35 Burst results for "Uber"

How to Examine Nietzsche's Work With Dr. Khalil Habib

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | Last week

How to Examine Nietzsche's Work With Dr. Khalil Habib

"Way to really look at nietzsche's works is sort of two categories. He's got some that. I would call. Sort of a wrecking ball approach. They're really designed to clear the deck so to speak younger will be an example. It's a very destructive. Book is primarily focuses on destroying the prejudices of of the Of the philosophers. You know trying to push nationalism out and make way for some new horizon. Zero fish tug would be sort of more of a constructive work. Okay so it necessarily follows his other works and endure deir through strove what he essentially wants. The obermann mentioned simply means the overmanned can be translated as superman but it's it mart Accurately overmanned and the question is over. What and essentially in network over the nihilism that has engulfed europe and so he has this image of a tight rope walker who stretches a wrote across an abyss and he wants to cross it meaning wants to carry civilization over this abyss that he falls and dies doesn't have the spirit necessary to lift europe up and so what so. What the uber. Mitch is designed to invoke or inspire our men who see the problem of modern europe as essentially nihilism. We've we there's nothing meaningful left in man's life anymore. I mean when you think about how pop culture most likely has more influence over most people's lives today than say god or family our country you can see need just point. The three things had historically always been A portal through which human beings can gain some sense of continuity or meaning have been replaced essentially bigest the market and so the overman is designed to connect a link between this world and something over the nihilism of contemporary contemporary europe. And sort of serve as a bridge to some kind of ideal

Nietzsche Europe Walker Mitch
Who Was Nietzsche and How Did He Influence the Nazi Movement?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:10 min | Last week

Who Was Nietzsche and How Did He Influence the Nazi Movement?

"Every soldier that was deployed in world war. One was actually given nietzsche And the german front and so they read this idea of the importance of the will which we're going to get into and this idea of becoming the superman or the overman or the uber manche and then they come back to kind of war torn germany and these ideas kinda laid the philosophical trans Foundation four hitler's most popular speech the triumph of the will. And if you read that speech it sounds a lot like nietzsche's ideas so let's let's work our way backwards from there and so can you just give us some biographical context of who this guy was and how he was able why he published ideas at the time that were so different than some of the metaphysics and philosophy. That was considered to be the consensus. Well he was a prodigy. Who's obviously a german philosopher. He died in nineteen hundred at a very young age of was teaching philosophy. He was trained as a philology which means essentially somebody who studies languages in price to think about their meaning and in one of his works. that gay homo. He tells us that he essentially abandoned his post as a professor so that he can become dot and what he meant by that is that he was horrified by what he describes as buddhism for europe which is just code for certain kind of nihilism. You believe that. Europe in particular has lost its capacity in meaning any kind of sense of identity and he was looking to try to inspire certain aspects of european instance that he thought could still breed some kind of idealism or transcendent that was transcendence that was just essentially close to being buried For example industrial era through strength in a very famous speech entitled the last man speech he is characters. Few strokes mentioned that our soil is still thick enough to perhaps a plant a grants Tree some kind of some kind of the ideal but it's getting a increasingly more difficult to find anyone in the world interested in anything beyond just a here

Philosophical Trans Foundation Nietzsche Germany Europe
The Creation Story of Bounce With Co-Founder, CEO Cody Candee

Code Story

02:10 min | Last month

The Creation Story of Bounce With Co-Founder, CEO Cody Candee

"Outsourcing network of local businesses all around the world big cities we operate different services inside of these businesses for the main one where the bulk of bounce is all around luggage storage. When you're traveling. Now let's check in check out day. You might have all your things in place to keep them with. Bouncy can open our app or a website and find a place to go and leave your thanks for the day the businesses that we work with make extra revenue off that after traffic and travellers all day of their vacation or business travel or whatever it. Is we see leaving golfer. Events wilson launched another product this year package acceptance rate on top of our existing network. You can send your packages to about slow pitch and help with traveling or if he lives in a city doorman i can't be around. Two receivers earned delivery so yeah sorta long-term and we'll be building bounds to help these small businesses make more money and then on your side we exist to basically keep people from not having to plan their days around there things anymore so luggage storage package. Acceptance tools will add more in the future in two thousand fourteen. I was working in san francisco. Some friends some co workers in the scrap. Some drinks after work. Someone said i'm going to join. But i'm gonna go all the way home. I drop off my bag and being minimalist that i am. You know living by this lawsuit that you're thinks she hold you down. I thought crazy how common it is for people to literally go way out of the way to plan the whole evening around there. Things spend extra money on taxis or the ubers and yeah it's crazy. So how can we solve problem. That night i was far. And i took the back of a menu. And we're just like writing all radios that came to my head including inbound that first day and the big vision is can we build a cloud computing infrastructure for the physical distributed storage everywhere. I mean you go with your thanks to you

Wilson San Francisco
The Not so Digital Workforce

Think: Sustainability

02:04 min | Last month

The Not so Digital Workforce

"You may think of the digital workforce as zoom meetings and shed google docs but this trend encompasses a wide range of industries and types of work. This labor refers to a really wide suite of different types of work quite often The moment is being used to refer to digital knowledge. Work so any works. That's that can be undertaken through computers. I virtually remotely roth than having to be in a specific geographical location. That's david vissel. David is a human geography at the university of melbourne and he researches the changing relationship between people and place. There's a wide spectrum of other types of works that could equally be referred to as digital works so the economy in in cities. So things like uber and delivery and all of those new types of services that we're seeing springing up in in our cities that are absolutely reliance on networks of connected mobile phones and algorithms that drive that drive both the workers and consumers so even sectors threats we traditionally associate with being very different and very not digital say things like mining for example are increasingly using. Ai and different types of autonomous developments. So yes a labor certainly a massive consideration through across a lot of different sectors of the moment and it's very variable bull people participating in the digital workforce than ever before this rapid change is something. That's come out of necessity with the emergence of the pandemic but as david explains this influx of flexible and digital workers has an impact on the way how cities function well hit potentially involves all of us in terms of the effects that it has so even if you don't work at all and no doubt you purchase things and you use different online services so even consumers are using dish labor.

David Vissel University Of Melbourne Google David
DoorDash, Grubhub, Uber Eats Sue New York City Over Restaurant Fee Caps

Daily Tech News Show

00:27 sec | Last month

DoorDash, Grubhub, Uber Eats Sue New York City Over Restaurant Fee Caps

"Uber. And grub hub filed a lawsuit against the city of new york. Federal court disputing. The law passed last month. Capping the amount of commission that food delivery apps khun charge restaurants. New york want to limit what the restaurants get charged by the deliver companies. The suit asks for an injunction against the law going into effect monetary damages and requests. A jury trial the firms alleged. The law constitutes government overreach forcing them to rewrite contracts with restaurants and raising fees for customers.

Federal Court New York
Tracking Growth Marketing in 2021

Equity

02:05 min | Last month

Tracking Growth Marketing in 2021

"Gonna be talking about growth marketing day. All kinds of really important subjects obviously was fintech as focused jonathan. You're up here but you're muted. Because twitter likes to annoy people that way. John are you there i am. Hello danny how are you good. We're getting people through this tunnel one next. We're going to get marianne set up here in just a second but in the meantime i'm going to introduce our speaker today. So jonathan metric is the chief growth officer at portage ventures or advises a global portfolio with companies including wealth simple in canada albert in the us and clark in germany previously. He was the chief marketing officer of policy. Genius when the largest intertek marketplace's leading a division of forty plus growth marketers in scaling revenue. Kennex over three years jonathan. Welcome thank you thank you very much. It's great to be here and excited to be on this new pop pharmacist by twitter spaces. Hang out so. I'm excited to see kind of how this goes and great to chat with you to today but growth and fintech absolutely. Well i will say it's gone from alpha to beta at this point. It was pretty janke the first few times we did this. Maybe two three months ago. And i think the android app is now working at doesn't crash every five minutes. Good started when you think about growth and twenty twenty one i i to me growth has been the uber story of the entire year in every company is growing. The marketing channels are getting congested. Cat costs are going up on almost every pay channel. It's more competitive than ever on organic. What are you thinking about these days when it comes to growth in two thousand twenty one. Yeah i mean. I think you you hit the nail on the head there right and i think you know if we dial it back a little bit to the beginning of cova. I think there was a bit of a pause on you. Know is the sky falling. Are we going to be growing all right. And i think you know a couple of months after that in twenty twenty we saw immediate rebound with folks just kind of shifting attention to online direct ways of buying products that weren't necessarily in person direct to consumer. And you know. I think growth really road that way right and when i think of gross you know i think it's more around folks who are looking at driving revenue for their business and that can involve marketing can involve product and Components performance marketing.

Hello Danny Jonathan Metric Portage Ventures Kennex Jonathan Janke Twitter Marianne Clark Germany John Canada United States
The Alexa Prize Story - Professor Jan Sedivy on Winning the Alexa Prize SocialBot Challenge and 40 Years in Voice Tech - Voicebot Podcast Ep 225 - burst 05

The Voicebot Podcast

04:28 min | Last month

The Alexa Prize Story - Professor Jan Sedivy on Winning the Alexa Prize SocialBot Challenge and 40 Years in Voice Tech - Voicebot Podcast Ep 225 - burst 05

"I start date group and there were many students who got through Applause am giving the who worked with me. Owner fees asuncion Step by step We have been following the progress in the industry and i was You know get inca people who are more and more interested than who are willing to cooperate and in some i would say like plenty fourteen. He decided to do question answering. So he did the Different knowledge database as son view slowly but surely giving questions like typing questions Did voice until Land the very basics of or the students learn the very basic so unhappy like do data extraction duties on the And then sunday in twenty sixteen. All's own came up with this competition and the competition or the main task of the competition was to create a social boat. Which would engaging louis and also entertainingly talking to users so and the target or the goal of those to talk as long as possible to survey difficult to convert into functional end to any a system function so it was something which is a entertainment as well as mathematics and many many different algorithms in it and a deadline We once of the road is meant a muslim put on there but they just resold so we should try and the weaver very pessimistically plus weaver. starting beautiful He can do these universities. We are admiring from here that they have a much better team. Sunday would be those who would lead. But the thought okay. Let's give it a try so we put together a proposal and the we mainly based on our work in the question onset. Inca believe me or not. We made between the top twelfth. Who was elected as these semi-finalists that time and is brought us like two fifty For students and This money this was something fantastic because this monday helped me to keep the key people on board and no students receive money therefore four day fully concentrated on the problems. We were interested in which was the social. We stopped the to put it together. In a very practical by firestone stopped with trying cody allies debts time grew and neural networks and after a few attempts we thought. Okay that is. This does not work. It's very difficult. And we opt for very simple based system and started to grow a simple system and it worked it did something is and people were able to talk to it so we went on indie competition. The uber very surprised that we were doing very out. We saw on the leaderboard by Even two or the competing sites and we've had been we have been leading so we continued. We ended up in the final on the second sports which was unbelievable. Fantastic success v about twice in seattle Received the mind price in In las vegas so unbelievably nobody for a while. I was in las vegas but none of the students was ever in las vegas. Which is again something you cannot note. See anywhere else. Except in las dos.

