35 Burst results for "Uber"

What's Right With Maryland

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:07 min | 1 d ago

What's Right With Maryland

"Every single person who spends the night at the house reads about their own state. And then they begin to compare. It's like the best publication you could possibly do. I don't know who the original brain was behind that, but it's beautifully designed. It's very easy. You can download it, but I think people can they order it from Alex so that they get the hard copy. The paperback copy. Yeah, you can order a copy. We'll send you one in the mail, but rich states poor states dot org. It's all there. I was actually my Uber driver recently was really interested to learn about it. He pulled it up on his Tesla touchscreen as we're driving. I'm not sure I like that. By the end of by the time I got dropped off at the airport, he was ready to leave Maryland. Well, a, that's good. In fact, I came in this morning to the hotel and in Alex staffer was going down to the gym. I said, you weren't outside were you? No, no. Because it's freezing. And I said, where are you from? I said, I'm from Marilyn, part of the Alex staff. And I said, well, good, you know how cold it is. Why does anyone live in Maryland, do you think? No one should live there. I moved to this area. I remember. I remember the other side of the river. Other side of the river and it makes all the difference in the world. D.C. should just tilt and empty out everywhere. So

Alex Maryland Marilyn D.C.
Doug Is Thankful for the World's True Servants

The Doug Collins Podcast

00:52 sec | Last week

Doug Is Thankful for the World's True Servants

"For servants. And I look around this world and I see so many. I say, I travel a lot. And I'm thankful for service. And I'll call them sorbet. Because they're out there serving others. I'm thankful for the Uber driver. I'm thankful for the taxicab driver. I'm thankful for the folks who clean rooms and my hotels when I'm out on the road. I'm thankful for the folks who work in the service stations and gas stations along the way. I'm thankful for the folks who get up and every day and still go to a fast food restaurant because when I'm hungry, I want something to eat and they actually showed up and work. I'm thankful for our police officers, our firemen, our first responders. I'm thankful for my fellow men and women in the United States military who serve selflessly all across this world, even on this day of Thanksgiving. I'm thankful for those servants. And

United States
Butler scores 35, Heat hold off Hornets 117-112 in OT

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 3 weeks ago

Butler scores 35, Heat hold off Hornets 117-112 in OT

"Jimmy Butler almost had a triple double but the heat blew a 15 point lead before downing the hornets one 17 one 12 and over time Popular delivered 35 points ten rebounds and 8 assists He scored Miami's last 8 points of regulation as the heat played their 6th consecutive game decided by single digits Bam adebayo had 18 points and grabbed 14 rebounds for the heat who scored 30 points off turnovers Kelly Uber junior scored 29 points and Terry Rozier had 22 for Charlotte I'm Dave ferry

Jimmy Butler Hornets Bam Adebayo Miami Kelly Uber Terry Rozier Charlotte Dave Ferry
New Poll Suggests GOP Win: Here's Why

The Trish Regan Show

01:58 min | Last month

New Poll Suggests GOP Win: Here's Why

"The polls are pretty extraordinary right now because you're seeing some things that we didn't think it happened. Like Washington possibly getting a Republican governor in the state of Washington, the Uber liberal place, well, that's because this chaos has finally caught up with voters, even in the trendiest and most liberal places, where they say, okay, I've had enough. I don't like the crime. I don't like what's happening. I don't like the taxes. I don't like that. I'm not getting anything from my taxes. And this is a phenomenon that's happening all over the country. Because I'll tell you what, the number one issue, the number one issue on the table right now is inflation. If any of these Democrats had had any sense at all, they would have paid attention months ago when they had an opportunity to do so because all the handwriting was there. The Federal Reserve, if they wanted to keep Democrats in office, would have paid attention. Months ago. Because again, the handwriting was on the wall. Right now we're seeing a GDP print that, hey, you know what? More than 2% looks pretty nice, but I'll tell you, there's more to that number. It's really not that good. There's some trade issues that affected the number. There's some inflation issues that affected the number. And when you look at reality, like consumer spending and the still steady high inflation, what you see is we've got problems. Listening to this guy, you wouldn't know it. Apparently, he's bringing inflation way down. Watch. Given record inflation, why should voters choose Democrat? This is not record inflation anymore. I'm bringing it down. Look what we inherited. I inherited a 6 and a half percent unemployment down to three and a half percent. We lost about 600 we lost hundreds of thousands of manufacturing jobs. We've created over 600,700 thousand manufacturing jobs. Things are moving. Things are moving. Things are moving down. I'm sorry. Joe Biden, you know what? A lot of manufacturing jobs were lost. That is true. And unemployment was higher because what happened? Oh, we shut down the country.

Washington Federal Reserve Joe Biden
This Is What's Happening to America...

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:19 min | Last month

This Is What's Happening to America...

"Allen Uber driver, who was going the opposite way, and she was deaf and pointed to this little piece of paper in between the seats that said, I'm deaf, would you please, you know, I'm looking at your lips. She was like trying to explain. So I tapped her on the shoulder and said, hey, you're going the wrong way, huh? But you got so mad at me, she threw me out of the car. And then the next guy I was a Muslim guy with a big old fucking beard that I can't stand. And he was great. He didn't know what to do on his phone with, here's the address. Just listen to my phone. We're gonna get there. And we got there. I gave him a final tip. Good guy, you know? He worked. He worked his way to getting the tip. He didn't show up death and hope that every passenger just decides, oh, well, you know. I'm deaf and they'll all comply. No. No. But here's the thing, guys. We all watch TV. We all watched the news, CNN or Fox. I don't care what you watch. We see what's happening at the border, the southern border. And if you're okay with that, then you are going to be okay with speaking with third world people while you're trying to book a flight on an airplane. You no longer get Susan on the phone. Or Amy on the phone. You know, those days are over. I spoke to a guy named numan, wait, before we go any further, my friend, what is your name? Tell me your name? How do you spell that, bro? And he spelled it. It's no man. So I was speaking to this guy named numan and I go, oh, okay, like Paul Newman. He had no idea what I meant. I said, you know, the actor, the famous actor, Paul Newman, he apologized to me because he'd never heard of Paul Newman. This is what's happening to America.

Allen Uber Numan CNN FOX Paul Newman Susan AMY America
Kelvin Cochran Shares His Story in His Book, 'Facing the Fire'

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:00 min | Last month

Kelvin Cochran Shares His Story in His Book, 'Facing the Fire'

"Everybody in a nutshell, we can amplify it through questions to you in a nutshell what did you do and who did you tick off for doing it? Well, after 34 years of faithful service in the star service industry, around 2013 I wrote a book in our own private time for Chris to be a Bible study, really encouraging them to be the man that got called us to be at walk into freedom of Salvation and not condemnation in a few paragraphs that talked about biblical marriage and sexuality. Ended up in the hands of an openly gay Atlanta city council member who complained to the mayor kasim Reed at the time of what I wrote about what the Bible says about marriage and sexuality. He suspended me for 30 days and after the 30 day suspension I was terminated providing what the Bible spoke about biblical marriage and sexuality.

Atlanta City Council Kasim Reed Chris
Marijuana Use Among Young Adults Is Skyrocketing

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:17 min | Last month

Marijuana Use Among Young Adults Is Skyrocketing

"A new study shows that marijuana use has reached record levels for young adults. Wow, how's that? How's that folks? I've been warning about marijuana for the 40 years I've been broadcasting. Even conservatives have called my radio show to say Dennis with all respect, agree with you almost all the time, but not on this one. My least popular, I think my least popular position is that I'm infinitely rather my kids smoke cigarettes. That smoke weed. I said this for the last 40 years. There was no doubt in my mind, which was worse for them. Cigarettes could affect their health, no question about it. But marijuana could affect their brain. And much sooner than tobacco or specifically cigarettes. Cigars enough, not nearly as dangerous. And any Doctor Who tells you they are, you should visit another doctor. Maybe the sweetest doctor in the world has your interest in mind, but they're not telling you the truth.

Dennis
Conservatives Conserve the Best of the Best

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:24 min | Last month

Conservatives Conserve the Best of the Best

"Conservatives conserve. Can you think of a more noble idea than to pass on the most beautiful, the most true, the most wise, the most profound the most deep to the next generation can you think of a better thing to do in life than to pass on the best that has been done? But this bores a lot of people. A lot of professors are bored teaching Shakespeare again. The fact that it is the greatest gift of English to young people through any people, but I say young because they're the next generation, is irrelevant to them. They want the new. There used to be a very common thing said on commercials for products. New and improved, and I loved it. I thought new and improved, and I still do, by the way. With anything in the technological sphere, the inanimate sphere, if it's new and improved, if it's really a new and improved toothpaste, I want it. Absolutely. New and improved car, but remember they always added improved the left is not the left does the new, but it's not improved.

