry. With w p p and omnicompetent. How did you find yourself working with artificial intelligence and next generation sequencing to transform medicine. Well in a way. It's the circus is closing. So when i was born. I was born into a household of scientists and my mom and my dad bio scientists microbiology Next plank bene- germany and my whole life. All the way up to nineteen was busy just biosciences. I heard it every every day. Counted always intriguing. Not intriguing enough to make me study medicine. Which goes of the wanted me to but i found other things also interesting is typically economics in psychology and so for the first nineteen years busy got the not just a crash caused very intensive course off mike about d by chemistry and so i was very familiar with a whole field then decided you know the other things too in the world that i wanted to explore the advertising and marketing angles more random because i was moving on the strategic side of things and from there i found actually even though i loved you know thinking about innovation and growth. Which was my my main objective. At these elijah marketing firms. I felt more drawn to a financial side of things in it's via transition more into kind of strategic planning and finance. These are very large organizations of it by their doing marketing. Also have wbz's in two thousand employees. It's not a small firm and from there you know i did some strategic acquisition things for them and they had gotten in touch with startups a lot and i decided i wanted to actually switch sides and doing do something much more. Entrepreneurial did this worldwide in the us young then the entertainment circuit beck abbas busy looking at different industries from more from an investment perspective and you know biotechnology became more and more important Starting two thousand fourteen fifteen because some sequencing confidence of sequencing innovation and a and cloud systems reach a critical mass that enabled you know something. That's amazing new age of precision medicine. And you know. I was looking had multiple industries but that really caught my eye and brought back these memories from my first nineteen years and i felt very comfortable jumping a little deeper in looking at different technologies and then by a series of coincidences led to the point where i realize now we are truly at this complete in point in medicine and biotech and then all these things came together right my my bio bake around my financial background in my date of bakery digital bitten finance and Ended was as perfect confluence of really liking biology and details of sequencing on the chemistry left side But also the combination with complex cloud systems artificial intelligence and of course business model innovation. Which was a part of my career. These ten years of graduating college Yeah there's all comes together in this would be the future of medicine. He was gone gene. And our ambitions goto extent you the human life span by ten years within the next ten years and dad's executive technology stack. You need to do that. You need biochemistry. Sequencing cloud systems ai in a deep understanding of business model innovation. The company as i mentioned has rather ambitious goals for transforming medicine. What's wrong with the practice of medicine today. It must be ironic. Miss you asking there. But i can. I can outline that. The biggest there are two things that are really wrong about what's happening today. And these two things resulted in you know. Hundreds of thousands of american lives being lost every year. Like talking about covid. This is a much much. Bigger problem in kuwait. Just has guesses so two things wrong. Unim- on the medically process sites that the feet of medicine still fundamentally follows. The idea that medicine is about treating disease treating symptomatic disease and when you get how people die today. What are the biggest causes of death. It's cancer it's cardiovascular it's diabetes and metabolic diseases in its new problems. All of these are chronic diseases. And all of these diseases cannot be dealt with on a symptomatic basis. You cannot wait until you have alzheimer's and then try to do something about it. You cannot wait until you have late. Stage metastatic cancer. It's just too late so the first problem is ed. Medicine is reactive and symptoms driven when it needs to be proactive and prevention driven and ought to get their many things. Have to fundamentally change Need to be data driven the level of precision foreside statistical understanding to be a higher by by many many many magnitudes. That's problem number one. And the problem too is the business model of health care And i'm in the middle of this right now because we also started doing cooler testing and god reimbursement and things like that.

Uc Berkeley Beck Abbas Iran Elijah JOE Germany Mike Symptomatic Disease AI United States Metastatic Cancer Kuwait Diabetes Alzheimer Cancer ED
Los Angeles - California hits grim 1 million COVID-19 case milestone

KNX Evening News

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Los Angeles - California hits grim 1 million COVID-19 case milestone

"Said a coronavirus milestone. One million confirmed cases the state is dealing with the surge right now, and one infectious disease specialist says will only get worse, very likely. December, January and February. You're going to be our darkest months. I say that because we're seeing the surge going on right now everywhere, including California, there's nothing to suggest that the surge will abate. There are many things to suggest. The surge is going to be excessive dated. Dr. John Schwartzberg is with UC Berkeley School of Public Health, he tells can exit more traveling over the holidays will spread the virus, especially with college students returning home. Forsberg says people can do their part to slow the spread by voting, large holiday gatherings and wearing masks. He does say multiple vaccines are on the way early next year, which offer hope that the virus can be brought under control.

Dr. John Schwartzberg Infectious Disease Uc Berkeley School Of Public H California Forsberg
The Other Big Apple