Amazon Alexa Prize NLP BOT Conversation Finalist Semi-Finalist IBM Socialbot Cybernetics Robotics Firestone Cody Las Vegas Seattle Las Dos
Dysfunction in the Desert: A Look at the Stumbling Arizona Coyotes

The Lead

02:05 min | Last month

Dysfunction in the Desert: A Look at the Stumbling Arizona Coyotes

"Also katie the arizona. Coyotes haven't exactly been the most stable nhl franchise over the years there's been a bit of a revolving door of owners and the nhl even took control of the team for a while back in two thousand nine after a bankruptcy filing so given all of that. What was the feeling when. Alex murillo became the coyotes new owner in two thousand nineteen or so appealing on a number of levels on new era of arizona. Coyotes hockey began today the nhl. I ever hispanic owner was introduced to the valley and it was heralded as sort of Watershed moment i think for the franchise in the sense. That here could finally be that guy with uber. Deep pockets like he was reported to be a billionaire. And someone that had tied to the latino community what started this is alex enrolling arizona's cowpeas which is a market that is about forty forty two percent down and really showed a commitment to wanting to grow that level of connection with fan base. You spittle to this. But it will stand up delekta akin arizona but luckily latina. It asked us. He has a really interesting. I don't wanna say rags-to-riches tail but someone that really supposedly scrapped. His way to where he is now. His parents fled cuba in the sixties. They came to miami in college. He opened a location for a pizzeria that grew to become a chain. I had this knack for picking up. Visit our broken losing money and turning him around and make them successful. I'm very proud to be a part of the fifty five year. Old morello owns a chain of pizza restaurants in l. a. casino on the las vegas strip a construction company as well as tv and radio stations. No doubt his will in history of success. Some major win for the coyotes.

NHL Arizona Coyotes Alex Murillo Katie Hockey Alex Old Morello Cuba Miami Las Vegas
Naomi Osaka Weighs Another Break From Tennis After US Open Loss

The Mini-Break

00:45 sec | Last month

Naomi Osaka Weighs Another Break From Tennis After US Open Loss

"Was just one of those days at the twenty twenty one. Us open a day that featured sixteen round of thirty two singles matches saw eight of those sixteen go the distance. Four on the side. Four on the women's side. Want to break down all of that action on today's show. Of course the place will start. We are down a defending champion. Two time us open winner. Twenty twenty twenty eighteen ninety homeo- sokha your third seep here. At this year's event knocked off by uber talented eighteen year old canadian leila fernandez. I wanna talk about the mechanics of that match. I wanna talk about soccer comments after the match as well she indicated. She's not sure when she's going to next step on a tennis

Leila Fernandez United States Soccer Tennis
Lyft, Uber to Defend Drivers Sued Under Texas Abortion Law

CNBC's Fast Money

01:19 min | Last month

Lyft, Uber to Defend Drivers Sued Under Texas Abortion Law

"At a news. Alert on uber contested. Burs got the story contessa. Hi melissa what we have just heard from. Dr nassar shot. He is that he's coming forward and clapping competitor. Lift on the back for the actions that it's taking in texas and saying it's going to match that. So here's what happened. Lift him forward and said that they were going to start a legal defense fund for any of the drivers who got accused under this new texas abortion law antiabortion law of assisting women receive now illegal abortions in the state of texas lift would set up a legal defense fund to defend those drivers and just a short time ago. Dara had tweeted out that He thought that that was the right. Decision on lifts part and they were planning to have uber matt. Make the same move So uber now also will cover legal legal fees for drivers in the same way. And there's dr thank. Thanks for the push. Logan green. That drivers should not be put at risk for gani people where they want to go. Melissa basically the premise contest is that even rideshare drivers. Who take women to these appointments are seen as aiding these women in an illegal abortion at this point and could be fine and so so at that point. The companies will step in and cover the legal fees.

Dr Nassar Texas Melissa Logan Green Dara Gani
Texas Law That Bans Abortion After About 6 Weeks Takes Effect

Pivot

01:59 min | Last month

Texas Law That Bans Abortion After About 6 Weeks Takes Effect

"Texas law banning abortions. After six weeks went into effect yesterday law prohibits abortions wants cardiac activity can be detected an embryo which very early the law also allows. This is sort of twist allows private citizens to sue abortion providers and anyone else who gives who helps a woman obtained an abortion in texas including even an uber driver who might have given a woman a ride to the clinic. The law makes no exception for rape or incest. The supreme court refused to block. The banner has now materializing a huge threat to roe versus wade. So what do you think under his eye. Where are we in the handmaid's to be the fruit. Blessed the fruit. It'd be fruit here not to joke about something so serious but let's not but to joke but not joke tweeted something yesterday And that is this that why men think they have something to say as much. They think they want to say about this when their contribution to the reproductive process last six or seven seconds. Maybe eight if it's been awhile and women for the next nine months and then feeding the baby breastfeeding afterward do all the heavy lifting all right. This is this. Is the women's show here and men want piece of this action like they've got something to say here it's dictatorial. This is i think janet jackson said it. Best in the first five seconds for in nineteen ninety-six smash album control okay. This is a story about control. Okay like it's about power and control. This is full handmaid's tale. That's one thing. The other thing as it relates to roe v. Wade as i understand roe v wade in nineteen seventy-three also texas with the same issue the supreme court as i understand it felt that texas's laws or whatever regarding abortion violated a woman's constitutional right to privacy about privacy. So what is it about this new situation. That is also not a violation of privacy.

Texas Supreme Court Wade Janet Jackson Roe V Wade
Texas Abortion Law Explained: Everything You Need to Know

Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

01:56 min | Last month

Texas Abortion Law Explained: Everything You Need to Know

"We're going to bring you an off week special episode to discuss the order. That was just handed down right before midnight on wednesday night up holding a really novel. Texas abortion law this law. We've actually talked about it on the show before is known as sba effectively bans all abortions. After the six week of pregnancy many many women do not know that they are pregnant at six weeks of pregnancy. There is no exception. For rape and incest governor greg abbott signed. Sp eight into law in may and of course the trick behind the law is that unlike similar deliberately unconstitutional abortion bans. heartbeat ends. What have you. Sba doesn't allow any state actors to enforce it there in fact prohibited from enforcing it instead literally everyone else. Any american anywhere is empowered is in fact conscripted to bring civil lawsuits against either an abortion provider. Or anyone who quote aids and abets those terms. Go undefined on abortion. That could include your counselor. Who talks to you about your options or the uber driver who drops you off at the clinic. Look the law is unconstitutional. Texas is well aware that the supreme court precedent sets the bar for abortion bans at viability. That somewhere between twenty two and twenty four weeks but this law was deliberately crafted so that there is no state actor and thus nobody for an abortion provider to take to court to try to get injunction one other thing if an abortion provider is sued in state court under sb eight. And they lose well. The winning party not only gets bounty of ten thousand dollars possibly more. They also collect. Attorney's

Greg Abbott SBA Texas Aids Supreme Court
Justices Blast Texas Abortion Ruling

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

01:59 min | Last month

Justices Blast Texas Abortion Ruling

"All four dissenting judges justices filed opinions. Some scathing against the majority's refusal to block that texas law that virtually bands abortion chief justice. John roberts who joined the court's three liberals wrote quote the statutory scheme before the court is not only unusual but unprecedented end quote justice. Sonia so to my order was much more direct quote saying quote a majority of justices have opted to bury their heads in the sand. She goes on to say it cannot be the case that a state can evade federal judicial scrutiny. By outsourcing the enforcement of unconstitutional laws to its citizenry with us again. I kneel cocktail department of justice veteran and former acting solicitor general during the obama administration. He argued dozens of cases before the united states supreme court. Neil good to see you. Thank you for being with us. We need your clarity on this. What did chief justice john roberts in describing this as unusual and unprecedented the bottom line is the supreme court basically gave a thumbs up to the overruling of roe versus wade so abortion clinics as of yesterday in texas are essentially closed to all patients. And what the court west texas yesterday can be enacted tomorrow in other states in deed will other states Code already Said they're gonna try to enact such legislation and so with the chief justice was referring to was. This is a really weird. Texas scheme outlawed abortion after six weeks effectively. But it said the state isn't gonna enforced instead. It created vigilante justice. Any private citizen could sue anyone. Who's helping anyone get an abortion so if you'd like take an uber to the ocean clinic this law said you can the uber driver and sue them anywhere in texas including far away from their homes and seek ten thousand dollars in damages against them plus attorneys

John Roberts Obama Administration Texas Sonia Supreme Court Department Of Justice Neil ROE Wade United States
Texas Abortion Ban: What It Means and What Happens Next

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

01:20 min | Last month

Texas Abortion Ban: What It Means and What Happens Next

"Texas law that went into effect today is being accurately reported as banning abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy in direct violation of federal law is established by the surpreme court nineteen seventy-three but but the important reality is. The texas law is very likely to ban all abortions in texas in effect because it puts every provider of abortion services including the uber driver who drives women's to a clinic at legal risk of being sued for every abortion performed in texas at any stage of pregnancy. Anyone in texas or anyone anywhere else in the con- anywhere else in the country. A lawsuit in texas now suing the receptionist at a clinic were an abortion has been performed if it can be proved that the abortion was performed before a fetal heartbeat could be detected then the receptionist defended will win the case and be okay but how is the receptionist. Defendant going to pay a lawyer in that case. How is everyone else working at the clinic. Going to be able to pay a lawyer when every single abortion performed at that clinic becomes the subject of a lawsuit as every one of them surely will

