31 Burst results for "UTA"

"uta" Discussed on The Angry Therapist Podcast

The Angry Therapist Podcast

05:44 min | 2 months ago

"uta" Discussed on The Angry Therapist Podcast

"And then it just was like, sometimes you know it's time to go. You know, you know when it's time to go. And the woman who runs new leaf literary, I had known for years. And she had said to me, do you ever, she said, if I know you when the first acquisition happened when UTA bought the smaller agency I was working for, she we had drinks and she said, if I know you, you want to try UTA. And if you don't like it, we'd love to have you over at new leaf. And how nice is that, right? To be to have an established relationship with somebody to be and what feels like uncharted territory, like things were fine. And then they were different. You know about mergers. You know, everyone tells you that everything's fine, and it's kind of like, is it fine though? Well, also, UTA, CAA, WME. WME, these big agencies, I can imagine you going from working intimately and having your space to now kind of getting thrown into the ocean and feeling, you know, whatever lost or overwhelmed or whatever happens behind the scenes. But yeah, I mean, people can get lost and also, that may not have been your thing, you know? Other than that. It was different. I mean, you're not wrong. It was different, but me the energy that I have and I'm always seeing something as an opportunity. Like people were feeling nervous when the acquisition happened. And I understand that. And I felt that energy, and I saw that energy, and I felt a little bit of myself, but I thought, you know what? I know what I do. They didn't UTA didn't have a book department. They had some people that did book to film, but they didn't have a dedicated book department. And I thought, you know what? I know what I do. That is an incredible pool of people. I can absolutely sell books, like they have huge names. So I took it upon myself to, you know, find out who represented who and introduce myself to people and maybe I had a couple of situations where editors knew that I was working at UTA and said, oh, do you think so and so we'll do a book. And then I was like, so if I could get it going both ways where I had an editor in a house asking me about a UTA client and then I could introduce myself to that the agent who was in LA and say like, hey, I'm here..

WME UTA CAA LA
"uta" Discussed on Trading Secrets

Trading Secrets

06:25 min | 5 months ago

"uta" Discussed on Trading Secrets

"Pick me, you know? But I knew I was good at it and I was dedicated to it, so I believed in myself. I took a lot of advice. I sat down with people. I humbled myself to learn when I didn't know stuff. But more than anything, I think it's just having a passion for it and yeah, I was not worrying about making money up front. And I think anyone starting a business. And my podcast, I look at it as a business. And investing in your product and investing in the front end and making sure it's a quality product that people will love and come back for. It was important in all aspects of business. And I wanted to create a show that people would give a chance to. I figured they'd give a chance to fucking batch a person. I'd do a swipe up on my Instagram like fuck it. You know. Are they gonna come back? Yeah. You know, everyone listened to it once. And so I was focused on that and I figured if it works, the money will come if it doesn't, I'll move on. And I just think a combination of all those things, whereas the secret sauce, you know? That's fair. Do you think either being extremely critical or polarizing or super opinionated helps drive the engagement with episodes? Yeah, I mean, I definitely think in podcasting I like being liked as much as the next person, but one of my agents at UTA when I signed with, like, what do you like to do? What are you good at? I'm like, I'm going to give an opinion. I'm good at having a thought and I know how to articulate my thought. I don't say things I don't mean, but I'm not afraid to say things, even if I think people might disagree. In fact, I like playing devil's advocate. Especially when it comes to recapping the fucking bachelor. I know how that show works. I know what the show is trying to get the audience to think. I know the show tries to sometimes. They want the people to think both sides. But there are often times that I see the audience going one direction, and I'm not necessarily disagreeing with them. I just want to be able to point out and then articulate what it's the why, right? I like asking why I like explaining why. I think a lot of people when they get asked and answered questions, they just take things at face value. Like looking into the weeds, and why do we think what we think? Let's discuss it. Let's break it down. I think that kind of analytical mindset in my brain has served me well in this space, you know? And at the risk of people saying, well, I don't agree with that. I will still be willing to have that discussion anyways..

UTA
"uta" Discussed on Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

"Thinking oh she says. I'm has anybody directed you in this. We know now. Of course we didn't even know what the right answer was supposed to be. But we said like no. We've just worked on us together like we have been tolls and she says rice. Yeah it's just that. I hate this. Play christ brilliant. We're screwed. She says i hate display. But you've done an absolutely brilliant job. You're both straight into the class notes. And then she said to me. And i want you might danced. Shakespeare classes very nice. I don't you know what. I mean all these years later. And that's like one of the highlights of my career. I know still kind of like. Ooh like i was on fire after this and then being in her classroom the respect for the work like you just knew that you were you were doing you. Were doing important. Work acting was important work and it was taken hugely seriously and we all worked really hard and you put your you want to do your seen every week and not everybody got a chance to do. They're seeing every week. And so you live early and you put your name on a list. And she'd worked through the list of scenes and am and if you didn't if you didn't get if you name was on the list but you didn't get then you knew that you're going to be top of the list. Those last six people would be top of next week's list and she would she would you'd finish and she'd go. I i have been listening in your your ear. Would hear whether she was scratching out words or whatever in writing and then she'd say how do you feel when i first heard this. I thought oh. My god i to how i feel. I don't know what's up just on this. I don't want an irish big because she was a real believable nas kind of.

Shakespeare next week six people first both one christ highlights irish
"uta" Discussed on Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

"Like things you know when you're watching television and my husband laughs at me now because as soon as somebody picks up a suitcase will will nearly say he'll premium me going well. There's nothing that soukous or the folding of laundry they're like okay. They're gonna have a big ding dong like. Let's let's give them something to do their folding laundry and the most roguish folding. I just i don't need it. Yeah yeah berlet. I know i was going to ask. My brain was full of questions a second ago. And of course now i've gone. My mind has gone blank. What was i going to ask you next. And so. I know what i was gonna ask you next. I was going to ask you about the about the actual experience of like working with mahogany. And just what is she like as a person or well. I get quick nostalgic. I'm died in two thousand four. They she had a nineteen ninety six at the age of what she's seventy six. She had she come back on. Broadway play called. Mrs claim and i hard may i. I got to see her. And she was a tour de force and then She worked she kept working and she was amazing. Now in terms of her of being in her class okay. So you know what i hadn't you you said to me earlier did you hear about. I think you have got to study that. No i didn't know who to hug. Laws are allies. Spivak are or anything. So i just i just followed the trail so alison come to new york train with me. I trained with haagen. She teaches here. At the hb studio. You should go and train with her. You get there. You can't just train back in the day you couldn't just train with user. You had to earn your own the right to audition for users class right well. That's what i did. I started training with the flu program of classes there and ultimately worked my way up to the point where you had recommendations mother teachers which meant that you could then apply to audition for class and then you Dishes for the class and you had to do. I suppose it was two minutes. Maybe was three minutes of a scene and you had a scene partner so i had a friend of mine at least cogan. She wanted audition as well. As i'll tell you what will seem together. We both audition. Who will use the scene. And we auditioned using seen from cal. Churchill's top girls and he was all very m so respectful and this was like ms haagen. Nobody called ruta. She's probably turning in the grave of me going on about this. She was misogony right. So you know you had your time and you from the minute you crossed the threshold. I think it was ten minutes to get in. Set up your stuff to your seeing does a an out again you know and hp studio had this fantastic. I loved us. They had loads of set everything on wheels. So that beat roberts and and beds and doorways and everything so you could easily recreate for the purposes of these exercise. You could easily recreate your own bedroom living room. Whatever you were trying to create a stock whatever so subsequently spent in and we had pared down. We had one bench chairs journal an cushion. We did our scene and to would. She scratched being dude here. The hinge sit in a corner as a desk with her dog and her cigarettes smokes like a train and she had this kind of voice. You can only get relief from smoking. That fabulously gravelly ross. Speed voice and sheets Actue and then when we did the audition and she said.

new york two minutes seventy six claim three minutes two thousand four nineteen ninety six Broadway ten minutes hp studio one bench both Spivak berlet alison ruta second ago hb studio haagen cal.
"uta" Discussed on Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

