17 Burst results for "US."

"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

04:59 min | 4 months ago

"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Which is actually about almost in passing. I read about this. But my own matter, I went to Harvard, Hudson is there, will be there again. Now, 14 alumni, obviously vastly more wealthy and successful than I have ever been, ended up donating $45 million to Harvard. To launch Asian American studies to kind of push forward the launch of Asian American studies. And I think the WTF for me is, okay, number one, there are 14 Asian American alumni who are willing to pull their cash and put $45 million together for this cause. I can't imagine that that would have been possible a decade ago or more. They also had $45 million to spend and give away. I think it's like, wow. We can do that now. Yeah. But also, it's like, we still don't have Asian American studies. Like even after that $45 million, Harvard doesn't have it. And the most I think they're going to do is sort of like they're creating a discipline of some sort of hiring more faculty and basically studying it to figure out where to go next. I don't know what it's going to take. I mean, Harvard is already one out of every four students at Harvard as Asian. It is wild because like dropping off Hudson there. I was like, holy crap. Really, everybody. Every other person almost in his hallway even was Asian. And that was not what it was like when I was there. So a C China change is certainly occurred. But definitely a WTF on both sides. What took so long? Why has it still not happened? And holy shit, $45 million a lot of money for this. Yeah, I mean, the thing about this influx of cash of not just at Harvard, but all these other places you see this corporatized kind of push into like I said before giving a shit about Asian Americans. And it took I'm sorry. It took like grandma's being beat on the street for people to care. Like that, that's like thanks for the money, but like, God damn it, like we've been here all this time, you know what I mean? That to me is that's definitely WTF. Totally WTF. Let me shift the conversation a little bit to another WTF. I want to talk about well, we did talk a bit about squid game, but I want to talk about squid game on the level of okay. So this is the biggest Netflix's biggest series ever ever. I mean, let's face it, none of us sell this coming, right? Another like a Korean series really doing this on this level globally. And I'm pretty positive Netflix didn't see it coming either. The key the key question right now is, where do they go from here? And especially when it comes to Korean content. You see all these other players jumping in trying to be the next trying to get in the next squid game, right? So you see other streamers like Disney+ and Amazon and whatnot like trying to get in on the K wave, you know what I mean? And it's like, I'm just curious and my questions are like, what does this look like for the future? This is stuff that I could not have imagined as a young Korean American growing up in the 80s, right? This to me, and then couple that with the one two punch of BTS and you're like, what?.

Harvard Hudson WTF Netflix grandma China Disney Amazon
"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

02:30 min | 8 months ago

"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another dish. They call us bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in asian america. I feel you. And i'm jeff yang and once again we have a fantastic guest on this episode. Somebody who's an old friend of ours over the podcast. And who has just evolved into one of those interesting attorneys filmmakers creators actors writers in the business of asian american filmmaking and that is justin chon who has a new film coming out blue by you which we have seen and i'm just so deeply my feels. I just. I q much to talk about that. I can almost like talk Welcome welcome to the show. Welcome thanks guys. Thanks is so great evac back on with you guys. You know. I just first off. I want to say that this has been some kind of a ride for asian americans. You know There was a time when felt like we couldn't tell any story is truly not them the way we wanted them to and when we did they had to be a certain kind of story over just the last a three four years. We started more idiosyncratic and yet really masterful new kinds of of narrative exploring explaining and just giving experiences around very different ways of being asian american and blue by us is right up there In in that world of like the minorities so just wanted to give you props for that and maybe ask bit. What the origin story in some ways of of this film. Was you know what i mean. You know Being asian american we all know. Adopt these you know it's I'm sure we all know that. Adoption originated the idea of international. Adoption originated in south korea after the korean war. And you know the whole family went there and the kids off the streets or whatever the case that needed families place a nice christian families in the united states and over the years become a big business in and you can't tell an asian narrative that's inclusive without including that storyline Without including that experience in this in this country So you know i. I'm friends quite a few adoptees and and I've grown up with few. And i started hearing that this was taking place at adopted. These were being imported in. I thought it was absolutely shocking..

jeff yang justin chon bruce united states south korea
"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"N welcome to another edition of they call the spruce not filter conversation about what's happening in eastern america and reality television and i'm jeff yang and as the ho- holidays approach. We are here. Yes yes yes because this is this a moment for plans. We are here to talk about the brand new reality tv. Show on the block. House of ho show that does seem to exist primarily to make about the name. Ho shonda for asians. Everyone knows getting. It's it's a fun show. Show that <hes>. Is definitely worth talking about. And we have some great people talk about it with us first of all our friends. Our colleague <hes>. Our collaborator jammu. Who is producer of the podcasts southern friday and the forthcoming movie daughter and has the morgan with fillon myself in fill one. I don't know a little bit of a book project which we can talk about some other time and welcome to the podcast jess. Thank talk about this. Yes you are not alone. We would also love to welcome to they. Call bruce both you guys. First time right hon win. Who is the senior culture editor at salon and co host of good pop culture club. Another podcast in our <unk>. Podcast family so welcome to the show. Yeah a happy to be here. I'm yeah shocked that it's taken so long for me. Ask but i feel like this is the one i meant to be on me. We definitely we definitely asked to vietnamese american women to be on the pike. Ask very specifically to talk about this show. And i like han when i asked you. I may have been like kind of presumptuous. And that like you know you're you're an entertainment journalist. Who's vietnamese american. I was like. I just assumed that you had watched you like interested and watch watched house of hope when i asked you. I presume that was true that you did and so and so. That's why you're like. Yeah i'll be on the on the podcast. It was funny because you know. I should've expected it and yet you asked me. I was like oh. Of course. Because i'm actually from houston perfect practically a ho hos and they were none of them though. 'cause toes what to private school system so we should say that house of hose on hbo. Max it is a <hes>. Reality television series in the vein of all those shows that you that no one wants a care to admit to watch like the cardiac shahs of sunset and <hes>. The real housewives that genre <hes>. But it specifically focusing on a very wealthy vietnamese american family in houston <hes>. Have i covered all the bases. I think pretty much. I mean know we we can say that the the cast of characters is <hes>. What you might expect for a family drama whether fictional or not set in an asian context right you've got sort of the patriarch matriarch the siblings they all have different dramas individually collectively. They gathered together. Eat a lot basically. This is the nonfiction crazy rich issue. Because that's exactly what what was clearly developed to be right right right. It's definitely created in the wake of the cruiser cheese <hes>. But that said i mean we've all watched it in varying degrees varying varying number of episodes. I will admit to having watched the first episode and a later episode. That i was told i should watch because it was worth watching and the guys are pretty finished. A lot of it right. So unless the jump in <unk>. Just start with you. What's what's your take coming up. Well i guess well i. I actually ended up catching it early. Screener of it before so. Luckily i only watch more so <hes>. It to be blunt. It was not as trashy as what i expected it to be. Maybe no expectations. And like i feel like new money. Beat amuse people like there are certain type and how the show presented was <unk>. Surprisingly a a lot. More layered than i thought you know especially particularly when <hes>. You know you go deeper into the series because at first episode definitely like leaned into like this this like you know american dream poll by the bootstraps model minority and all that jazz and and then it starts off like that and then just breaks it down and just show us like just all the dysfunctions of the family. So you know actually was an keep in mind. I don't really watch. the family. Reality shows is just not my thing. But you know i had to see it. 'cause beat me representation and you know all my worries and concerns