Texas Surpreme Court
Ridesharing Services Premium Digital Channels With Octopus Interactive CEO Cherian Thomas

MarTech Podcast

02:17 min | Last month

Ridesharing Services Premium Digital Channels With Octopus Interactive CEO Cherian Thomas

"And welcome back to the mark tech podcast rates back. Ben accent have you back on the show and to continue our conversation. Yesterday we focus more on out of home. Broadly the idea that people are leaving the house. Were not just focused at home. So we're basically getting more impressions in different places and it's changing the marketing mix billboards transportation and octopus specialty marketing in rideshare. I wanna double click and talk about where your bread is buttered. And how rideshare is an opportunity for marketers. Talk to me about the rideshare market and how it's grown and then how marketers can take advantage of it one of the things that's important to note is just like folks went from television to desktop desktop to mobile. We feel that the next place to consume media will be motorized. You can go from rideshare to robo taxis autonomous vehicles and rideshare israeli this unbelievable setting where you have dwell time. I'm not driving the vehicle. So i can be entertained. It could be productive. I can watch videos. Listen to music socialize and so forth and that's where we see this huge on lock right this unbelievable amounts of dwell time in a captive setting. And then you layer in. Who is the uber and lift rider and the audience demographics are just you know that quintessential consumer that eighteen to forty nine. That's hard to reach high disposable income travelling in and around cities and so not only. Is it valuable setting. but it's also extremely valuable audience. I understand the audience is valuable. And i understand that they are captive. They also have a cell phone because they called an uber because they call the lift so the medium that octopus uses putting screen built into the rideshare he just hanging an ipad off the back of a chair or something obviously mounted so people aren't running off with them but yeah it's mounted of the cussing cases and you're right people have their phones. They also can look out the window. They can also talk to the driver. We are the largest screen in the room. they spit out money and prizes for engaging with it. And you're gonna get content on our screens that you just cannot get on your phone. For example if you're playing trivia against hundreds of thousands of other uber and lift riders to win prizes. Right that's happening on our screens. Not on the phone and then also our brand partners are giving us exclusive games that you're not able to plan your fun.

Rideshare BEN
How to Get Chicago Kids to School Is Latest Pandemic Headache

John Landecker

00:43 sec | Last month

How to Get Chicago Kids to School Is Latest Pandemic Headache

"Chicago area school districts are dealing with yet another hurdle with kids heading back to the classrooms, and that is a shortage of bus drivers. A lot of drivers retired during the pandemic or have decided because of the virus. They're not going to come back. Here's WGN's Megan Dwyer. School bus companies are now competing with uber Grubhub and Amazon to get drivers and they are finding they just can't compete despite offering incentives like signing bonuses and free healthcare. With CPS going back to school next week. The fear is the district shortage is going to be severe. W. G M reached out to CPS asking for information on their transport plan, but they have not

Megan Dwyer Uber Grubhub WGN Chicago CPS Amazon
Ben Simmons Trade Talks Are Reportedly 'Stalled'

Jalen and Jacoby

01:14 min | Last month

Ben Simmons Trade Talks Are Reportedly 'Stalled'

"There is a report from. Cbs sports that the sixers could be preparing to have ben simmons in camp on the roster after trade rumors all summer. What do you think the chances are ben. Simmons starts the season with the sixers. So let's not clough what you saw. Ben simmons in the fourth quarter against the atlanta hawks with the fact that he's a uber talented player to just doesn't attempt shots outside of the paint so to couple. Those are two different things. So if you're feeling you trying to move him after that you're just not going to get the value play return. He's gonna have to come to camp and play value back up and when you do an extension with joel embiid. I'm pretty sure you talk to him. About the future of ben simmons and so you bring them back to camp you start the season woodham. You hope that he plays remotely like he was playing last year as he became a defensive player of the year candidate as he can't flirt with triple doubles. There's so many valuable thieves he can bring to the table. Then if that if in win that value re elevates. That's when you try to move him especially for what they're going to be asking for in

Ben Simmons Sixers Joel Embiid Atlanta Hawks CBS Simmons BEN Woodham
Why Is Fasting Bad for Menopause?

Ask The Health Expert

01:55 min | Last month

Why Is Fasting Bad for Menopause?

"Well. I don't think fasting is bad for menopause. In fact i would argue that. Menopausal women have this incredible advantage because they're not dealing with having monthly cycles not having significant fluctuations like they did when they were still cyprian between estrogen and progesterone. Each month their bodies are not in a place where they're going to procreate they're not going to have to maintain and sustain of pregnancy and so therefore biologically. I think that are an advantage. I think it's it's a time when We have to mitigate stress. We have to be really proactive. I remind everyone that knit middle ages the time when our bodies will remind us if we are not being conscientious enough about software strategies so that includes high quality sleep that includes stress management that includes removing inflammatory foods from our diet that includes not over exercising. Which is the typical tendency. We think when you have to work out harder to lose weight than we did when we were younger and really. It's it's all the other things. I've just kind of mentioned yet to be workout smarter. Not harder and so. I don't think fasting. As bad for menopause and backed i think most women as they transition into their early forties with the loss of esther dial which is the active form of estrogen is. That's kind of petering off People's appetites shift and change and so it's much easier for people to eat less often. It is the the you know. The desire gede naby decreased and so getting up in the morning and getting a workout in and get your kids off to school or getting yourself to were You're not focused on having to get that. First neil end so i really do believe that utilized with the other strategies that i've already kind of alluded to stress management making sure that uber removed inflammatory foods and and the big ones. Are you know gluten. And

Neil
"uber" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

05:21 min | 3 months ago

"uber" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"That could be good for streamlining costs but that was something that you really loved for innovation. That could be a problem for you. You know are the bright spots ahead. The economy is reopening. People are going to be going back to their offices but at the same time. Uber's going gonna need drivers to be able to to take people places right and is it a risk will they be able to hire attract and retain drivers. You know. these are all things that i would think about And journal about definitely before deciding if selling is right for you. I'll just out a couple more things one is. Obviously you want to think about taxes because you're in the fortunate position of having to pay capital gains taxes. And it's just a question of how long have you own the stock and are you paying their short-term capital gains or if you've owned it more than a year obviously that's a much lower rate and then the other thing is like what are you going to do with the money because if these are your investment dollars in your thinking you know what. I've made a fifty five percent gain and i think over the next one three five years. I can do better putting my money somewhere else. Then you know that that goes on the on the list of reasons to sell. But i think you know. And that's the things you've touched on a leash. I mean that's part of why find such a fascinating company because i think there are. We're years away from knowing uber is going to end.

And journal
"uber" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

01:44 min | 3 months ago

"uber" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"Going to note from aaron in chicago. He writes uber. Is up fifty five percent since i bought it. But i'm hearing from drivers who are unhappy with the culture of the business and there are rumors that the business plan was to offset costs of underbidding. The competition for rides drive others out of business and then raised their prices. Yeah that tracks with what i've always thought about over. He goes on to say. I'll add that in the last month months. I've personally experienced price. Prohibitive rides in three different cities and felt the need to find an alternative. Is it time to sell or. Is there a plan for change. That i'm missing. Thanks for any insights. Love the podcast. Thank you for that aaron. And it's interesting because uber is one of those businesses. I find incredibly fascinating to watch. And i have zero interesting owning i just. I just don't see the the payoff that others. But you know aaron sitting on a fifty five percent gain. Obviously we can't give individual invite advice alicia. But what do you think. Yeah so so i. Yeah congratulations on being up. Fifty five percent. That's pretty great but for selling it is a personal decision in individual choice that every investor makes for themselves based on risk. What kind of risk you're willing to to deal with kind of risky thing is too much as well as your investment thesis For me whenever. I think about selling a take a look at my original investment thesis and. I really actually journal about to see to see if anything's

chris l Alicia alvian whirlpool Jp morgan alicia Us
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:35 min | 4 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Compute the possible permutations of every driver pairing and find the configuration which maximizes net present value in the future value. Both of which are supermodel constraints. Do you have the time to do that. Like the time it takes for the rider to like 'cause you're describing stable matching basically right. Exactly what's interesting is. There's actually a floor. There's such thing two convenient in the rideshare space where we covered the probability of cancellation goes up from about ninety seconds to thirty seconds. Like you of have this. We got a bunch of these you see. Obviously probably kim felicien goes up as eta's up through thurbers fifteen minutes away. Never mind the sort of falling probability to about ninety seconds and then spikes again right and what we've hypothesize we call. A bunch of people actually verified this usual research is it's like oh my god uber. Zero is to put my shoes on. I wasn't ready to look. I was expecting three to five minutes. So it has to be fast did has to be in. Fact are real. Time systems are dispatching systems have performance constraint. I think they had to execute stable matching and think of something like seven hundred fifty milliseconds or something like that. But you do have a little talk you can basically batch people for five or ten seconds run the stable matching algorithm the second and actually give them know the car in fifteen or twenty seconds and users don't seem to mind in fact they like there's a little bit of like intentional lack some mobile phone lag. Sometimes it's just sort of convenient before you get the car set to you. I think sometimes you can do stable matching straightforward is just by integer number of requests. And you just sort of say okay. Like every ten requests will be dispatched. We've experimented without. I quite that. The status dispatching over the michigan my intelligible stale but early on we honestly just ran it as like university p ideal and then you started to do a little bit of weighting function with sort of geospatial adjacency between these different neighborhoods. We prayed while the superpower to them is that they are thomas. The big drawback to them is that they are autonomous. And so we consistently cut tripped up famously. Early on i think we've we've sent ten recovered a bit of raising prices or sort of dynamically pricing in circumstances where your price optimization was not the highest order bit near the most famous like the navy yard shooting in boston or there was a cafe there was like a mass casualty event. At sydney i remember in point and the system was responding. The model itself was responding in a way which makes economically rational sense. Which is a bunch of people. Wanna leave the area know. The price of new should go up by the kind of like science common sense. Human decency and your price. Optimization is not the highest order bid for the company that point so we always got tripped up with this kind of fundamentally reactive nature of how our models were built. And i think you can showed her short and that feedback U-turn of often thirty seconds thirty minutes quite know how you get to proactive. Sort of root cause analysis of what is causing pricing driving the price by thinks. Okay let's shift the conversation a bit given that you're now an investor and we've been talking mostly at a pretty high level relative to the data infrastructure problems that the data engineers burgeoning data engineering ecosystem was being tackled at uber. While you were there but you know you saw uber. The rise. a lot internal technologies. That have now been productized. Whether we're talking about imx three. Which is now kronos fear or the special technology which got productized as unfolded the data lake middleware. That is at least getting turned into open source projects. And i'd love to know like what are some of the broader product areas that uc opportunities for companies to be built in as far as i'm concerned after crypto data engineering is basically the coolest space to building. It's it's the most it's the most problem rich. Maybe exaggerate. But i think data engineering is a really great space to be investing in and i'd love to hear about the companies in the problems. The space is the sub spaces within data engineering. The most excited about absolutely one of the things. I think we built at the beginning stages of building the haven't really seen productized at and i think you have. Obviously it's been nice for me as an investor with a bunch of the old data gang starting companies including life michelangelo guys with tech. Tom and a couple of other things one interesting part that we were trying to struggle with sort of. How do you balance data security and data access it sort of the need for chretien. Creativity innovation the system. We tried to build. An uber was a principal of basically. Everybody could theoretically have access to every piece of information at the company but you kind of have a spectrum of which is ideally correlated. Well with the sort of riskiness or anomalous behavior like how weird is this request given everything we know about you and your job your job family. I really liked to see. Somebody explore that idea in a- product around data security and data access the little kind of on the edge engineering where that but the idea being. Like if you're a driver operations manager in phoenix and you're accessing client records in boston. That's very weird. Like have very little business reason for doing so. Somebody should be made aware of this or you should have something where you say like. Please explain why you're doing this submit a request for approval. Somebody has to authorize it. But we also had lots of very creative people who we go adjacent to their job title or sort of learning something else and sometimes unlisted access patterns. Were a great way for us to internal tooling product research into sort of saying like. Hey you're you're pulling a bunch of different lake driver ticket information. Why are we doing this. And they're like trying to create the ability to think through what would like a insurance or risk product. Look like if we want to build internally like some of our best ideas came from people kind of riffing on tools and you're talking about kind of like a zero trust detection service for self serve data engineering. I think the core piece of it is a the ability to build a data access risk model.

