35 Burst results for "US government"

Black-Owned Businesses Hit Especially Hard by Coronavirus Pandemic, Study Finds

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:29 sec | 5 hrs ago

Black-Owned Businesses Hit Especially Hard by Coronavirus Pandemic, Study Finds

"Reserve study warns the pandemic poses a grave risk the black owned small businesses across the United States on with that story, Here's Bloomberg's Vinny Del Giudice. The data compiled by the New York Fed Showa, 41% drop in the number of small business owners who are black. That's twice the number of total small businesses. Recent include concentration of black businesses and pandemic hot spots and the uneven reach of government aid in the early days of the crisis, many down to die Spielberg radio

Vinny Del Giudice New York Fed Showa Bloomberg United States Spielberg
Census to Halt Operations a Month Early Amid Growing Fears of a Population Undercount

Here & Now

04:58 min | 8 hrs ago

Census to Halt Operations a Month Early Amid Growing Fears of a Population Undercount

"Bureau has confirmed it will wrap up its count a month early. It's a move that many fear could reduce the accuracy of the population. Tout NPR national correspondent has alone. Juan broke this story last week, and the bureau confirmed it last night in hand. The census happens as we know every 10 years. The end date was initially postponed until late October because of the pandemic. Now the bureau is saying that it will wrap up on September 30th. What reasons has the sense is given According to a statement, the Census Bureau director Stephen Dealing Ham posted on the sense sphere is website last night. The Commerce secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, has directed the bureau to speed up counting to end it cut it short a month early in order to meet current legal deadline. There's a deadline set by federal fall, it says the Census Bureau via the Commerce secretary has to present to the president the latest state pop. Elation counts by December 31st of this year, and those are the numbers that are used to redistribute seats in Congress among the states, and that was a deadline The bureau had said in April that it could no longer meet because of the pandemic needed more time has asked Congress to give it more time by extending the deadline into 2021. Sir from Congress has not extend that deadline. Democrats have introduced legislation, but Republicans have not regarding those deadlines. And so the Commerce secretary apparently is saying it is time to make this change to make sure we can meet that deadline. Okay, let's break this down a little bit. NPR first reported that the agency had decided to cut short door knocking efforts. What is the impact, though of finishing early like this and what populations Could be most impacted by an undercount. One thing to keep in mind here is that you know, through all this back and forth career officials from the Census Bureau, including associate director for the 2020 cents is an associate director for field operations has publicly stated that the bureau as early as May, they've said, can no longer meet this federal deadline of December 31st And by rushing to do it at this point by not continue to count through October 30 1st there are concerns here that there would be great and accuracy and the data that are collected because we're at a point in the senses, with roughly four out of 10 households that have not yet responded to the senses, those four out of 10 whole household's roughly our representative of historically under counter groups who are Less likely to respond on the census around their own and are really probably only get counted if a door knocker gets to meet them and tries to essentially convinced them to do an in person interview outside their home for about five minutes, trying to collect that information and otherwise the bureau if it rides up, finding homes that are vacant or or seemed to be vacant or unresponsive here has to rely on government records and That way of rely on government records using statistical methods The bear has used before, but the bureau might have to use it at a much, much greater extent. And that could really hurt theocracy because those methods tend to over represent the white population while under representing people of color. Yeah, as we know, the Trump administration tried last year to get a citizenship question added to the census. The Supreme Court rejected that attempt. How does this week's news that the census will wrap up early fit into the bigger picture? I mean, the question everyone is asking is, Is this change? Politically motivated? You know, I've been covering the 2020 cents is all the lead up to it for three more than three years now, and it has been a Siri's Of attempts by the Trump administration to have a very direct hand and how the senses is carried out to be very clear. There is no citizenship question on the 2020 cents is, even though the Trump Administration tried very hard to get one onto the forms, and that on now, you know, just just recently Last Last month, President Trump released a presidential memo calling for unauthorized immigrants to be excluded. From the census numbers used to redistribute seats in Congress. Even though the Constitution says the counting of the whole number of persons in each state that's the that's how that's the people that should be counted nor determine how many states how many seats in Congress each state gets. So this latest move here a lot of Democrats a lot of sense its advocates, given what career officials have said about the need for more time or really questioning. Why is there this push to not extend counting and what happens with Congress? That's NPR's national correspondent. Hotsy Low long hands. Thank you so much for joining us. You're welcome, Tanya.