jeff yang House of ho Ho shonda fillon salon and co host of good pop jammu jess america morgan bruce houston hbo Max
"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Low end. Welcome to another edition of us bruce. None kilter conversation about what's happening in asia america which includes the white house. I'm bill you. And i'm jeff yang and yes. The white house got a little bit less white over the last couple of days. We are exhausted. We are mentally physically may even spiritually very very tired. All of us as americans i think. But we're also tonight kind of exultant and sitting the essentially the stoop of history. So we thought it'd be a fantastic opportunity for us to just get our thoughts out there with some are are close closest friends in just smartest hot takers. That could actually reach out to <hes>. We want to welcome to the podcast to talk about the election election. Twenty twenty gen fang <hes>. Friend of ours. Friend of the show blogger behind the appropriate and aisha sultan who is a syndicated columnist based at the st louis post dispatch and just as personal round many many different hyphen. Tash her. i walked thank you so much. Thanks for having me on for the very first time now. Welcome and thank you much for having me two guys. Welcome back your back boy. So okay so this one this episode together pretty quickly because you know. We woke up this morning to some major news and after the shock of that and are quick twitter takes. I texted jaffna like yo. I think we got record episode tonight. So let's get some smart people on and let's let's do this so smart people welcome. What were your respective first thoughts when you heard the news and let's be honest here we've been we've been all just far too far out on that limb of wondering whether or not the future of our republic was strong aisha <unk>. I mean how did it feel. What did you feel so <hes>. I'm a public writer <unk>. In writing in a red state. I'm in missouri and i write too frequently <hes>. Ideas and things that challenge a lot of my readers here <hes>. Humanely disagreed little <hes>. Some of the things. I have to say and ever since the last election cycle the response to a lot of where i wrote got much more personal much more bigoted. Much more violent nasty. I think you know all all of us probably experienced that to some extent but <hes>. And you know we're used to as journalists public writers. We're used to harsh criticism but it felt very different and <hes>. I feel like i did take an emotional toll on me. And i felt like for the i. Guess almost five years because it started before the last election <hes>. I feel like. I was really questioning whether the work i did even mattered. I was wondering if truth even mattered in this country. I wondered if people even had enough empathy to care about the stories. I was telling and honestly jeff i was ready to <hes>. Look for different job or do something different. If this election it turned out differently. I had thought this all through. Because i didn't see any meaning in it and so there is so much and beyond being a muslim woman. A brown woman a south asian woman <hes> and mother <hes>. I just felt like there was so much personally writing on his election for me. And so when i heard that it was official they called it. <hes> i don't know that i could even intellectually process that moment because there was such a physiological flood of emotion in my body.

white house aisha sultan jeff yang asia missouri writer st louis
"us." Discussed on The Hows of Us

The Hows of Us

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"us." Discussed on The Hows of Us

"Complex chessel again by let's in Boutros into my lap. Actually I go. Small Group off. evil. Offer NUMB MUNGO BASSIM WHO. Washington plastic as it orbits the. But on the inbound one smart bogus. Ed Lycett sites Bunsen. So, okay back, but you'll be. Money left and third the you know you many left on center us the worst would equal on I amber. My May Latte international bill passed Lavar. By an alien a Nauseam Demars Gore's your markle since. So by young. And you Erin Yeah bugs in his at not the New York. Jimmy. Meeting, Okay Munis Gusty you stopped by does he see my mom's? saw some mind leggings bottom. Project network been beginning, announcing Bendigo Art Strenuous Sean practice Philippines. Under me on project Arts numb independence Shimon tradition in eastern. 'cause Gustavia Epoxy Bouma Numa Diana Philippines. My Own Siberian by Yan France kinds gunslinger. The wishing him again. Young visualization are built needs is muggy. E Shah. SO-SO Brown. In Egypt NEOM. maxine while I want structure Nineteen eighty-one. Lynch Pin. Ninety? One. I. Make Up, a one-year. Obsolete. Unemployed so. Brown. So but on Mommy's actually. On field or muschamp valued. Eighteen. Key Construction on Budget Neil. Live by million US dollars. In Siberia. I, suppose me. Eight. Or a new wing of Philippine general. Hospital. Couples said, Vo. So in business. People Agai. Doom. Money Levinger national ice and then he left things. Workforce Nipple feeding needs to be them to engineering. Only were forced nucleus. Unbelievable. Unbelievable. Then piracy on four somewhere. In. Films Center. Native. Unbelievable in the way? By. Then Austin. Won't go on. Weekly in his Own. and. Holes. In terms than some. Of the, Bible I. Know It's a good old nop. You meet them all meddle in our. Dance. Concert. A. Yeah. Saudi. Enough. Or don't want on main four thousand workers colby ECB not. Actually. Being. A. Moved higher ceiling thousand workers. Three shifts betsy. Before our informs that. I see my dad meal. Makram meal. Anymore. Twenty four hours, three ships you now. On unbelievable unbelievable. How unbelievable unbelievable keep in bats own. And during it. Manson on. The grind lobby. Motivation gunshot. Between. Mr Llamas. Until me. On the YOU'LL GRANDMA BE. Estimated Nina, it will take six weeks by Apple's. Six weeks in love Longtime Madison in your deba-. Unbelievable. Unbelievable. So I'll see exciting being. Hallmark. Young. Out The foreign thousand workers in one thousand workers it's. been in full was Grand Nabi. Insane. In a saying that. You've seen US I've been six weeks I'm young. Looking. Out You know one Alaska seventy, four hours flooded. It. Means as. As floor. So you'll. You'll six before for A. Saving people. Hours. Buying. Oh. By. Lavar fools yeah. Oh battle I mean to go to. The battle. Is You need structure like Kim with. You surely a gun. motherly. In terms numb. On structure and site saying, Zinni. Quality Assurance and Quality Shaking I. Boil. Abide not an ongoing term. Or Apple spinoffs. New News. Foundation but on. The budget but. In memorial young man or young foundation non at least. One day or two days. Bad. Urine. Hosts stangl boost engulf. Kabila's. Somebody. Motto Your I use my forum. Now are yours huma only show and Huma being snogging and? By marching. Casino. Coming from somebody I, but on the booze Paris, a second floor. Can Kim type? Movie. Again I would burn the harvest. Ding Ding Molin deep onion. Parramatta you. Take. One, hundred five. Cyber gone saying new power and someone. MOP and on the golden get enough. But. Now. To turn that gun lobby from six weeks listening to two hours out of that portion. You saw disaster are. Key, we went up motherless it and uncles truck Sean. Around three am would be by macanese seat that it'd be. Yuppie by. Don't three am long members have been new nine, hundred, ninety, one, November seventeen. On on on target January. Okay Moustapha, movies in quarantine chill on. Done more than a month. Let alone. So anything alone. Be B. Scott folding under your but on. Scuffling the union you don't WanNa. Talk. About..

Apple Brown Mr Llamas Lavar B. Scott New York Demars Gore Ed Lycett Boutros Numa Diana Philippines Bendigo Art Jimmy Bunsen US Washington Egypt Lynch Pin Yan France muschamp
"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, , and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, , the creators of a very, , very special book when his right in. . The heart bone. . Shall we say? ? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. . It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, , the greatest generation of our community but who? ? Make. . It beautiful with their very presence? ? So. . We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. . Valerie Lou in. Andrea . Lo. . Thank you guys so much for joining us. . Thanks for having US have come. . You guys have put together a really great project. . Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. . It's Chinatown Pretty. . Is Just A. Really. . . Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, , but it hits on a very specific. . Aesthetic. . A fashion aesthetic. . I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the <hes>. . The the style photography mold and apply to <hes> kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. . People who are very special in our community so Maybe, , you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. . This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America <hes>. . It's really a patchwork of different. . Eras right close from Hong Kong? ? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? ? A lot of colors. . A lot of patterns <hes> sometimes I, , four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. . And that's about keeping warm mostly <hes>. . So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. . So really white built a hats. . I love that description <hes> just viscerally <hes> but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. . Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. . So. . When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. . Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. . Traditional clothing from. . <unk>. . Historical closets as it were. . Sometimes across gender lines. . It's often incredibly colorful like you said, , is layered <hes> it's branded, , but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. . In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, , who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. . But I guess, , what was it? ? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. . Yeah. . This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. . have. . Known each other for. . Several years now, , and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. . And that <hes> press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? ? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? ? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. . They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. . For us we might think, , oh, , it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. . It had ended preserved for decades. . Mixed with <hes> with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. . So there's so much. . Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, , and so we were really curious about you know. . Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, , how did this? ? Is just such A. . Look in. . So we're really curious. . About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. . What led us to investigate. .