Gastropod

05:10 min | 2 months ago

The Other Big Apple

"Well i was kind of. I guess in inadvertent midwife that we at the at the fellowship that we did back in what year was two thousand thirteen although we agree time has ceased to have any meaning. And that is michael pollen of michael palin fame. He is indeed the advert midwife of guest or pod. Because nikki and i were together at uc berkeley that year in two thousand thirteen out of fellowship. Run by michael. That's how we met. And you discovered your shared love of science slash food. yeah it's one of the happier offspring of that fellowship. Obviously if you're into the stories behind food and farming as we both are michael's writing is pretty much at the top of your list. We've wanted to have him on the show for ever and this episode was the perfect excuse to revisit one of our favourite of his books. The botany of desire in the botany of desire michael traces the stories of four plants and their intimate relationships with humans. One of those plans is the apple tree. And i don't know about you. But when i think of apple trees the first person is of is johnny appleseed. This is a very american thing to think of. I'd never heard of until. I moved here so for our non american listeners. This is what americans are thinking of when they think of johnny appleseed well they would probably have the walt disney image johnny appleseed which is of this you know barefoot guy on the frontier bringing goodwill sweetness to people when people hear johnny appleseed. It's it's very wholesome. It's very Uncontroversial he's a disney character right very soft. But actually the the real. Johnny appleseed and i use that word advisedly because there's so much we don't know about him is much more interesting in his book. Michael traces janis path planting apples across the us. And we're going to do the same here but i. There weren't actually apple's growing here. Before europeans arrived there crab apples that were here in the sixteen hundreds but native people did not have sweet apples. This is amy traverse. Oh she's the author of the apple lovers cookbook and senior editor at yankee magazine. So apple's are we think of apples as this american fruit and american as apple pie and we identify closely with apples americans but it turns out. They're not they're from kazakhstan around town called alma mata which means father of the apple. I'ma autism now called amati and it's the largest city in kazakhstan. I've never been there but if you go. Apparently you will see whole forests of apple's fifty foot tall apple trees. Apple's coming up in the cracks of the sidewalks. It's like a weed there and these apple's most of them look nothing like our image of the apple. I mean there's some the size of there's there's big brown ones there's just this incredible range and they're apple trees that are kind of prostrate and grow along the ground and ones that grow vertically ones that have canopies. I mean it's just incredible diversity but a lot of apples weren't particularly sweet or delicious. At least not to humans. They were dry and hard so did survive the drop to the ground and often the flesh was kind of bitter acidic and tannock because these chemicals were preservatives that would also help to fight up worms and insects and that was all useful because the apples needed to be eaten by bears to spread their seeds. And if you would like to hear what the delight of a group of bear cubs that has just come across the pile of fallen apples. Sounds like which of course you would you need to be on our special supporters mailing list gastropod dot com slash support bears. Yes there are a lot of bears and kazahstan. They love apples but like humans they also prefer sweeter ones and larger ones and even retro ones. These big red sweet apples sometimes appeared in all the different ones that grew wild and bears chose those and help spread their seeds and so the bears hopes for just the kind of apple's that we wanted the large sweet red ones and so then people who tasted these bear approved. Apple's turned into apple fans to and not just the locals because that area of kazakhstan was right in the middle of the silk road. An incredibly important trading route that stretched all the way from china to europe magin stumbling across. I mean you're living in a world with no sugar ray or at least it's a very rare. That kind of sweetness is extremely rare and very fleeting and you stumble across a forest where you find these fruits that are sweet and that actually keep well. I mean not a lot of fruits that you might find in that same forest like apricots will rot very quickly whereas an apple would last for weeks or maybe months and so people would pocket them and bring them to the next trading ports or the next trading town and they really spread that way and they flourished wherever they spread. because apple's have a couple of botanical superpowers. Apples are unique in that they easily enter. Breed with the native crab will species of whatever region. They end up in. And so those crab apples within s- place in the genes that allowed to survive in their climate. So that's super useful. Those local crab apples had jeans. That would be perfectly suited to the local environment.

Apple Johnny Appleseed Michael Pollen Uc Berkeley Michael Kazakhstan Amy Traverse Michael Palin Nikki Tannock Walt Disney Kazahstan Yankee Disney Magin United States Bears Europe
Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine found to be 90% effective

Pacifica Evening News

03:56 min | 2 months ago

Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine found to be 90% effective

"Promising Corona virus vaccine is from the drug company, Fizer today. The pharmaceutical giant says early data suggests its formulation maybe 90% effective at preventing covert 19 on Lee Barrett. Reports Co 19 vaccine developed by FISA and bio intake prevents 90% of people from getting the virus, according to preliminary analysis. It's being tested on over 43,000 people without safety concerns being raised and could receive emergency approval for use by the end of the month from feature story news in London. I'm Ali Barrett. The announcement does not mean a vaccine is imminent. The interim analysis from independent data monitors looks at 94 infections recorded so far in this study that's enrolled nearly 44,000 people in the U. S. And five other countries. Some participants got the vaccine. Others got the placebo visor caution that the initial protection rate might change by the time the study ends. Even revealing such early data is highly unusual Doctor Jesse Goodman of Georgetown University The former chief of the Food and Drug Administration's vaccine division ticked off many questions still to be answered, including how long the vaccines effects last and whether it protects older people as well as younger ones. Goodman cautioned that even if icers vaccine proves the effect of it's going to be a while before it has a major impact at the population level. The vaccine by Pfizer and this German partner buying tech are among 10 possible vaccine candidates in late stage testing around the world for them so far in huge studies of the U. S. Another U. S company but during a incorporated also has said it hopes to be ableto file an application with the FDA for its vaccine later this month, infectious disease specialist Dr Anthony found, she said the results suggesting 90% effectiveness are just extraordinary. Clinical professor, a marriages of infectious diseases that UC Berkeley School of Public Health Doctor John Schwartzberg called the data from the Visor vaccine stunning. There were there were 94 people. Who got sick and 80 for them were in the group that receive placebo. And only nine who got the vaccine got sick so that that's absolutely Running. Um they're going to continue to trial up to 166. People get sick and they've got 44,000 people in the trial so they should get there pretty quickly, Schwartzberg said. Important questions about the data include whether the results were as positive for older people is younger and across, so she socio economic and ethnic differences. Another is whether the vaccine prevents infection without symptoms as well as the disease itself prevents you from getting infected like, for example, the measles vaccine would do You can't spread it lets you get infected, But it doesn't let you get sick, responsible. The still spread the virus. So these are questions that come out. But still, even if it is 90% effective in preventing us from getting sick, That's a major step forward. Public Citizen, the consumer advocacy group called the relief of the preliminary and incomplete data. Bad science, said that any enthusiasm for the results must be tempered. Until they're reviewed by the FDA in this

U. S. Fizer Lee Barrett Ali Barrett Jesse Goodman Food And Drug Administration Dr Anthony Infectious Diseases Berkeley School Of Public Heal John Schwartzberg Georgetown University Goodman Schwartzberg Pfizer London UC Public Citizen
Biden on track to win California by largest margin for Democrat in history: poll

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Biden on track to win California by largest margin for Democrat in history: poll

"When it comes to voting Presidents California considered a very blue states, new surveys shows this time around. She could be history making The final UC Berkeley pulled before Election Day shows Joe Biden on track to earn the largest margin of victory over Donald Trump of any Democratic presidential candidate in California history. Oh, it's clearly about Trump in this election. Mark DiCamillo runs the UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies Poll. We asked Trump voters what their main reason for supporting the president Wass and 62% said. It's because I like Trump. We have finding voters the same question. Why are they supporting Biden? It's because I don't like Trump 55%, So majorities are focusing on Trump when they're making their voting decisions. A Republican hasn't carried California in a presidential contest since George H. W. Bush in 1988, and the state hasn't been competitive in more than a

Donald Trump Joe Biden California Uc Berkeley Institute Of Gover Mark Dicamillo George H. W. Bush Wass President Trump
COVID-19 pandemic in California

KCBS 24 Hour News

01:12 min | 3 months ago

COVID-19 pandemic in California

"We appear to be flattening the Corona virus curve in California. However, as we hear from KCBS reporter Melissa Karras, that doesn't mean we can let our guard down. A curfew has been imposed in El Paso, Texas, due to a surgeon Cove in 19 hospitalizations and case numbers are ballooning in some of the countries more sparsely populated states. But in California are numbers are way down have been coming down for at least a month or more. John Sports Burgers clinical professor emeritus with the UC Berkeley School of Public Health, and he says one thing state and local officials have done well, particularly here in Northern California is build enough trust with the public, so that straightforward messaging from the government has led to people responding appropriately. They wear masks the social distance and these things work. But Schwartzberg says, our numbers have ticked up over the last A few days, and even if we're doing well, California hasn't built a wall around itself, And that means that people are going to be coming back and forth into California so we can't insulate ourselves completely from what's happening in the United States. And he says This will be particularly true as we get into the holiday season when people may gather together and travel more. Melissa call Ross KCBS.