five three fifteen five minutes Tom ten seconds fifteen minutes boston seven hundred fifty millisecon thirty seconds Both thomas thirty minutes kim felicien twenty seconds about ninety seconds sydney second uber two
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:21 min | 4 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Which are constraints. Do you have the time to do that. Like the time it takes for the rider to like 'cause you're describing stable matching basically right. Exactly what's interesting is there's actually a floor. There's such thing two convenient in the rideshare space where we discovered the probability of cancellation goes up from about ninety seconds to thirty seconds. Like you serve. Have this. We got a bunch of these. You see obviously. Probably kim felicien goes up as eta's you'll out through the uber's fifteen minutes away. Never mind the sort of falling probability to about ninety seconds and then spikes again right and what we've hypothesize we call. A bunch of people actually verified this usual research is it's like oh my god uber. Zero is to put my shoes on. I wasn't ready to look. I was expecting three to five minutes so it has to be fast. Did has to be in fact a real time systems are dispatching systems have performance constraint. I think they had to execute stable matching and think of something like seven hundred fifty milliseconds or something like that. But you do have a little talk you can basically batch people for five or ten seconds run the stable matching algorithm the second and actually give them you know the car in fifteen or twenty seconds and users don't seem to mind in fact they like there's a little bit of like intentional lack some mobile phone lag. Sometimes it's just sort of convenient before you get the car set to you. I think sometimes you can do stable matching straightforward is just by integer number of requests. And you just sort of say okay. Like every ten requests will be dispatched. We've experimented without. I quite that. The status dispatching over the michigan my intelligible stale but early on we honestly just ran it as like university p ideal and then you started to do a little bit of weighting function with sort of geospatial adjacency between these different neighborhoods. We prayed well. The superpower to them is that they are thomas. The big drawback to them is that they are autonomous. and so we consistently cut tripped up famously. Early on i think we've we've sent ten recovered a bit of raising prices or sort of dynamically pricing in circumstances where your price optimization was not the highest order bit near the most famous the navy yard shooting in boston or there was a cafe. There was like a mass casualty event. At sydney i remember in point and the system was responding. The model itself was responding in a way which makes economically rational sense. Which is a bunch of people. Wanna leave the area know. The price of new should go up by the kind of like science common sense human decency ethics and your price optimization is not the highest order bid for the company that point so we always got tripped up with this kind of fundamentally reactive nature of how our models were built. And i think you can showed her short and that feedback U-turn of often thirty seconds thirty minutes. Quite know how you get to proactive. Sort of root cause analysis of what is causing pricing driving the price by thinks. Okay let's shift the conversation a bit given that you're now an investor and we've been talking mostly at a pretty high level relative to the data infrastructure problems that the data engineers burgeoning data engineering ecosystem was being tackled at uber. While you were there but you know you saw uber. The rise. a lot internal technologies. That have now been productized. Whether we're talking about imx three. Which is now kronos fear or the geospatial technology which got productized as unfolded the data lake middleware. That is at least getting turned into open source projects. And i'd love to know like what are some of the broader product areas that uc opportunities for companies to be built in as far as i'm concerned after crypto data engineering is basically the coolest space to building. It's it's the most. It's the most problem rich. Maybe we're exaggerating. But i think data engineering is a really great space to be investing in and i'd love to hear about the companies in the problems. The space is the sub spaces within data engineering. The most excited about absolutely one of the things. I think we built at the beginning stages of building the haven't really seen productized at and i think you have. Obviously it's been nice for me as an investor with a bunch of the old data gang starting companies including life michelangelo guys with tech. Tom and a couple of other things one interesting part that we were trying to struggle with sort of. How do you balance data security and data access it sort of the need for chretien. Creativity innovation the system. We tried to build. An uber was a principal of basically. Everybody could theoretically have access to every piece of information at the company but you kind of have a spectrum of friction which is ideally correlated. Well with the sort of riskiness or anomalous behavior. Like how weird is this request given everything we know about you and your job your job family. I really liked to see. Somebody explore that idea in a- product around data security and data access the little kind of on the edge engineering where that. but the idea being. Like if you're a driver operations manager in phoenix and you're accessing client records in boston. That's very weird. Like have very little business reason for doing so. Somebody should be made aware of this or you should have something where you say like. Please explain why you're doing this submit a request for approval. Somebody has to authorize it. But we also had lots of very creative people who we go adjacent to their job title or sort of learning something else and sometimes unlisted access patterns. Were a great way for us to internal tooling product research into sort of saying like. Hey you're you're pulling a bunch of different lake driver ticket information. Why are we doing this. And they're like trying to create the ability to think through what would like a insurance or risk product. Look like if we want to build internally like some of our best ideas came from people kind of riffing on tools and you're talking about kind of like a zero trust detection service for self serve data engineering right and i think the core piece of it is a the ability.

three five fifteen minutes fifteen five minutes Tom boston ten seconds thirty seconds thomas about ninety seconds kim felicien phoenix second thirty minutes seven hundred fifty millisecon uber two twenty seconds sydney
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:52 min | 4 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Number of sessions. Where user didn't see a car that were zero cars available was one of our single biggest negative. Kpi's that number had two zero every week or doing her job and pricing became a big part of that. What what was interesting about. It was raising prices. You know we kind of this system. Because i felt that was hokey on talked about in the sack but raising prices did three things it disincentivize demand that there were people who said you know what i'm willing to walk. I'm willing to wait a couple minutes like let's go. Having rounder order desert and we prove or prices to come down secondly it's incentivize supply in time and space and there was this idea of you know we saw this most obviously in new york if you are driver. Who's sitting in a suburban in brooklyn and you know it's friday night. There's demanded midtown downtown manhattan. You're still looking. Like i got all across the brooklyn bridge. This is like a massive pain in the neck for a very uncertain reward. I'm not even going to bother like. I'll just wait for the next brooklyn ride kind of and being able to raise prices. Spatial geospatial dynamic pricing was a way of kind of playing with the calculus on the risk reward of doing something like relocating across the city encouraging. Gas cost incurring the headache of just fighting traffic to go downtown. So it helped drivers move to places of higher demand or more importantly underserved demanding the city and it also helped them train their schedules to say okay. I'm going to work later hours. I'm gonna to shit my schedule from for more downtime to more busy time just because the economics are better on that and the third of most stumbled thing about it was actually increase the throughput of our system. I think what was fascinating about. This is what happens when uber's get too busy in the marketplace. I've done a couple of talks on this but when you you hit a tipping point where cars become less dense. They have a lower spatial density. Any go up right. You've probably seen this a really busy time. Uber is not three minutes away. It's like fifteen twenty minutes away and if you request that car you're transaction takes longer and talk ready takes the car now fifteen minutes to get to you plus like the fifteen minutes from where you're going to where you wanna get dropped off. Your transaction took thirty minutes whereas if you call during a slow time. The car was one minute the way of the one minute to get to plus fifteen minutes to go to your destination. Your transaction took fifteen sixteen minutes. So there's the sort of tricky second-order effect that happens. Where in times of high demand with demand outstripped supply transactions take longer and the system is actually less capable of serving the transaction. So you end up. With sort of negative feedback loop which causes uber's despite two hundred percent utilization so by keeping the system out of that sort of negative feedback state. You actually end up. Doing is interesting when you're in this study and it was like for every point two five acts multiple increase in pricing. You had twenty five percent higher per fair value. Obviously but you also have seventy one percent higher revenue per hour. Because of the marginal increase in the throughput of the system by staying out of that destructive feedback state system so pricing was sort of pricing helps keep overs available. That was like one of the be talking points back. Then it was actually literally about maximizing the number of trips per hour the fleet could serve because otherwise you end up in the fleet. Do do roughly half as many trips. Between ninety and one hundred percent delineation between eighty and ninety percent utilization. So wait this whole system. You sort of how we built it. What the focus was on. That was the single biggest. Mathematical insight is there is a tipping point in utilization where research to get negative feedback signals. So you have this min max problem if you want to be as busy as possible without falling into negative feedback loop and so we. Bill is actually for the very first models were literally unit area and it was like a pi dealer where he would just sort of say tipping utilization measured utilization if measuring utilization ten percent of tipping utilization. Raise prices. Like step up right and you'd have kind of a scorecard of how many steps in with these sort of injury chunks. I was point. Two five was a tenth of a point one x so like every five minutes they would run this calculation. Dial prices down and the operations teams could do these basically set guardrails. We built this whole internal tool and we're big on automated internal tools. We you could say. I want a very prices dynamically from floor to ceiling. Usually like one x two two or three x and they can change a little bit of sort of. I want to be really sensitive to light. Supply shocks are demand. Shock you the heavyweight the derivative term. They had a couple years like of three or four life. On the control panel click a button and then the system would take over the prices up and down and it worked surprising. Well i mean for. Model as simple as like measure utilization fee hit through like an algebraic expression that worked for years waiting for the first eighteen months for. We're busy scaling out diversity every city and doing all these different product lines. Eventually you get much more sophisticated. Approach the people. I think have published the most research on this. Actually didi where most sophisticated purchases. Treat this as a you. Basically calculate the expected value of every driver writer pair. Say a bunch of requests command center for fifteen or twenty seconds. If it's usually fifteen you have a bunch of drivers who become available. You compute the possible permutations of every driver pairing and find the configuration which maximizes net present value in the future value. Both of which are supermodel constraints. Do you have the time to do that. Like the time it takes for the rider to like 'cause you're describing stable matching basically right..