San Francisco TALLEC Chinatown Different Chinatowns Francisco Oakland Vancouver York New York Chicago Ross La Oakland Los
"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce and unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. . I'm bill you. . And I'm Jeff Yang and we are so incredibly pleased tonight to have with us a very special guest, , a friend of ours, , a friend of the PODCAST and a brilliant <hes> animation creator. . That's kind of a big drum roll right now who's it going to be? ? But I'm here to tell you that it is in fact, , Daniel Chong the creator of we bear bears one of our favorite animated series Daniel welcomes the fogcast. . Welcome. . Thank you for that intro. . Man I don't know what to do with that that. . Good now. . All right. . No for real. . Huge. . Admirers of yours and big fans of <hes> of we bear bears <hes> I've you know as much as possible I've I've kept up with it given. . The fact of the world is basically a rolling apocalypse I'd. . Things things we've your bears are the things that make life feel less like a total and utter shit show. . And I will say <hes>. . We're particularly excited because we have the chance to actually take a look at the. . We are bears movie, which , is sort of like an exclamation point on the series and it was fantastic. . I mean I have so many things to ask about say about it especially the fact that it feels like. . I don't want to say this <hes> to overstate this in some ways, , but it feels Kinda like an important movie in ways that I will elaborate. . Thank you perfect for twenty twenty I'll say that But let's begin actually Daniel. . By talking about how this got started in I mean for those of you who have not yet watch, , we bear bears. . It actually began <hes> as a web comic called the bear bears right. . Three bear bears right shortly there and tells how that where that came from and I guess how this how this turned into. . What it is today. . Yeah <hes>. . It was a web comic that I had created it. . You know I was working in the industry in the animation industry ad. . I just wanted to make my own thing. . And at the time you know <hes> people are posting things on blogs and stuff. . So I created this comic on my own called three bear bears is kind of a play on Goldilocks, , three bears and so <hes>. . Yeah it was. . It was a comic that <hes>. . It was very like free for me. . I. . Didn't like really right out anything ahead of time I just kind of like A. . Free associated as I was drawing it and nobody read it and nobody cared and just completely I remember going onto comic forums and trying to post it like, , Hey, , guys check this out in like nobody wanted to talk to me on forum. . So it was just like. . But but the thing is I was already working. . So it's not like it was so debilitating. . What was it? ? The only thing I had? ? It was just You know it is it is that was just it was my outlet that my special hobby I guess at the time. . So but <hes> as I was in the animation industry working as a story artist for about ten years <hes> run by fifth year I was starting to get antsy I just wanted to create my own things. . So <hes>, , I started taking these comics different ideas that I had started just flushing them out into pitches into stories and or. . TV shows, , and that's where three bears <unk> became weaver bears. . I got to change that title for legal reasons apparently. . Some <hes> what's called a some company owned I think there were a taxidermy company, , they own something similar. . So. . <hes>. . You know now the title really means nothing at it makes no sense but it's So. . Yeah. . We're not responsive opportunity right there if you. . Off. . So. . When you when you came up with this for the idea when he became a cartoon a series, , like what were the kind of the things that you were <hes> like how did you pitch it honestly when I tried tried to explain this series to people who've never seen it? ? Yeah. . It's kind of a weird thing to try to like I like the concept is such a <hes>. . It's so simple and yet it. . So it's too simple in a lot of ways. . Yeah and then trying to explain to the emotional complexity of is difficult. . You know. . I think the pitch itself was was. . The visuals help a lot. . I'm not just pitching words so. . I think there are two things that were very crucial to well, , maybe three. . Crucial things to the the Bible ever the pitch that I did that help sell at one was the visual of stack these three bear stack them each other which you know I it was a very iconic thing in the comic and that was definitely the thing carried into the pitch, , and so you know I pretty much started off the Bible by showing this image of the three bears together. . So it just. . kind of it's sort of just evokes a very strong image up the top. . The second image that I put in the Bible was an image of the three bears mingling at a party with a bunch of Humid's holding like cups at a party and nobody is freaking out by them. . They're just all mingling together as if they're like, , you just talking about the weather or something like that, , and that was another like. . Important image to kind of sell here's the joke. . Is that these three years nobody freaks out when they see them they're just one of you guys except there bears. . So that was the other really important image to sell this project

Daniel Chong Jeff Yang Bruce Asia America weaver
"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

"And its relationship to creativity mental health and emotional well-being. And as always I'd like to give a trigger warning these are adults show. So the themes will be complex and interesting and maybe at some times be triggering if you've attended this position today put this on pause and bookmark it for later. Otherwise Dive Right In today. I'm actually Overjoyed to be introduced and what's going to call you my long lost friend chocolate the Friendship has gone. It's just the you're in another part of the world than you used to be absolved. And you're in a country with its own challenges some of these say that so you should say that that's a understatement but yes, yes ton of challenges. I would say so you're in the this United States of America. I am I am in and not only am I in the United States. I'm in the middle of Silicon Valley Home in California, which I think the last time I I looked this up the the sort of if it was if California was its own country club in terms of the money generated, it would be the 7th most sort of profitable country in the world will be number seven. Which has its own problems. I found that quite a stunning fact. I've been enjoying some of your poems on Instagram and I'm like, oh, I can't quote the whole oshaka. I won't about the one of the poems. I just think is phenomenal is the poem. You said you might change the title of it is the one called stuck. Oh, yeah is a perm and a half and is it? Is it is it you don't know what Devils had to be tamed for me to be here now. Yeah, it was. Yeah, it was even who just saying that it you know off the Genesis of stuck was you know, and it's it's it's tied to all that's going on now with with the police brutality and and and I wouldn't even say its BLM but it's off, you know, I was sitting here God there's so many different aspects to this but there's this idea that you know back order for as a young as a black person coming up in in in the United States and police brutality and just all of these things that you sort of wage order to move forward. It's almost like you've got a tuck this stuff away. It doesn't it doesn't mean that you forget about it or anything of that sort, but you can't move into this world. I mean it's dead. It's a racist environment is a racist. Well, you can't move through it if you're attaching all if if you've got it all stuck to the outside of your body, then everything's going to stick off. So you almost have to tuck it away. The problem with that is that there's these moments like this like Mike Brown like almond dobre like off George Floyd Brianna Taylor that make these things pop back out, right and you've got to figure out how to manage that and manage the anger and the same ad and the fear and all of that and then tuck it back away cuz I got to get up and go to work the next day. I've got a raise a child. I've gotta do all of those things and that's what kind of the stuck came home. Right? Cuz it's all it's all kind of stuck and there's one day I was sitting here and just randomly this wealth of emotion Port over me, and I'm dead. Crying and and it wasn't for any one particular thing and what it really when I sort of peeled away the the layers I've put stuck so many things away. I didn't remember how many of them they were and how many times I had. I I could have been the Mike Brown's I could have been to George fluids, right the amount of times that things have happened just walking down the street and police stopping me are being pulled over in a car and and I've written about it here and there but it was just moment when it all came and I think to a certain level. I suppress this memory of these four policemen, you know running up on me in my apartment. I was carrying Pizza. I had a pizza box and my key is coming into my apartment and You know it just it I think I partly suppress it. But in that moment, it came back full fledged. Like I remember seeing the nozzle of the guns Irish, and and I think what all of this sort of brought up in me is how easily You know, you know there's another poem I have as about a a stop at a police car and the whole idea that I don't even know this guy. Bob understand the I I do understand the language his uniform speaks, right? And there's a line in there where I said, you know, I'm wondering all these things one of which is I'm wondering how quickly this Earth beside the car could bury me right? And so in that same sense, it's sort of like I I sort of like went right back to that moment and it was just a month which that could have been, you know, it could have been completely different and I tried to capture it in that poem stuck while it was here while it was you know, while it was Earthbound so to speak and that's where that that sort of poem kind of came out of and sort of like, let me let me catch it now before I stick it away I thought It's really important cuz we were talking before the interview talk about started about the thought impact of the afterworld on our inner World in a very broad way and that poem describes it really well. And I remember having a conversation with a friend of mine who's a photographer and we were talking about different sorts of oppressions to the body and that the more privileged you have the less you need to erect an invisible force field around yourself off when you enter into that world and entering into that world doesn't mean when you leave the house. It means everything including your computer your television, even when you close your eyes so that force field means stuck that force field means the burial of feelings in order to do that. You say dog Take your kids to school get the milk from the store right brush your teeth.