California Melissa Karras Ross Kcbs Uc Berkeley School Of Public H Northern California El Paso Schwartzberg John Sports Burgers Reporter United States Clinical Professor Texas Government
Hot-button words trigger conservatives and liberals differently

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

03:55 min | 3 months ago

Hot-button words trigger conservatives and liberals differently

"From UC Berkeley, Stanford and Johns Hopkins University's scanned the brains of more than three dozen politically left and right leaning adults is they viewed short videos involving hot bottom hot button immigration policies. And for more on their findings, we turn to the KCBS Ring Central News Line and talked with Yin Chong Leon Post doctorate fellow at U. C. Berkeley's Neuroscience department and the study's lead author. Well, thanks so much for being with us. If I understand this correctly, you are suggesting through this research that there was a neural basis to partisan bias and vocabulary is part of that. Yes. Well, first of all, thanks for having me Jeff Patty? Yes. So we can conservative and liberal meaning participants. They watch these videos, and we saw that neuro responses to watching the same videos with different Suggesting that these parties are suggesting ah Nero basis for these partisan biases, and we were interested in on the words and that tend to trigger these different instruments contest. And what we found was that words related to threat to risk to morality and emotions tend to drive these different simply speaking. What do you mean by a neural response? So what were well, the thing is that, um we basically the participants respond differently to the same video. So in the sense that when you when you see that when you When you watch a video, your brain responds to the particular way while we see if they consider this response similarly to other conservatives, liberals respond similarly to other liberals. But the difference is between the groups have different. So if I'm understanding things correctly, you're not suggesting that there is an inherent liberal or conservative genes, so to speak in the way we process there. It's once we have sort of formed our opinions. Our brains react accordingly. So in our study, we can't really speak to the genetic genetic basis of these differences because we scan a doubt and we've only scanned them once. But, you know, I do want to emphasize that the differences that we see that we found in the study could very much be deal, too. So that we're having been exposed to different media sources having different beliefs, and it doesn't necessarily have a genetic basis. Yes. I find it very interesting that you thought the key the trigger was vocabulary right and not images. I mean, part of the part of the Ah, that part of that might be, because that's the sort of analyzing the video that we use. A lot of them were news reports that contain basically people talking about issues and not just showing images of those issues. So I think that might be one reason why linguistic content state such a strong role in the study. But if we want the show videos of, for example, a protest things might be a little bit different, So we don't we don't really know if that would be the case by at least in this study with the videos that we use what we saw what that the difference is really more just a result of the words that we're using in the video. I'm so curious. Is there a way to turn this around and say, Can we use neuroscience to the benefit of trying to bring people together? I think there is there is such a possibility. I think what we have now, if in the study is a potential in your old Marka off when conservative and liberal leaning people process the same content differently, so we can try to do is use it. Use that market to find message is that Reviews that different. So in that sense, I think it is a promising mixed up but step and it does provide us with a way to leverage on neuroscience to try, Teo. Get at these sort of intervention. You will Oh, thank you. Interesting research We have been speaking with in Xiangyang. He's a post doctorate fellow at UC Berkeley's Neuroscience department and the study's lead author.

Neuroscience Department Yin Chong Leon Berkeley Uc Berkeley U. C. Berkeley Xiangyang Johns Hopkins University Jeff Patty Stanford Marka
Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:48 min | 3 months ago

Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

"High is at Arley. Yes Hi Krista yes good to meet. Thank you so much for doing this and I. so apologize for the delay as we had in this totally unusual and I think it happened twice with you I. Really Apologize. No problem but but what we need to talk about has not. diminished. So here we are. We have construction going on here in our in our studio and so like coming in. itself is very quiet, but there's just hammering as I walk in. For an audio yeah program. So good. Are you? Are they going to I mean I don't hear it so. Where where are you? Right now. Are, you talking to me? Yes. Yeah. I'm in North Gate Hall, which is in. The basement of the journalism department at UC Berkeley Okay Okay Yeah Berkeley. Three blocks from our home. Oh, what a what a wonderful place to live. I think we're pretty good here. I. Don't like to. I. Don't want to start talking about anything substantive until we're really doing it. So yeah, I. Think we're fine. Good and where you KRISTA. Minneapolis. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. It's you'll. You'll understand this I grew up in Oklahoma and kind of went far far far far far away and And that's become more important to me in these recent years that you know that he and and then our studios in Minneapolis has been for a long time and. I've thought across the years about how the show might have been served by being on one of the coasts and. And in these last few years since two thousand sixteen. I'm I'm so glad we're in the middle of the country you know. It's Really important in life giving. So. Good Yeah So, you were the child of a Foreign Service officer. So you sound like you grew up all over the world. Well. Yes to to some degree. Yeah. Starting at age twelve. Yeah it was pivotal. Father was ambassador us. Ambassador to New Zealand. Ghana and Tunisia. Yeah we don't need to go into his rank spread. Yeah. But did you live where those places you lived in I lived in Israel? And from aged twelve to fourteen, very pivotal experience. And then New Zealand Wellington New Zealand. The university. there Victoria University so in New Zealand and then my folks were in Ghana and I spent a summer. Ana But by then I was in college and then they weren't Tunisia and I. Actually spent five months a doing a study on the emancipation of Tunisia and girls so. These French questionnaires. Second Year of Grad School at Berkeley. So. yes. So I was very. Fortunate, really to get to experience all that. Yeah. Yeah was there a religious or spiritual background to your childhood in your family or in those places? Yeah. Yeah. I would say there there was And So. Are we starting your going? Yeah. All right okay. yeah my parents were very religious, unitarian? And So religious in the sense of it being a very important thing to go to church on Sunday and. My brother and I would. Kind of. Wrestle with each other and tickle. In the back seat of her whole sudden Hudson in Silver Spring Maryland and And Go. Drive to all souls UNITARIAN church in Washington DC very important to my father especially and I didn't feel particularly religious. At that point and. But if I look back on it what. the influence of that was is that. There's An important part of one's self to express and to learn to develop and that. For. UNITARIAN inside the message I took away is that it's very big world and we have to learn to. get to know and. Empathize with. People in radically different cultures and that that's a good thing to live in a big world. I think by the time I was. Sixteen. I had that message, but I felt something missing. And I got interested in quakers who? Be Much. More. Okay Gang. So what are we going to do about it? You know view terriers were very talky. Talkers talk talk of the thinkers looked like they were kind of. interesting. They were doers, and so I would say. That that. Connection for me. when I was in high school very informal I didn't become a former quaker anything. But It led me to volunteer on weekends when I was in high school At something we called Neighbourhood House on tenth and L.. Street. was in the middle of the. the back area of Washington