Shakespeare
Benjamin Netanyahu on His New Book 'Bibi: My Story'

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:29 min | Last month

Benjamin Netanyahu on His New Book 'Bibi: My Story'

"So why don't you give us a little background about when your parents went to Israel, how you were raised, et cetera? Well, I was born in 1949, a year after the founding of the state. And then I devoted my life to intrinsic security and prosperity. And for actually the premise, basically I can contribute to the junior. My generation came into being right after the Holocaust. And my father was a great historian as well as my money and welcome. They devoted to ensuring that the Jewish people recovered an independent state of their own after the horrors of history that were running against us. And my generation started to ensure that black miracle lives on. So I served as a soldier in an elite unit and a commander there. And then our special forces was shot while the whisking officers from hijacked during nearly drowned in the firefight and see what's canal. When we didn't have peace with Egypt, I was bitten by a squatting yearly run with my Jeep into a fandom jet turkey glass and one of our bases, which is like what you see in the movies. And I led many kinds of operations. That was my military service I described it as something to tell. And I think people who want to see how Israel and special forces work will get some kind of inside there. And

Israel Egypt
State Department Funding Drag Shows in Ecuador

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:26 min | Last month

State Department Funding Drag Shows in Ecuador

"State Department funding drag theater performances in Ecuador. To promote diversity and inclusion. State Department awards $20,000 $20,600, grant for cultural center in Ecuador. To host 12 drag theater performances. So every South American country is relatively conservative, traditional in its in its personal life in their personal life. Their socialist oriented in the government life. But they're not left wing oriented in their personal life. What do you think they think? The U.S. Department of State is awarded more than $20,000 for a cultural center in Ecuador to host drag theater performances in the name of diversity and inclusion. It was done on September 23rd through the centro equatorial, North America. Nor did they have any Kano. A nonprofit organization supported by the U.S. embassy, and consulate in Ecuador, to promote diversity and inclusion in the region.

State Department Ecuador Grant For Cultural Center U.S. Embassy Kano North America
"uber" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

05:07 min | Last month

"uber" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Got a great story for you, my Friends. Another Dennis prager Uber story. I make friends with Uber drivers apparently. I had a great one in Washington, the Uber driver from Muslim from Afghanistan, who ended up coming to my talk at the museum of the Bible. And I noted his presence and everybody cheered. And he even bought a copy of my commentary on deuteronomy. Then last night, my Uber driver, I generally ran cars, but sometimes it's not feasible. So I have an Uber driver yesterday in Philadelphia. Going to the venue. Where I and my colleague spoke. Or properly, my colleagues and I spoke. So the man says to me, what do you do? Not a logical question. What are you doing? I said, I give lectures. Oh, did I mention he was a black man, as a black driver? Because what do you do when I give lectures? And usually, even though it's odd to me because you'd think there would be a follow-up like on watt. He did that, he goes on what subjects, though I said pretty much everything about life about men and women about politics about religion about psychology and he said, well, they didn't let him go. Well, what's your basic message? Am I thinking, listen? Is this the time to alienate my companion here, the driver? On the other hand, I have to tell the truth. So I said, I speak the basic theme of my speaking is the collapse of western civilization. And I was certain it would end in the conversation. And the guy goes, I could not agree more. This woke stuff is ruining the world. We can't even speak freely anymore. There's no freedom of speech. Cancel culture. And I'm thinking holy crow that I hit the jackpot. My Uber driver. And to be obviously the elephant in the room is he's a black guy. You don't normally associate with conservative views. And the guy is basically delivering my speech. So I said, yeah, I just told you you're my man, man. And I'll tell you what. It's sold out, but I'll get you in, and not only that, if you come to the speech, I promise you a standing ovation. Well, the guy showed up. And sure enough, I would respond to speak. I introduced him. I told the story. I did not have to prompt the crowd at all, 1200 people rose in unison. And gave my Uber driver a steady ovation, the spotlight was out of, he was in the front row. That was a great moment for both of us. I would love to know how he recounted the story. By the way, I asked him in the car, and I told him I ask every black conservative callers to my show, guests that I have. And how does your family view you? And he said, basically, what is it they think I'm nuts? Or whatever. But the very, very good news was, he has four kids, and they all share his values. And that's more important than whether his siblings or his parents do. Anyway, those are among those wonderful memories that one has. You never know if you end up my Uber driver whether you be the hero for the night or not..

museum of the Bible Dennis prager Afghanistan watt Philadelphia Washington
Finding Truth in an Uber

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:54 min | Last month

Finding Truth in an Uber

"So I have an Uber driver yesterday in Philadelphia. Going to the venue. Where I and my colleague spoke. Or properly, my colleagues and I spoke. So the man says to me, what do you do? Not a logical question. What are you doing? I said, I give lectures. Oh, did I mention he was a black man, as a black driver? Because what do you do when I give lectures? And usually, even though it's odd to me because you'd think there would be a follow-up like on watt. He did that, he goes on what subjects, though I said pretty much everything about life about men and women about politics about religion about psychology and he said, well, they didn't let him go. Well, what's your basic message? Am I thinking, listen? Is this the time to alienate my companion here, the driver? On the other hand, I have to tell the truth. So I said, I speak the basic theme of my speaking is the collapse of western civilization. And I was certain it would end in the conversation. And the guy goes, I could not agree more. This woke stuff is ruining the world.

Philadelphia Watt
Former Uber security chief found guilty of concealing data breach

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Former Uber security chief found guilty of concealing data breach

"There's a conviction in the Uber data breach cover up The former chief security officer for Uber has been convicted of trying to cover up a 2016 data breach in which hackers access millions of customer records Authorities say Joseph Sullivan was convicted Wednesday in San Francisco of federal charges for concealing the breach in which hackers stole data of 57 million users and 600,000 driver's license numbers Prosecutors say Sullivan concealed the breach from the Federal Trade Commission and secretly paid the hackers $100,000 in return for promising not to release the data Uber's new management uncovered the truth in 2017 and made the breach public the hackers pleaded guilty in 2019 to

Joseph Sullivan Uber San Francisco Sullivan Federal Trade Commission
"uber" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

04:02 min | 2 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Friday, September 16th, 2022, I'm Brian McCullough today, Uber is investigating a breach of its systems that has caused it to take some of its most important systems offline. The White House has finally delivered on that big comprehensive framework for crypto regulation. How did Amazon do with its NFL broadcast last night? And of course, the weekend long read suggestions. Here's what you missed today in the world of tech. Two big stories this morning. First up, Uber has taken down some of its internal communication and engineering systems taking them fully offline as it investigates a breach of its overall systems. Uber stock opened down more than 5% this morning on the news. Quoting The New York Times. The breach appeared to have compromised many of Uber's internal systems and a person claiming responsibility for the hack sent images of email, cloud storage, and code repositories to cybersecurity researchers and The New York Times. They pretty much have full access to Uber, said Sam curry, a security engineer at yugo labs, who corresponded with the person who claimed to be responsible for the breach. This is a total compromise from what it looks like. Quote, an Uber spokesman said the company was investigating the breach and contacting law enforcement officials. Uber employees were instructed not to use the company's internal messaging service slack and found that other internal systems were inaccessible, said to employees who were not authorized to speak publicly. Shortly before the slack system was taken offline on Thursday afternoon, Uber employees received a message that read, quote, I announced I am a hacker and Uber has suffered a data breach end quote. The message went on to list several internal databases that the hacker claimed had been compromised. The hacker compromised a worker's slack account and used it to send the message, the Uber spokesman said, it appeared that the hacker was later able to gain access to other internal systems posting an explicit photo on an internal information page for employees. The person who claimed responsibility for the hack told The New York Times that he had sent a text message to an Uber worker, claiming to be a corporate information technology person. The worker was persuaded to hand over a password that allowed the hacker to gain access to UberSuggest, a technique known as social engineering. These types of social engineering attacks to gain a foothold within tech companies have been increasing, said Rachel toback, chief executive of social proof security, miss tobacco pointed to the 2020 hack of Twitter in which teenagers use social engineering to break into the company. Similar social engineering techniques were used in recent breaches at Microsoft and octa. We are seeing that attackers are getting smart and also documenting what is working, miss toback said, they have kits now that make it easier to deploy and use social engineering methods. It's become almost commoditized. Some security experts are saying that the hacker had access to Uber's AWS accounts, even Uber's hacker one bug bounty program. One source reports that the hacker downloaded all vulnerability reports before losing access. On the hacker in question, The Washington Post says the hacker claims to be 18 years old, says they had breached the company for fun, and might leak its source code in a few months. Quote, internal screenshots obtained by The Washington Post showed the hacker claiming to have wide ranging access inside Uber's corporate networks, and appeared to indicate the hacker was motivated by the company's treatment of its drivers. The person claimed to have taken data from common software used by Uber employees to write new programs. The hacker posted as Uber on a chat function at hacker one, which runs interference between researchers who are reporting security vulnerabilities and the companies who are affected by them. Uber and other companies use that service to manage reports of security flaws in its programs and to reward researchers who find them. In that chat, which was viewed by the post, the alleged hacker claimed access to Uber's Amazon Web Services account in a subsequent interview on a messaging app, the alleged hacker told the post that they had breached the company for fun and might leak the source code quote in a few months. The person described Uber security as quote awful. And