United States Mike Brown California BLM George Floyd Brianna Taylor Devils Bob America George fluids
"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

"Shedding stuff. You know and saw the whole. It's like the sprint of Carnival exists. Whether physical Communist's narrow. No I've in my head. I've got this this image and that's probably not true. But it's like the idea of laughing and crying at the same time this collision of of really strong feelings and they both have to come out they both have to express and I think what's really interesting you talked about routine. Actually I think with tea and it's when when it sticks as when routine becomes ritual. Right and I think that what it is is what it is what what you're actually talking about. What we're saying is that how we GONNA come up with this cove ed how do we in we enact rituals that enable us to do both that's what the weakest it's a ritual that enables us to do both. Right so this carnival party everybody knows that and everybody knows everybody understands carnival is dying. But everybody's GonNa understand you put on your costume they're gonNa Laugh at first like Oh my God you're ridiculous but we understand you put it on your costume. This little ritual of party is giving you the space to be able to enact a bit of a ritual that you agree with him and so your sadness you're putting it on I'm sure you're shedding tears you put on is you taken it off but in the moment with it you're dancing and so I think it's ritual that we're looking for that within that encapsulates all of that. And sometimes, we just focus on the ritual of the ceremony of from the Church to the hearst going to the funeral. The funeral ground, and then that terrible moment when you hear the the drop on the coffee him. But actually what is the ritual around that? You know your own around the spore wherever that's that tradition is retained of Joe Pin rum even the young people do they don't know the the levels of it but libation remains hip hop videos you see it. So, there these things that a car with its that's a ritual. You might not know what? The big thing of the ritual you know your friends gone and you know you can't. You don't know what to do. You've got to drop some spare. You've gotta drop some alcohol on the ground and that's that's the ritual and the thing about ritual apart from the fact that they're repeated their repeated and repeated over time. And across outlet you say. Across the aspirin so that that's that's it's like any point that's always. A reenactment of a ritual, it never stops it. It's. Continuity. At this point during this conversation, it will happen summa. That will have been a library also, it's also it's like a shape shifter, it ships and shapes. Wherever it is. Wherever it's you know with the environment that is in that way the African retentions shifted itself. rituals shifted itself into rituals of of of Catholicism this is amazing. You know nearly the end I've given you an hour 'cause he was just so amazing supposed to help the GonNa get. Joe. Because that's I'm like so I'm. At the end allows you preempted right at the beginning of the Web I had for you. But delighted to show some luck yet I just didn't prepare it. So I'm just like Oh God it can be anything because I was talking about Carnival and the Dia spoarer, and also these projects that I'm working on this project takes into account. That one of my friends a lot of one of the things that happened around this pandemic is domestic abuse. and. This poem is for one of my darling friends, knees. Who was my one of my Soka friends who post away At the hands of our husband So I think I'm GONNA, end with this, and this is both celebration and energy. And it suits what we're talking about. I don't tentative history of stolen 's take one. I time to cost away stones and a time to gather stones together I time to embrace a time to refrain from embracing. Let us address the stones. What are you stone? If not a small pebble that can be carried by hand therefore is the hand your sevens and you stone to have your stories to tell if I hand throws US stolen who is in the wrong the hand. The poet piles up stones to build a cathedral around a young black woman. So she will not burn stone though she hears you only score, scorch crumble or crack on the flames, the poet bills this protection, but it is too late in the season of struggling lungs and hammering fist behind quarantine doors. Mothers daughters sometimes men will come like sheep are really goat. He came like a lamb and turnbull turn beasts pummeled with hoofs breathing fire stones. This is meant to be a poem about you sir, but it is unruly poem a headed poem away with poem. Now, the poet's heart is a stalled yesterday. A picture of a young black woman friend bounced into the poets inbox. He killed her on the line on the knee. I don't turn it to history of stones take to let us address the stones and the use stone to have stories to tell back home the woman's hometown village young men. Gaba. Stones in lush. Green Bush to create a circle of stones to rest their parts over hot cold cooking oil down yesterday. News flew across the net like a soiled dove with a broken wing. Fragile bruises bloomed. How long had he been seized in the woman up to cook in our home by car house was often Oh let us address the stones as stolen to have stories to tell say you tell me the poet stolen does not burn it may crack or even be crushed into powder, but your answer is. Too late stored, you speak of David toppling Goliath with a slingshot in the woman's vintage boys went into the Bush on slingshots to pelt birds break their wings. Is this where the man learn to break his dog swings remember poet you say this is a poem about stolen meanwhile across facebook. The women's friends are stones rumbling stones happy. One Poe states I spoke to her only last night death. Did Not hint it was a stone's throw to the crawling fire in this poem, honey thickens in the women's veins instead of water boiling epidemic shrinks splits open and oil flows from the woman's body boiling tears or give me more oil in my lab. Keep it burning her friends sing acquire across facebook hymns to erase thoughts of oil in that often burning burning until daybreak. Sir, this is a poem about stones. Yes, and you stones have our stories to look at the woman's village a non. Sits on a big stone look again at the women's village are man sits big stone by the seashore are this fire of sunset praying for the woman chat between a rock and a hard marriage sir? Stone is a prayer a seventh of the mouth like stones seven of the palm where prayers at daybreak when the woman needed own, let us address the stones as stones have their own stories to tell the poet attempts to resurrect the poem attempts to rest with Susser Tate old lettuce address stones..

Joe Pin Bush Stone facebook Dia spoarer US aspirin hearst Poe Susser Tate David turnbull
"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"us." Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"Low, , and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. . It is one which we are going to used to. . You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, , and that is Disney's live. . On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. . And we have guests, , schools, , opinions in some of them <hes> our guests <hes>. . We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. . Who have with us? ? Phil? ? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. . Quite possibly a record. . Record record. . Our good friend <hes> formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, , she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. . Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. . Welcome. . Thank you. . I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. . On. . Challenged. . Bring honor to us all. . We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not , the last frankie. . Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. . I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. . Chinese about this. . Conversation's. . Break Welcome, , to the show. . Thank you for having me. . So excited to chat with you about this. . Well, , the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. . The movie itself <hes>. . debuted Friday, , and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, , maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. . The film. . You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if <hes> maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. . The way they perceive this this new one right. . Rebecca. . What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? ? This one for you. . Yeah. . Well, , for me, , I <hes> you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, , my whole life, , and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. . So I think I was sixteen when I came out <hes>. . Even, , though I was no longer a small child I, , what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, , like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. . Just swallow emotion. . Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. . Who I was, , you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. . Listen. . <hes> you know <hes> and reverence that was so moving. So . that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, , you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time. . And Frankie in you grew up until age nine in China, , right? ? Yeah in Beijing was. . Yes. . But you but you did also see Milan and I'm atrophies theaters or at home or so I was already living in the US by the time Mulan came out. . So I washed it in Missouri were I was in the fifth grade and I think. . My first exposure to Mulan the figure was actually when my mother taught me the ballot of Milan and made me memorize recited back to her. . So this character was already one of my favorites. . You know this <hes> cross dressing heroine who bests all the boys that was basically my dream I wanted to. . Show everyone how amazing I could be. . So you know I wasn't super. . I had very mixed feelings about it because even as a ten year old I was you know I had trepidation about whether or not Disney was going to do a good job representing my culture, , my country. . So but at the same time, , of course, , I was really proud to see that they chose a Chinese story <hes> to bring to the big screen. . So when I saw it I think I continue to feel mixed because there were these moments like the one that Rebecca described was incredibly moving but there were also these little things that day I guess. . I don't know if I would say they got wrong because you can tell a story a story Harry you want, , but it's more like there were very clear league. . American narrative elements that were meant to. . Get, , a reaction out of American audiences. . It makes sense but as a Chinese viewer I just thought while if you're going to represent my culture, , why don't you get it right? Why ? don't you think that the? ? Quote Unquote correct representation can't also get a reaction out of Americans I remember when she dressed up for the matchmaker in the face was all white I just thought well, , this reminds me of Geishas much more so than Address up Cheney's lady and maybe geishas is much more recognizable symbol. . But why can't you just make her look uncomfortable as? ? A Chinese woman rather than something that looks more, , Japanese. . Their stuff like that. .