Tunisia New Zealand Berkeley New Zealand Wellington New Zea Washington Minneapolis Ghana Arley Oklahoma North Gate Hall Israel Neighbourhood House Grad School Victoria University Silver Spring Maryland Officer Foreign Service
"uc berkeley" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:15 min | 5 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Interview With Kamala Harris

Asian Enough

04:28 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Kamala Harris

"US Senator. Kamla Harris is an open born Howard educated lawyer legislator former district attorney of San Francisco and Attorney General of California in Twenty Twenty Democratic presidential candidate. She is the daughter of immigrants who met during the civil rights era Berkley Hello Bay area shout out Bay area and her mother's from Indian. Her father's from Jamaica so welcome to Asian enough senator. It's great to be with you so I'm going to take. Take the first question, and we're just GONNA. Jump right into it so in your memoir. You talked about how your mother made. Conscious choices about raising you and your sister is black woman, though with strong and unquestionable connections to Indian culture. How did she do that? Tell us more about that. Well, so I mean it's complicated, and and probably a lot deeper more complex than we have time for, but I'll try You know she arrived in the US. When she was nineteen years old. She was the eldest of my grandparents. Children and you know an Asian cultures that. She wanted to become a scientist. She wanted to cure cancer, so she went to her father as the eldest child, and it set up by WANNA. Go and I study in what is considered to be one of the best schools for science. I WANNA go to UC Berkeley, and Mike Grandfather it now. This is his eldest daughter, and this is in the late nineteen fifties. Said okay. Follow your dreams. He was very progressive. So my mother flew this. When transient ENA national flights were really very rare, and she arrived in Berkeley California alone. And began her studies, and because my grandfather was really an advocate for India's independence, he was really a extraordinary person, and really always fighting for democracy. And Justice and so immediately. Then of course, my mother was naturally attracted to the civil rights movement that was blossoming or occurring in the bay area and Met My father, and so instead of going back to India had been the plan to have you know what would have been an arranged marriage? She met my father and had a love marriage, and that through my sister and me and my mother understood you know she was just conscious of race. She understood what these things meant. And she knew that in America that her daughters would be treated as for better and for worse as black women and black. Black children and she raised us with a sense of pride about who we were who we are, but never with a false choice, right? It was never to the exclusion of of always also being very proud and very active in terms of our Indian culture as well, but she and she understood what America was at the time, and who America is, and and the struggles that people face in America, and so that's that's it in a nutshell. But there were never any false choices you know. We grew up in the black community and learned that you can cook Okra with mustard seeds, or with dry shrimp in and spicy sausages. Did you learn any of those recipes you. Did you keep any of those? You know my will, so I mean? My mother was an extraordinary cook, and as was my grandmother, my aunt, my. Is the. It's the name for your. Your mother's younger sister basically means younger mother, and she thankfully still with us. She and she's a great cook. Indian cooking is very complicated. It's like a lot of Asian cooking. There are a lot of different spices and she was such a good cook, and my aunt is such a good cook so I never really had to learn how to make Indian food, but I have been slowly teaching myself how to do that. But my mother was also. She loved good foods, so she would make. Incredible Italian meals. She would make you know I. Remember US making bows and. Tons I. Remember s making you know. She loved to make barbecue. It was just it was a ECLECTIC, but I think it was just was a very universal I in many ways she loved cultures, and and and she loves to cook.

Kamla Harris Berkley Hello Bay America Uc Berkeley Mike Grandfather California Jamaica Bay Area Howard San Francisco India Berkeley Cancer
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:57 min | 7 months ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KCBS All News

"At UC Berkeley react to the university's hybrid learning plan that is kind of underwhelming ES news update wow what a decision Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer reacting to the supreme court's decision that rejects president trump's efforts it ended the legal protections for young immigrants house speaker Nancy Pelosi the daca decision is something that supports our values as a country the dreamers across the country I enjoy more popular than almost anyone CBS is Camilo Montoya Galvez on what this means for the daca recipients this is a major victory for them and their advocates as it prevents an immediate end to the program however the Supreme Court noted today but the government and advocates have always agreed on and that is that the administration has the power to overturn an executive action by the previous administration and Mexico says it will also track the renewal process for current daca recipients CBS news update hi Matt Piper case CBS news time twelve thirty two and time now for our daily tech in business report today we're joined by Bloomberg news tech reporter Garrett the Vanke Gerrit Google says it's going to step up its efforts to diversify its work force and hire more black workers you've had a look at the numbers so how big of a problem is diversity in Silicon Valley I mean divers have been huge problem in Silicon Valley and definitely not a new one you know it these companies are massive they control huge swaths of the economy they pay very well and at this point you know they have very very few black workers Google specifically has been tracking it favors the number since twenty fourteen and back then it had about two point four percent of its employees are black and today that number is on the grounds around three point seven percent so still very small single digit minority of employees and so the company has obviously been working on this for a while at least saying that they've been working on it but they just become under a lot of extra pressure right now with the black lives matter movement gaining traction across the country and black workers at Google are saying look you know you guys are talking a big game about this but you need to do more and so what the company is now done it said that it's committed to filling thirty percent of its leadership position not quite sure specifically how that would be defined but leadership positions out thirty percent of them will be from under represented groups by twenty twenty five so that doesn't actually speak specifically to black people it's more general to all people of color at Google but that's sort of the the hardest commitment that the company has made so far this is coming at a rather unusual time the gap because of the pandemic a lot of companies are actually cutting staff how does that play into this you know I mean I'm I I've been asking Google about that I mean it it's gonna be tough for them because they already say look you know we try to hire as many are people of color we try to hire as many black workers as we can they only have so many positions that the company has been growing like crazy for years and now they suddenly stops that growth last year they hire twenty thousand new people this year they said you know except for specific parts of the business they're not actually gonna be hiring for many people it also that momentum is actually working against them you know Google's employees have a reputation for giving their bosses and earful what are they saying on this issue yeah I mean Google employees generally have never been afraid to speak out it's sort of this culture that the company sponsored early on yeah you know as it was getting started and and still says it really believe in and stand by but of course there've been you know most places where employees have asked for either the company to stop doing work with the U. S. military or with border agencies or to do more when it comes to sexual harassment and issues like that with the company has moved us you know slower than what at least some of these employers want and you know I've been tracking some employees on on social media and speak to some toys and and obviously you know the the conversations mostly happening internally but it does look like one of the initiatives that they have also started in to try to find a way that they can actually build products that can be more useful to black people so you know one of the ideas that that that I I've I've heard about it in example maybe of of adding to Google maps when businesses black owned so if someone wants to support local business owners in their community they can you know see that on Google so the company is definitely having these conversations and we'll have to see if those those numbers change much in the next couple years thanks for your time this afternoon appreciate it Garrett the Vanke is a Bloomberg news tech reporter you can hear our tech and business report weekdays at twelve thirty here on KCBS and for more tune in to Bloomberg TV at two PM KCBS news time twelve thirty six will go back to the roads and check your forecast in just two minutes you.