"Because we're a bit longer in the tooth acting malarkey that that's essential and but i remember when i started out and certainly when i have students in front of me and you have this thing where they they may be there. They might decide that they're exercises. They're just coming in from their hallway to their kitchen making a cup of tea and they're going back out again. That's that's it. That could be the exercise. What i find the until the list an and applied but they need to apply. They're making a cup of tea like vick think they make win. In morning when they're rushing to work are on a thursday night before eastenders starts. Whatever the is. I remember it. It wasn't hugging workshop. Or anything. But i remember being in a workshop ab louis love it was giving and he leads instruction to us was just just come into the room and sit on a chair and you think like what i'm sorry wash but then of course you do it and you realize oh hang on. It's actually not as easy to just walk in and said chair with all of these people watching. Yeah so i just so it's it is to be able to walk in and sit in a chair like a normal person in a private moment as if there's nobody looking at you which of course what actress. I'm trying to do all the time when the chair or make a cup of tea. So she's also then it sounds as if it's it's it it it sounds like it's a technique that is also focused on you know in advert tacoma's bringing yourself fully to a role. Totally chosen is see. I suppose i. I very first. Training was with an hbo studio. I'm actually. Let's talk about that as well so did you. Did you hear about hygiene and go right off to new york to study with are how did this..

new york thursday night first ab louis
"uta" Discussed on Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

"With everything. Because as well as the ten exercises i mean a lot of people have heard of the six steps which are six questions to ask yourself before. Every role seen audition. What am i find. A lot of people know them or at least think they know them. It would be around like who am i. What's my name. where am from. 'em how old am i. What time of year is it. What's the weather like is a day or night is a two o'clock in the morning or a ten past to what was wednesday wednesday the fifteenth of june am. Where have i just come from. Where my what to expect to happen. Next was a might home. I in relationship which she talks about relationships. She means all your relationships so micom i in relation to myself in this scene. How am i in relation to this pain. Does this pen main is is mine is at somebody else's did they leave it to steal. Did i borrow it. I have not a clue came from. Rundle's hotels apparently truthfully. So i'm getting the impression. She was big into specificity. Specificity all the way and rounded in your in your place place was right usually important to her so that one of the jokes of the jokes about hp students myself included was as you see we be. We'd be rehearsing these scenes and exercises at home in our own apartments or whatever and then you need to take with you to the studio the bits that you need so i'd have to bring my randall's pain and this car again and staff water buckland forever. You'd have a bunch of stuff that you would take with you to class and we used to look like them bag men and women right a friend of mine actually she. She was twenty. We had those shopping shepherd. Trolley things you know like you like 'em a new yorker has one of those you cannot go anywhere without but by a very good friend my iraj into clouds with thank god. I'm after being. I'm after being nearly abused on the way because she was coming. M h we studios down in in greenwich village and she was coming east village so she'll come across the city and she said she was posited lying to people you know and they all started having golder. She's like what the hell and just troubling pass with thing.

six questions two o'clock twenty six steps ten exercises new yorker fifteenth of june am greenwich village one iraj wednesday wednesday randall village Rundle hp ten
"uta" Discussed on Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on Acting Related - The MySite.Actor Podcast

"But i do know that m. Respect for acting came out. Which was the book. The first of the two books that came out after she started teaching both. I think it was away of of for her to share what had become har myth Like so he already sharing her methodology by teaching and now she was putting pen to paper trying to trying to put it insteps that an actor could actually apply it themselves. Were being out and so the what is. What is her technique. I can hear you saying what is her taking is. It's basically if you really boil it down. It is like how to be truthful. In imaginary circumstances no she started off in respect for acting saying how to be realistic ryan ori circumstances and then she said read somewhere that she was in the horrors then which he'd have she'd see some performance or something and the actor would be claiming to have been using approach. And she's no. That's not what i meant at all. Which is why she then A challenge for the actor to make it really clear what she meant because huge difference between being realistic and being truthful being realistic means i have to make an entrance stage left sweaty having run up the stairs despite my bad left hip rice dal to realistically what would you run up and down the stairs from the stage door to the whatever a few times and then enter actually of breath. That's that's that's realistic..

two books both first ryan ori
"uta" Discussed on Esports Minute

Esports Minute

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on Esports Minute

"All media podcasting and video programs. Please reach out to e-sports network CEO Mark to make using the email in the bio of the show. Let's start with face claim the United talent agency or UTA has sign off as claimed. They signed the entire organization UTA will work as agents for the organization and its wide roster of content creators and streamers previously individual members of faith in Nick mercs were already signed to UTA. But this new deal makes the scope much much larger UTA is already a massive agency. They represent some of the biggest celebrities in the world including Mariah Carey and her name Ford their list of musicians reads like a Coachella line-up on steroids and recently they put a big focused on gaming and Esports among the gaming influencers are disguised toast pokimane scump and many more off with this partnership with FaZe Clan UTA has signed on the biggest social media brand in Esports with tons of currently popular and also up-and-coming influencers across its roster now over an email and the publisher keeps boatloads of money is Q3 for fiscal year 2021 brought in a profit of 211 million dollars. That's actually a downswing from Q3 2024 revenues were up this year. It was profits that deal is still finding a ton of Success With The Ultimate Team mode. It doesn't seem like fans are at all tired of buying a $60 game and having to open packs to randomly find good players to fill out their squads. I'm a bit surprised especially because your entire roster then flips over the very next year. So it's like you spend all of this money on packs to get players and then everybody starts playing FIFA 2021 and it's all becomes worthless. So I didn't enjoy it but it doesn't seem like fans are at all tired of it good for ya. I guess if it's not broke don't fix it and also an ETA world. The acquisition of code-breakers was approved by shareholders this morning. It will go forward with acquiring the racing game developer for 1.2 billion dollars. That's Office episode of the Esports minute as always. I'll be back tomorrow at the top e Sports story of the day. It's just a few minutes..

UTA $60 Mariah Carey tomorrow 1.2 billion dollars Mark Nick mercs FIFA 2021 FaZe Clan Coachella 211 million dollars fiscal year 2021 this year next year Ford this morning Q3 2024 CEO Ultimate Team United
"uta" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Tickets book A flight today. Toe London, Paris, Madrid or anywhere else you want to go and pay a lot less guarantee. Call the international travel Department right now at low cost airlines 800 to 175107 800 to 175107 800 to 17517. That's 100 to 17 51 0767363 11 10. Let's go The phones 6 10 363 11. We go to Scott's Scott's going to Mississippi? Hey, Scott. Hello. Damn. Good morning. My My question is I have f or 83. I'm concerned about its feet from down like 50% in it. And I was thinking about selling it in buying E 67, which is also down about the same amount. And and I don't have that type of stock. What do you dog from that actually hang on the f 4 83 Or just would you sell it and buy something else besides eat 67. I wouldn't I wouldn't buy I wouldn't buy energy. What did you say What? 67 Yes, because because it was down about the same percentage in also producing pretty good. Yeah, produce. It's a good It's a good income stock. And if you don't have anything Um You know, in energy? I'm a little concerned about E 67 their financials right now and, frankly, with a little concerned about the energy sector in general. If we really have to wait until we feel that the elections are in fact final, So I don't know if I would want you to So here's the thing. It's kind of tough because the F 4 83 is a concern of mine. Should we have a bidet administration? So that's a bit of an issue a concern of mine that has been and I've been saying that for months now about that another one I also have the same concerns about the energy stocks. Under Abide administration. So my fear is that you could be jumping from the fire to the frying pan. And get Are you an income investor? You do this for income. Yes, I am in a block so much in my other income's gotta quit paying dividends and so much in those and I had to move to other incoming from start. Do you have utilities? I do. I have. I have Ah lot of utilities. But So for a free what would you recommend? I would recommend that you probably go get overloaded in utilities if you need the income. And do you own? Do you know that if you own ut 82 Man. I don't know which one idea, Okay, Uta Uta 82 is in a very expensive one. Fresh air. But I would probably look at U T 74 yu ti 82. I'd rather see you in something. That is going to give you more stability from income standpoint. Okay, That's what I need to know. Well, what one more question? Sure. No income investors. We really looking at large cat make.