Disney China Mulan Missouri Beijing Milan Frankie US Geishas Deng Xiaoping Rebecca Zeidan Harry prime minister Janet Yang Hollywood BRECCA Cheney producer
"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

"An older black woman to die happy. Radical! And if you tell a white person is radical that your grandparents died happy, they'd look you like what the hell he talked about me. So, what do you mean it's radical? An I realized this near me. Sorry to go on about this by realized. A few months ago, I realized I read is again. This week. I am black for life. I going to be a dark, skinned black man for life forever. I have to deal with until I die. I'll be reading about black murder black the torture. Until, I'm dead. We're not going to solve this and I said to my friend be happy new lifetime. Whatever can be happy because we're not going to solve this. Does never going to be a month. It's never going to be here. I'm in a lot of pain at the moment to be honest. I'm lot of pain. And it affects everything effects like. Effects dating it affects all of that affects the fact that like I mean like just twice in the last month. I've heard people from different sources saying. Bring home. Who Have you like as long as it's not black man? How am I supposed to feel? Like okay, yeah, people can be like Oh. Yeah, but who wants today to racist. Anyway, that's not the point the plus not the fucking point the point is. The entire sections segments of this life are close to you close to me as dark skinned black person, just because of this body inhabit this arbitrary skim the I inhabit. Our entire worlds are close to me. I came back from a weekend in East Germany. A fifteen minutes in Leipzig. and. Hot and fifty meters in the front door. One of my best friends lives family of Nazis who are against the mixing of blood the actual. Hard fifty meters two hundred meters away from the front door. They're against the mixing of races. The racial mixing they live two hundred meters place spent entire weekend with a lovely lovely family. That's my reality near me. At obt fucking die. But breaks my heart to be honest well. It can't break your you're. Thinking as you say the underside, thank you for sharing it. 'cause it's farmable and painful and true. And then. And that wack about the horrifying moment at. Hopeful so hey. Now you so just south. Up this is not the favor that's. That's how shitty the favor is. That the devil reveals himself. That's how shitty favor is is that you knew that anyway? I knew that anyway, it just gets revealed. It doesn't change the system and I'm thinking about how we started this talking about. Sabotage online I'm thinking. About, how the sabotages internalized with that much oppression like you go home, and you see the absolute comfort I'm luxury and it's the line actually in. The Great Gatsby which is often quoted about and daisy and their wealth and retreating into the vast Keller Smith's. Yeah Line. Describes this describes. White supremacy on whiteness ill at why as fast carelessness! And how? You start talking about. This idea of sabotage. When I'm wandering. It's not sabotage. Is it just a trauma response? It's both can be both I think. Yes a trauma response, but then it cuts you off from happiness. That might be out there. So each experience you have this prohibitive makes afraid to try new things and to be honest. One the reason putting this song out. is a triumphant itself. Whatever happens I? Mean whoever listens to it. Frankly and I know the people listened to. It will have different types written. Those putting out of different heights, but really for me it's a form of self actualization, and I'm honest with you I just WANNA put out. This I won't use it to live in the world because. You know there's many things I was told I couldn't do as many things. I was told that. Wouldn't exist in the world so I'm just I just finished a memoir about? I'm finishing writing about private school. Someone said to me, why didn't you? Why didn't you put that book out? And China set it to like big publishers and get bidding war started. A simple there are two things I the my story to tell. Sabas scared if I sold it to the wrong publisher, they want me to name all these names, and it'd be like a tabloid type thing, and that's not the because derive. The other thing is the to be honest with you. I hadn't sold a book for eighteen months before that I'd written a big sci-fi Novel Avenue, said No, I've written a new memoir about Berlin. Evidence, said No. I spent eighteen months trying to sell. Something quite broke. It was quite difficult to get anywhere and. Then started a music things difficult with that and to be honest with you. I felt like a failure. On how to get something out, I had to put something out so. Putting out this music and putting out this book. Is just a way of affirming myself. And it was weird because as an artist. You know a lot of people. I'll be honest with you is not I'm not ashamed to say this is the truth is what it is I came to Berlin six years ago to kind of disappear. I literally thought I was done I thought like you're just going to end up. Toiling in Obscurity Writing away quietly. You write a little bit about football. A little bit politics maybe meet someone I sit with him by the Lake Fall in love and. An RB good with that. Because that's good for most people, it's not good for most artists because desires to reach people with a range of things. But I was good with that. Like, and that was a form of arguments, a former self sabotage coming to Berlin like instead of going to the US to build my curriculum. I didn't give a shit. I'm not was a response to trauma because I was so used to being. To this, too. That black or to queer or to wear to outspoken to partial to whatever I was so sick of Olivet. I came to into disappear. People like Oh. Why did you go to country like that with these things on us up well, because actually..

Berlin murder East Germany Keller Smith Lake Fall football US Olivet Leipzig. publisher China
"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

"You rebels radio presents the two of US shorts with neo me Watterson. Albert, Frederick. High this is naming lattice. Welcome to the US Charts Myself Alba Frederick he's talking to people across the globe about that pandemic experience. On its relationship to creativity, mental health emotional wellbeing. And as always I'd like to trigger warning. These adult shows of the themes will be complex and interesting, and maybe it sometimes be triggering. If you're over ten the disposition today, put this on pause and put market for later saw otherwise dime, right. Today I'm interviewing. My did their Mussa Conga. Who is a broadcaster, writer and musician? Only you said occasional musician on my question that because the reason I questioned that, but don T end. is about creativity and this idea that you have to. Get up everyday to paint a bear painter guess up every day to be a writer and I'm. Behalf fluctuations in our lives for a million reasons, so, does that mean be kind of define ourselves? If we're not doing everyday Bikaner, find ourselves as that. We haven't got a huge. Online following, we made lots of money. So that's why questioned. Let you said occasional while you went straight in love. No good. No, we said we would. Do you know what it is? It's because I have so much respectful. The process on the Croft. That when I see, you're right when I see myself. Making stuff now then is as a part time amateur thing because each time I make music I'm deeply commited I'm. It's weird. I'm I'm passionate about music in a way I. Don't fully express a lot of friends. Like. It's not even my twitter bio. Talk about very much. What I make music I'm deeply passionate about sound about craft. The reason like you love making music is because there's some things you can say with that. You can't see any other way. There's a way that music enters you. Dot that nothing else does and I love having the options putting out some music pretty soon because there's a song I wrote and I'm like well right with Chris so I worked with this project. Kubiak so. I, wanted to talk about the fact that there's so much Prussia. You mentioned the pressure to produce this pressure to produce. There's also pressure society to be positive and be well and be fixed and be better. Know me how you doing you better, you better. Everyone's always you'd better. There's always the sense of like okay like people. Other people get tired. Of Your tiredness and I wanted to do a song which is basically about. It's okay to feel broken. Songs is sabotage spacey about. Always talk about self help actually if I can't help myself. What if I actually destroy myself because I? I've learned. The Bat so many bad things happen that I've been given no cause for optimism. I wanted to do some for those people. Because if think that's quite related, but I think a lot of people will be yeah. I have self-destructive cycles. Yeah, I have like bad patterns of like. Self Management I was like. Yeah, this is for you and. That's not the kind of. You know because of the way. Make Music. It's not the I. would be chatting albums. Every China would be producing albums every year. Every now and again is like I can only say that this song I can only say that particular thing. With eight of music. So yeah. Some sometimes. Not Sometimes, not occasional like you're right. I'm I started correct. You correct me even before. I arrived on the on this conversation's post. Funny, but yeah. I hope you don't feel corrected in an awful way I. No this is no holds barred like you're welcome to ask anything. That's fine. Too Because I am so interested in what you say about self sabotage, and even defining himself as an occasional musician. Is You got so sabotage, but but then. Like you say. Do we want to self sabotage? Ourselves sabotage. You know you can feel crappy by yourself. You One cam. And we can actually call lay, and then we can give ourselves a half time about giving ourselves a time. You know that like the addictive loop synthetic, and that was the liberation from it. The whole thing is about that it's about. Out She, just let it be. It's okay to feel. It's like. These are the things that happened to these things you may have done. The mistakes made. Those mistakes may have arisen from being undermined so often that you made more, and it's okay to still are part of healing. The beginning of heating is dislike. To try to be ashamed of your mistakes to just to try not to be in, it's not even there's not even any pressure to get better this dislike. Knowledge this. Knowledge that yeah, this is the thing didn't go right. But don't be ashamed of it like or trying to be ashamed of it Yet try not to to say this is so i. Am and maybe carry on doing after this after hearing this whatever? People talking to you maybe that you know what? It's okay to acknowledge that, too. But. I would say if anything just acknowledge if you can. But there is a pattern i. think that's the helpful thing because I've spoken to people before going through staff. I've been myself. And the hardest thing the beginning is that. Something has going on. A There is a there is a dynamic, because sometimes it also one thing I say one really keeping I stress in song is. Look people talk about like self sabotage being exhausting that it relates how exhausted positivity can be in familiar his. It's like a muscle you've never used. Says suddenly woke. You haven't walked in ten years. It's like telling someone be competent. Be Positive. You're like what I've never done it. There's no precedent for it. There's no. There's no precedent is actually so much more precedent so much more logical to sabotage because that's all I know and I'm really good at it. So it's honoring people's pain. On People's processes of crating will pay. Dot To. Me feels really important, and that's why it was harder to say that. In text on! It wasn't music for some reason. I think because I found Catharsis in in writing. If that makes sense doesn't make a lot of sense and I think. There's something about releasing something. Comes an entire thing given. To the walls to a an audience. It comes. From Yourself, two hours can also say because I see told. I'm thinking about. Big Things Accountability. And a shame. and. Forgiveness on those already huge moment and this thing hand and. I wouldn't be doing this conversation justice if we didn't talk about the your black man I'm a white woman, and those words have a different resonance for us entirely because of our unique personal and political experiences. And how to level those and. It's let the Hughes topics, and that's why think say music or cultural artifacts Useful story. So they don't. It doesn't become an abstract conversation. It becomes embodied rail. I'm personal like you say. So many things have happened. The tendency to self sabotage gets greater. Am I wonder how much self sabotage? is about making meaning out of chaos. Yeah, it's because then you have If you self-harm. Maybe Mark Yourself you've. You've gained some level of control. Some measure of that I was talking to someone in an abusive relationship. She emerged from it copies ago and she's thinks so much better. Announce shot up to her..