Census Bureau Congress NPR Trump Administration President Trump Juan Wilbur Ross Associate Director Director Stephen Dealing Ham Tanya Supreme Court Siri Representative Field Operations
When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

The Takeaway

13:57 min | 9 hrs ago

When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

"Since its debut and twenty seventeen, the Chinese APP tick tock has become one of the fastest growing social media tools with more than eight hundred, million active users. The APP lets users make short videos that are often shared across the Internet, but Tiktok isn't all fun games for months. Now, a lot of the attention about the APP has been focused on the national security concerns and the collection of user data, and as a result, the platform has been banned in India, by multiple branches of the US military and by Wells Fargo employees most recently however, president trump took aim at tiktok himself by threatening to ban the APP. We're looking at Tiktok we may be banning TIKTOK. We may be doing some other things, a couple of options, but a lot of things are happening. So we'll see what happens but we are looking at a lot of alternatives with respected dictum. Those remarks were before reports surfaced that Microsoft was pursuing a deal to buy TIKTOK in a press conference at the White House yesterday president trump claimed Microsoft or any other company would have to wait until September fifteen to acquire the APP and would be expected to give a percentage of the profit from the sale to the US Treasury. Joining me now is Graham Webster editor of digit China Project at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and a fellow at New America Graham thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me. And Cowan Rosenblatt is a youth and Internet cultural reporter for NBC, News. Dot Com callen thanks for being with us as well. Glad to, be here. Cowen who is the average tiktok user? The average tick tock user really is is a dynamic question because there is a huge range of different people who are using the APP but I'd say the most common person you're gonNA find is someone who is either at the tail end of high school or College who is definitely a solidly in generation the Gen Z. and he was using me APP mostly for fun to do dance challenges trends an engaged with communities that serve to their world. Graham. All of that sounds pretty basic I mean it doesn't sound like there's anything to be concerned about so far what type of data does tiktok collect from its users Graham? We'll TIKTOK is like a lot of social media companies these days It's using an AI driven or machine learning driven algorithm to figure out which content to to individual users. So to get this accomplished, they pay attention to obviously whatever you post that also you know what posts on your feed you look at how long you look at them where your device location is They also tried to track individual users like many apps do by looking at things like screen size and operating system and of course, they have a fair amount of information about your social graph, your your connections to friends and other people that you follow. And so what were some of the concerns around the data collection that way Graham given that it feels like there's a lot of, as you mentioned, other social media platforms and advertisers and the like that are tracking everything that we do already. Why? Why is Tiktok being highlighted here and banned in some of the institutions that we mentioned at the top Well, the basic reason is that tick tock is owned by a Chinese company named Bite Dance and they're a fairly new social media company. They had a breakout a few years ago in China with an APP called junior Tokyo that that is a you know an algorithm, IQ news feed and this is China's first big breakout internationally in terms of social media APPS and really getting take-up in in many different countries around the world not just the United States. So there's A concern that data collected by Tick Tock could end up in the hands of the Chinese company or the Chinese government and wild tick. Tock says that it stores all US user data in the US or in Singapore we don't really have a good way as a society right now to check that type of thing and to make sure that companies commit you when they commit to you know storing data and the Safeway making sure that they're actually doing that. Doesn't sound like we have a lot of that in the United States either though Graham. I mean, we have constant security breaches left and right Right. Well, the United States doesn't have a central data governance or data security or privacy Regulatory System the most prominent example of one globally as Europe, which has the general data protection regulation called the GDP are, and that governs things like when an apper services going to collect your personal information they have to gain certain types of consent and follow certain types of rules and there's also kind of limits the. Idea that if you collect data for a certain reason that you got consent for you shouldn't be able to use it for other reasons and that type of governance is just not that prominent in the US partially because the big US social media companies are not especially keen to have their practices heavily regulated they. They find GDP are in Europe to be burdensome and You know get in the way of making money. Kalland back in June president trump organized a rally in Tulsa Oklahoma and rumor has it that tiktok users promoted buying tickets for the event and didn't show up so that the event would be empty. What do we know about how that rubbed of the administration? So, what we know is it seemed to sort of frustrate the administration. Now, there's no evidence that the Tiktok users and K pop stands who are fans of Korean pop music that they had any impact on turnout. We are going through a global pandemic. There are a lot of factors going on right now. So it is really hard to know sort of what that impact was. But what we do know is it likely inflated expectations for turnout. The administration was planning to have a second rally after the main rally in Tulsa. which they then had to cancel, and so we think that it really messed with them. It was a it was a real genuine troll on the part of these tic TAC users against the president, and it really seemed to rub him the wrong way and there are lots of Tiktok users young first time voters who are telling me that when trump said, he wanted to ban this APP that was a retaliation for what they did the stunt they pulled the prank they pulled in Tulsa most what they think is happening. That's what they think is happening why there is no evidence that that's the president's line of thinking but that's what these eighteen to twenty two year olds are telling me that that's their beliefs. Cowan, we talked about The you know whether or not talk users actually had any effect on the trump rally in Tulsa back in June but more more directly here