Scott Uta Uta Toe London Paris international travel Departmen Mississippi
"uta" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"I think he's incredible, right but God. Joe gets is just like a totally different Beast like you look at his performance in elimination games like that guy is that guy is a chance to be like a top 30 player of all time. Whereas Rudy is going to go down as like one of the great Defenders but probably not a top one hundred player of all time off. So I thought in real time I thought really, you know, I think for when you look at what yogesh did to the Clippers and then they you know, what he was doing to the Lakers until they they figure some stuff out and kind of got him a little bit under control. I thought Rudy played yokich as well as anything. I did in the playoffs agree and I think out of the seven-game series I thought it was relatively Close like I thought Rudy outplayed yo, kitchen about two or three games. And then I think Joe gets kicked Rudy's ass and three or four games, but even that being said, You can still hit to to get two game-winners. In that seven-game series like the Jazz legit lost multiple games in that series because Rudy could not get one stop on yogesh and I still situation. Yeah the last four games for well now let's just do the whole series numbers for jokic cuz they're fucking outrageous twenty six 8 and 5 on 51 from the field 48 from 3:55 from the line. Like that's insane. Absolutely insane in the last four games of that series. It was 28 8 + $6,053.48 + 100% from the line like Andy made the game one or two of those games like right. I mean the guy is or one of the healing me the game winner in one of those games if I remember correctly. Just there's a there in a different here at the end of the day those two. Well joke is to me separated himself as without a question about Center in a week. Yeah. They should like us going into going into the 2021 NBA season like there's no question about a hundred percent. Yolk is just the best center in a week. And everybody else is vying for the number two spot. Yeah, like I even used to be someone that made the Joell embiid is better than ninja case that case does not exist anymore know it doesn't exist anymore. But I mean, I had all three I had I had Rudy jokic and and and embiid. You know basically in the same tier and there's like okay for whatever you whatever you need on that team. I mean you could go either way, but joke is just playoff performance. I mean that that's. I'm like, he's he's number one. He's without a question the best on her leg. So, you know You know, who is number two men. Do you want to go bam? Do you want to go and be do you want to go Rudy? Who's number 3 do you want to go bam? Do you want to go on V?.

Rudy jokic yogesh Joe Lakers Joell embiid NBA Clippers Andy
"uta" Discussed on X96

X96

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on X96

"Good fun or poor taste. You decide. I was sort of undecided. Gina sent this Jimmy a czar, perhaps a boner candidate. I'm not sure it should be. But you decide. Two news was contacted by employees of UTA. About a costume that a supervisor wore on a zoom meeting. Some called the supervisor, costume tone deaf and disgusting. UTA tells to news that the costume was meant to pick the way REM entered to pick what they called the calamities of 2020, including the windstorm that Utah in September and Corona virus, the employees Ask not to be identified for fear of erected retribution. We have monthly staff meetings and we were told to dress up in on in the title. It said. Turn your camera on. You're not going to want to miss this one. During the meeting, a spokesperson said. Ah, spokesperson or a nem ploy was where and I guess it was a supervisor was wearing a costume that had Like Corona virus. Molecules around the top, like on the head. UTA spokesman Carl Archy said the costume wasn't exclusively Covad themed, He says it was meant to pick the calamities of 2020. I was immediately offended to me. It was just a gross display of insensitivity, said one employee. It turned our world upside down. We need to have a little empathy, Wouldn't you think? Said another employee. My problem was being the leader, setting the example the supervisor setting the example It was just tone deaf. Or was it maybe was funny? I don't know. Government office. I don't want a government office. It's UTA O UT. It's Utah Transit Authority employees. A staff members were some some who have been impacted by the virus. We're very upset by it. Yeah, if you had You know our relative that was hurt by it or passed away from murder. Adam Archy said no offense was intended and the costume broke no UTA policies. But he said We'll discuss it not appropriate, I think Boehner candidate number three Good fun or poor taste. All right. You've got to decide now of these three candidates, which one is the worst? Let's review the first two and then get to voting Boner candidate number one local one as well. I was going to pay for that stuff sometime. David Davis Conference Centre kitchen equipment stolen by a supervisor there a manager there stolen. It's really nice equipment and taken to a restaurant that his sister Was opening so that you could use the kitchen equipment there. Boehner, candidate number two No social services for you Gaze anew. Texas rule letting social Service workers turn away clients who are l G or who have disabilities? And Boehner, candidate number three Good fun or poor taste. Okay, Here we go..

supervisor UTA Covad UTA O UT Boehner Adam Archy Utah Transit Authority Carl Archy David Davis Conference Centre Gina Texas Utah Jimmy murder
Alabama's Saban tests negative for COVID-19 in follow-up

Home Fix It Show

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Alabama's Saban tests negative for COVID-19 in follow-up

"To the dogs now number three UTA, facing second ranked Alabama tonight in Tuscaloosa. Love. Yes, BJ Black reports the tide might have Nick Saban with them. After all, testing positive for covert Wednesday. Saban was negative Thursday. He needs two more clean test in a road a coach, so it's possible that would line up for tonight, But it is a huge game. Either way, George has lost its last five to the tide, including two Heartbreakers. This game matches up the nation's best D. It's Alabama's loaded office, and we just learned a few minutes ago that that second test was negative. We're now waiting on a third test. That Nick Saban took

Nick Saban Alabama Bj Black Tuscaloosa George
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 1 year ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
"uta" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on WSB-AM

"But that is not process. 130,000 absentee ballot requests in another 15,000 will be out soon, Election supervisor Christie Roisin says. Even though those requests were made back in August by law, they couldn't process them until September. 18th. We've made huge strides in the last couple of days as faras getting them. Turned around, and he says they had anticipated as many as 250,000 requests, but the lower number with just four weeks to go to the election, maybe more voters plan to show up in person. Early voting begins on Monday. Sandra Parish 95.5 WSB as the Braves take game, one of the NLDS with the Marlins fans were allowed to watch on jumbo screens inside through his party grades up of separating us. Um and you know everyone is socially descend with Master. Also, I'm extremely happy 1500. People are spread out across 41,000 seats and the field. However, this man tells Channel two action news. He felt more comfortable watching for the battery. I feel like it's a super spreader situation. Game two against Miami is this afternoon, UTA plans to make a few changes to the game day protocols ahead of Saturday's matchup with Tennessee. He had a hard time believing only 20,000 saw George's home opener. Heard a lot from a ship was deputy athletic director Josh Brooks tells me the way they put the seats created an optical illusion that is staggered approach. So when you look at it straight on, it does look like The biggest issue is some lack social distancing the student section the 1% knock. It was not a malicious intent for many of them. As for the mask issue, for most part, that was very well stay in effect the policy. You must wear them while walking around, but not in your seat. J. Black 95.5. WSB news time. 6 11 11 After six lad, you weather's here this.