US writer Dot Mussa Conga Frederick Watterson Alba Frederick don T Albert twitter Prussia Kubiak Bat Hughes China Chris
"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

09:57 min | 2 years ago

"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

"Weeks Saturday I'M GONNA. Make a masterpiece leg east even often when. I am BC when you know videos of like heavy like word. When silently I found that I need to create the most and I think because a scape for my mind to create art. And now because I have all of these time, available every. Time. I don't know I just I. Find it really difficult to. Properly focused on and make something. So. I think I have been trying to. The. We really responsible in a sense of. Okay you know? I am not going to leave as I used to leave before the pandemic because that's the whole point. that. Since supposed to feel the same way as before or the wise, we are not doing things right. so I think this has been. A might add of. That I into. s still make my own work like in. I'm. Even looking archives on the inter- night till to keep inspired myself but. Being gentle with myself and thinking well if I'm finding the three men to make. It took. The? Let's really mature because I think people responded very differently. Some people making law. 'cause that fails support for them. And I think it's like three just like. When of were that some constraints by himself? You know you're working. Go Daydream This that I'm the Newark as well. You seem to flower Shandra. Certain sort of pressure is quite good for you, but now that you save got open-ended time. I'm that's not helping. But you'll reading some ready curious to know what you're reading. So. I am reading the story of pain. And I think is quite fascinating like to see. I I. Love the title because. Now called the story of pain because pain can be dated. And I absolutely love the fact that you know is a human experience. And even everybody feels pain differently. Manasseh how other people react to pain? As well like a very different like. So at the moment on. I was trying to see if I make some kind of parade. About pain. but I am there. I just don't know. He's GonNa come or these. Here. and was it that really attracted you to the apart from the fact that it's not a history. It's a story which makes it sounds like there's multiple experiences. Why did you feel that you need to be a? Why did you feel you needed to read that book? I. I came up after conversation with another artist and live away of. We were both in the same boat of. Item feel like creating now like I. Don't know how I like an talking about. I guess it is when you have lost someone in your life like I lost my mom. When I was quite young, so. I just think. It is stemmed when you realize. The pain. That means to lose this. On now that we are in this pandemic. some thanks feel like. The people who is not taking the issues that they still it may be because they didn't lost their loved ones. I'm think. Thinking about all of the? and. Watching US welcome documentaries about you know they black black play and past pandemics everything. I I, so something that. Pain transform you and Bain transform societies and paint transform humans, and because I am in this loop about transformation I feel. He we on bow, lay in this moment of uncertainty. I'm paying and I want to know how the pain is going to transform us the same way. I felt and as formation loosen my mother. How always society transforming. I'm how you know. We are going to come out of this if excess. I just want to get the book as soon as we get off this interview. I'M GONNA. Be Looking for on long during big Old Burgess thing I. I think that about the pain being transformative because I was talking with my mom, she's ninety two online she's. She's lived through the Second World War. She's quite stoical. I was talking with him wondering when these incredible pressurizing situations. Why disarm paypal seem to be. Afflicted with the most awful trauma and trauma, especially like PTSD IN COMPLEX PTSD. It's like stock record. It goes round and round round, and other people seem to feel quite stoical. And that was like there seemed to be like a fork in the road between. Different experiences and then I then I thought was the by intergenerational trauma when. Generations have got the. Freedom to even begin to explore their pain. So they push it down and they carry on, keep calm and carry on something, and then the next generation, the generation of that other people to express the full extent. What's happened? I mean that's a complex so. Discussion because it can't really be measured than there is something about intergenerational drum being real thing. But. As as just add in what you're saying about. The trans formative quality of pain which egner. Has. Everything you know it's sadness, but it also has optimism at has. Sold about creating new meaning and living differently. So thank you answer I've got one more question. And Desperate HOUSEMAN PEOPLE I've. Thought about a world or question asking them to respond to win whatever way and I've done a bit of a you of just use the intuitively. I've just been writing down the. So the question for you is where is home? I think. Many places I think nowadays a home is where I feel safe. Home is where I feel myself. And I think I, a half few homes nowadays. So I feel that I have a home here in England. Because I feel at home at my house with my boyfriend and I feel like he made me feel at home and my friends around me. I feel at home. But then I have my home in a Spain, and that would always be my home so when I go back to my parents on my see my dad and my brother. is like a nevertheless. Then I don't remember you know. When did I leave like you know this is my home. I! Think yeah, I think I yeah. You can bill home. As long as you have your loved ones around. You know anywhere. Slow beautiful. Slash mice on the. Absolutely love lay. I think that's a really nice place to. End The interview. Tender soft place, but I'm just say huge signed Q to Paloma people can find online. They can enjoy your work. The really comprehensive websites of people can say they can. For you on Instagram Social Megyn. They want something more current, but I definitely definitely recommend anybody. To go to your website, because the work is absolutely outstanding. Airs. I love your work. That's absolutely amazing. It's like. What you say, and then your talk about transmission. The your life has changed after. Ucla new bring something entirely new..

PTSD BC Shandra US Newark Ucla Bain Spain Burgess England
"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