Uber Brian McCullough The New York Times Sam curry yugo labs Rachel toback miss tobacco White House toback Amazon NFL The Washington Post Twitter Microsoft
Lee Zeldin: Independents, Democrats Are Hitting a Breaking Point in New York

The Dan Bongino Show

01:33 min | 2 months ago

Lee Zeldin: Independents, Democrats Are Hitting a Breaking Point in New York

"So you probably get that a lot too Lee you're probably here oh my gosh it's New York There's no chance we're going to win which by the way the polls don't say that at all The polls are actually very close But you and I both know that's ridiculous George pataki won three terms This isn't even that long ago And Rudy Giuliani was the mayor at the same time I mean this is an unheard of Yeah no doubt And actually what people are finding crazy is that the consequences of one party Democrat rule So this isn't just Republicans who are saying hey the Democrats have gone off the deep end and they're destroying New York You have independence and Democrats who are saying I don't know if I can stay here There's a lot of people all around the state who feel like their families they're hitting their breaking point Their dream is now a dream to be taken to some other state People who want to on a beautiful night be able to maybe go walk ten 15 blocks in Manhattan Instead they'll get in an Uber and even if it's just to go two or three blocks They won't go down in the subway and when they do I'm hearing stories of how they grab a pull or guardrail because they're afraid of being pushed in front of an oncoming subway car So earlier this week I was on the steps of New York City hall And there were a whole bunch of Democrats It was a Democrats for Zelda rally current Democrat elected officials former Democrat elected officials Democrat communally leaders all endorsing our campaign because they're fed up and they're saying that we have to save our city and save our state and the Democrats are destroying the place

George Pataki Rudy Giuliani New York LEE Manhattan Zelda New York City
Black Lives Matter Executive Accused of 'Syphoning' $10M

The Officer Tatum Show

01:37 min | 3 months ago

Black Lives Matter Executive Accused of 'Syphoning' $10M

"I got a list of them. They got all your favorite companies, PayPal, slack, we use slack our company. Comcast, Uber, a snap Shopify. We use Shopify on my ecommerce store. I mean, you go to Microsoft, Grubhub, DocuSign, DoorDash, I only want to talk about bumble 'cause none of y'all better be on the bumble. Go down the list, these major corporations, that's not even including celebrities. That's not they had so much influence around the world. And somehow black people found a way to mess it up. How in the work with that much power and influence, why couldn't a group of black people actually do something for black people? Why couldn't they clean up the inner cities, build the schools better, get kids a better education, somehow have a contingency of dads, community leaders, curbing crime in the inner city, they could have done something, they didn't do nothing but pimp y'all. Straight hoodwinked. Patrice colors. Step down until 2021. After they caught her, spending millions of dollars on mansions, then this dude, when she stepped down, she put him in charge. They claim that he didn't extract the $10 million from Black Lives Matter. In 2021, his company was paid $2 million.

Uber Comcast Paypal Microsoft Patrice Colors
The Menace That Is the IRS With Dave Bahnsen

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:25 min | 3 months ago

The Menace That Is the IRS With Dave Bahnsen

"Educate our audience a little bit about the menace that is the IRS. Yeah, you know, Charlie, I work with high net worth investors for a living. My firm manages about $4 billion. And the people who are most aggressive at reducing their taxes are left leaning clients. They support the taxes. And then they will move heaven and earth to avoid paying them. The people that don't have the options to hire financial firms like mine and accountants and lawyers and so forth are middle class people. And so all of a sudden you have wage earners that maybe get certain money from Venmo in the IRS starts auditing how much cash they're receiving if they're Uber drivers and other things like that. Well, the IRS people are not the cream of the crop intellectually. Okay, this is just a fact. You don't become IRS agent because you're a brilliant businessman or businesswoman. But what they can make up for with talent deficit is more volume, more people. And that's what this bill seeks to do. It may end up only being 50,000 agents. I love that pushback right now. The Washington Post said, no, it's not going to be 87,000. But the Biden administration ran a report saying they could afford up to 87,000 more people. So let's say it's only 50,000, all that means is the rest of the money is going to be lost and thrown away in bureaucracy

IRS Venmo Charlie Biden Administration The Washington Post
Robert DeNiro to Play Two Separate Mafiosa in 'Wise Guys'

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:27 min | 3 months ago

Robert DeNiro to Play Two Separate Mafiosa in 'Wise Guys'

"But wise guys, this movie is going to make De Niro. It's a period of peace. He's going to tell the story of Vito Genovese and Frank Costello. Who are a pair of Italians running two separate crime families during the mid 20th century, Genovese tried and failed to assassinate Costello in 1957. But then, well, it's a great story. The in Costello got his revenge. And De Niro, you ready for this? Is playing both roles? What are we doing? I love De Niro. In my mind, he can play anything. I'd watch De Niro play an Uber driver. I don't care. He's the best, and I know he's done some roles in the last 20 years, which are embarrassing. You know, yeah, I have to remember. When actors get to a certain age and their grandpas or daddies, they tend to do things that their kids are grandkids want to see. So you can't get up there and ask too much. De Niro did a rock in bullwinkle. He knows it was a piece of shit, but he wanted his grandkid to see him in the movie, or hear him in a movie. You know, you can't. But De Niro's playing both these roles, Genovese and Costello. Nick pileggi has written this script pileggi wrote Goodfellas. He's the best in the business. And he wrote the book wise guy, but that's not what this movie is based on. Unfortunately, the producers Irwin Winkler, he's the fuck face who keeps squeezing Sylvester Stallone, and won't give him a percentage point of the rocky movies, so Winkler is producing this which sucks. Barry Levinson is the best. He'd made movies toys, bugsy, rain man, good morning, Vietnam, ten men, and diner among others. He also did the HBO Emmy nominated series, the survivor, he did two episodes of dope sick with Michael Keaton. This guy, I mean, look, you can't get better people. But De Niro playing both roles, I wonder what that's gonna look like, you know?

De Niro Costello Vito Genovese Frank Costello Genovese Nick Pileggi Pileggi Irwin Winkler Goodfellas Sylvester Stallone Barry Levinson Winkler Vietnam Emmy HBO Michael Keaton
Alex Jones Discusses Being Patient Zero of Cancellations

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:04 min | 4 months ago

Alex Jones Discusses Being Patient Zero of Cancellations

"Alex, you were banned in one day, talk about this. Apple iCloud, Facebook, Twitter, Google. It was simultaneous. There was collusion and it was you first and they went after all of us afterwards. How do you keep going? What's the lesson for the everyday American that gets canceled? Those Alex Jones first and they went after Donald Trump. It's Alex Jones first and they raid Mar-a-Lago. Like you said, your patient zero, what keeps you going, what's your advice for the everyday American? Well, it's actually the four year anniversary yesterday. It was August 8th, 2018. That I woke up at like 4 a.m. like I always do. And all my alerts were going off. My inbox was full, and it was Tim Cook met with the other heads of the other big 5 tech companies, Facebook, Google, Twitter, you name it. Apple, but she headed up and made the decision to ban Alex Jones, and then over a hundred other platforms from Uber eats to LinkedIn, Uber eats. Everything. They said that you no longer can order Uber eats, is that what they did? That's right. My name was put into the social credit score, database that they've already setting up. I was the test case, patient zero for the social credit score, putting us into that. And so I saw that happen and I told listeners I said, this is for you. This is a president setting case for everybody, and now they had met that. So now, with lawfare and rig courts and weaponized judiciary and weaponized law enforcement, now what's happening to me, they admit, they said in closing arguments last week at the state sandy hook trial, I get what the judge said I was already guilty. They said, we're going to silence him, we're going to take him out. These are quotes. We're going to take his megaphone and then we're going to take everybody else's megaphone. Anybody that questions us, the judge said, I am truth. You are not. What I say is truth, what you say is lies. Those are quotes right out of 1984. So they have devolved into what George rworld wrote about 1947.