Christie Roisin WSB Josh Brooks supervisor Braves Sandra Parish Marlins Tennessee UTA Miami George director NLDS
Atlanta - Georgia QB JT Daniels cleared to return for Bulldogs ahead of key SEC matchup vs. Auburn

Dana Loesch

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta - Georgia QB JT Daniels cleared to return for Bulldogs ahead of key SEC matchup vs. Auburn

"Will transfer J. T. Daniels be the starting quarterback when number four Georgia meets number seven Auburn Saturday night in Athens. Daniel's towards a C L in the first game last year at Southern Cal and UTA is Doc's needed to see a lot before they let him get hit again. They measure his ability to move around on that knee compared to his other knee. That box is checked, but not Kirby Smarts. One. For starters, we're gonna be able to go out there and prove to us that Could do it in the game like situations. Steps admit it will also get a shot in practice, and it's not over for Dewan Math is either the one did not play as bad as it seemed to some winter will face another strong Auburn defense. Kickoff at 7 30 Saturday night here on the home of the dog's

Auburn Defense Kirby Smarts Auburn J. T. Daniels Daniel Athens Georgia
"uta" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"uta" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Think saying to nose actually don't think science knows actually a perp Uta shin of science. Science theme echoed by Joe Biden is locking crises of our time. Requires action, not denial. Requires leadership, not scapegoating. Requires a president. To meet the threshold duty of the office to care to care for everyone, he says. Cities were burning and there'll be more to come if the president continues to ignore science, Sally's now hurricane level two headed toward New Orleans. Supposed to make land far is predicted to make landfall tomorrow in San Francisco. I'm Ed Baxter, this is Bloomberg. Alright, Eddie. Thank you. Let's get to our guest for the half hour. Shamayleh Kahn, director of emerging market debt at Alliance, Bernstein, Djamila. Thank you for being with us on a on a week where we have a couple of key Central bank meetings. We've got the Fed. We've got the Bank of Japan. We also have the Bank of England. Let's begin with the Fed. Your expectations against a backdrop of The Jackson Hole symposium. The recent comments from Fed chair Powell the pivot now to this new understanding of how hot the economy will be allowed to run to try to get a meaningful lift in the level of inflation. And a much weaker dollar today. And as you know, I mean, as it correlates to AA E M. The direction of the dollar is is very important. No, That's absolutely true. Thank you for having me here. I think a lot of interesting things that happened for emerging markets. This here initially emerging market was quite negatively impacted by market volatility, and there were concerns related to Howard. These countries will handle covered and that there was an expectation of master forms. A lot of these. We believe door unfounded and certainly be fed Sam have been instrumental in coming the market. The fact that we are in a lower rate period for the foreseeable future is positive for magic markets and the big dollars Is going to be key for all performance of emerging market in our opinion, Welcome island in terms of the emerging markets in particular, and of course, you specialize in emerging markets. Bonds. There are emerging markets central bank meetings this week. I guess South Africa is one of the few that is expected to cut. You know India isn't ready to move yet, but their inflation numbers air remaining on the high side. And I'm looking quickly down R Bloomberg summary because it just There's there's so much going on on that front, and it's it all interacts one with the other In fact, Bank of Indonesia. Is probably going to hold its key rate steady this week, so there's a a big emerging market in the spotlight as well. Absolutely. And you know, emergent market countries have them write, I would say by large, not all of them quite discipline in terms of how they've used policy to mitigate the godown of experience as a result ofthe cornbread. Monetary policy has been keep many of them have Lord interest rates. I would say most of them are probably done at this point in time. They can maybe a few more. A's cut's going forward, but we're not expecting Tremendous decline in rates on dawn, the physical side, I would say that there was an expectation that emerging market countries would, uh, employee significant stimulus and therefore weaken the credit metrics that really hasn't happened. What you've seen is that emerging market countries have employed much less fiscal stimulus, then developed market countries and therefore the credit impact on emerging market countries. Hat was not as bad as it was originally. Aired earlier in the year and therefore the affairs of the board, which I mentioned before we're rightness place. So we know that China is very much concerned about the degree of leverage in its economy Still, and you were indicating that you don't expect a high level of default and I'm wondering whether or not That includes economies that are closely linked with China. We know that the economy there isn't recovering. We're going to be getting some very key ICO data for China Little bit later today, I'm speaking about retail sales and industrial production. I'm curious to get your take smile on the connection, a ligature between the mainland and some of the satellite economies..

Fed Joe Biden China Bloomberg president Bank of Japan Bank of England Uta shin scapegoating Bank of Indonesia San Francisco Ed Baxter New Orleans Shamayleh Kahn Eddie Welcome island
Justin Jacobson - The E-sports Observer

The Business of Esports

09:49 min | 1 year ago

Justin Jacobson - The E-sports Observer

"We have just Jacobsen on the podcast he's an e sports and entertainment attorney in New York City who works with professional athletes, gamers, musicians among other creative talents He was also recently appointed, and this is where we talked about or at least his company the manager of Ford models newly formed E. Sports and gaming. Talent Division. Justin. Welcome to the PODCAST. And the things we said about four miles although I don't think we said anything bad. We just wanted to get signed to Ford models. Yeah. I. I'm still waiting just I hope that's why you came on the podcast is well, you know you're trending in the right direction shirt you're wearing a nice presentation going on. Yeah I brushed my hair for this. I'm not gonNA live like species I. figured I figured it was time to show up in my best so Are you implying that Williams the better looking one between the two of us because I'm about to be wearing. Dressed up for me. now, Justin look I know our listeners actually the question I get from my students actually recently has been all about talent agencies in that part of the business I'd love for you to tell our listeners a bit what you do how you got into East sports what you're doing at Ford models now just some of the background. We as been an entertainment attorney for over a decade working primarily in music and sports and fashion, or than about five years ago I kind of really transitioned working the East sports in gaming world started working with a bunch of different East sports, town agencies, both in house an outhouse the really familiarize myself with the different players in the team's how the deals are structured and how you kind of engage in. That and for the last few years I've kind of just been doing that on my own helping different players and teams and brands as well as other management firms. kind of would their legals, trademarks, copyrights contracts also do some visa and immigration work for players. So really just kind of all the legal and business side of the industry and you know, as you mentioned Ford, they're pretty established town agency. Primarily in kind of the model in high fashion world but in other markets including in Latin America they had a very strong more traditional talent platform representing musicians and professional athletes, and we just kind of good looking people and obviously in light of what's going on in the world, they're kind of more shifting toward Damore global platform they already had an established digital. influencer division where they had you know beauty and fitness and wellness models and really were able to kind of expand that into the sports and gaming world and you know as I said, I worked with many of the top teams I've done deals and overwatch really call do pro-lee fortnight's he has go halo of these big major games all the major teams across. The industry and from there I was really able to kind of have my own connections with different brand representatives and really kind of take this approach that I learned from the more traditional entertainment and sports agents that I've worked with and kind of apply to this bigger sports and gaming world. So now we signed initially ten talent and kind of looking at some other ones and really try to have a bunch of different people across the board who really what we're looking at is people that kind of transcended they weren't just gamers. They'd had other things going on whether they were coach for a team or they were caster or they really like sneakers and fashion or you. Know. They also just had this really his unique history or known hip hop game where he's really being hot ninety seven's world kind of on the red carpet interviewing these celebrities and you know really kind of having all these musicians and athletes actors gaming with him like almost every day of the week. So really kind of look for unique talent that we can kind of takes Ford's existing ecosystem and the brand even decades and really start offering you know unique Colin. That may be you know has his gaming know fortnight stream or are they play warzone there to touquet player, but they also have other things going on and we can start integrating some of their products into what? You know these sports players have been doing. I mean so you basically just described me and William. So I'm doubly doubly offended now and I would put my sneaker collection up against anyone's Now I. Know You maybe on my radar now? Jet. Mentally, Paul has a poppin sneaker collection. But here's the question like maybe you could talk to a couple of the the initial players you signed and what you know truly was sort of the thesis in your mind why you sign them and more importantly. Like what the future how do you develop these guys? How do you know how do you monetize them? How do you look at the next two to five years for them? We you know we kind of have like a really big take top gaming creator and someone who's kind of a coach also has his own podcast and really trying to figure out new ways that are maybe not solely related to streaming or you know like this is what I do extreme all day I'm going to compete in tournaments like how do we build these other avenues? So like we're helping them setup merge and finding unique designers to kind of give them their own kind of brand identity beside think that you know what I Learned from the more music world and some of the athletes it's all about kind of finding what's unique and highlighting it, and we have some talks with some brands that kind of are looking to get into the space. So we're really kind of focused on more than non endemic ones I see there's you know some of them are starting to come in when you have Lori L. Prod or Louis the con- but you know there's just a ton of more from you know more hair care products and face care products and you know. Even the high end luxury brands that are maybe looking at it, but don't really know how to go about it, and maybe they don't. WanNa. Spend a lot of money and do the wrong thing and it come off bed because as we know, that's not what you do. That's how you lose the market instantly. So it's you know hoping a familiar face in Ford that they kind of know the level that they come from and kind of someone like me who's really understand how you activate properly how you kind of find the unique. Stories. Like we sign this female Gamer who you know one of the best go players in the world and we're kind of figuring out ways to maybe develop you know training camps or interactive ways where she can have these how to get better female. She go camps to K. Coaches, kind of teaching than youth in how you kind of the next generation. So we're trying to look at how we can build around what their interests are and bring them some unique opportunities that you know maybe some of the other people in the world. Town Industry. Kinda can get do. You wanted to ask something. Yeah I'm just curious about like. So do you see the Ford Models Niche? Basically as there are a lot of talent agencies that represent Tammy, sports today right and you know I put many of the minute category, which is like Gamer I write basically their job is they represent people who are great gamers get on top pro teams. They got them a good salary on that team, etc right and those tend to historically those have been smaller East sports bespoke agencies have grown up from the community. Now that's changed quite a lot and you have other major talent agencies coming in like a and others that are taking really active role so and I kind of put those other. Than another category as well. Sort of these larger more established players. So given that ecosystem, right? He kind of sports specialists, some of the bigger agencies is it right to say you think Ford's models benefit is to connect with the classic fashion brands. So I'm going to sign with Ford models versus CAA because you can get me Louis Vuitton sponsorship because you can get me the you know what's Mascara Company, L'OREAL or revelry Al f you can get me the revlon like eyeliner deal is that really the value add is in the traditional fa or Did you see it as a broader piece of I. Think kind of is both I think that you know we're able to help some of four traditional models and other high in fashion influencers. Kinda come into the space maybe kind of acted properly, and then we really can be the bridge with some of these high fashion brands. But now also approaching it from the traditional one talking with hyper accessing the G. Fuels and no. As I said, I've been doing these deals with these teams. You know about once a week for the last couple of months. And years. So it's like I'm very familiar with them and it's really kind of being able to find talent who compete at this high level but also have other things that we can build around and you know the the C as in the UTA's in a one thing I've noticed. Yeah. You can have like fifty, one hundred however many players but can you really spend the amount of time servicing them and giving them the proper attention and you know it's great if you have fifty overwatch players but unless you're the top three or four or five. or You really spending your day pushing deals for the number fifty, number forty two and you know. So it's like we're looking at finding people that we can really focus on and develop because ultimately that's how you give them staying power and longevity and much more where it's not just based on how well the game goes I mean like you mentioned someone like cloister who you know champion one day and dropped the next like that's pretty tough and you know if you don't have other avenues and don't have other things going on and you know like. Tabs was about not expansion in the league aren't him anymore teams and everyone's dropping a player if you know supply and demand. We just don't have room for all these kids that compete at this high level and. Going to do now, you go to another game you so don't revalorised. You know you try to do content creations like we're trying to create these other avenues. The way, a traditional age in the other