Uber thirty minutes new york uber ten percent eighty fifteen brooklyn fifteen minutes fifteen sixteen minutes twenty five percent ninety two hundred percent fifteen twenty minutes three minutes friday night two one minute seventy one percent ninety percent
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:09 min | 4 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And as far as an application of data science the economics of the business has been thrilling to watch over time. We're just from a from a human incentive point of view you start with this like five dollar per ride highly subsidized thing and you have been able to boil the frog over time you know especially during and post pandemic. The economics of uber look so appealing compared to how they used to the very subsidized world. Now it's like. I will effectively pay taxi. Prices or premium on taxi prices to. Just get the uber service. I know i'm not alone in that regard. Was there always a plan around this in the data science around the economics of pricing. I'm not sure how heavily involved you were. But if if you were involved can you help me understand the strategy for how to ratchet prices and how to maintain a healthy range of prices or how you approach that problem absolutely so i was very involved with this is discussed prior to this. I did the first couple of years of dynamic pricing. I in a way invented surge. You welcome to the world by the. It's an interesting problem. Even from one. I joined it. I was kinda referred uber from a friend. Tagline was kind of like it's like limo company with an app with big dreams like it was black cars. Only at the time. And i was sort of like okay like you know interesting of your check it out but even twenty eleven there was kind of idea of. There's a a layer in every major city in america. That doesn't work particularly well. And you know we of want to start with his limo service but eventually have a point of view on all of it and i think that large vision is important. I mean obviously work on business side but it helps kind of reframe the problem. Mathematically of like it's not just about getting town cars to people efficiently but it's about fundamentally increasing. The throughput of the transportation in automobile layer in every city in public transit for that matter and starts with okay cars ride share runs really efficiently by in the abstract. You realize it's kind of a problem of how do we just move stuff right in a cost and time efficient way. It's an optimization of cubic footage within an automobile per time per hour on a dollar cost optimize basis and i think dynamic pricing kind of came into it relatively early where what you figured out without pricing. We had this sort of era where you couldn't get hoover's on friday.

america friday uber twenty eleven five dollar per ride first couple of years one
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:09 min | 4 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And as far as an application of data science the economics of the business has been thrilling to watch over time. We're just from a from a human incentive point of view you start with this like five dollar per ride highly subsidized thing and you have been able to boil the frog over time you know especially during and post pandemic. The economics of uber look so appealing compared to how they used to the very subsidized world. Now it's like. I will effectively pay taxi. Prices or premium on taxi prices to. Just get the uber service. I know i'm not alone in that regard. Was there always a plan around this in the data science around the economics of pricing. I'm not sure how heavily involved you were. But if if you were involved can you help me understand the strategy for how to ratchet prices and how to maintain healthy range of prices or how you approach that problem absolutely so i was very involved with this is discussed prior to this. I did the first couple years of dynamic pricing. I in a way invented surge. You welcome to the world by the. It's an interesting problem. Even from one. I joined it. I was kinda referred uber from a friend. Tagline was kind of like it's like limo company with an app with big dreams like it was black cars. Only at the time. And i was sort of like okay like you know interesting. Check it out but even twenty eleven there was kind of idea of. There's a layer in every major city in america. That doesn't work particularly well. And we kinda want to start with his limo service but eventually have a point of view on all of it and i think that large vision is important. I mean obviously work on business side but it helps kind of reframe the problem. Mathematically of like. It's not just about getting town cars to people efficiently but it's about fundamentally increasing. The throughput of the transportation in automobile layer in every city in public transit for that matter and starts with okay cars ride share runs really efficiently by in the abstract. You realize it's kind of a problem of how do we just move stuff right. In a cost and time efficient way it's an optimization of like cubic footage within an automobile per time per hour on a dollar cost optimize basis. And i think dynamic pricing kind of came into it relatively early. Where what you figured out without pricing. We had this sort of era where you couldn't get hoover's on friday.

america uber friday first couple years twenty eleven five dollar per ride one
"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

09:37 min | 4 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To the show. Thank you for having me. This is great. You were one of the first data. Scientists to work at and grapple with the scale of that company. And i think of uber and other ridesharing firms as well other logistics companies as basically an unsolvable data engineering problem because the scale of juice spatial information customer information that is generated on the fly and needs to be munched turned into other actionable. Data points is effectively infinite and the optimizations that you could do or effectively infinite so in such an environment you have to figure out some platform strategy some sustainable platform strategy for collecting the data working with the data and making it serviceable to the data scientists. So i'm most curious about the state of that platform when you joined and the direction it took as the company matured. Sure absolutely as you're probably where. I joined bid twenty eleven. I was there twenty-first employees. And i think there were seven engineers the seventh engineer so i inherited basically nothing from the get go. I mean the what was actually very interesting about. You're right that there is massive scale today but if you think about it for my customer transactions point view like on a transaction volume people are using uber. Even if you're a power user you order of single digit times per day. Netflix wants to work. Maybe wants to lunch back. When so so the actual speed of customer transaction data was pretty slow in fact that you could basically usually like an off the shelf my sequel cluster for a long time which is basically what we will do to handle transactional records and all the analytics are doing on predicting in predicting reengagement these types of things could be built on top of my sequel stack and so for a long time just because we were constrained by data infrastructure. That was where a lot of the effort got spent on the data side of things. The obvious exception to that is the geospatial information that you get from cars right so we would have telemetry coming off. These cars. one hurts a second location. Basically everything an iphone could share with us speed accelerometer being with uber and so most of our data scaling constraints came from the geospatial. And guess you'd call them gio. Temporal logs coming off of cars and for a long time. We didn't really know what to do with it. We we stumbled on sort of pub early on even before it really caught on with. You know the confluence of the world and all of that in literally are geospatial information. System was it comes in from the cars a simple basically handler to process that information like a cd and type system just to basically received from the cars published to akaka stream got sent to a flat file and we just spoiled these gio slogs and did nothing with them obviously for the first several years but knowing they were going to be valuable by about maybe twenty fourteen twenty fifteen. We really felt like we developed enough engineering on data infrastructure. Side to start tackling mapping and traffic in all of these sort of products. We wanted to be on top of geospatial information that was where a first real data lakes built. We started out with like your classic duke system. We have a bunch of friends from cloudera who were getting going realized pretty quickly. We needed something a lot. More custom and that eventually took the form of us building projects like and three which was our time series database in the sense. They've gone off kind of criticism coming on top of that but one of the big things for the analytic side of things we stumbled on the sort of hex notation and you'd see it as a certain area even surfaces in the driver out we realized you could basically cover the world in hexagons that were roughly the size of a city block and you can test the late the entire globe if you put five big pentagon polygon somewhere on the planet and we kept playing with it and we will get four those pentagon's over oceans and the fifth one is over the western sahara desert so like parts of like morocco might if we ever get to that part of the world over western sahara corky analytics some boy but actually got one basically rooms of spatial computation. Because hexagons you can just sort of have a rank order radius of your your you can say. There is data within the hexagon of interest. There is the ring of hexagon surrounding the ring of hexagon surrounding that. Those actually a lot more computational simple to think of the world rather than as continuous. gps points as just hexagon and hexagon rings. Around the heck out of interest does it does. and i've seen presentations at conferences. Where uber uses this hexagon thing. Exxon like format to display information to the audience. Yeah geospatial has really tricky to work with it scale. There was a whole era of guber. I mentioned we started with. My sequel was sort of our business database lamp technology of choice and we pivoted the post. We did a live cut over from my sequel to post grass and devops team did some phenomenal things. Basically making it so we could run this whole thing live. There was basically no downtime and went but we moved to post grass because of the post. Gps and geospatial functionality. Creating functionality that post offered ironically is kind of funny we that lasted would say four to six quarters somewhere in there. I actually the moving back because we hit appointment for post wrestling wouldn't scale for us to and through a friend of a friend like i got connected to these guys who were consultants who were post rest core code base commanders and they made a whole career of a kind of fine tuning and performance tuning post crest clusters and so they came into the session with us. We started to have them on retainer. They were basically extended members of the team and they running out of ideas so we tried literally everything including talking to the guy who wrote it to scale up post resident at some point. We just realized this wasn't the right technology for us. Which is when we moved back to a much more. Classic sort of my stake will do eventually that vaulted h. Bays and i'm actually not sure what they're using now but much more of classic my sequel back stack and then tried to solve the geospatial cream problem with a sort of hexagon test. Elation structured instead so the of database and data infrastructure you just gave one example of how a conventional choice basically broke at scale sure. What were some other ways. Where off the shelf solutions were breaking and you had to recreate your infrastructure strategy. Yeah i will say that uber philosophically. I think this might have come right. From the top rate from traffic sort of approach tended to bias to build over by. We bought very few technologies off the shelf. One of the most sort of obvious and big ones were read. The sexual dependency was on google. Maps and google contract was renegotiated every twelve or eighteen months. It seemed like my data guys. Were kind of tangentially involved. You know kind supplying the quantitative figures to all of that and eventually we realized that paying google order of tens of cents every time a google map popped up was a strategic dependence. They'd we didn't wanna take off and that began the so it was kind of a. We don't want to buy this anymore. The classic build versus buy manifested itself in us. Going in buying our own mapping product developing house. Not being solution. That i think was initially. Let's just figure the way to attack marginal cost but also created some really interesting opportunities to do embedded traffic monitoring. Vertical integration of things like the operations team knows that there's a parade going on or these roads closed and you could develop a tool such that. The ops team can close a road and the cascades all the way down to the stack and the reading engine becomes aware of it in the driver's no not to go on and that sort of deep vertical integration. I think it was a lot of what enabled our scale ability and sort of operational leverage without having engineers in turn the lakes bit poll request a yoga mat. The whole build over by decision. To my mind. This is a point of differentiation from.