08:29 min | 2 years ago

"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

"Kind of experience in my life is really important. You so preempted me. There's two things here because I've got my little. Story Little Arrow that says storytelling and the role of imagination, and that's for me. That's awesome about drawing on path events creating an unnamed future getting something from nothing. That's the first thing, but the thing about the child's spirit are a friend of mine loves to remember. She has parties. It's very important that people bring their children and she had a party. This was sometimes last year under fantastic band, and the kids smoke hits with jumping on a bed and screaming and somebody else to this. Not Okay, she said. Where else do they get the opportunity to the home screen? Have this much joy. It's really important that they have that freedom. And she really engaged with that and I think it's the sort of the spirit of the child you know, so. I mean which is a lot of different things, but somehow that excited engagement like the fairy lights, the freedom of expression, so that are the two points. I'm going back to my point about this role of imagination, so how when you're? Working with. Children and you're doing storytelling with much younger bonds. How does that feed into your matching imagination annual in a world? Save when you're writing your novel. Is there a link between those two things? Absolutely I think I, think for me. Imagination is key in. Everything and it's interesting what you're saying about the spirit of children as well because I think children have something. That I don't lose. The adults really need to have if we're going to solve. All of the problems of the world, because I think often to children. They have the solutions to those problems and I. genuinely would be a better place if children were in charge. But going back to that kind of involvement imagination. Yeah, I think getting to engage with. My imagination regularly. In order to what with children and engage their imaginations. Echoes out I guess in my other work, but will stay in life in that. I think you can always imagine a solution to any problem all any issue you're facing. Just about going into into that creative brain and I think when I'm writing. If I'm stuck on something I mean. and as I said I'm working on a novel and I'm working on it for about two years is doing it in between. Life and jobs and earlier this year. I was kind of made the decision, right? This is the lining to really. Focus on this. And I think often I run up against where I get stuck. You get that thing. And how this needs to go, and just remembering the actually can imagine. Ten, different eventualities for, and it's trying most sometimes before you come to the right place and I think that's off to. Children we might go in. Storytelling adventure or something, and there's a character facing something, and we might try five different things before we get that character out of the place where they're stuck. And that's all part of the fun of it as Trying different things and using your imagination to do that. If it's your question, there is perfect them at makes me think play 'cause, I know because I. Know you person. You were the woman who said this wonderful phrase which I'm now living by. That's always time to bake a cake. It's just become like a cliche in our household, because it's offered so often, but I suppose that thing is there's always time to squeeze a bit more joy out of a situation, even if things were tough and there's always room to make it better so how? Do you an Jama during this time especially make sure that you have. A playful attitude or Just play itself in a relationship in your day to day. Existence isn't about the rigors of working on setting up a new business. Yeah, I mean that's really interesting I. think it's really hard. And I think in this and I feel like I've talked a lot about creativity and. Work in things that I have to say. I've definitely fat like that's not. Sam found this time challenging and I had days where crude into bed at one o'clock in afternoon in that's been it and I think that's really important not to give a false. Has Been But I. also think you're absolutely right. We've definitely. I actually one is a few weekends ago is one of the really hot weekends. I wake up in the morning and I was feeling. A bit of a Funk is really stuck. Just couldn't quite get myself out of whatever place are stuck in? Quite own fun of journaling I interesting the I when I was younger I used to journal every day like pages and pages, and then I stopped a lot through late twenty s my started again kind of in my thirties, and I was writing my sort of general ammoniac. How can I make this fun what we descend on? The paddling pool out and so we have a paddling pool. We don't have children. We have a paddling pool. In. The paddling pool. We live in Apollo and she was walking through the streets of it and their parent of a child she's to teach. Is that your little ones in Tallahassee to admit no. Just for us. and. We've got the paddling pool. Garden, it literally takes up the whole garden. We filled up with water in cat, and and so it day paddling pool, having some cocktails and reading, and I made a sine die stuck up. This said we were having a pool party, and just it was essential. I think it's about in these situations trying to think of that. We love swimming and we'll pay out side and we can't do that at the moment, so it's about thinking about maybe the things you love doing and how you can. Bring those until life in whatever way in this strange lockdown situation. So I, guess that's an example. We've made lots of silly I. We like rewriting musicals and singing them for friends who've done a few times, the people's birthdays. We've been making videos. Someone friends kids who is too. I didn't absolutely loves definitely loves Gemma. She kind of constantly sort of she says often. This two year old is just Gemma Gemma. Gemma over and over again. She's very very sweet. We might have some videos and yeah. I think we've just been trying to keep us in subpoena. Aside from work. On feels like you know because you together on your already established that system you know of. Playing a making things and engaging and having fun, so that's not like you suddenly had to. Do something fun. You know it's in the style of you both way to a paddling pool in your garden. Even though you might not have done that, you might have still had that sense of ceremony because I've been around for dinner at your. Menu cards and those games. There's lots of stuff to engage whether it's deliberately engaging. So, what did you think of? Go live before your life now? Though some of its similar, some of it's very different. What sort of tricks do think you have from the life before this helping you survive now especially I guess. With the people, you're not saying you know family and friends who love that you can't see face to face. Yeah I guess some. Interesting A, we have very very fortunate. I have a very close group of friends who have been. There are six of US six months, yes. Who I've been friends with since I was probably about fifteen. And we're very close. We've got. We've been through an awful lot together. We have a WHATSAPP great and some days I can put it down back twenty minutes later in their seventy messages. You know, and it's a lovely, so it's like a family and I guess Interestingly, a few of us are gay and I..

Gemma Gemma US Sam Tallahassee Apollo
"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

09:29 min | 2 years ago

"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

"The two of US shorts with Watterson Albert Frederick. High, this is naming lettuce. Welcome to the vast shots. Myself Alba Frederick talking to people across the globe about that pandemic experience. And its relationship to creativity, mental health and emotional wellbeing. And as always I'd like to trick a warning. These at shows of the themes will be complex. Interesting, and maybe at sometimes triggering. If you're over ten the disposition today, put this on pause and put market for later. Otherwise dive right. I am. Overexcited extremely pleased to have my dear friends and multi-talented multidisciplinary artist in every area possible. Amy Taylor and when I was thinking of you say. All the different creative things you do. I was flying. This is quite a long list. What's last? Stop Win because obviously I know that you teach your storyteller puppet maker. Artist you're also really great Baker, and you can feign and you right. Is there anything that I haven't included? I think. That's everything slow. That's everything I think. So I, go the first thing I felt because usually I like down some questions and all notes and see. If we can. Go from that until broader conversation and the first thing I thought with you because the conversation we were having before. Lockdown isn't very different from your day job in the sense that you're used to working at. You use to create your own structure and discipline but I thought in the context of the fact that you are social creative person creativity part of your daily life in your hourly live. How do you balance the sense of self discipline and a free? Open heart creative expression. That's a really good question. I find. Creativity identity for me. It's all comes in bursts, and it never really announces when it's going to come. And I remember seeing Great Ted talk once. I think it was by the lady who wrote the book eat. Pray Love Carbon Behan name, but she told Elizabeth. Gilbert is with Gilbert I. Don't know if you've seen the Ted talk about. How they believe that you'll muse was in the room, and it came into common problem worship for a long time, but I do sometimes feel like that. That sense of creative I don't always know when it's going to strike, and it can be really difficult. Thing of money been commissioned to do something, or you know you need that discipline to work on something, and it's not necessarily there and I'm quite often i. work very well and depression so often leave things until the final hour on them burst about in that kind of final hour. Because that's sometimes the pressure I think quite need. And it's been interesting. Being looked down at because I feel like I haven't been as creative. And I haven't always had that creative spark. That often there if that makes sense. It does make sense, but you have been doing something else so now. I'm going to plug. About. Forward which is a really lovely initiative. Some thinking we can talk about that, but perhaps how some of your creative energy new inspiration has gone into to that. Yes so my partner and I. We, I guess we both lost our work kind of overnight. There were a couple of weeks before the end of March, and I was just guessing email after email canceling all of my freelance work for the next. As you for the foreseeable future and people were saying things like well. Maybe July maybe September. I I mean it was everything. Everything went within about four days. And for Demo in that she's. She was at the time working as a freelance play teacher pitchers who writes in? Inclusion where can kind of course? Let's different freelance work as ID. And we were talking. With goodness, but what are we gonNa do we need to? We need to do something and I think. For me I need work for my mental health really like I. Need something to get up in the morning I, really struggle, I think some people. My brother, for instance he, he got furloughed, and was very excited about. It was like I have to do anything every day and for me, the thought of having to get up in the morning afternoon is quite terrifying, so we kinda talk about skills. We have between us and Gemma's primary school teacher by training and. Arts educator I do not work in Schools Children Teaching, drama? Skills together and came up with Spring forward. which is online zoom classes for children? We can take up to three time and we're covering everything from math to philosophy to literacy to drama I've been doing my favorite thing at the moment. is storytelling sessions for real tiny's? because. There's just stuff they're stuffy can zoom zoom as well as he caught doing life like yesterday ads in fairy lights in my hands that I was holding them up in there and the kids were just like oh my goodness. And it was just some very lights. Words in real life. I. Don't think they affect the same because they can. See kind of better. So a lot of creativity is beginning to that and say the early days of really difficult I was I was really tired at the start of lockdown. I was really struggling. To quantify more than maybe an hour a day, where could be creative and productive? And it was I have to say. JEMMA was the driving force behind the early stages of it. And, as it's going on I, think is kind of picked up speed in that I've also picked up speed, so it's Kinda got gained momentum, and now I'm feeling more inspired a more creative and having to kind of design, different storytelling sessions each week in different lessons. has kind of kick started I guess my creativity OPEC. which has been good? What's been? Have you worked with Gemma before? We said we would never work again. We said we would never work together. We said it's enough that we live together. Have relationship together. We will never work together. I'd actually it's been lovely. Obviously. The situation has quite dramatically changed from previously. And I think we have a good balance. We have different I guess in the whole running or I suppose now is a business. We have different interests so yeah. Happy loan stuff about each other that you didn't know through working together. Yeah, so I guess having been together for years. We already knew quite a lot about each other and I was quite resistant I to throw myself into it because I felt like. I guess I was a bit scared about how when you were in a relationship with someone how working together might play out and I guess we've kind of ease myself into gently and now we've got. We've got really nice balance like I. Love Doing Accounts, so I do the accounts and Gemma's much better at the communication in the social media side of things, and it's quite naturally divided. We have a nice balance I don't think I've learned anything. New About Each Other? I would bit more patient with each other now as a result of having to navigate starting a business together. But I think what sounds like because you've been busy and. Not just your creativity, but how important is to engage with other people, and how teaching is us of artistic practice here? You know that the teachers I've interviewed all people who love teaching. You know they have this in common. They get really excited by the people that teaching are engaging and blossoming and changing so seems like it's been really important for you to keep engaging with other people. Through this is not been one of the things that has helped kept you going. Even if it's teaching little ones, you're still in a very sign namic way of relating to another person. Yeah I think so and I think it's Fa- me as always I couldn't have life where I wasn't engaging with kids on a regular basis and I think. All of my work outside of teaching and children and I write plays and make theater and right. You know marking on an awful and I. Think all of that, but I could never do that if I didn't have away time with kids because I think there's something about with kids quite often. That keeps he very present and very in the moment and very responsive to their needs. And also a going into that immagination space children feels really important to me and I love discussing completely lost in a space with them. And so in terms of needing to bring that into my life quite quickly when knocked out of started happening and needed to make sure I was having that engagement and that teaching..