Ford Talent Division Justin Attorney New York City Jacobsen Latin America Williams Wanna William Town Industry Paul Louis Vuitton Lori L. Prod Tammy Colin CAA G. Fuels Mascara Company Louis
Patrick Mouratoglou and Andrea Leand

Beyond The Baseline

04:14 min | 1 year ago

Patrick Mouratoglou and Andrea Leand

"Everyone John Worth I'm here is this with sports illustrated tennis podcast. Sweet. We have two guests, I. We talk with Patrick Rata Glue who of course wears many hats in tennis keeps the Tennis Miller's busy. He's a broadcaster he's a coach. He's a promoter Today we talked to him in two capacities. We talk about the the ultimate tennis showdown that he ran over the past several weeks. This was an attempt by Patrick to speed up tennis, make it faster younger draw a new audience. We talk about what worked what didn't we spoke with him in June and he invited us sort of wouldn't he said we'll do a reassessment when we're done and see what we did well, and what we need to work on, and so we took him up on that so. A conversation about the UTSA ultimate showdown, and then we talk about Serena. Williams. Patrick of course has coached Serena for almost a decade now, and we talk about where she is what she'll need to do to Win that elusive twenty-fourth major He is about to leave niece for Lexington Kentucky from the south of France to the land, of Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul but Patrick. is going to meet up with Serena and couture in Lexington on her way to the US. Open to we talk a lot about Serena Williams how she's handling pressure, which he needs to do differently if she were to get to the final and her sort of general disposition during during the Cova crisis. So good conversation that we talked with Andrea Leeann Andras a former top fifteen player. A commentator she also wants did a brief stint as an agent She was at the Greenbrier for the final of World Team Tennessee other day she was sitting courtside. So we talk a bit about tennis and a bit about what the US Open is going to look like under this sort of quasi bubble configuration. So good to good conversation sort of looking back but also looking forward. So let's get started in the south of France with Patrick. So we spoke a few months ago before. Before your events began and we said we would we would check in and you were open to suggestion and you sort of you wanted to hear how this went. So you you tell me first. Grade yourself what what work well. Most of it. I to to see the reality of something you've you've imagined is is amazing. It's an incredible feeling. And it was it was really impressive to see those those great champions play. As. I mean something that was difficult to imagine like play formats. So different from tennis. The accepting to be in such in this comfort zone at the start because it's very different it's very stressful. Is Very difficult in terms of physical because you don't have a lot of time between the much less so he can't recover well. You're so much more stress. To see them go through all that. In a completely new environment All the things that go is the software we had to give up this machine we had to develop for the JEREM buyers day so. I mean. The whole feeling for me was just incredible. To be completely honest, you you you sound to me like you you've written a screenplay and then you've you've actually seen it performed as as a movie. Perfect who put it What did you think first of all, what what did you think of the level play I mean this this was a different environment for the players. They were also coming off along break. What did you think of quality of Tennessee? I think at the start of Utsa one level was really so-so. After a few weekends decided to play well. the one birds for example, who on your gs? One I think is level the first two weekends was wow. Was Far from very far and then. He took off and then he started to play a some of his best tennis I think. Why he won and the level of I think for UTA. Finals. Men and women I. Think the level was really good. I think it was very good tennis. That's I really enjoyed so much watching.

Patrick Rata Glue Tennis Serena Williams Utsa Miller United States John Worth Tennessee Andrea Leeann Andras France Lexington Greenbrier Mitch Mcconnell Lexington Kentucky Rand Paul Patrick
UTA Cuts Salaries Across Company to Avoid Layoffs

How I Built This

02:10 min | 1 year ago

UTA Cuts Salaries Across Company to Avoid Layoffs

"And. Naturally UTA, and the entertainment industry was hugely affected starting this past march when many productions and live performances came to a screeching halt Jeremy's been in the business for more than forty years, and even though he's never seen anything like this, he's optimistic about his company and the future of the industry. Take us back to March. When did you realize that that this was going to have a huge impact on on your business? Well I, you know I, don't know that in March I under I could understand or grasp the full impact that it was gonNA. Happen I I. Certainly remember you know it was I. was supposed to go to a Laker game as sort of debating psycho, she not going in the news came out about Rudy Gobert and then suddenly the game was canceled and boom, and that was the first sign of wow. They cancelled basketball games like that seems really a big thing. The season was canceled shortly thereafter and then boom. It was it was hard to comprehend in the beginning. Yeah UTA like other talent agencies has been affected by this You have had to have furloughs and pay cuts. You're not taking a salary. Talk me through a little bit about how this has affected UTA. Well so far it's affected us because Y- you know I bowl everybody in the company participated in a salary reduction of some form or another, that was a really difficult thing to ask everybody to join in the sacrifice, but you know what we realized is the overall financial health of the company. Sustaining the company for the duration is going to be more of more positive and ultimately important thing for people than trying. Trying to maintain everybody's salary at that current level in the short term, so that was a difficult sacrifice. We chose to make some furloughs. We took advantage of the fact that governments were supporting people who have been furloughed so so far we've been trying to keep going. Keep everybody's spirits up and and trying to figure out ways to be creative and thoughtful and of service to the clients when we can't just. Just make a deal and send him off to go to a movie or book. Show and having go perform in front of twenty thousand people, creating new business opportunities for clients has been a big big priority for

UTA Jeremy Rudy Gobert Basketball
"uta" Discussed on Hellbound with Halos

Hellbound with Halos

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"uta" Discussed on Hellbound with Halos

"Christopher this kind of what you're saying is to go back find out what you enjoyed in the past and try to reinvent and yourself through that so if you enjoyed playing tennis when you're growing up and you haven't played tennis in fifteen years or golf we could use. Who's your saying for the New Year? Maybe pick up a tennis racket again or pick up a golf club again and find that. UTA spend a little bit more time on you. I you're there's an exercise that right in the back of the book and it's basically a series of lists and something that I think a lot of people have not spent time doing. Just sit down and write a list of things that for new joy and then you sit down and completely separate list of things that you're good at and most people would be very surprised to find that. There's a lot of lines that intersect check those two lists and if you can find those things that connect that's what you need to be doing right. Why Force yourself work towards a goal all that you honestly don't care about why focus on something that's not renew any join your rice and said look at what you're good at what you enjoy doing ring in power that path you know with something that matters to you? I think that's the hard thing though. People just don't know how to answer those questions themselves. You know they get down into such a deep depression or the way of life for whatever life is thrown at them and it's just it's hard for them to think back actor far Agus One. That's why.