UC Berkeley Senate
Calls from the Frontlines

Long Distance

05:08 min | 9 months ago

Calls from the Frontlines

"Last episode. I told you that came down with some mild symptoms of covert nineteen and per doctor's recommendations. I isolated myself for a total of eighteen days. I lived in one room. Yes I'm very thankful to have a spare room to stay in during this time. It's basically the office slush guestroom slash long-distance Studio. Let me tell you living in one space for that amount of time makes you think a lot about what's happening to you to the world. What matters most how I got here. I started thinking about how messed up. It was that I couldn't get tested because at the time I came down with symptoms. The only people who could get tested were sixty five years up or had traveled or had come in contact with someone who tested positive or was a famous movie star or basketball player besides wondering if I was really sick or if my symptoms would get worse I spent lot of time thinking about how I could have gotten sick in the first place and the only thing I could think of was the night after experienced that racist encounter. I mentioned last episode. You'll have to go back to that episode tear. What happened but long story short. I went to a Filipino market. One day while wearing a mask and instead of ingredients I found a racist who told me China brought the virus here and to please. Don't give her the virus. Her racism didn't change my need to go to the store so that night. I went to two grocery stores with my producer partner. Whatever Patrick Aquino this time I wanNA wear mask Patrick than me either. I just didn't want to deal with weird looks or racists this is before the mayor of La started telling people to our facial coverings when they go outside. I remember in one store. I made the regrettable decision to walk through a sort of crowded. I'll then a woman started coughing as I passed by. Patrick remembers how crazy busy the other store was. And no one was social distancing. That was the last time we went out for at least a month. Patrick never got sick. I did but since I couldn't get tested I'll never know if what I had was. Kovin doctor said it could be a cold or allergies but I didn't sneeze or have a runny nose I had an incredibly annoying and itchy throat. I had a high temperature but no fever thankfully and I had a persistent cough. So yeah I could have had something super mild or I may have been a symptomatic or it could allergies. Whatever it was. I'm glad I isolated myself like I told you last episode Patrick's DADS with us. And he's pretty high risk so we wanted to play it extra safe. I'm better now but we'll talk. It would really suck if the reason I got sick was because I didn't wear protection because I was afraid. A racist attack a few weeks ago on Social Media. I asked for frontliners to get in touch her. I got a lot of responses mostly from healthcare workers and specifically nurses let's make no in California Filipinos make up eighteen percent or the second largest nursing workforce in the state that's according to a two thousand sixteen survey of California registered nurses in the migration of Filipino nurses to the United States in later other parts of the world can be traced back to the early twentieth century during the early part of American colonization when American nursing schools set up shop in the Philippines and began exporting Filipino. Women as nurses to the United States Catherine Sinisa Choi Professor of ethnic studies at UC Berkeley dives deep into this history in her book. Empire of care. I highly recommend it. A lot of people tend to think Vo Pinos. Oh we like to take care of people. That's why there's so many nurses but let's not entirely the case. Nursing is embedded in our culture because of American imperialism in that deep history has never felt so present and even ironic with so many Filipino nurses on the front lines on my calls to healthcare workers. I asked if they experienced racism at work. Most said no not on the job where they're needed when they step outside the hospital. Yeah on today's episode calls from frontlines. We'll hear from workers in industries like healthcare and food service. Where keeping a safe while. We stay home and flatten the curve. This is the last episode of our second season of long distance. And we couldn't find a better way to end than by sharing the stories and experiences of our frontliners.

Patrick Patrick Aquino Kovin Itchy Throat Basketball Catherine Sinisa Choi Uc Berkeley China Cough LA California Vo Pinos Cold United States Filipino Philippines
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Academic space for UC Berkeley has received the green light from the UC. Regents finance committee KCBS's mortgage Schaefer reports live the city of Berkley is threatening a lawsuit Margie. Well, that's right. Patty, the multi-million dollar project, but include housing one hundred fifty apartments over parking and additional academic space at her stamina and Gailey road. Martha Chavez senior assistant dean at the Goldman school of public policy. Although there are concerns about the project's impact on parking, the Goldman school is in dire. Need of academic and teaching space. UC Berkeley chancellor says housing is also needed we've very very badly. Need housing for our young faculty? Berkeley mayor Jesse arrogant opposes the development. We believe the university's using this project as a chance to avoid the responsibility of addressing over a decade of unplanned student population growth. In our community. He says the project will strain city services with the green light from finance. The board of regents is expected to approve the project this region's meeting also received multiple public comments on a proposed plan to expand UC's partnership with Catholic healthcare provider dignity health. The partnership will be discussed at a health services subcommittee next month in Los Angeles. And that issue is expected to head to a vote of the full regents in San Francisco in mid July reporting live Margie, Schaefer KCBS, thanks, Mark KCBS, news time three thirteen Steph curry Seth curry and mom and dad all at ARCO last night. Not at ARCO at oracle last night. We're going to check in with Kevin the rat for more on that. He was there to coming up next with the capital on saver card. You earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Does.