Alex Jones Apple Twitter Facebook Google Donald Trump Tim Cook Alex Linkedin George Rworld
The Democrats Want You to Be Government Dependent

The Officer Tatum Show

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

The Democrats Want You to Be Government Dependent

"They're evil, these who can defend the Democrats. Nobody. If there's a perspective here, they're not passing, they're not signing these bills into law and doing things like that. They're not doing this just for the heck of it. They have an agenda. They want to take over the country. They want you to be government dependent. That's why I was wondering the other day I said, why would they do this? This is like a death sentence for them. Well, because they're going to rig the election anyway. In their minds, they're going to rig the election, so they'll get who they want to get in there. And then they're going to force this down our throats, and they're going to turn into a totalitarian government. And I said this before, Elon Musk's girlfriend said it, that they're going to create AI to supplement the middle class. Now, it seems like a far stretch today. I don't think it's a stretch for the future. If you have electric cars, what do you need Uber for?

Elon Musk
"uber" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

07:24 min | 8 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"News has to travel fast, but hiring often takes longer than expected. In 2022, don't let the search for the best candidates slow down your growth. Find quality candidates fast within indeed. If you're hiring, you need indeed because indeed is the hiring partner where you can attract interview and hire all in one place. And indeed, is the only job site where you're guaranteed to find quality applications that meet your must have requirements, or else you don't pay. Instead of spending hours on multiple job sites, hoping to find candidates with the right skills, you need one powerful hiring partner that can help you do it all. Indeed, partners with you on every step of the hiring process. Find great talent through time saving tools like indeed instant match, assessments, and virtual interviews. Start hiring right now with the $75 sponsored job credit to upgrade your job post and indeed dot com slash what next. Offer valid through April 30th. Go to indeed dot com slash what next to claim your $75 credit before April 30th. Indeed dot com slash what next terms and conditions apply. Need to hire, you need indeed. Here in New York where I am the city taxi and limousine commission has traditionally been pretty hostile to ride sharing companies. You talked to the deputy mayor Mira Joshi, who oversees the TLC. Why did she think this was a good idea for the city and for the city's taxis? You know, Mira was a former TLC commissioner herself. Yeah. And her thinking was this. She said, look, if this deal creates more economic opportunities, for existing drivers, without adding more and more cars onto the congested streets of New York, we're in it. What she did take with a pinch of salt was this. She said, you know, Uber burst onto the scene a decade ago with the idea that it would completely disrupt or say, kill the taxi industry, yes, they did modernize the taxi industry. They did make it possible for everyone to become a driver. They did make us the custom to the service of the touch of a button, but they really didn't kill the taxi industry. And so she said, we're at a point now where it seems like both groups realize that after years of fighting each other, that can be a medium where they can coexist. In her reporting, predica spoke to several different drivers to get a sense of how they feel. Both cabbies like Jaime Serrano and drivers who have been exclusively doing rideshare. Some taxi drivers that I spoke to were receptive, the taxi tech companies that Uber has partnered with in New York City have their own taxi healing apps. But their consumer base is no match to ubers. So for taxi drivers, if it's bringing more customers into the fold, they're all for it. A lot of taxi drivers said, you know, sometimes we ferry passengers to the outer boroughs from Manhattan. And then we have to drive all the way back to the city, empty handed. And that's particularly painful right now with gas prices that record highs. So now those drivers can just switch on the Uber app if they don't get a street hail and hopefully get a ride or back to the city. Where this gets interesting is for Uber drivers. What does this mean for them? Some will be drivers I spoke to are pretty concerned. They said what this might do is create excess supply and some of them were worried that it might mean longer wait times for them to get rides. That Uber will no longer pay them the big bonuses that they have been paying to get drivers to return amid the labor shortage. So they were a bit worried about what this means for their earnings. There are a couple of quotes in your story that really stand out to me. And one is the Uber executive saying that 35% of people who started using the Uber app to hail taxis went on to use other Uber products like Uber eats, which is it's food delivery service. And it made me wonder if even if this doesn't end up being a net positive for their bottom line, if they view this as a way to expand their business kind of no matter what. Uber stands to gain more than just on its rights business, of course, a landmark deal like this where your onboarding the entire fleet of New York City taxis onto your app is, of course, you're going to have a direct impact on Uber's revenue, market share, but this is not just about the rights business. This is a play by Uber to say, okay, we getting new consumers onto the fold through this taxi offering. And typically what their data has shown is that people who download Uber to hail a taxi end up using Uber eats. Its delivery service. So this is really a play by them to have crossed over effects. This idea that by 2025, Uber wants to list every taxi in the world on its app. I don't know how to say this kindly, it seems ambitious. Is that really the future of the company or is this just some sort of crazy Silicon Valley fantasy talk? I mean, it's certainly ambitious and that's the question I asked Uber's mobility chief as well. I said this seems a bit too ambitious, don't you think? And he says, it is ambitious, but that he thinks it's certainly possible. I think we should all take the claims that Silicon Valley startups make with a pinch of salt. But to Uber's credit, when I first got wind of a deal like New York city where they went in and overnight, they basically have 14,000 taxis the entire fleet of New York City onto its app, the speed with which they moved was pretty striking. And so if they've gone ahead and done this in one of their most lucrative cities, one of the biggest cities in the U.S. and a city that is typically been a fierce battlefield between Uber and taxi groups, it's going to be easier to go into the smaller cities and point to the model of New York and say, look, we've done this in one of the biggest markets in the U.S.. So.

Uber taxi and limousine commission Mira Joshi TLC predica Jaime Serrano New York Mira New York City Manhattan Silicon Valley New York city U.S.
"uber" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

03:21 min | 8 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"It as an engine for growth in the last year alone, Uber has added a 120,000 taxi drivers to its platform around the world, which has been a full fold increase from 2020. Then just as Uber was courting drivers overseas, a funny thing happened here in New York. Uber wanted to start advertising in new places. And in New York, a great place to reach captive eyeballs is the digital display on top of a taxi or inside it. So what happened was that Uber contacted one of these taxi tech companies that basically run the show in New York City and are the city's license partners to say, hey, can we advertise on the roof of New York City taxis? That's how the two got talking. They said, look, let's start to talk about an alliance that might benefit us both. I wonder if, as a company, Uber also thought partnering with taxis would allow them to have prices that were maybe a little more appealing to their writers. Oh yes, we are going to see an impact, hopefully, on rider prices. I should say at the outset, I don't think prices for rides will ever go back to being the dirt cheap prices that we had pre-pandemic because Uber is looking for ways to turn a profit. They're under pressure from investors. But what's happened is prices have been elevated because of this labor shortage. And once they get more.

Uber New York New York City
"uber" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

The Secret History of the Future

03:21 min | 8 months ago

"uber" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

"It as an engine for growth in the last year alone, Uber has added a 120,000 taxi drivers to its platform around the world, which has been a full fold increase from 2020. Then just as Uber was courting drivers overseas, a funny thing happened here in New York. Uber wanted to start advertising in new places. And in New York, a great place to reach captive eyeballs is the digital display on top of a taxi or inside it. So what happened was that Uber contacted one of these taxi tech companies that basically run the show in New York City and are the city's license partners to say, hey, can we advertise on the roof of New York City taxis? That's how the two got talking. They said, look, let's start to talk about an alliance that might benefit us both. I wonder if, as a company, Uber also thought partnering with taxis would allow them to have prices that were maybe a little more appealing to their writers. Oh yes, we are going to see an impact, hopefully, on rider prices. I should say at the outset, I don't think prices for rides will ever go back to being the dirt cheap prices that we had pre-pandemic because Uber is looking for ways to turn a profit. They're under pressure from investors. But what's happened is prices have been elevated because of this labor shortage. And once they get more.