wondering if you're seeing any more political movement on the APP, whether it's a pro trump or pro biden or anti-trump anti, Biden has it started to move away from dance and song and move towards more political leaning so far. It can do both things at once actually. So there are still the dance trends. There are massive accounts that are just enjoying music on the APP but we see a lot of politics on Tiktok now maybe more than ever some young people are telling me they feel that because their home in quarantine and because politics ramping up nationally as we get closer to this election that they're seeing more and more politics in their feet, and what we're seeing is a not so much pro by content, but a lot of anti-trump content and I WANNA be clear. There is Republican Todd Democrat tiktok liberal Tick Tock conservative Tiktok. But what it appears to be is a lot of generation. Z.. Has a anti-trump sentiment and that does not mean they heavy pro biden sentiment. But things that we see our young people say, Hey, on this day, everyone go to president, trump's campaign store and put these products in your cart. But don't check out because allegedly that messes with their inventory or everyone on this day go to president trump's twitter account and report account, and let's see we can get a taken down. So we're still seeing these sort of organized movements sort of Troll, the president and a lot of discussion of politics but whether or not that is in in favor of vice, President Biden or in favor of president trump is sort of yet to be seen. Graham LE. Let's talk a little bit. But I mean, it sounds like tiktok users are for the most part having fun on the site sort of trying to do the things that Collina's talking about here but. On a more serious note, the trump administration has been trying to ban the APP. They're citing national security concerns, concerns over censorship by the Chinese government. Valid are any of those concerns really given what you know about China US politics Well I think it's you have to separate them out So the the concern about censorship I think is legitimate there was there was an example a little while ago where it looked like some of the censorship that they would do in China restricting conversations about things the Communist Party doesn't like discussed had bled over into the international product Now, Tiktok said that they were addressing that wasn't intended again, we don't really. Have a good way in the United States to check up on that and to kind of make sure that speech isn't being censored one way or the other the national security issue I think requires a lot more imagination Now, you know as was mentioned, the the military has has told service members to not use the APP and I think that makes a good amount a sense you know if if you're concerned about an APP Having links to a potential adversary There's all sorts of possibilities of ways that it could be exploited even just using location data of of service members or people who work in sensitive facilities. But if you don't work in sensitive facilities, if you're just sort of going around and and and doing the fun things and engaging in some of the political discourse that Cowan was mentioning you know there's not. A real big national security issue there a I will say that some people think that collecting the full aggregate totality of US Tiktok users could be used later in a analysis to try to do something, but it's really imaginative at this point whereas I think the censorship concerns a real and could be checked on and data privacy concerns are real but should be able to be checked on as well. What about the fact that we we just heard from Ian Bremmer, the president of the Eurasia Group in the previous segment talking about how the United States is viewed internationally in terms of our response to the corona virus. But I did ask in also about his thoughts on what this Tiktok dust up between president trump and China what seemed to Be Rooted in and he said, you know this is also part of trump's sort of relationship with how he views China and Chinese technology he's gone after while way he's gone you know talked a lot about five G. technologies. So do you see that I mean? Do you see that as a pattern in how the president views technologies specifically that's coming out of China. Yeah I think the you know the trump administration's been. Pursuing a campaign of you know escalating what could be a new type of Cold War approach to China and a lot of it is wrapped up in technology and and I think the focus on Tiktok really makes the most sense. If you consider it a distraction from two things I is a distraction from actual problems with China you know the the trump administration got this phase one trade deal which didn't really get to the deep issues of subsidy and market access and intellectual property protection. And, on the other hand, it's distracting from the fact that a lot of these security concerns should apply across many apps. Why just tick Tock you know you're talking about including American made apps like facebook and twitter. Yeah I mean the concerns are different when the parent company is in China but there are really unaccountable data collection methods going on across ad networks and data brokers are building profiles of Americans and people in other countries that can be purchased just with money and you know it's not only add companies that by this data governments can get it to. Callan, as we sort of touched on this earlier. But of course, we I, say this all the time we're heading into one of the most consequential presedential elections in my lifetime at least social media is constantly changing is tiktok going to be a thing and twenty twenty and November, or is it going to be eclipse with something else or it'll change the? Will it change the election? Calvin what are your thoughts on that? I don't see Tiktok going away anytime soon, as long as the president allows it to operate in the United States I think we're gonNA see more is eight organizing on the APP among young people and I think we're GONNA see. TIKTOK. As long as Microsoft buys it or another company comes in to allow it to operate in the US I think it's going to stick around for a long time. I mean the president did Callan has also asked that Microsoft give money to the Treasury. If it makes this sale, we is anybody else interested in buying tiktok or is it just Microsoft right now? I don't think anyone else has come out as far as I'm aware and said that they are interested in purchasing Tik. Tok I think Microsoft even just recently confirmed that they were interested in this conversation, but it appears a deal needs to be made by September fifteenth. So if someone's going to buy it, it has to happen soon. Well you heard it here I guess I callan Rosenblatt is a youth internet culture reporter for NBC News Dot Com and Graham Webster is the editor of the digit China Project at the Stanford? University Cyber Policy Center and he's also a fellow