Schaefer KCBS Berkeley ARCO Goldman school Goldman school of public Kevin Martha Chavez Berkley Jesse arrogant Seth curry Patty senior assistant Los Angeles Margie chancellor San Francisco Steph million dollar four percent
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

"UC Berkeley, scientists may be on the verge of curing blindness. A recently discovered form of gene therapy was able to restore sight and blind mice within a month of treatment. Researchers at UC Berkeley say the method could have the potential to restore a sufficient amount of vision for humans who have lost side due to retinal degeneration. Authorities are investigating two separate freeway shootings in as many days in the East Bay cagey. Terry rows tells us in the first incident police say a woman was found dead inside a car that had crashed in the willow pass road offer from highway four near concord on Saturday twenty five year old Antioch resident destiny Hillary reportedly drove off the roadway and collided with the center divide her driver's side door was riddled with bullet holes. But it's not clear if she died from the crash or from the gunshots in the second freeway shooting a passenger in a vehicle was hit by gunfire role riding along interstate five eighty and Livermore last night. The twenty four year old woman was hitting. In the leg. She is expected to survive. No details on a suspect in either case. Megan McCain is pushing back after President Trump's attacks on her late father, Senator John McCain for turning over a controversial report, alleging Trump ties to Russia. Correspondent Linda Kenyon has the story in a pair of tweets. He wrote he stepped forward to risk his life for his country served honorably under difficult circumstances. And was one of the most consequential senators in the history of the body and the late senator's daughter Megan McCain who has tangled with Trump in the past over his comments about her late. Father tweeted, no one will ever love you the way they loved my father. I wish.

Senator John McCain Megan McCain UC Berkeley Trump retinal degeneration senator concord Linda Kenyon Livermore Hillary Russia President twenty five year twenty four year
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KCBS All News

"And private entrepreneurship UC Berkeley groundbreaking accelerator program is proving to be enormously successful at bringing the. Two worlds together, KCBS is Jeff Dow offer a closer look. At sky deck Guida is UC Berkeley, global startup accelerator and incubator answers sky deck executive director Caroline win it it got its. Start in twenty twelve win the dean of engineering dean of high school and the vice chancellor for research got together got together with this goal in mind to launch and help promote and nurture startups that. Were coming from campus began as a simple workspace and mentorship program but says it became increasingly clear that what could really help the startups was startup funding and to that end we. Decided the best thing to do would be to partner with a fund a private venture capital fund that would have, the exclusive. Agreement with UC Berkeley to invest in, the startups, skydeck did use that in else's, at the fund is investing one hundred thousand dollars, in each startup in the accelerator program in exchange for a five percent. Stake as for any profits fun has a contractual agreement with UC Berkeley did it will share. Half of the, returns of that fun with campus not surprising Skydeck is proving to be a big draw in. Fact for the latest cohort admitted twenty two companies to the, accelerator track, and that, was, out of. Six hundred applications to keep up with its growth skydeck has doubled its office space in, Berkeley Jeff bell KCBS KCBS news time now it's four forty to southern California man has been arrested on suspicion of theft of agricultural products Riverside County sheriff's officials say the sixty nine year old was, arrested after deputies found about eight hundred pounds of stolen lemons inside his car deputies were. Investigating recent farm thefts when they stopped the car and thermal and discover those freshly picked lemons that they believe were stolen from a nearby farm KCBS news time four forty three hey hey that's flow and. You have never understood top hat aren't all hats on top the toughest part of every outfit unless I've been doing it wrong.

UC Berkeley KCBS skydeck dean of engineering dean Jeff Dow Jeff bell executive director Riverside County chancellor theft partner Caroline California one hundred thousand dollars eight hundred pounds sixty nine year five percent
"uc berkeley" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"A puff of smoke dare i say you bet your bottom dollar these people are nuts speaking of uc berkeley where they riot over free speech rights of people like ben shapiro and milo yannopoulos why do they hate the jews so much you know milo yannopoulos jewish they burned the campus ben shapiro orthodox jew burn the campus what's what's what these burners they love burning things don't they sick bunch of people uc berkeley here's the fun headline from the los angeles times that used to be a newspaper out in california at uc berkeley a squirrel ran for student senate and one driving some people nuts say they have to make it fun because it's lefties so he can't make it a serious thing so this student who is he calls himself furry boy b oh boy furry boy he decided to dress up as a squirrel in a squirrel suit like disneyland because it's california and to run for the students senate at uc berkeley which used to be a school with a fairly positive reputation before it became a work free drug place or something i don't know what the hell it is the candidate for a seat in the uc berkeley student senate promised safe spaces for squirrels better access to acorns and support groups for those experiencing habitat loss his name was furry boy boi he campaigned and a squirrel suit and he attracted immediate attention probably got a lot of dates out of there because it's uc berkeley omg i love him he's so cute iris melody zoo a that's ex you a uc berkley student wrote on furry boys facebook page finally a candidate i can get behind someone else wrote but when the character that sophomore stephen boyle had created as a joke actually one one of the associated students of the university of california's twenty senate seats up for grabs last week the backlash was fast and furious sure now they're talking about fast and furious the student newspaper published an editorial calling furry boys election a travesty yet as many of you at least five hundred and thirty eight strong thought it might be a funny joke to have a man dressed up in a squirrel costume with no real platforms represent you at the administrative table.

ben shapiro milo yannopoulos los angeles times california uc berkeley disneyland senate stephen boyle university of california
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"Publican's except for half of the women those women weren't allowed to participate those women were shunned from the movement total lies when it comes to the names of the free speech movement was founded in nineteen sixty four to nineteen sixty five school year at uc berkeley under the leadership of someone into morio salvio and berkeley now by the way totally embraces the name of the free speech movement they they have renamed the steps in front of the hall where seven hundred students were arrested during the original free speech movement they've renamed them the mario savia steps they have a dining hall now named the free speech movement cafe as you go down there really you know very bouche wa now they're taking all the radicals and making it very bouche wa freshman now have to read a biography of the free speech woman leader savia ironically every undergrad must now also take a course on theoretical or analytical issues relevant to understanding race culture and ethnicity in america in society that is to say they have to take a course in rigid ideological conformity the free speech movement begets this well how does the free speech movement beget mandatory ideological conformity how did it happen it's because it was a lie the whole time this was largely aimed at expanding political activity on campuses so in the nineteen sixties by the early nineteen sixties political activity and fundraising on college campuses was basically limited to the gop and the democrat clubs the college republicans college democrats those are the only people who could do it the free speech movement and which were basically useful idiots for a communists for the soviet union for people who didn't like america very much they viewed america as an evil imperialistic empire they largely supported the soviet union and the cold war they opposed to cold war liberal consensus they wanted to clear political barriers for using campuses as a base for.