Christopher UTA
Endeavor goes public, rocks Hollywood

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:37 min | 3 years ago

Endeavor goes public, rocks Hollywood

"I'm Kim masters. And this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Matt Bellamy of Hollywood reporter, and Matt, this is news. We have been awaiting. It's big. Big deal, literally, a big deal endeavor, which is, of course, the parent company of William Morris endeavor, the agency, as well as many, many other business. I mean these guys are in music festivals, and they have TV shows in the ultimate fighting championship and several of the world, most of the world's highest paid models. They they've, they've diversified as the entertainment business has become increasingly a challenge. And they've looked to the future, they've, they've borrowed a lot of money. Now, they're looking to raise about five hundred million dollars in an IPO a public offering stock they're valuing themselves more than six billion dollars, and that's going to resonate through the industry. This has been expected for a while. But still it is a game changer if a talent agency much larger than that now but an owner of a talent agency goes public, the gates are open. In and all bets are off to mix metaphors this will absolutely change. Everything about the representation industry from, you know, the fact that a lot of agents are about to get very rich to the fact that, you know, these diversified companies will have quarterly earnings. So it creates a very different value proposition for the people who work at this company are there representing clients, but they're also managing to a quarterly bottom line and that just changes the way you operate. There's also implications for the various talent guild's obviously the agents are fighting right now with the writers guild over this practice of packaging fees, which is where a an agency put together a bunch of pieces of talent into a show and gets a percentage of that show. And the WJ is probably looking at this endeavour IPO and saying what you built this company on the backs of our members and now you're going public and gonna make yourself hundreds of millions of dollars. Whereas our. Money. Yeah. I mean the old thing about agencies was you can't go public because the assets go home at night. You know, you have these agents, it's not like you're making something, or you own something other than the people who can all quick. So that was always what people said and the agencies were looking for money. And at this point, they most of them have taken on major investors. Who are, you know, kind of hedge fund people in looking for profit, with always with that thought, maybe eventually, we go public, and we make a lot of money. However, as you note, this is in the middle of this fight with the writers guild. Now the day before endeavor filed for this public offering J service from UTA, another agency, actually, sort of went to the writers guild publicly and said shouldn't. We sit back down again and talk. Because this fight is really just so destructive. I mean, I love the way he framed it like he said, you know, I know you guys really want to get back to the table. This is not us blinking. I just find the timing also interest. I mean if endeavour wants to go public, they note in the filing for the public offering that this fight with the writers guild is potentially a problem. And of course, we know it because if the writers prevail, the snowballing effect of what could come next with other aspects other people in this business. I it's a wildcard. I, I am not surprised that it's the agents would like to put this to bed. Yeah, this is a drag on our Emmanuel's big plans for this IPO, but jumping off, what you noted is that endeavor is much bigger than just representing clients. At this point you talked about how the assets go home at night. I mean now endeavor owns the UFC it owns professional bull riding tour. It owns a lot of licensing businesses. They have these packaging fees that are essentially like owning a piece of these shows and these are assets that are going to deliver revenue streams going forward. And that's become the basis of this IPO not the clients or the agents who go home at night. That's where our Emanuel has been very. Shrewd in creating what is an asset based company, rather than a service based company? Well, I will just say that, that may be, but we know that Hollywood's value is not always counted in hard dollars on the movie stars are what might attract investors. So I'm saying, maybe no disrespect to the bull riders or whatever. But I think keeping the peace with the entertainment world, the conventional movie, and TV business might be a priority. Thank you, Matt. Thank you. That's Matt felony editorial director of the Hollywood reporter he joins me this Monday at one thirty on the business. I'm Kim masters. And this is the Hollywood breakdown.

Hollywood Matt Bellamy Writers Guild Kim Masters Reporter William Morris UFC UTA Emmanuel Emanuel Editorial Director Five Hundred Million Dollars Six Billion Dollars
"uta" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:11 min | 3 years ago

"uta" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"So how did that come about? And how has it changed simply for the better? Yeah. It was incredible. And it's been a few months now, we're really getting adjusted and learning, you know, the ins and outs. It was about a year long process. I had a baby about a year and a half ago and to our walk strolling the baby along I was like having so many different thoughts going through my head and really clearing my mind, which I never really got to do jumping off the hamster wheel five years. Having a business really helped me have a vision of where I wanted the business to go. And I knew that I needed a larger company behind me to support. I really drew simply as large as I could by myself with my small team of four people. And I knew that I needed a massive infrastructure to really take us to the next level. So I reached out to five companies that I really loved that. I thought could be good partnership for and all of them wrote back we had caused with everyone and ended up getting to. Offers out of five which is incredible putting entrepeneurship it seems so big and so overwhelming, but honestly, just take it one step at a time and reach out and see if there's interest. I mean for me, I didn't think anyone on I got five emails back to offers a year and a half later the acquisition went through. And it's been the best decision. I think I've ever made my business. And now I have a team of sixty five in New York. I'm now the president of west coast operations for nylon is a wholesome overseeing the west coast division. Here. And we have a sister company called socialite, which is all digital influence or casting. So they represent traditional bloggers we represent celebrity bloggers, and the nylon of courses media, arm magazine, tons of great digital content video. So now, we're the full three sixty package, which is amazing, and we can all kind of help each other grow, which is great. Yeah. That is so cool. It goes to show you never know until you ask because you even said that you didn't think you'd get that response by eager like, I'm just gonna go for you. Look at you now, and then they respond, and they say, you know, yes, send me your valuation. All this. All the NRA. Then I go you the experts that do a great job in in their field. I don't know how to put together all of that information. So I hired a financial expert that those packages together lawyer. So you know, I had my little team. And we after a year we finally owes. So I feel like I got my master's degree and selling a business. There's a lot to learn. But it was a great experience. And I can be happier. They're an amazing team. They give me a lot of creative freedom and direction and really just a great form for grow so full. So how has your job description change because it sounds like it has quite a bit. Yeah. Well, I mean now I have such a great team behind me as opposed to be kind of doing everything with my team of four. So now, I have a sales team in New York. I have you know, all different sorts of people. They're brilliant and smart, and you know, UTA UTA's our strategic partner, we have access to them and just all of these amazing resources that I can tap into. So it alleviates a lot of pressure on me, you know, as a small business owner when it's just you. You don't have someone to talk to like a mentor or someone that has been there before that you can really ask these questions to now I have that which is nominal. I have weekly calls with them every week and. Brilliant. So that's great. And then now, I'm also overseeing the west coast teams, I mentioned so you know, just kind of unifying everyone where three companies under nylon. So it's kind of bringing everyone together. Giving them giving that like kindness the company ethos and connecting everyone, and how can we all work together as opposed to being three separate companies are really making the team worked together and bringing everyone together for weekly lunches or happy hours, and you know. Doing what I do. Yeah. Hoping with strategy across the board and bringing my expertise to all the other ends business. So when you decided that you did want to expand were you very clear on that you wanted to get acquired by larger company or had you considered raising funding. How did you decide how you're exactly going to expand? Yeah. I did think about investment. But from me, I could get a lot of investment and that could go right out the door for one conference. And then where am I now I gave away half my company, and I still don't have the support and all of this. You know that I was looking for. So really what I wanted was the strategic support and the team behind me and the sales team in all of these people that instantly come with nylon or of the companies I was thinking about and for me to easily plug in to what they have as like kind of the missing puzzle is we have the obviously the event and activation and all of that into their arm. So for me, it was the right decision for everyone. I mean, it's different for every business owner. But that was what I was looking for. Yeah. You said so perfectly. Yes, you're nylon and thirty business model and all of that. I think you're a really good example of knowing who your audiences and really catering to them and understanding how do you add value to them on that day? And what's the experience and the feeling that you're providing on that date to speak to that a little? Yeah. That is everything from the minute. They walk into your event. The first person they see what they receive in their hands. Is it a beautiful notebook with the pan, you know, designed by a fashion designer is that what music is playing when they walk in. Is it hot? Is it cold? What you know what food? Do you have all of those details really speaks to you know, the day experience to the end when they're leaving with a gift bag that is a breaking their arm, and then in between we have all of our panels. So we're very specific in who we have speaking in what they're speaking about and provide them all of their talking points. So we can really curate conversation we do surveys after every conference to get feedback on. But people liked what they didn't like so we can her to them and make each one better. And better after all these years, we've done probably twelve or fifteen conferences now. So I hope that each one gets better and better. Yeah. And I would imagine if your guests stay happy if they keep showing up then getting sponsors for your vents is. A lot easier because the guests are there. They want to be there. Right. Yeah. Definitely sponsor is. It's a tricky. That's probably our biggest obstacle. Yeah. Because you know brands, it's budgets are tight. The industry is really changing. Everything's going digital. But I really think that in.