Netflix iphone uber seven engineers seventh engineer tens of cents today twenty-first employees eighteen months google fifth one one western sahara desert first several years single digit second location first five big pentagon One six quarters
"uber" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:06 min | 11 months ago

"uber" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"As the pandemic recession drags on people are turning to gig. Work to fill the gaps and the nature of that work is evolving proposition. Twenty two in california which passed this month. Let's companies classified delivery and ride hail drivers as independent contractors but with some requirements. Such as a wade's floor. And some health benefit options some describe it as a third way between benefit free part-time work and traditional full-time employment. If the idea catches on more. Broadly what could it mean for how we work. David-weill is dean at the school for social policy and management at brandeis university. He told me about the origin of this idea. A third way comes in fact from canada where there is a concept of. What's called the dependent contractor where you have a set of protections that are designed for independent contractors that really rely on a single or a small number of major employers who who are contracting their business to protect independent contractors. Who really have this level of dependency. But i think the problem of the third way is the fact that canada's starts in a very different place than workers in this country. Start well so now. We have prop twenty two new york city and seattle have their own laws providing for workers with prop twenty two. These companies have said that they'll start to provide some basic protections. That don't go. as far as you know. Full employer sponsored health insurance are we creeping toward new mindset around how we deal with labor in the us. I think we are. Creeping is the right word. I think what we have done is. Unfortunately we've allowed some very powerful platform companies to dictate the terms of our public policies. I mean remember that in many markets hooper and lift basically their business model was to come in in advance of regulations. Just set the terms on their own before there had been measured public policy discussion. About who are these workers in. Is this an appropriate way to classify them. And what concerns me about the efforts of those platform companies in lots of different places before we even got to prop twenty two was they were trying to in in in many ways dictate the terms about who is protected under different laws. And who isn't and that to me is an appropriate thing for public policies and and people we elect to think about not for people in <hes>. Any any industry your powerful company to determine for us. I think prop twenty two and a lot of other things that have happened <hes>. At the state level have pushed us unfortunately towards a defining that based on the interests of <hes> <hes>. You know the small number of businesses rather than on what the what we as a public thinker appropriate protections.

canada ali brandeis university us california new york seattle
"uber" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on Risky Business

"Joe Sullivan the former chief security officer of has been charged with obstruction of justice. . His fight yet with companies finding out to notify regulators about it's two thousand sixteen dodge. . We covered this time. . This was the story where you know a couple of hackers breach some systems over I think they they <hes>. . We're going off the individual employees, , get accounts soffer. . Then using that defined aws creates enough of things like that and then breaking into corporate environments, , stealing some data and trying to ransom. . And Yeah, this , <hes> this pair of individuals went after Uber got a whole bunch of daughter out an an Uber Paid D'Amato quote unquote bounty to delete the daughter and said they do make. . Legitimate stuff and we talked about it at the time and it was a little bit Kinda unclear exactly. . How it unfolded. . It was when we didn't see details about what happened until I think it was a year or two later was the change of leadership at Hoover. . Then the details came out and yeah that's always been grinding its way through the Aj since then and yes, , the guy finally charged. . The people go pretty mixed opinions about about this 'cause. . You Know Bug bounties and ransoming I'm being held hostage and all those things are they exist on a continuum I'm yeah and those little bit of wiggle on on on the spectrum. . Well, , there's a little bit of wiggle and then there's this happen here. . And mean at the time I've gone back and I've listen to a two thousand seventeen report I actually had an uber supergrass feeding me Info on that one, , right. . So it was <hes> that was a report and it has actually held up pretty well. . So what basically happened is that someone got into Esra bucket by as you say, , you know targeting like a private get pulling a secret out and getting in there grabbed a whole bunch of data and then tried to shake down the company, , and this is where it gets interesting because essentially what they did is they use that payment process. . Well, , this is what we reported in twenty seven. . They use that pilot process to try to essentially docks the attack is now it looks from my reading of the DOJ complains it looks like they didn't actually successfully dachshund through that process, , but we're able to a couple months later and I'm not sure if that's because they split the payments because I think they paid off up front and then off again but but look into the day was actually able to figure out the identity of the attack is they physically sent off to. . Their their residents and made them sign about a bunch of documents and they retrieved the computers forensically a them and to prove that the data was gone but the point is like once that docs them there was no way. . These guys were going to do anything with that data because they would be dimed immediately. . Right. . So that seems like a pretty good dot com. . But where they really screwed up is they did not actually report this to regulate all the FBI end these went on to target companies, , which is also something we reported. . In, , two thousand seventeen. . Now, , what makes this particularly egregious in the view? ? The DOJ is that Erba was in the middle of an F. T. C. investigation revolving around a twenty four fourteen data breach and the reason, , the FCC. . So Cranky, , about this is that also involved accessing Dada in S. three buckets. . So the DOJ is arguing that this was a cover up on the part of Yuba and when you read through the the complaints. . The criminal complaints it looks like a reasonable argument eyesight look they prepared as for the attackers which got them to acknowledge that they never downloaded rubel Datta. When . clearly they did further that one hundred thousand dollars was way more than they paid for any other bugs. . We actually have some audio here from the US Attorney for the northern district of California. . David Anderson Talking about the Sullivan indictment here he is Sullivan did not report the twenty sixteen hack after quired. . Instead Sullivan Hid the twenty sixteen hack from the public and the FTC. . Under Solvents Direction overpaid the twenty sixteen hackers one hundred thousand dollars in Bitcoin in return for promises not to tell anyone about their hack Sullivan disguised payment by calling it. . A Bug bounty of bug bounty can be illegitimate means of compensating so-called white hat hacker who has discovered a security breach but has not exploited. . It is not a bug bounty to pay a hacker who has taken your data and is threatening to expose it. . Sullivan's desperation to hide the twenty sixteen hack is revealed by the size of a payment. . The fact that it was paid to the hackers before he. . Even learned of their true names. . After the Twenty Sixteen Payment Sullivan reviewed and approved statements to the F. T. C. that failed to reveal the two thousand sixteen hack. . When Uber hired new management in twenty seventeen Sullivan deceived them also in their guilty pleas the admitted to hacking other companies using similar techniques to those used in the Uber Hack If Sullivan had promptly reported the Uber Hack those other acts of those other companies may have been prevented at this point. . My prediction is Joe. . Sullivan's going to have a pretty hard time. . Sydney win it's laid out like it is in the complaint does you know thous- look kind of compelling them and you can argue that the outcome that they that Yuba got you know for their customers data was perhaps in the end somewhat of success right? ? That didn't end up. . On the underground somewhere. . But yeah, , laid out like it is it. . It looks Kinda scammy. . And Yeah I'm probably

CTO Casey Ellis Adam VP Uber Eighties Hoover Gray. Joe Sullivan aws D'Amato Aj ESPN officer
"uber" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Just just you know Polish off what's already there exactly now and it was never really promoted particularly effectively or well. So I. Agree with you. It does need a little bit of work but in a sense essentially, what makes it different from Uber is Uber and lift centrally control the pricing, right so Uber Uber and lift also centrally control the distribution of the The rides, right. So they they somebody requests a ride. They send out the request to the nearest driver to the person who's sending the request. So they've a system, their system does work pretty well, but they ultimately set the rates. So Uber looks at the market and says, all right. Well, we're we look the cab companies are charging this amount or the government mandates this for calves. So we're going to price slightly below that, and then we're going to give drivers seventy five percent of the revenue and deal. Okay. Here we are with cell four, one one, you can set your own rates. So you can actually have competition for rate within the same APP. So if one person wants to drive for. Next. To nothing they can, and there's no one else that can stop them from doing that because ultimately the APP doesn't take a cut of the sail at all. So the driver keeps full amount of the the fair they can collect whatever fare payment they want. They WANNA take Crypto, they can take Crypto, they could take gold goldilocks wherever take goal bax. they can take cash can take credit card whatever they're prepared to accept so there so it's decentralized in that the driver's decide to rate and the driver's decide how they get paid But of course, there is still the centralization that the APP is an APP and yeah, you know that sort of thing. So I'm sure that some of that can. Throughout impossible. Sure no doubt about. Well you know. I mean there is a centralization to some degree You know when it comes to all absent in the sense that the download the APP to someone that from the APP store generally unless you know what you're doing of course, right? So there you go that's the latest on the Uber lift controversy. We will continue to follow this closely because it is real bad news. For the idea of being contractor and just having the state come right in and rip your contract up and rip it out from underneath you and say now everything's.

Uber
"uber" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"uber" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"New legislation could put the brakes on the GIG economy last Monday a California Superior Court judge ruled that rideshare companies Uber and Lyft must reclassify drivers from independent contractors to employees. . The companies are appealing that decision but if the ruling stands Uber and lift would have to add thousands of drivers to their payrolls and offer them benefits like healthcare paid sick leave vacation the companies say the additional cost would jeopardize their businesses. . The ruling is the result of California's a B five law a b five, , which took effect in January. . It was the first of a series of labor bills that have cropped up around the country in states like. . New York New Jersey Illinois and others, , and there's a proposed federal version to the laws are well intentioned ms classified workers are a big problem. . Nationwide some companies pay fulltime workers as independent contractors to avoid the cost of payroll taxes, , health insurance, , sick leave, , or vacation time so-called ten, , ninety, nine , workers named for the irs form businesses file to report the income they paid aren't covered by most labor laws. . So these workers don't get minimum wage overtime, , medical leave or other protections but how do you determine which category you fall into a b five uses the so-called ABC. . Test to determine whether an individual is an independent contractor or employee. . Basically if the company controls most of how you work or provide your equipment or office, , you're an employee, , and if you work in the company's quote primary business like say being a driver for a ride share company urine employees to. . But pushback on ABC test legislation strong critics like the US Chamber of Commerce say the test is antiquated. . It was developed in the nineteen thirties when people were offices or factories. . The ABC test also doesn't consider the increase in freelance and independent work that technology has enabled as result. . The vague language could also apply to workers like freelance writers, , musicians, , and even lawyers who work independently and from task rabbit to Insta- cart virtually no GIG worker platform would be spared from the laws. . There's another issue too many people choose to work as independent contractors and GIG workers. . They like being their own bosses they can turn down work when they feel like it take medications when they want to and create their own dress code try doing that with typical employer for Uber and live. . The ruling is just the latest batch of bad news. . Both companies have been struggling during the pandemic people are staying home more. . So they need fewer rights, , which means the rideshare companies need drivers in. . February Uber announced that it would lay off roughly thirty five. . Hundred employees. . The workers got the news during a zoom call according to Forbes. . Oh, , the irony in April lift laid off about one thousand employees and furloughed about three hundred more even Uber's news. . The expansion of its food delivery Business Uber eats isn't all that great as food deliveries have grown uber eats has surged more than double the size of Obama's ride business but overeat still isn't profitable. . Uber is attempting to boost its margins through consolidation according to a Yahoo Finance report last year it acquired food delivery company post meets to bolster its delivery business. . Last Wednesday. . Both companies announced that the California ruling could force them to suspend operations in the Golden State at least for a few months, , California makes up more than ten percent of each company's gross bookings marketwatch reports. . That revenue loss would be yet another speed bump for the rideshare companies during an already rocky year for now uber and left we'll wait for the results of their appeal. . Hoping another judge will shift gears on the ruling. .