Uber New York New York City
"uber" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

07:07 min | 8 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"About cybersecurity. Though what that means with Camille episodes offer great insight around emerging technologies. Camille morhart asks top technical experts to explain terms in their field, like cybernetics and blockchain, in ways that we can all understand. Whether you're a security expert or just want to know more, the cybersecurity inside podcast will help you walk away smarter about cybersecurity and have fun while you're at it. Check out cybersecurity inside slash TBD today to listen to the latest episode. That cybersecurity inside dot com slash TBD or search cybersecurity inside wherever you listen to your podcasts. The news that Uber would join forces with New York's taxi fleet was broken by predica Rana. She's a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, and she covers Uber. I was dialed into this investor presentation that Uber's chief mobility officer Andrew McDonald gave, and he said something really striking. He said, we think that taxis of the future. And he outlined a really tall goal. He said he wants every single taxi in the world on the Uber platform by 2025. And so that's what made my jaw drop. I'm just dialed into this meeting where the Uber guys are now hailing taxis the future. And I'm just like, what? I think we should go back and establish why this all seems so shocking. How would you have described Uber's relationship to taxis? Even 6 months ago, a year ago. Traditionally, taxis have been enemy number one for Uber. The companies sort of burst onto the scene over a decade ago with the idea that it would completely disrupt the taxi industry. And at first, they were just fighting each other. Each wanted to drive the other out of business. So we would see taxi drivers snarl traffic, file court cases, protest, outside Uber's office. Furious taxi drivers turned burning tires into barricades. And Uber was kind of doing the same thing. It was lobbying. And it was filing court cases against unions and taxis. Randy Uber is turning to its customers today to get them to help lobby against proposed changes here at Logan airport. So they haven't been friends. Exactly. I wonder if you could run me through Uber's playbook when they wanted to come into a city. When they wanted to muscle out taxis. I mean, Uber was just flush with venture capital money. So their playbook for consumers was using venture capital money to subsidize the rides. And to be honest, the service was pretty good. In cities where public transport is sort of fractured, Uber really changed the way that we moved. It made it possible for anyone to become a driver, it made us all accustomed to the service at the touch of a button, and it modernized the taxi industry. The other side of Uber's playbook often meant ignoring local laws, exploiting loopholes and regulations, or lobbying city and state officials to change the rules so that ride sharing companies were legal. It was a tactic that worked for Uber and cities around the world, just not everywhere. There were many countries actually that banned Uber from existing. And then there were other places that essentially put into effect rules that rendered Uber, useless. So one example is Barcelona. In Barcelona, the local government introduced a rule that said that if you're an Uber driver, you have to wait 15 minutes before you can pick up the passengers. So in effect, that was their way to make sure that the taxi industry thrives. And they were successful. They drove Uber out of business. Uber said we can no longer operate in Barcelona because as a writer, why would you book an Uber if you have to eat 15 minutes as a driver, that's not serving your time well. So Uber essentially quit Barcelona. After years of pushing its way into different markets, Uber hit a massive roadblock, COVID. It forced the company to rethink the way it did business in a lot of unexpected ways. The pandemic was a complete game changer. Initially, both Uber and taxis lost customers because you had widespread lockdowns across the world. Then when people started to get vaccinated, go out, that was this pent up demand, and for Uber, it sort of bought up a different problem. They had way too many riders and not enough drivers, because Uber drivers went on to do other things. So Uber drivers went to become delivery drivers. They started delivering groceries. And for the last year, Uber has been contending with a major labor shortage in the U.S.. So they have way too many riders, but not enough drivers. At the same time, taxi drivers were facing their own issues. Now, what changed for taxi groups is that many taxi drivers in big cities like New York, they started to go bankrupt because demand for rides completely dried out. So taxi drivers are now back and are looking for ways to make up for the losses that they have made over the last two years. So what happened here is that Uber said, look, we really need all the supply of drivers that we can get right now. And you guys, meaning the taxis really need all the customers you can get. Let's start talking about a marriage where we can get some of the drivers from this deal and you can get our customers. How did the specifics of this deal come about? I'm sort of curious. You've described this as a marriage. What was the courtship like? So this is quite an interesting story. The only reason they partnered with taxis early on is because it was the only way to survive in highly regulated markets. So they've done these deals in Europe and Asia, but only because it was the only way that they could survive in those markets. And what happened was increasingly they saw that those deals are bringing them results and they started pitching.

Camille morhart predica Rana Barcelona Randy Uber Andrew McDonald Uber Camille The Wall Street Journal Logan airport New York U.S. Asia Europe
"uber" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

03:41 min | 9 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Confiscation. Symantec is detailing a China linked back door being referred to as dachshund, which is a Windows kernel driver that can hijack TCP connections to stealthy connect with command and control servers. Quoting bleeping computer. According to a technical report published by Symantec's threat hunter team today, daxton is one of the most advanced backdoors ever seen by Chinese actors. One point of differentiation in is its form, which is a Windows kernel driver. An atypical choice in the malware landscape is stealthiness comes from its advanced communication features, which makes its data exchange with regular Internet traffic. Daxton is without doubt the most advanced piece of malware cement tech researchers have seen used by a China linked actor, Symantec said in a new report, quote, considering its capabilities and the nature of its deployed attacks, daxon appears to be optimized for use against hardened targets, allowing the attackers to burrow deep into a target's network and exfiltrate data without raising suspicions. Back doors provide threat actors with remote access to a compromised computer system allowing them to steal data, execute commands or download and install further malware. Because those tools are typically used to steal information from protected networks or further compromise a device, they need to involve some form of data transfer encryption or obfuscation to evade raising alarms on network traffic monitoring tools. Daxton does this by monitoring network traffic on a device for specific patterns. Once these patterns are detected, it will hijack the legitimate TCP connection and use it to communicate with the command and control server. By hijacking TCP communications, the decks and malware can hide malicious communication in what is perceived to be legitimate traffic and thus remain undetected. Daxton's use of hijacked TCP connections affords a high degree of stealth to its communications and helps to establish connectivity on networks with strict firewall rules. It may also lower the risk of discovery by SOC analysts, monitoring the network for anomalies, explains the report by Symantec. This essentially opens an encrypted communications channel for transmitting or stealing data all done through a seemingly innocuous TCP tunnel. Symantec's threat analysts have found evidence linking Dax into the Chinese state backed hacking group slug, AKA owl proxy, reportedly the particular backdoor has been actively used in attacks since at least November 2019, while researchers spotted signs of its deployment again in May of 2020 and July of 2020. Most recent attacks involving daxton were observed in November 2021 targeting telecommunication transportation and manufacturing companies. Uber has added new ways to buy concert tickets or book restaurants all from within its app, 'cause why not? Welcome to the explore tab, quoting the verge. Uber has always had aspirations outside of just being a taxi broker. But as the company shifts more into food and grocery delivery, it can be hard to remember its roots as a product used by people to move around cities. Now Uber wants to remind its customers of that legacy while also bringing more Yelp style features into its app, starting March 1st. Today, Uber customers in over a dozen North American cities will see the new explorer tab when they open the app, Tapping on it brings up a variety of live event and restaurant recommendations that they are encouraged to check out. And if this sounds a lot like Yelp, it's by design. Restaurant reservations are handled through a Yelp integration in the app and Uber is even featuring that company's 5 star ratings for restaurants in explorer. Another integration.

Symantec Daxton China SOC Uber Yelp
"uber" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:06 min | 10 months ago