business owner New York UTA UTA arm magazine NRA west coast division president partner five years
Writers Guild Meets With Talent Agents Over Proposed Rule Changes

Digital Production Buzz

08:51 min | 3 years ago

Writers Guild Meets With Talent Agents Over Proposed Rule Changes

"It's time for Jonathan handle. He's an entertainment and technology attorney of counsel at Troy gold in Los Angeles. He's also the contributing editor on entertainment labor issues for the Hollywood reporter, which is why we're chatting with Jonathan today. Jonathan welcome back. Larry, thanks for having me. Jonathon? Let's get right into it. What's happening with the writers guild? The registered is trying to change the rules that apply to talent agents the guilds like the state of California state of New York regulate calendar agents each of the Union's has a set of rules called an agency agreement or franchise agreed. There is named for it almost a year ago, the writers guild Sanday one year notice of termination. So the existing rules expire April six on April seventh the writers guild is likely to impose new rules unilaterally. And that's something that the talent agencies are very very very uncomfortable with to put it mildly. Well, why does the writer skilled wanna make changes in the first place? There are three reasons. One of them is basic question of power. We think of the talent agencies and the guilds as both being very powerful. They both serve their overlapping constituency of writers in this case, and they have their own pepper functions writers guild negotiates, the basic union agreement the basic wages and so forth. The talent agents negotiates wages above that for people who have more more power and more standing in the industry so to organizations one overlapping constituency, that's that's the way it works in practice. But a guild says look as a matter of very basic power unions. Have the exclusive right to represent the United Workers in this case, the writers, and therefore any power that the agents have notwithstanding that they live in you know, they have these beautiful expensive buildings and lots of money any power that the agents have derives from us the union, and we're gonna dial it back. That's that's number one. The next two are two specific practices that the agents engage in that the gills don't like one of them is called packaging to aspects of package at one is you take a script someone, you know, your bring your agent script. Eight and says, this is great nature says this would be great for George Clooney who just happens to be client of our agency as well. So we're package the script with George Clooney. We're gonna persuade Clooney that Clooney likes the script. And if so we're going to go out to the marketplace with Clooney, plus the script package together and find a studio that wants to buy this as a movie or TV series or whatever this project is now, that's that's fine. But what? What the guild objects to is is the payment process that works in conjunction with that. You may think that agents get ten percent of what their clients make in general, especially at the big agencies. That's not it at all. They don't take anything from what the client's make let's suppose this Clooney. Plus Jonathan handle script pilot television series actually gets picked up by studio. Are they going to take ten percent of what they negotiate for me and ten percent Clooney's fee? They're not they're gonna take what's called a packaging fee from the studio itself, not paid by the clients paid by the studio and the way that packaging fee is calculated complicated. We don't have to get into it. But the writer skill says, you know, what that reduces their incentive to maximize the money that comes to Clooney, and and handle, and in fact, notwithstanding the fact that handle created this series this television series to begin with, and it turns out to be really successful series. Sometimes the agency makes more money. Than the crater himself or herself. We don't like that finally a newer practice called affiliated production, the talent agencies the big three, which is w EMMY William Morris endeavor, CA and UTA have all set up affiliated companies that actually substitute for studios and our buyers themselves and do production or production type activities you're not forced to take your project to them. They are an additional choice in the marketplace. But the writers guild says that's inherently conflicted that if your agent is also at least in in even indirectly your employer. You don't have an agent to begin with now, the irony is that one of people who's in business with endeavor content. The w EMMY affiliated entity is is none other than Bo Willem on who's the president of the writers guild east. So while the writer skill these is taking his very strong stand against -ffiliated production, but Willman is actually availing himself of.

George Clooney Writers Guild Jonathan Writer Contributing Editor Emmy Larry Los Angeles California Troy Gold United Workers Jonathon Reporter Hollywood Of Counsel Attorney Bo Willem New York William Morris
"uta" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"uta" Discussed on WSB-AM

"WBZ radio app. Download it now from the app store and Google play. WSB is broadcasting university of Georgia sports on ninety five five FM and AM seven fifty broadcast restrictions. We cannot offer. The UTA sports presentation on the WSB radio app north through wsbradiOcom. Tune in and iheart here. The game and bulldog talk on news ninety five five FM on your radio and on AM seven fifty WSB WSB programming continues here at a later hour as normal. On it. Early morning workout meetings. I'm busy, I hate it. When I missed weight and Jamie, debris storms, and we lose power. What good is the guys you do know you can listen to WSB anytime anywhere with the WSB radio app. His latest news and traffic on demand in always severe weather coverage. Breaking news your station on your time. At the best news. I've heard all day, I'm downloading WSB radio app. Download from the app store and Google play. WSB is broadcasting the rest of the Georgia sports on ninety five five FM and AM seven fifty broadcast restrictions. We cannot offer. The sports presentation on the WSB radio off nor through wsbradiOcom tune in and I heart here the game and bulldog talk on news ninety five five FM on your radio and on AM seven fifty WSB WSB programming continues here at a later hour as normal depend on it..

sports wsb georgia google uta north
"uta" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"uta" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Offer. The UTA sports presentation on the WSB radio north through wsbradiOcom. Tune and iheart here the game and bulldog talk on news ninety five FM on your radio and on AM seven fifty WSB WSB programming continues here at a later hour as normal depend on it. Job keeps me busy on the road storms. And we lose power. What good is a computer. Breaking news, weather, and traffic, you depend on your schedule. My job keeps me busy on the road storms. And we lose power the computer breaking news, weather, and traffic, you depend on WSB radio app. Download it now from the app store and Google play. WSB.

Google
Georgia Tech, Manti Rice And Kirby Smart discussed on Atlanta's Morning News

Atlanta's Morning News

00:14 sec | 3 years ago

Georgia Tech, Manti Rice And Kirby Smart discussed on Atlanta's Morning News

"After a big win over UMass fifth-ranked, Georgia preps for Saturday's game against Georgia Tech. Both teams have won four in a row, the jackets triple option offense is a fishing as it's been all season, more and more teams. They play less and less teams won't actually go out there and tackle UTA coach Kirby smart could be without its top tackler linebacker manti rice injured his foot before the game. Sure. What it is. But he's unable to play. And hopefully getting back feel like we'll be is always this, man. That's what we rotate gas a linebacker nitrous. Patrick kickoff from Athens of Saturday at noon here on the home of the dogs. Jay, black WSB.