Gemma Ted Alba Frederick US Gilbert depression Albert Frederick Amy Taylor Watterson Baker Behan partner JEMMA OPEC. Elizabeth primary school teacher
"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

07:19 min | 2 years ago

"us." Discussed on The Two Of Us

"Two of US shorts with Watterson Albert Frederick. High this is naming lettuce welcome to the US Shots Myself Alba Frederick talking to people across the globe about that pandemic experience. And its relationship to creativity, mental health and emotional wellbeing. And as always I'd like to trick warning. These adult shows of the themes will be complex. Interesting and maybe it sometimes be triggering. If you're over ten the disposition today, put this on pause and put market for later. Otherwise dive right in. I am very excited. Today chuffed even to be interviewing a husband and wife tape. Ricard Lund. I think I've pronounced that correctly. Are Carpenter who? Autism the unripe, but also collaboration and work together. Looking at them now that that's. Thanks Office mate's a gorgeous team and I've got to tell you something what I've been doing. I've been picking out the full Angel Cards. Because I'm not home. I can do this for my interviews on the ones I got for you. I'm this brings me to my first question. The ones I've got for you a spontaneity huma. So. How much is of those well? It's themes. Part of your individual work in process I'm when you work together. good question. The the thing is very nice because. I, don't know. I like things that are caught question of joy and Brian. Comedy Weiss. Sometimes in been my pictures and in my projects I don't think that people necessarily see it, but. It's definitely there without sound yes. So yeah, they make me chuckle. Then I guess I know us. Why No? Your humor and yet record has yeah very dry sense of humor, a very sweetie sense of humor. I guess so sometimes. Maybe it's missed boy. English people. So. Spontaneous is definitely Mai without a doubt. We've realized working in the last few weeks together. And separately is we both we've records built a makeshift darkroom in in the cellar. And he's learning how to do so printing and album printing, and because I haven't had any money to buy film up. Until now I've been doing loom, imprinting and wet, Siona types and I am very chaotic, and and we realized that I like to intuitively work with things so i. I will make apiece and as it's developing or as I will. I will work with it and I'll change around and I'll add things to it. So why working very spontaneous, people have an idea to it straight away. I mean you enjoy being a photographer as well sometimes photography you cough. You know that this different stage stages involved often taken the picture then process it printed, too. Many might lay it out in sequins, and all of those steps going to change the way that the. Picture looks. The way it works unfamiliar with with learning the things that I've been learning recently. You don't do the sold printing if I if I do a change to the negative. Or if I add an extra bit of an ingredient in the in the sort of developer, fixer or something that's going to change the results. And I'm not gonna see that until maybe like twenty four hours later without result is. That's driving czar nuts. I can't do that I. Absolutely I have. I to be able to see something changing and be able to. To work with it so I see. I think oh I'm not Sakina on that, so maybe I'll spray some water on or our lads, some lemon juice, or do with the with the lumens. Thankful. because. Because of the LT supports pledge. Scheme of been selling prints have sold a few, which meant I could buy symposia Woodfield last week, so the last couple of days I've started a I do my ghosts again. And it's just a relief because it's a project that I've been wanting to continue, but also it's I'm. I can work with I'm like. It's very physical the way I work. Very spontaneous slept right? Okay. I'm going to go do this the two nights ago. We did some polaroid's in the garden. About midnight, because then there's no neighbors that can see what we're doing and no neighbors to interfere or anything like that. Record is very very considered, and as he says you know, his process often can take a few days to do whereas I need to be in. And I think. It's definitely on kind of like more like a painter. And so I think you should. I know we talked about this the other day, but I think you're more of a sculptor. You kind of like to shape something as see the way that it's sort of changes and develops in front of you. As you conflict pushing something. To See what that does to to your picture he's. Got, this 'cause spontaneity I just thought to visa era because I think. You've been really instrumental. some of Mayakoba this idea of having a play. And what that means and I think for me when I started this a long term project, which is on hold on hold. I don't know which had Kohl's all my bad work, which was a way of like escaping the? Rigidity of producing and aesthetically pleasing photograph. And I did it with the different cameras. Right into my dad's law did it with my food today, which much poison pointing shoot? I'm my that thing of having a play not wasn't hands on. It's been very much just like letting the process. Lead itself rather than come to a decision, but also in him about Ereck because we have something in common of power from Photography Leo much better at the thing I'm about to mention which is baking. I can't make told you come because I can say that because you can't keep an opening on off them. It's not like stern something on the top of the Slovene you can ask been ascendant. have a play, but baking. You have to wait. That's the spirit of waiting while slip the thing that you've made goes to. It's unprocessed, absolutely outside view. Of feel like my brain is kind of jumping around all these different. Different things you know to do with photography, 'cause I I..

US Alba Frederick Albert Frederick Ricard Lund polaroid Watterson Carpenter Ereck Weiss developer Sakina joy Kohl Brian
"us." Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

Drive with Us Podcast

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"us." Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

"Know it was really a real thing lack current while who named that. That's why I want to for anyways. The next on you. How did a previous episode the on ice and Americans and their ice? This Americans love ice and they said that they found it strange. That American sold ice cold beverages even in the data winter. Yeah people eat ice cream and like drink snow ice cream. Sales are apparently the highest in the winter than in the summer. No sense like more people get ice cream in the winter than they do in the summer when you're melting in the summer. Yeah Yeah. I don't attempt ice cream like crazy in the winter and I don't understand why and then they get sick and then they they wonder why and how. This person's comment on ice was hilarious. That order any drink in a restaurant and two-thirds of is surely going to be filled by large ice cubes. Which we've discussed before then literally you get ice with a little bit of water win giving you less like beverage. Doesn't it like no wonder? Why ice ice baby is popularly hummed? There is ice ice ice. I don't agree with that but I mean the fact that they're thought advice but is true. I think it's just a way for them to be like. Yeah less pledged to drink. I have to give you so. That's the one thing I always was like is weird here as people eat cold stuff or drink cold stuff in winter like all year round. Yeah and I'm like why aren't you frozen already like cold and you're drinking. I never have that craving ice cream during colder time when it gets. Hot like Rosen drinks or whatever just like lizards what warm like. I feel like having US movie where I feel like having like you know I am but then most cool like just looking at it makes me go well while now alone no whoa no humidity song will well. No well no no. Whoa WHOA is not going to So the next one. They said that we literally have dry through his Almost very dry. What through almost every kind store from restaurants liquor stores. Who would you say drywall? Throughs drive through the.

US