"uber" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"It's nothing different than anything else I've ever experienced throughout my whole life. In many places where I wasn't allowed to be, people didn't accept me for who I was. So this was kind of like that same situation, but I was like, wait, this is me. And I just, I knew I didn't want to back down from this. Uber at first, when I had reached out to them, said, essentially, they were always working to improve drivers experience, they said that they had part nerd with the national center of trans equality to train their staff to respond better to these concerns that they had processed to like more than I think almost 2000 requests since they launched this pride initiative. They'd process that many requests to have name changes or profile changes and yeah, essentially they said that we've done all this work and we'll, you know, we're always trying to improve the experience. And then I think, you know, when I came back to them with more questions, the spokesperson said that the company apologized for the experience that these drivers that I spoke to had and that they were working to reactivate the accounts of the drivers who I wrote about. But I don't know if they haven't announced any sort of broader policy change or initiative to correct this problem as far as I know. We'll be back right after this break. I'm Jake halpern, host of deep cover. Our new season is about a lawyer who helped the mob run Chicago. He bribed judges and even helped a hitman walk free. Until one day, when he started talking with the FBI and promised that he could take the mob down. I've spent the past year trying to figure out why he flipped and what he was really after. Listen to deep cover on Apple podcasts or wherever you like to listen. Welcome back. Suhana, your article about these driver struggles with Uber published and government officials took notice and started getting involved. Like a month and a half after I published the story in December, a coalition of California city attorney is the city attorney of Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco. They sent a letter to Uber asking Uber to respond to questions about their treatment of trans drivers. They are specifically trying to determine if what happened to these drivers I spoke to was like a few one off incidences or if they were part of a broader pattern of how Uber treats trans drivers and they said that some of the actions of the company were potentially violations of law that the city attorneys could enforce. And what was Uber's response to that? Uber said, essentially that they would cooperate with the city attorneys and I assume that means they'll answer their questions and reiterate, they reiterated some of the initiatives they've done in support of trans and other LGBTQ drivers and customers. And then finally, have you heard from some of the drivers in your stories about how things are going for them right now? I've heard from several of the drivers that I spoke to whose accounts have been reactivated since the story published. One of the drivers I spoke to a genre is now driving for Uber again, I believe, now that her account has been reactivated in the meantime, while her account had been off and after she was banned or after her account was taken offline with Uber. She had been driving for Lyft, but it sounds like now she's also driving with Uber again. You know, and it was already getting frustrating. And so I'm like, you know what? Forget this. I'm just gonna go work for Lyft. And then that's when the article came out on the LA times. And then Uber stated that there are going to fix all of our accounts and do everything and then when I look back onto my Uber account, then all of a sudden everything was good to go. That trans people, or even non binary folks, right? They might, like, and then plus anybody else who really looks like their ID, unless you walk into a place right after you've taken the picture for your driver's license. But I have everything else that is so that's me, except for my picture, maybe looking different. And yeah, I know I can go get it changed and all that. But at the same time, I kind of think it's important to show people that, hey, what's in your mind of what a trans person looks like, sounds like, you know, is like, I'm no different than anybody else, and at the same time, why do I always have to say I'm trans in order for something to be except for me to be accepted in a space. Suhana, thank you so much for this conversation. Thanks for having me. 2022 will be pivotal for Los Angeles. The first open mayoral primary and nearly a decade happens in June, alongside with many other competitive races across the city and county. Subscribe to our limited time newsletter, LA on the record and will help you make sense of it all with thoughtful context, dishy tidbits and deep dive into the inner workings of city government. Yerba will matter more than ever as the city confronts homelessness and housing affordability amid competing visions for its future. Go to LA times dot com slash LA on the record to sign up. And that's it for this episode of the times. Daily news from the LA times. Tomorrow, avocados from Mexico, and why they're currently banned from entering the U.S.. Our show is produced by Shannon Lin Denise Guerra, kasia brusselian Ashley Brown and angel carreras. Our engineers Mario Diaz are editors Kinsey moorland. Our executive producers are hasmin aguilera and shani Hilton and our theme music is by Andrew epen. Like what you're listening to, then make sure to follow the times on whatever platform you use. Don't make us to put your podcasts. I'm Gustav ariano. We'll be back tomorrow with all the news and this mother. Gracias..

national center of trans equal Jake halpern California city LA times FBI Los Angeles Uber Chicago San Diego Suhana San Francisco Apple LA Shannon Lin Denise Guerra kasia brusselian Ashley Brown angel carreras Mario Diaz Kinsey moorland hasmin aguilera
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:16 min | 11 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"All of these are real-time operations. We don't have the flexibility of taking this transaction and then letting you know later about what was the result of that. It is a real-time operation. The user is waiting on the response from the server, and we need to return the response to them, whether it is valid or invalid within a reasonable period of time, because the user is waiting on that particular action to complete. So that means the systems that we built, they need to handle high concurrency. They need to be real time, their latency has to be acceptable. The user should not at least the persuade perceive latency from the user point of view. They should not have a laggy experience. And that makes it really tricky. And the system has to be transactionally correct. If I begin a trip, we can not, we have to be very accurate with respect to at what point the trip has started. And what was the timestamp what was the location? We can not and if let's say if we did not record this transaction correctly, then the entire fits will get messed up. We'll not that idea will not see the writer experience will be matched up. So there's a lot of implications. If you mess it up. And that means once it's a transition has happened, we need to make sure that it is consistent from the non words. In my career, I've been in a couple of situations where I had to recommend a technology to adopt like a database or something like that. And I get healthy pushback where people will say, how do you know this is going to scale for our business? And a trick I've liked to use is what I call the big fish strategy. Find a company much larger like Uber or Netflix and say, they're using the technology. They're ten times bigger than you. Surely if there's a bug in it, they're gonna find it first. Yeah. But there aren't any companies ten times bigger than Uber. Do you have to collaborate with partners to get on to new technology or to do bug prioritization things like that? I guess are there any challenges being a leader or at the forefront of pushing the limits on technology? Yeah. I mean, absolutely. I think you know that's also an advantage. If we are at the forefront of adopting new things and taking new things, we also will get that level of support from the partners or from those teams, and I think in the last 6 years, no matter which technology choice that we chose, we would collaborate very closely with that open-source team or whether the third party provider or whether a company and they would give us the right kind of support because they would also know that if we can solve their use case that would be a good proof point for their system as well. So we have many instances like that where we collaborated super closely with that particular platform team. Even from other companies, and then made sure that we can customize their software to scale to our requirements. And can we do a deep dive on some of the requirements? We've talked about it being real time, but there's always going to have to be tradeoffs. We have the cap theorem to face and things like that. Maybe you want some sort of transactions or maybe that's not important. What are some of the core features you're looking for when seeking technology? Yeah, so the code state machine stack and for the code are storage system. I think some of the requirements that we want to make sure is one with that is availability, whether and whether single zone or single region, if there's intermediate infrastructure failure, it has minimal impact on availability. Because ultimately, this is one of this code tenant that has to be from Uber stack because users are in the real world doing operations. In fact, let's say if you're on the street trying to go somewhere and if the system is down, then you are standard that. So we need to guarantee at least four 9s of availability. We need to have strong consistency and we have operations on a single row, multi row multi table. And we need to make sure we provide strong consistency within a region and across regions so that even if there's an application failover from one region to another region, we don't have any user and user perceived inconsistencies..

Uber Netflix
"uber" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"From wondery, I'm David Brown and this is business wars daily on this Monday, November 15th, happy Monday, everyone, although it might not be the happiest Monday for Uber, last week, the U.S. Department of Justice sued the rideshare company, the DOJ's claim, Uber discriminates against passengers with disabilities by charging them if they need more time to get into Uber vehicles. All of this can be traced back to 2016, according to The New York Times. That was the year that Uber instituted a new policy. If drivers had to wait more than two minutes for a passenger to get to the car, the driver would be compensated at the passenger's expense. Previously, drivers wouldn't be able to punch in on the clock until the ride began, which meant if they had to wait for a passenger. They were waiting for free, and that waiting could last for quite a while. But two minutes isn't much time for anyone to get into a car and get situated. Parents you know what I'm talking about here. And for some writers, particularly those with blindness or wheelchair users, the time crunch is nearly impossible to navigate, hence the lawsuit. The suit alleges that even when Uber was aware that a passenger may need more than two minutes to get into the car, it still charged a weight fee. And that is violation of the Americans with disabilities act the DOJ says, and they want the court to require Uber to change its wait time policies for people with disabilities. It also wants Uber to train employees and drivers on Ada accommodations. Pay damages to customers impacted by the policy and pay a civil penalty. For its part, Uber said it's been in discussion with the department on its wait time policies, and that the intention of the policy was to compensate drivers if passengers made them wait not to impose on disabled passengers. It also updated its policy to wave wait time fees for passengers who said they were disabled. But does the policy in itself violate the ADA in a statement a spokesperson for Uber said it doesn't think so. The company said it would keep improving our products to support everyone's ability to easily move around their communities. You know if we're talking about Uber, we got to talk about the other massive ride share company in the room, lift. Lyft has previously been in hot water over how it allegedly treated passengers with disabilities. Last June lift reached a settlement with the Department of Justice over allegations that drivers had denied rides to folks with disabilities who used mobility devices like wheelchairs as part of the settlement lift said it would revise its wheelchair policies and it paid damages to complainants as well as a civil penalty. Lyft does have what it calls access rides, which are vehicles equipped to transport larger, fixed frame wheelchairs, but access rides aren't available in all markets and are expensive for lift to maintain. Uber and Lyft have promised to change. But for folks with disabilities who want fair and equal access to ride shares, promises, may not be enough. From wondering, this is business wars daily. I'm your host David Brown, written and produced by Jessica, you're lost. Our executive producers aretino Rubio.

DOJ David Brown Uber The New York Times Lyft ADA Department of Justice Jessica aretino Rubio
"uber" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"That could be good for streamlining costs but that was something that you really loved for innovation. That could be a problem for you. You know are the bright spots ahead. The economy is reopening. People are going to be going back to their offices but at the same time. Uber's going gonna need drivers to be able to to take people places right and is it a risk will they be able to hire attract and retain drivers. You know. these are all things that i would think about And journal about definitely before deciding if selling is right for you. I'll just out a couple more things one is. Obviously you want to think about taxes because you're in the fortunate position of having to pay capital gains taxes. And it's just a question of how long have you own the stock and are you paying their short-term capital gains or if you've owned it more than a year obviously that's a much lower rate and then the other thing is like what are you going to do with the money because if these are your investment dollars in your thinking you know what. I've made a fifty five percent gain and i think over the next one three five years. I can do better putting my money somewhere else. Then you know that that goes on the on the list of reasons to sell. But i think you know. And that's the things you've touched on a leash. I mean that's part of why find such a fascinating company because i think there are. We're years away from knowing uber is going to end.