uc berkeley america gop soviet union
"uc berkeley" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Reasons why it's tough to get new recruits but according to david swing president of the california police chiefs association the biggest challenge is the current narrative about law enforcement in the news nobility of our work certainly cannot be understated but certainly that's being challenged and there's a perception out there that the law enforcement is peanut inobound light that's going to impact our arbitrating efforts as well some police departments are offering signing bonuses an extra vacation to bring in more applicants chief swings says being a police officer is both physically and mentally challenging and departments can't afford to just take anybody diane thompson with our all news sister station knx in los angeles a fifteen month old springer spaniel abused as a puppy has found a second life as a uc berkeley police department explosivedetecting dog kcbs is jeffrey schaub has the heartwarming story of obi and his partner you see pd officer sal lopez also lopez with a uc berkeley police department my canine is cannot officer obi obi is a bomb detection canine a fifteen month old springer spaniel uc berkeley video posted online officer lopez talked about obi's past and present is the rescue dog out of wyoming were his previous owners used to abuse them and beat them took them a while to get used to me at first he was very skittish he's wanted just go find a dark place and just being there now ob is happy and playful ever ready with a big lick for his police partner at others officer lopez says obi has taken to the skill of sniffing out smells from devices may to simulate a real bomb once he does he alerts he sits down and looks at me and that tells me that there something there ob best police partner best buddy thoroughly enjoys detection work and he's really good at it we learn together his first time being a police dog and it's my first canine and thoroughly enjoying jeffrey schaub kcbs.

president california police chiefs assoc officer diane thompson uc berkeley police department jeffrey schaub partner sal lopez obi obi david los angeles wyoming fifteen month
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"Social media issue i won't take too much time other than the sense everybody who clapped for the proposition that social media's a trap or a threat you're all wrong now you're probably nice people and everything but absolutely wrong you're all fascist now but i will say this this is a really grave error this is this is what i was talking about before people don't understand free speech there the it's not i don't think it's possible for social media and it makes no sense to say social media is a threat to free speech that's like saying all of us talking what will get to questions later all of us talking and trading our views and just disseminating information is it's it's a threat to free speech is like saying free speech is a threat to free speech it doesn't make any sense that doesn't mean that everything that facebook and all of the various social media companies do is perfect i mean i agree with you what google did today more really is atrocious in my view if we accept the day more complaint as true although they have emails in there i mean there's really atrocious behavior i think it seems to me that they fired him because he did exactly what they want him to express his views now i think there's a lot wrong with his views although he he expressed them intelligently exam the way you would want a person to do that and they and they can't him and i think that's really bad news but it doesn't make google equivalent to a sensor google cannot censor your speech facebook cannot censor your speech youtube cannot censor your speech they can say i don't want you to speak on my platform my platform i created it you don't get to speak on here it can be stupid it can be disagreeable they can be wrong about that i'm like i know you all a lot of your videos are restricted and i think it's stupid i criticize them don't get me wrong but the the issue here is they created this platform it is their platform it is not your platform you do not have a right to have a video on although we'll get you the county.

facebook google
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"I believe that that youtube google all all the social media companies are now an active threat to free speech yeah i mean that that that is a lot that is a huge problem right now and there's a huge debate obviously in the youtube community about what do you do about this and there's organizations run by a guy who i love dennis prager and they're involved in a lawsuit right now my my libertarian side says that getting the government involved is never the answer i know steve you're you're kind of where i'm at with that but it's interesting i think there's a compelling this is an interesting case where i think there's somewhat of a compelling argument that google control so much information so much of the tubes the pipes that we get this stuff through so much of our ability to communicate that perhaps there's something unique here i haven't been fully sold on that but i'm curious what you think about that other you're asking one person as far as the tech possibilities here well god brought early if if the government should be involved in this well you know what we've got now is not working so i don't know i can't i have no faith that would be any better say under you know an administration call it the bomb administration just what the heck that that shares the same victimology ideology would they do anything different than google they may have the exact same views that dennis i'm i've my two does prager videos have been taken off the web one on on the diversity bureaucracy and campuses and the other on the the war on cops and and the black lives matter movement so i don't know if being.

dennis prager steve google youtube
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"Couple other professors in there who have diversity of thought that doesn't teach anybody anything they need to be discriminated any to actually figure out what knowledge is true and how to even think about that another idea i think that that i think we should challenge that it's what i would call a package deal is the idea of tolerance that we should just tolerate every idea and this i think leads people to be repelled by free speech and the idea that i always have to tolerate anything you shouldn't tolerate every idea in the same way that you should be discriminating about what you learn i mean as a take a benign example relatively benign example if i were in biology class and they marched in the intelligent design guy the creationist and said just tolerate this guy because his user just as good as brett weinstein's for instance no that's nonsense i'm not gonna say bullshit bullshit it's bullshit but but it doesn't mean you attack the guy right you don't attack them you say i don't buy this this is nonsense i'm going to criticize this prison if if this is really what the school is all about i'm out of here i wanna walk i'm gonna vote with my feet we have to understand that thinking reasoning speaking involves not just saying things to people involved sometimes taking action and sometimes saying what you are teaching me is crap i don't want anything or i think your ideas are not going to support those ideas i'm outta here we have to have freedom of association we have to have freedom of movement freedom of action and freedom of speech so there's an interesting component here that steve kind of touchdown on which is the technological side of it how many of you actually.

brett weinstein steve kind
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"Do you think that's a fair assessment i mean i i wouldn't quite put it that way i don't blame them for that but but i think that the issue i mean that's part of it's easy to take things for granted when you were as rich as we are told my kids this every day you have no idea what it's like to even have a job why are we complaining about the fact that you don't get to drive the exact car the who want today it's hard for jit can we kate to young people but i don't think it's the fundamental issue i think the fundamental issue is that the west when you're referring to the west i would think about it more as america and the pinnacle of freedom and i don't think people really have ever understood what freedom really has to be grounded on and they haven't understood consistently and we haven't had the real defensive freedom that we that we need and it's it's been flawed i mean the founders were great men they did many great things and they were i think political geniuses but they there were flaws in their thinking about the founding of american their flaws in our views of free speech today there's all kinds of problems with our views of free speech i mentioned earlier but the idea of conflicting force with speech that happens all over the place people understand the role of property rights and free speech and that you know your your free speech basically ends at somebody else's property you do not have the right to speak on someone else's property if we conflict that we calls all kinds of conflict and then you actually plant the seeds of people thinking it actually does make sense for me to fight back if if i'm forced to to have to deal with this if if it's okay to take over somebody else's property if it's okay to come into my living let's take over my company or my school and i'm and i'm really conflicting force in speech in many.