Uber ABC Business Uber irs California US Chamber of Commerce David Brown Portland Apple Elaine Appleton Obama Forbes Leonardo Pez executive producer spotify Yahoo Marshall Louis Emma
"uber" Discussed on Reset

Reset

09:42 min | 2 years ago

"uber" Discussed on Reset

"There is a problem with sexual misconduct in the GIG. Economy that this utopia of peer to peer work is not not the utopia that they've made it out to be and that this is something that needs to be addressed that these workers are vulnerable Alexandria. Ravanelli Tom is a sociologist. At the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and the author of the Book Hustling Gig struggling and surviving in the sharing economy. In her book. She writes about how the sharing economy is an umbrella term that includes everything from craigslist and Ebay to Uber and task rabbit and the GIG economy. Konami is what happens when a person signs up to perform services for other people through an APP that means the Dog Walker who uses rover and the task rabbit who puts together right Kia furniture and the driver for Uber or lift Alexandria used interviews with economy workers to illustrate. How vulnerable these workers? Here's our because of the nature of the GIG economy itself. I asked Alexandria what she thought of Uber. Safety reporting. So so the Uber's safety report is a start About a year ago Uber said that they were going to be issuing this report in twenty nineteen and when they talked about the report in twenty eighteen they said it was going to have more than twenty different categories of sexual misconduct. Everything for Leering. All the way up to nonconsensual touching touching and nonconsensual penetration and the report that they just released only has five categories in it. They've left out the leering. They've left out the propositioning opposition in and in my research. That's the type of thing that happens. Is highly prevalent in the GIG. Economy is sexual misconduct. More likely in sort of a GIG economy job than in other workplaces we do know from some studies done a freelancers that they seem to have a very high level of sexual harassment and in part because anything sort of goes in the GIG. Economy workers have told me that it's like a jungle out. There is like the wild west there are or no protections for the workers and we also have the company's presenting this as a peer to peer environment and so- workers aren't going coming in prepared to experience sexual harassment. They're not expecting it to happen. And so when it happens and ends up being very surprising for them have you actually heard of of specific stories of this nature. So I'm doing follow up interviews right now with the workers I interviewed for Hustle and Gig. I have a task. Grab it worker. Who was hired to take photographs for somebody? They're linked in profile. Seems like a really simple job takes the photographs outside. The woman says. Oh you know what. This isn't really what I wanted. These are actually from my dating profile. Okay brings him back to her. -partment turns out. She wants boudoir photos. Oh Oh actually turns out. She wants him and then she throws herself on him and starts very much nonconsensual touching and then I have other workers offers. Who told me about being propositioned for threesomes and cooking in a client's home while the client has very loud sex in the other room room because they feel like they can have an exhibition? This type of situation you know. It's interesting because I know a lot of people who work in the restaurant industry and a lot of these stories are kind of the sound familiar to me but the difference here is that we're talking about very intimate places. We're talking about people's homes. Were talking about cars places that are outside of view. Does that play a role that absolutely plays a role when you are operating behind closed doors in a private location an anything goes you are incredibly vulnerable. And you're even more vulnerable because in the GIG economy. These workers are rated and reviewed. And so if you find find yourself in a bad situation you have to figure out a way to get out of that situation to protect yourself and also protect your reputation on that platform so the photographer talk for for instance who finds himself being touched by his client has to come up with a nice way to let her down easy so that she doesn't Ding him on the APP and so he doesn't have her calling the APP and complaining about him and he ends up being deactivated. Okay so when I have a problem at work I can go to my boss I can go to. HR A lot of these companies talk about drivers being able to sort of be their own boss. So who's responsible. Offer keeping writers and drivers safe so yes the all these platforms talk about entrepreneurship for the masses. And it's going to be fantastic and a a lot of these workers would really like an open door. HR Policy Accountability according to the platforms. The drivers are accountable and and the passengers are accountable and the platforms are not really accountable. Because they're just a marketplace and they're just bringing people together and they're not in the a car but I think that the platforms really should be held accountable for this. You know if it wasn't for Uber if it wasn't for lift we wouldn't have people stepping into the car of a stranger. We wouldn't have people allowing strangers to get into their car so what does giving protections to Uber drivers a look like does that necessarily mean in not treating them as contractors anymore. I think so I think actually that would be the easiest solution to start treating these drivers and other gig workers as W. Two employees. You know one of the things that I say in Hustling Gig is that we've seen a rolling back of generations of workplace protections through through this move to independent contractors. The GIG economy is truly a movement forward to the past. We have workers kersh. Who if they get injured on the job? They're on their own. They're not getting contributions to social security. They don't qualify for any type of paid time off. Aw family leave sick leave etc.. Essentially they're back in the same situation and their great great grandparents were in in the factories and in the slaughter houses says the image. That comes to mind so often when I'm doing this. Research is actually an image out of Upton Sinclair's the jungle where all the workers run the risk of getting getting injured and yet they're still clamoring at the gates because we've seen wage stagnation and they are desperate for additional sources of income. So where does the government's it's responsibility lion all of this. So regulations are not always the answer but some regulation is definitely the answer here definitely like you are certain that this is the way. Yes yes I do not trust the platforms to self regulate to be fair. I think that's not just the platforms. I think that we need government government to take an active role on this. We need to see More cracking down on misclassification of workers. We need to see workers being you can give in workplace protections classified his W. Two employees. We need to see more attention. Paid to how the companies are protecting their workers. The reaction to the Uber Safety report largely had to do with writers people. Were really concerned about what it means to be vulnerable person in the backseat of one of these cars. US When you look at that reaction what comes to mind if you are vulnerable as a passenger getting into the car of a stranger singer and you do that maybe once twice a day a couple of times a week. How much more vulnerable is the driver? Who has their back to the passenger and who is doing this for hours of each and every week and they are out there with you know protections the no one looking out for them what these writers have experienced some of them have experienced rape some experienced terrible sexual assaults these things? These are horrible and really serious and important. I am curious though in reading this report and seeing that both riders and drivers are experiencing some of these of these cases of sexual assault. What does it tell you about? Society that what we're focusing on specifically writers more so the drivers it tells us that these drivers are considered expendable by not just the platforms but also by some of the customers customers and that they are invisible that no one is really paying attention to the challenges that they experience because the challenges that workers workers experience in the GIG economy are huge and they are astounding and they include sexual assault and sexual harassment and involvement in criminal activity activity and physical injury and then even economic ruin if they get deactivated from these platforms after investing time or money in building a life for themselves on these platforms. You know. The the work of these workers is So dangerous and they also run the risk of getting sort of stuck in the GIG economy. Because it's difficult if you've been driving uber for four four or five years to then go back into the job market and try to get a job that will let you use your college degree in English or do something that will allow you to move into another occupation.

Uber harassment Alexandria University of North Carolina C Konami craigslist Tom assault Upton Sinclair Kia Ebay rape
"uber" Discussed on Reset