And journal
"uber" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"Going to note from aaron in chicago. He writes uber. Is up fifty five percent since i bought it. But i'm hearing from drivers who are unhappy with the culture of the business and there are rumors that the business plan was to offset costs of underbidding. The competition for rides drive others out of business and then raised their prices. Yeah that tracks with what i've always thought about over. He goes on to say. I'll add that in the last month months. I've personally experienced price. Prohibitive rides in three different cities and felt the need to find an alternative. Is it time to sell or. Is there a plan for change. That i'm missing. Thanks for any insights. Love the podcast. Thank you for that aaron. And it's interesting because uber is one of those businesses. I find incredibly fascinating to watch. And i have zero interesting owning i just. I just don't see the the payoff that others. But you know aaron sitting on a fifty five percent gain. Obviously we can't give individual invite advice alicia. But what do you think. Yeah so so i. Yeah congratulations on being up. Fifty five percent. That's pretty great but for selling it is a personal decision in individual choice that every investor makes for themselves based on risk. What kind of risk you're willing to to deal with kind of risky thing is too much as well as your investment thesis For me whenever. I think about selling a take a look at my original investment thesis and. I really actually journal about to see to see if anything's

chris l Alicia alvian whirlpool Jp morgan alicia Us
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Number of sessions. Where user didn't see a car that were zero cars available was one of our single biggest negative. Kpi's that number had two zero every week or doing her job and pricing became a big part of that. What what was interesting about. It was raising prices. You know we kind of this system. Because i felt that was hokey on talked about in the sack but raising prices did three things it disincentivize demand that there were people who said you know what i'm willing to walk. I'm willing to wait a couple minutes like let's go. Having rounder order desert and we prove or prices to come down secondly it's incentivize supply in time and space and there was this idea of you know we saw this most obviously in new york if you are driver. Who's sitting in a suburban in brooklyn and you know it's friday night. There's demanded midtown downtown manhattan. You're still looking. Like i got all across the brooklyn bridge. This is like a massive pain in the neck for a very uncertain reward. I'm not even going to bother like. I'll just wait for the next brooklyn ride kind of and being able to raise prices. Spatial geospatial dynamic pricing was a way of kind of playing with the calculus on the risk reward of doing something like relocating across the city encouraging. Gas cost incurring the headache of just fighting traffic to go downtown. So it helped drivers move to places of higher demand or more importantly underserved demanding the city and it also helped them train their schedules to say okay. I'm going to work later hours. I'm gonna to shit my schedule from for more downtime to more busy time just because the economics are better on that and the third of most stumbled thing about it was actually increase the throughput of our system. I think what was fascinating about. This is what happens when uber's get too busy in the marketplace. I've done a couple of talks on this but when you you hit a tipping point where cars become less dense. They have a lower spatial density. Any go up right. You've probably seen this a really busy time. Uber is not three minutes away. It's like fifteen twenty minutes away and if you request that car you're transaction takes longer and talk ready takes the car now fifteen minutes to get to you plus like the fifteen minutes from where you're going to where you wanna get dropped off. Your transaction took thirty minutes whereas if you call during a slow time. The car was one minute the way of the one minute to get to plus fifteen minutes to go to your destination. Your transaction took fifteen sixteen minutes. So there's the sort of tricky second-order effect that happens. Where in times of high demand with demand outstripped supply transactions take longer and the system is actually less capable of serving the transaction. So you end up. With sort of negative feedback loop which causes uber's despite two hundred percent utilization so by keeping the system out of that sort of negative feedback state. You actually end up. Doing is interesting when you're in this study and it was like for every point two five acts multiple increase in pricing. You had twenty five percent higher per fair value. Obviously but you also have seventy one percent higher revenue per hour. Because of the marginal increase in the throughput of the system by staying out of that destructive feedback state system so pricing was sort of pricing helps keep overs available. That was like one of the be talking points back. Then it was actually literally about maximizing the number of trips per hour the fleet could serve because otherwise you end up in the fleet. Do do roughly half as many trips. Between ninety and one hundred percent delineation between eighty and ninety percent utilization. So wait this whole system. You sort of how we built it. What the focus was on. That was the single biggest. Mathematical insight is there is a tipping point in utilization where research to get negative feedback signals. So you have this min max problem if you want to be as busy as possible without falling into negative feedback loop and so we. Bill is actually for the very first models were literally unit area and it was like a pi dealer where he would just sort of say tipping utilization measured utilization if measuring utilization ten percent of tipping utilization. Raise prices. Like step up right and you'd have kind of a scorecard of how many steps in with these sort of injury chunks. I was point. Two five was a tenth of a point one x so like every five minutes they would run this calculation. Dial prices down and the operations teams could do these basically set guardrails. We built this whole internal tool and we're big on automated internal tools. We you could say. I want a very prices dynamically from floor to ceiling. Usually like one x two two or three x and they can change a little bit of sort of. I want to be really sensitive to light. Supply shocks are demand. Shock you the heavyweight the derivative term. They had a couple years like of three or four life. On the control panel click a button and then the system would take over the prices up and down and it worked surprising. Well i mean for. Model as simple as like measure utilization fee hit through like an algebraic expression that worked for years waiting for the first eighteen months for. We're busy scaling out diversity every city and doing all these different product lines. Eventually you get much more sophisticated. Approach the people. I think have published the most research on this. Actually didi where most sophisticated purchases. Treat this as a you. Basically calculate the expected value of every driver writer pair. Say a bunch of requests command center for fifteen or twenty seconds. If it's usually fifteen you have a bunch of drivers who become available. You compute the possible permutations of every driver pairing and find the configuration which maximizes net present value in the future value. Both of which are supermodel constraints. Do you have the time to do that. Like the time it takes for the rider to like 'cause you're describing stable matching basically right..

Uber thirty minutes new york uber ten percent eighty fifteen brooklyn fifteen minutes fifteen sixteen minutes twenty five percent ninety two hundred percent fifteen twenty minutes three minutes friday night two one minute seventy one percent ninety percent
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And as far as an application of data science the economics of the business has been thrilling to watch over time. We're just from a from a human incentive point of view you start with this like five dollar per ride highly subsidized thing and you have been able to boil the frog over time you know especially during and post pandemic. The economics of uber look so appealing compared to how they used to the very subsidized world. Now it's like. I will effectively pay taxi. Prices or premium on taxi prices to. Just get the uber service. I know i'm not alone in that regard. Was there always a plan around this in the data science around the economics of pricing. I'm not sure how heavily involved you were. But if if you were involved can you help me understand the strategy for how to ratchet prices and how to maintain a healthy range of prices or how you approach that problem absolutely so i was very involved with this is discussed prior to this. I did the first couple of years of dynamic pricing. I in a way invented surge. You welcome to the world by the. It's an interesting problem. Even from one. I joined it. I was kinda referred uber from a friend. Tagline was kind of like it's like limo company with an app with big dreams like it was black cars. Only at the time. And i was sort of like okay like you know interesting of your check it out but even twenty eleven there was kind of idea of. There's a a layer in every major city in america. That doesn't work particularly well. And you know we of want to start with his limo service but eventually have a point of view on all of it and i think that large vision is important. I mean obviously work on business side but it helps kind of reframe the problem. Mathematically of like it's not just about getting town cars to people efficiently but it's about fundamentally increasing. The throughput of the transportation in automobile layer in every city in public transit for that matter and starts with okay cars ride share runs really efficiently by in the abstract. You realize it's kind of a problem of how do we just move stuff right in a cost and time efficient way. It's an optimization of cubic footage within an automobile per time per hour on a dollar cost optimize basis and i think dynamic pricing kind of came into it relatively early where what you figured out without pricing. We had this sort of era where you couldn't get hoover's on friday.