kate america
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"Don't know the history of how governments have used suppression to silence opposition to silence heterodox thought and they're also extremely naive about their own precarious one hopes hold on power it's partly why i feel like this is happening all over the west right now i get emails literally from i mean virtually every country on earth you know we bounce around the globe from france australia and mexico and china and japan and every literally from saudi arabia places that don't have freedom in the places that do but the most alarming ones i get actually are from the western countries it's from people that are in france and that are in belgium and eastern europe which is having all sorts of problems with this do you guys think that part of this is actually the success of the west i mean it's like as you look who earlier we can look out here these are students at one of the most incredible schools in the entire country who have everything at their fingertips you come from different things some of we're going to make great successes and somebody you are going to be miserable failures hate to tell you i could point it a couple of you now it's pretty obvious but just kidding that guy looked at his friend who was like yo dude through but that part of what's happening here is the success of the west i think that all of these countries they got to a certain point not that it was perfect not that there aren't racist not that there aren't bigots and all of those things which always exists but that a certain amount of freedom started turning on its self and i think that that's what we're seeing here.

france australia france belgium mexico china japan saudi arabia europe
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"Agree with the victim point i think that's a consequence of even deeper philosophical convictions and convictions about ideas that are leading us to be victims to reject rationality and speech to reject individualism to klay onto groups and the rise of tribalism all of these things are playing role but you're absolutely right that this pro prosperity that has been achieved through freedom through trade through free markets is stunning i mean every every item in this room has been created by some guy who's got a company or some woman in the in the market chain it's extraordinarily but that doesn't persuade people and if they can if a student on a campus like this which is so beautiful i was in the main library today with these grand reading rooms and the noble architecture and the the plants of trees you've got around if they can feel sorry for themselves and feel oppressed at berkeley i'm in that's preposterous on leading they're living a chocolate they're leading a delusion they are they are completely unable to perceive their privilege to be at a place of learning where they should be down on their knees every day saying thank you for giving me this opportunity to absorb human history languages science you name it well that's why i was thinking so fascinating because there's such a disconnect between the reality of the goodness of this country not to say we don't have problems and what this sort of postmodern cultural marxists collectivist set of ideas whatever you wanna call it is about i mean you know i say this on the show all the time but the essence of prejudices to prejudge i could look at you guys right now and go okay brown guy here white guy here girl here brown guy asian guy they're white lady there and that would assuming that i thought that that meant i know what.

brown
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"Well steve as a straight white men would you like to apologize to the audience i've made a labor should rate white man i mean is there anything straight white man with all women in my family so i'm constant all right how do we how do we reverse some of this i mean we talked about this over dinner we all sort of were like wow are we i i like to think that i'm an optimist at heart heather you said you're a pessimist where do you consider yourself i'm torn between you guys i i was on your side of first and now now i'm i'm generally an optimist but i have i'm an optimist that realistic about i'm optimistic because of the potential of human beings i'm optimistic because we can think we can achieve things look at the society we live in today i mean this is one of one of the the big rebuttals to or one of the things that people just ignore in whole victimology i just look at the society we live in my god it's the most advanced free freest greatest society in the history of the world that i mean there's something to be taken from that not just that they're wrong to constantly be playing victims and claim that they're oppressed in a context in which they're not oppressed but that human beings can achieve unbelievable things that's a great thing so i'm optimistic they're human beings can also ruin great things and i'm concerned about the future because of the direction of this issue and i think a lot of what heather said i think they're deeper issues going on which i don't want to we can talk about them but i.

heather steve
"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"All right so so heather steve or kind of writing the in the thick of the free speech battle and heather i'll start with you because i spoke at claremont mckenna at the beginning of their that's that they they they they actually let me speak there which is better than they did for you actually you're not as important i guess well hold on i want to get out of this respectfully just so you you were supposed to speak at claremont mckenna few few months before i spoke there i think in september of this past year i think you were there in may or june or so april and give us give us about a one minute breakdown of what happened what were you intending to speak about and then and then what happened well i was intending to speak about the police in my book and saying that in fact there is enormous unrecognized support for the police in high crime neighborhoods for that i've been called a white supremacist fascist homophobic islamophobic transphobic and the the students at the various clermont colleges were determined that nobody should hear me speak so they blockaded the venue the name whereas is supposed to speak i had to be escorted in through a secret passageway but there was nobody in the auditorium and i spoke to an empty room it was livestream like this event but people were pounding on the plate glass windows during my talk and eventually the security decided it was not safe and i had to be escorted through the kitchen an ignominious retreat.

heather steve claremont mckenna one minute
"uc berkeley" Discussed on Invisibilia

Invisibilia

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"uc berkeley" Discussed on Invisibilia

"His glenn now then we learned something amazing this sleep researcher at uc berkeley he explained that dreaming just falling asleep in dreaming is emotionally healing in and of itself it's like overnight therapy see when we dream our brain reactivates our most jarring experience experiences like the russia fear when our father threatens us but at the same time our brain israel living this it shuts down the chemicals that cause us to feel stress so as we dream night after night after night the emotional charge runs out of the traumatic memory allowing us to walk around in the world feeling less traumatized tonya was taken by this that's awesome that's awesome if only function seems to be to heal me in my sleep we is pretty beautiful in mystical in its own way and recently a walking alone in the golden hour of twilight axes message wherever you go i am their clicked and something inside of tonya began to shift there's a place inside of me that i've personified as this little girl that is not wounded and has can never be wounded is like the idea of that of like getting more of the feeling in my life is a credible relief like a credible would that be out be amazing and i think that's what is being offered to me actually kenya's started to accept an offer she's been calling her grandpa and canada to catch up going for long by crowds alone just to feel the wind on her face little ways that she can see proof of attacks playing in broad daylight kickable who have rethink oh like i'm what's in what's deep inside me like sometimes what's deepens ideas like dislike of rock in tea party with like a three year old or something you know or just like your area.

glenn researcher uc berkeley tonya canada russia kenya three year