Georgia Tech Manti Rice Kirby Smart Georgia Umass Athens JAY Patrick
A showdown between Megyn Kelly and NBC

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

03:47 min | 3 years ago

A showdown between Megyn Kelly and NBC

"Support comes from mocha presenting one day at a time. Manny Farber and termite art, featuring approximately thirty artists and more than one hundred works Farber, championed art that was committed to opt survey Shen and deep attention now on view, more at Moca dot org. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Bella near the Hollywood reporter and Matt as we speak. I think Megan Kelly's lawyer is flying from Los Angeles to New York for showdown with NBC ship been in trouble for a while now. But this is the sound that did the job that I think had been percolating for awhile at NBC. You do get in trouble. If you are a white person who puts on the or black person who puts on Whiteface Halloween like. I was a kid. That was okay. As long as you addressing character. So apparently, not okay. She has been a very expensive investment that did not pay off at all. And this. I would note if she came from Fox News, not the first time she's made racist comments. Notably. Santa Claus is white. That was she told the world. Everybody knew that in two thousand thirteen I feel like she sort of, you know, made her her identity clear at that point. But NBC picked her up. This is one of those situations where NBC knew there was a risk here. Much like ABC knew there was a risk with Roseanne and NBC took the leap anyways. And now, it's lo and behold blowing up in NBC's face. I think Megan Kelly will leave NBC I don't think this relationship is salvageable question is whether she will land anywhere else. But I just think that the combination of the ratings problems, and the fact that she was horribly miscast as a. A morning show host. And this latest blow up is really just kind of the last straw. So I think she will be gone. Absolutely. She's trying to embarrass the heck out of NBC. Meanwhile, with her lawyer saying that they want Ronan Farrow to be involved obviously trying to project. Bad things that NBC appears to have done in the past talking about somebody on the real housewives who wore black face as if that is apropos to how a person who presents herself as a journalist should behave. I think we can agree that the sixty nine million dollars over three years was money badly spent and she's going to clamor, and I think they will pay her. And honestly, I don't know who would employer at this point because we are told that Rupert Murdoch got fed up with her at FOX, and you know, she's branded in a toxic way right now. Yeah. And it's one thing to be toxic to a television network. She managed to lose to agents in the scope of one day, actually, her relationship with CA which had represented her for the past couple of years having going downhill recently, and we're told that she had expressed some frustration. Also represents no Oppenheim is the president of NBC news. So that relationship ended CA confirmed that Megan Kelly was out. She had also been talking to j syrup. At UTA, another prominent agent who represents a lot of people in the in the broadcast space, and when all of this controversy broke a UTA decided that they did not want to represent Megan Kelly either she ended up hiring a litigator the same day. So she went through to agents and got a litigator in about twenty four hours. Very interesting. I think we can safely predict that litigation will not ensue. I mean to me this raises the question again about Andy lack who runs NBC news has overseen a lot of problems at that network. But so far Steve birkhead of NBC universal standing by him. Thank you, Matt. Thank you. That's not felony editorial director of the Hollywood. Reporter. He joins me this Monday at two o'clock on the business. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown this podcast

NBC Megan Kelly Hollywood Kim Masters Manny Farber Matt Steve Birkhead Ronan Farrow Fox News Rupert Murdoch Reporter Shen Los Angeles UTA FOX
Georgia Bulldogs baseball player Adam Sasser dismissed from team amid alleged racial slurs

High Noon

00:22 sec | 3 years ago

Georgia Bulldogs baseball player Adam Sasser dismissed from team amid alleged racial slurs

"UGA sports report reporting that atop UTA baseball players, university of Georgia. First baseman. Adam Sasser is being investigated by school officials for allegedly shouting, put the inward into game except he didn't say inward inward toward freshman quarterback. Justin feels during the fourth quarter of Saturday's game against Tennessee feels was the number one overall recruit in the nation this year. Now, Georgia coach Carvey smart cities address the incident we

Adam Sasser UGA University Of Georgia UTA Georgia Justin Tennessee
Union, KTLA and Arlene NOAA discussed on Tim Conway Jr.

Tim Conway Jr.

01:05 min | 4 years ago

Union, KTLA and Arlene NOAA discussed on Tim Conway Jr.

"Homeless advocates in LA have had, their rally disrupted by homeless people rally was in support of a couple of propositions to build, housing for veterans and. Those with mental illness mayor Garcetti says the issue. Affects everybody people are experiencing drug addiction people who are have untreated. Mental health crises and you don't have to be on the streets, of feel the pinch of this housing crisis but a, half naked homeless man repeatedly interrupted the rally outside city hall he. Started singing the national anthem during council president herb west remarks why

Union Ktla Arlene Noaa UTA Garcetti LA Herb West President Trump
Baby dies after being forgotten in hot car in South Texas, police say

Chris Krok

01:54 min | 4 years ago

Baby dies after being forgotten in hot car in South Texas, police say

"Fire it's being worse by the depart part apartment on your drive and saint jude's drawn wbz ap forecast says partly cloudy skies overnight there is a slight chance of rain that's mainly to the north west we should have a low seventy one tomorrow pretty hot a high of ninety six possible understanding skies and friday night partly cloudy with a low seventy three right now it's eighty three degrees at love field the nieces brought to you by discover bayside dot com president trump says both us and north korean officials are still preparing for a scheduled summit next month even though north korea threatened recently to pull out there would be a historic first meeting between a us president and a north korean leader uta political science professor allen sack says despite the rhetoric he thinks meeting will still take place and if it's successful it may take a little time to implement any deal not to be a one day affair they make some deals at singapore on the twelfth of june it's gonna be a long time kill the implementation of this actually take shape now trump has reassured kim jong in the north korean leader would remain in power if he abandons his nuclear weapons program triple digit temperatures climb the life of a south west texan in texas infant who was left in a car while her father went to work police found the six month old and the car at eagle pass high school at south west of el paso she died at the hospital it was one hundred degrees outside when that child was found this is the first child death in hot car in texas this year and the sixth such death in the nation and the trump administration is resurrecting a reagan era rule that would ban federally funded family planning clinics from discussing abortion with women or sharing space with abortion providers senior white house official says the department of.

Saint Jude Donald Trump North Korea United States President Trump Kim Jong Eagle Pass High School Texas Official Professor Allen Sack El Paso Reagan White House Eighty Three Degrees One Hundred Degrees Six Month One Day
What results of Texas primaries could foreshadow for November

Morning Edition

01:49 min | 4 years ago

What results of Texas primaries could foreshadow for November

"All right rachel martin is in texas this week where voters waking up to the results of the country's first primary election of year that is correct it's really nice here's steve i may not come back okay fine you know can't you could pace yourself in dallas it's the left lane i am a member station k e r a here in dallas we have to remember this is a primary vote that happened yesterday so there are no decisive contests here yet and there are some runoff elections that now have to happen to decide who compete in the fall but the big question in this vote has always been about enthusiasm democrats here have been fired up in ways that they just haven't been any very long time and this primary was widely seen as a test of how much anti donald trump's sentiment could affect a deep red state so the question now what can tech to show us about what might be the ahead for the midterms in november ben philpott is going to help us address that question he's senior editor at member station k uta and austin hey there been so okay if the big question is turn out house turnout well democrats double their primary turnout from four years ago the last midterm election they had about a million people coming out to vote and democratic primaries did you say to do jews did you say doubled their turnout from the primary four years ago again ahead about five hundred thousand in the primary of four years ago and and now a million i'm so that's all good news but then you of course look on the other side of the aisle of republicans had about one and a half million people come out and vote oh they still had more people who were active in the process republicans of course the dominant party in text although i have to tell you i i don't even decide interbank i don't even think it matters for democrats right now data data just want to savour this i mean these are people who have felt a relevant in texas for you know decades and less i we're at this campaign event for democrats here in dallas.

Rachel Martin Texas Dallas Senior Editor Steve I Donald Trump Four Years