Reset

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"uber" Discussed on Reset

"In reading. This study was the emphasis. That Uber put on It's use of background checks for drivers. It Uber seemed to suggest that their background check process was extensive sensitive. I'm wondering though if more than half of these assaults aren't being reported to law enforcement what does that tell us about the strength of the background check system system in general in the background. Check thing again. One of the things. That Uber has taken heat on for years and years and years is the fact that they don't include biometrics in their background checks. So there's no fingerprint. Option that they're that they're using no they don't do a fingerprint background checks they never have and it's something that you you know. People have been on them for years and years of trying to do in this state regulator here in California says that they don't think that the fingerprint fingerprint background check is necessary. There are a lot of people who have represented victims. In these cases disagreeing there are people on Capitol Hill who want fingerprint An Uber has chosen not to do it. The way they background check They look at a driver's driving history. And then they look into Public Records in court records to see you know no if they have any convictions And they do that on a rolling basis so they're trying to catch any kind of New Incidents that occur. And and so what. I think the work around the Uber is talking about doing for. This is sharing a list of deactivated drivers with other other. Ride hailing company so that you know if an incident is reported to them about driver they don't take it to law enforcement but they knew who that driver is they'll turn around to lift and say hey you know. We have a credible report sexual assault against this driver. You Might WanNa consider deactivating them as well and how should I think about Uber wanting to do this because my reaction to that is. Why weren't they doing this earlier? You know that's a very good question. I mean I think the history of this company and a lot of tech companies I think is just the they didn't anticipate some of the real world risks. They were introducing with their products. You know in this. This rolled out. Your option is if anything happened to you during an Uber Ride. You could leave that driver one-star that was sort of Recourse and right you know is that sufficient to protect against all of the kind of real world harms that happens when strangers together. I don't think so Okay and by the way have do any other ridesharing APPs do this. Currently no there's sharing of the driver information between the companies at this point. How does somebody hearing this? Take in the fact that there is no other report to compare this to we. We are talking about rides. We are talking about people getting in cars with people that they do not know. Is it weird that there hasn't been a safety report like this before I I think it is. We are the no one has really looked at this in a comprehensive way before. But you know I do. I do give Uber Credit for doing I think you know especially given sort of the the PR beating. They've been through in the last couple of years. I can understand looking at these numbers and being like these are not gonNa look good for us. Let's never talk about them in public. So you know the fact. They have kind of tried to focus on safety that they've put. I think you know almost two years of effort into producing this report and counting. In these cases they do get credit for that and now this is out there and creates a benchmark so and other companies. Hopefully start to come forward about these numbers. You have something to compare it to. So if I'm the person who uses Uber on a regular basis or lift how should I be thinking about this report. I I can't help but find it just really hard to sort of figure out. Should I feel safer now. Should I feel less safe. That's a good question and you know as a writer. I don't think it changes my sense of safety very much. It does give a sense to me. That Uber is at least interested. Interested in looking at this issue and trying to figure out what to do about it. But you know you also have to think about what it took in Uber's history to kind of force them to this point right right you know. There's so many of these sexual assault cases some of them very high profile Uber went through an incredibly damaging year in two thousand seventeen with a number of safety issues. And you you know it took an immense amount of public pressure and the ouster of their CEO to get them to this point where they said okay like maybe. Let's take a clear look at safety and I think that's that's an issue at Uber and throughout the tech industry again at these companies not really thinking through the real world implications of what they're doing and only looking at the cool tap you know this is also. I suspect a problem in a bunch of this sort of so called GIG economy companies. You know. I'm sure that food delivery services have this problem AIRBNB. He has safety issues all the time. Yes and I don't think that any of these companies have really started to grapple with that yet like this. I hope is the beginning of that but you know I. It's taken a very long time to get your. I'm a lot of these companies who've been around for nearly a decade at this point so that's the takeaway okay from Uber Safety reports and since its release. It's caused a stir because writers are worried about their safety but what hasn't received as much attention is what what this report means for Uber Drivers after the break. My discussion with a researcher who spent a lot of time talking to Uber Drivers about the risks. They run when they just tried to do their jobs. This is reset so I have recently started receiving a quite a few holiday cards from friends and family. The and it's been really nice because I get a bunch of updates about what they've been up to I get to laugh at their crazy holiday sweaters and I get to check out their haircuts haircuts and just see you know what are they look like right now. I personally really really enjoy that. So if you haven't gotten around to sending holiday cards yet you can still. We'll do that. There is still time you can do it at vistaprint dot com and actually. It doesn't take much time at all. You can go on the website. They have a bunch of designs that you can pick from and your satisfaction satisfaction is one hundred percent guaranteed or they'll make it right either by reprinting your order or by offering you a refund so this season make the people around you. Happy by going to vistaprint DOT COM with up to fifty percent off all holiday cards and photo calendars plus great deals on photo gifts at vistaprint. SPRINT DOT com. Just enter the Promo Code Reset fifty. That's vistaprint dot Com Promo Code Reset fifty. The offer expires on January fifth breath. If you have a business on the side you probably want to market it. You Probably WanNa get the word out and just help people people understand what you're trying to do. Maybe you're an artist. Maybe you're an entrepreneur. Whatever it is you can jump Start Your Business and your brand by building your audience using the all in one marketing platform from Milton? It has everything you need all in one place to give your new business the strongest start with the right marketing. When when you're ready to get your hustle off the ground start with Milton? Milton makes it easy because it offers things like a website builder and scheduled social posts any marketing. Crm Tool that helps give your brand and online presence and keeps your followers engaged and give you more time to focus on the business itself. So if if you're ready to be your own boss but you're still asking yourself now. What start with mail chimp? That's what learn more about the all in one marketing platform at mail. Tim Dot Com..

Uber Uber Safety Uber Drivers assault writer vistaprint DOT COM Milton California AIRBNB CEO researcher
"uber" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"uber" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"For uber Mike thanks a lot appreciate each time thank you so much K.. we of course have an excerpt for you the bit Mike was talking about for expanding into Portland by hook or by crook it's at our website market place that order. there's a story about how the economic times they are A. Changin the top ten companies in this economy the mainstays the reliable should have been pretty constant right the likes of G. E. in I. B. M. Exxon Mobil as well until this weekend that is as of this weekend for the first time since nineteen twenty five Exxon Mobil is not in the top ten anymore as tallied by the good people at standard and poor's yet another indicator that old school oil and gas companies to start the corporate Titans they once might have been from the sustainability test market places Katong has that one we're number twelve Exxon Mobil won't be chanting that but it has been leapfrog by visa and Procter and gamble on the S. and P. top ten list no it's still a huge company but a decade ago Exxon Mobil went on a run of six straight years at number one today's rankings are topped by Microsoft apple and Amazon here's independent investment strategist ed Yardeni energy is simply not this sector that had been in our economy it's relatively small meanwhile other sectors of been growing very rapidly like technology of course financials are large as his health care for decades ago energy companies made up twenty five percent of the S. and P. five hundred index now it's four percent these days oil prices are soft and energy stocks are under performing especially Exxon Mobil says Amy Myers Jaffe at the council on foreign relations back in the day Exxon Mobil was considered a blue chip that was a must have but in recent years it has not been well performing she says some big investors consider all oil companies exposed to climate change risk and that fossil fuel use will taper but mark stoical the CEO at Adams funds as any energy transition will take decades the notion that electric vehicles or wind or solar. is going to take away a lot of demand the numbers really just don't play out that way especially over the next ten or fifteen years stoical expects energy laggards in the market to come back given.

Adams ed Yardeni Amazon Microsoft CEO Amy Myers Jaffe Mike Procter Katong Titans Exxon Mobil B. M. Exxon Mobil G. E. Portland
"uber" Discussed on Equity

Equity

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"uber" Discussed on Equity

"Even it's not quite Uber scale money. And I think that's pointing out. And then I I was pulling numbers. Uber. Had I think it was. Yes, they had seven point nine billion of Uber eats gross bookings for the year ended December thirty one twenty eighteen and two point six billion of that came in the fourth quarter. And that's a lot of burritos. But it's an impressive stocks. That shows Google has a second business that will do over ten billion in total from spend next this year. That's huge. Yeah. I mean, I got I imagined that was part of their big pitch to investors in this sort of run up to the IPO since the growth they're having outside of ride hailing. Yeah, here's a question though. And I haven't actually figured out the answer. This may be done question. But we point out that Uber's kind of net revenue slow to a crawl from Q three to q four presumably, you know, ubereats grew quite a lot. We know it's two point six billion out of seven point nine. In Q four does. I mean that right. Haley may have actually shrunk in Q four compared to Q three like a sequential decline. I I'm gonna look at the numbers and decline in revenues in booking sequential decline in net revenue from ride hailing in particular because revenue was essentially flat. Uber eats went up materially. And that means that right? Helen play when I mean, it's it's highly possible. But you have to look at all the other businesses that running within like where they're spending going at Thomas vehicles, fry like, I I don't know. But that's possible. I would say leaning toward unlikely moving toward likely. Okay. Well, our petitions tend to be wrong on the show. So I'm going to go the Cates view of that one. 'cause I'm over my skis a little bit. But can you tell us about Corinne? Yeah. So we thought this was interesting. It does take note in the s one that there's a possibility that Hoover's acquisition of Kareem will not close. This is however in the risk factor summary, which is the part of the one where the company basically is like here's all the reasons why we might fail. And why we really suck. But like actually these are all extremely unlikely scenarios. So Uber's acquisition of cream is in the process of closing right now. But I think they have to be clear that you know, they don't they can't see the future. So there's a possibility at won't close and in which case that would stunt Uber's growth because Uber acquired corium in a deal that was just essentially purchasing growth in the Middle Eastern market where they don't operate a right healing business at all. I mean, Uber really was have exposure to the entire world, and they are not gonna stop until they have. I mean, they wanna be a world dominating company. They wanted to lead the world and ride hailing either through minority stakes majority stakes or their own business itself. It's still very cautious. And I think I won't talk about adjusted losses really quick. And then we're gonna talk about complexity, and then we're gonna leave you alone. That's the plan for this show. So if you are following along at home role with me to page ninety in your S one document, and if you're still scrolling that's because I am too. Welcome to live taping in the bottom of that page..

Uber Google Hoover Haley Cates Corinne Middle Eastern Helen ubereats Kareem
"uber" Discussed on Invested: The Rule #1 Podcast

Invested: The Rule #1 Podcast

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"uber" Discussed on Invested: The Rule #1 Podcast

"No matter how much you know about it. You don't have enough to know. It's still at that early stage. Uber not don't eat. Nothing. Like uber. You don't buy stuff. That's coming public to get the money to survive and to build its market that's pure crap shoot that is a straight up and by the way, they're going to price it through the roof. So high the price and it really high because the the private equity guys don't wanna put the money in at that new valuation. They're ready to get out there ready to bail and say, look, you wanna take to the next level. It's all you because we're outta here. We we took it as far as we could. We don't wanna put any more money in at these sky, high valuations with a negative cash flow company now. You take. Let's take it from smart money to dining that's a lot of conjecture. I think that they can you on privately they want to. Oh, I don't know. I don't know at the price. They're laying out on this company. I mean, who I take take I don't know that much. I don't even know. Round of capital was at such a high price that there really isn't much choice other than to go public from here on out because here's why Honey if you're in venture capital, you're demanding essentially that you see a forty to fifty percent compound rate of return in every investment you make because you know, some are not gonna do right? Right in order to justify that kind of risk. You've got to come out above twenty percent if you're doing well. Right. And the good ones. Do they don't come out at forty. They come out at twenty right? Twenty twenty-five make about what Buffett mix. So in order to get there. You gotta you gotta see every deals gonna make you forty to fifty percent compounded per year. And so when you're coming in these last stages of a company like Uber. There's no way to see that. It's very hard can't grow the company that it's true. It's true. It's very hard. And yet, I would guess that Uber can get some investors if they want to which is what they've been doing. They could have gone public two years ago, if they were so desperate for money, and they didn't they could have gone last year. They didn't because more vehicles. They were going through these these terrible PR situations and real-life situations. And they didn't want to go public at a lower value than they thought they could. So they waited to sort of write their house and put everything in order and. And now they've got a new CEO and they have a chief privacy officer. They're like you're going to catch some late mezzanine investors in the in the hedge fund world who are going to say. All right. Yeah. We'll we'll pop in at this valuation..

chief privacy officer Buffett CEO fifty percent twenty percent two years