america friday uber twenty eleven five dollar per ride first couple of years one
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And as far as an application of data science the economics of the business has been thrilling to watch over time. We're just from a from a human incentive point of view you start with this like five dollar per ride highly subsidized thing and you have been able to boil the frog over time you know especially during and post pandemic. The economics of uber look so appealing compared to how they used to the very subsidized world. Now it's like. I will effectively pay taxi. Prices or premium on taxi prices to. Just get the uber service. I know i'm not alone in that regard. Was there always a plan around this in the data science around the economics of pricing. I'm not sure how heavily involved you were. But if if you were involved can you help me understand the strategy for how to ratchet prices and how to maintain healthy range of prices or how you approach that problem absolutely so i was very involved with this is discussed prior to this. I did the first couple years of dynamic pricing. I in a way invented surge. You welcome to the world by the. It's an interesting problem. Even from one. I joined it. I was kinda referred uber from a friend. Tagline was kind of like it's like limo company with an app with big dreams like it was black cars. Only at the time. And i was sort of like okay like you know interesting. Check it out but even twenty eleven there was kind of idea of. There's a layer in every major city in america. That doesn't work particularly well. And we kinda want to start with his limo service but eventually have a point of view on all of it and i think that large vision is important. I mean obviously work on business side but it helps kind of reframe the problem. Mathematically of like. It's not just about getting town cars to people efficiently but it's about fundamentally increasing. The throughput of the transportation in automobile layer in every city in public transit for that matter and starts with okay cars ride share runs really efficiently by in the abstract. You realize it's kind of a problem of how do we just move stuff right. In a cost and time efficient way it's an optimization of like cubic footage within an automobile per time per hour on a dollar cost optimize basis. And i think dynamic pricing kind of came into it relatively early. Where what you figured out without pricing. We had this sort of era where you couldn't get hoover's on friday.

america uber friday first couple years twenty eleven five dollar per ride one
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

09:37 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To the show. Thank you for having me. This is great. You were one of the first data. Scientists to work at and grapple with the scale of that company. And i think of uber and other ridesharing firms as well other logistics companies as basically an unsolvable data engineering problem because the scale of juice spatial information customer information that is generated on the fly and needs to be munched turned into other actionable. Data points is effectively infinite and the optimizations that you could do or effectively infinite so in such an environment you have to figure out some platform strategy some sustainable platform strategy for collecting the data working with the data and making it serviceable to the data scientists. So i'm most curious about the state of that platform when you joined and the direction it took as the company matured. Sure absolutely as you're probably where. I joined bid twenty eleven. I was there twenty-first employees. And i think there were seven engineers the seventh engineer so i inherited basically nothing from the get go. I mean the what was actually very interesting about. You're right that there is massive scale today but if you think about it for my customer transactions point view like on a transaction volume people are using uber. Even if you're a power user you order of single digit times per day. Netflix wants to work. Maybe wants to lunch back. When so so the actual speed of customer transaction data was pretty slow in fact that you could basically usually like an off the shelf my sequel cluster for a long time which is basically what we will do to handle transactional records and all the analytics are doing on predicting in predicting reengagement these types of things could be built on top of my sequel stack and so for a long time just because we were constrained by data infrastructure. That was where a lot of the effort got spent on the data side of things. The obvious exception to that is the geospatial information that you get from cars right so we would have telemetry coming off. These cars. one hurts a second location. Basically everything an iphone could share with us speed accelerometer being with uber and so most of our data scaling constraints came from the geospatial. And guess you'd call them gio. Temporal logs coming off of cars and for a long time. We didn't really know what to do with it. We we stumbled on sort of pub early on even before it really caught on with. You know the confluence of the world and all of that in literally are geospatial information. System was it comes in from the cars a simple basically handler to process that information like a cd and type system just to basically received from the cars published to akaka stream got sent to a flat file and we just spoiled these gio slogs and did nothing with them obviously for the first several years but knowing they were going to be valuable by about maybe twenty fourteen twenty fifteen. We really felt like we developed enough engineering on data infrastructure. Side to start tackling mapping and traffic in all of these sort of products. We wanted to be on top of geospatial information that was where a first real data lakes built. We started out with like your classic duke system. We have a bunch of friends from cloudera who were getting going realized pretty quickly. We needed something a lot. More custom and that eventually took the form of us building projects like and three which was our time series database in the sense. They've gone off kind of criticism coming on top of that but one of the big things for the analytic side of things we stumbled on the sort of hex notation and you'd see it as a certain area even surfaces in the driver out we realized you could basically cover the world in hexagons that were roughly the size of a city block and you can test the late the entire globe if you put five big pentagon polygon somewhere on the planet and we kept playing with it and we will get four those pentagon's over oceans and the fifth one is over the western sahara desert so like parts of like morocco might if we ever get to that part of the world over western sahara corky analytics some boy but actually got one basically rooms of spatial computation. Because hexagons you can just sort of have a rank order radius of your your you can say. There is data within the hexagon of interest. There is the ring of hexagon surrounding the ring of hexagon surrounding that. Those actually a lot more computational simple to think of the world rather than as continuous. gps points as just hexagon and hexagon rings. Around the heck out of interest does it does. and i've seen presentations at conferences. Where uber uses this hexagon thing. Exxon like format to display information to the audience. Yeah geospatial has really tricky to work with it scale. There was a whole era of guber. I mentioned we started with. My sequel was sort of our business database lamp technology of choice and we pivoted the post. We did a live cut over from my sequel to post grass and devops team did some phenomenal things. Basically making it so we could run this whole thing live. There was basically no downtime and went but we moved to post grass because of the post. Gps and geospatial functionality. Creating functionality that post offered ironically is kind of funny we that lasted would say four to six quarters somewhere in there. I actually the moving back because we hit appointment for post wrestling wouldn't scale for us to and through a friend of a friend like i got connected to these guys who were consultants who were post rest core code base commanders and they made a whole career of a kind of fine tuning and performance tuning post crest clusters and so they came into the session with us. We started to have them on retainer. They were basically extended members of the team and they running out of ideas so we tried literally everything including talking to the guy who wrote it to scale up post resident at some point. We just realized this wasn't the right technology for us. Which is when we moved back to a much more. Classic sort of my stake will do eventually that vaulted h. Bays and i'm actually not sure what they're using now but much more of classic my sequel back stack and then tried to solve the geospatial cream problem with a sort of hexagon test. Elation structured instead so the of database and data infrastructure you just gave one example of how a conventional choice basically broke at scale sure. What were some other ways. Where off the shelf solutions were breaking and you had to recreate your infrastructure strategy. Yeah i will say that uber philosophically. I think this might have come right. From the top rate from traffic sort of approach tended to bias to build over by. We bought very few technologies off the shelf. One of the most sort of obvious and big ones were read. The sexual dependency was on google. Maps and google contract was renegotiated every twelve or eighteen months. It seemed like my data guys. Were kind of tangentially involved. You know kind supplying the quantitative figures to all of that and eventually we realized that paying google order of tens of cents every time a google map popped up was a strategic dependence. They'd we didn't wanna take off and that began the so it was kind of a. We don't want to buy this anymore. The classic build versus buy manifested itself in us. Going in buying our own mapping product developing house. Not being solution. That i think was initially. Let's just figure the way to attack marginal cost but also created some really interesting opportunities to do embedded traffic monitoring. Vertical integration of things like the operations team knows that there's a parade going on or these roads closed and you could develop a tool such that. The ops team can close a road and the cascades all the way down to the stack and the reading engine becomes aware of it in the driver's no not to go on and that sort of deep vertical integration. I think it was a lot of what enabled our scale ability and sort of operational leverage without having engineers in turn the lakes bit poll request a yoga mat. The whole build over by decision. To my mind. This is a point of differentiation from.

Netflix iphone uber seven engineers seventh engineer tens of cents today twenty-first employees eighteen months google fifth one one western sahara desert first several years single digit second location first five big pentagon One six quarters
"uber" Discussed on HOW THEY DID IT AND WHY

HOW THEY DID IT AND WHY

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on HOW THEY DID IT AND WHY

"You're listening to how they did it. And why were we learn from the experiences of others so today this is going to be kind of a unique episode today and i know that You guys will find this interesting and you know me. I like exploring all different walks of life. I'm very much someone who is interested in the lives of other people and it doesn't even have to be anything you know out of the norm or just celebrities or doing or whatever i like talking to regular everyday people what we have going on. What's on our minds. What's going on in our lives so today today's episode is actually gonna just kinda give us a behind the scenes kind of look at Some people who've been working very hard for all of us behind the scenes during the pandemic We're gonna be interviewing today. A uber driver uber eats specifically grubhub door dash all those apps. This guy does okay so this is going to be a great episode just to kinda see what life is like for them right now during the pandemic and so thank you so much charles for being with us today. How are you today. I'm doing good how you doing today. I'm doing pretty good. Thank you so much for asking know for sure that you are an uber. Eats drivers you deliver food. The uber at what other apps do you use to.

today uber charles