President Trump Tiktok United States Donald Trump Graham China President Biden Microsoft Tulsa Graham Webster Callan Rosenblatt NBC Us Treasury Chinese Government Stanford University Cowan
Tipping the Waiter at the TikTok Table; Howard Schultz: This is a five-star emergency

Squawk Pod

07:33 min | 10 hrs ago

Tipping the Waiter at the TikTok Table; Howard Schultz: This is a five-star emergency

"Up on today's podcast tech and the platform that's finally got adults talking tick tock tech stocks have been on a tear salesforce Microsoft and facebook all hit record highs this week. But leading the charge apple last Friday I will lead over ten percent in one day yesterday the stock closed at an all time high and now apple is just a few percentage points away from hitting a two trillion dollars market cap the golden number to get it there four, hundred, sixty, seven dollars and seventy seven cents a share. And it looks like apple wine this milestone before it's order one stock split goes into effect at the end of this month. The other companies in the headlines? This Week tiktok beloved by teems commonly misunderstood adults, and now a chesapeake in international business and diplomacy. Here's injury Ross Mark and we've been talking TIKTOK and Microsoft and all of what's happening in Washington. Eunice Yoon reporting now that it's not just Microsoft but to other tech firms that are in talks with Tik Tok owner by dance over a possible sale in president trump said yesterday, he was ready to approve a purchase of the US operations tiktok. But then he said the only woman to do it if the government receives a lot of money in exchange listen to this. Microsoft or somebody else who was the Chinese? What what the price is the United States could should get a very large percentage of that price because we're making it possible without us you know I use the expression it's like the landlord and the tenant. And without the lease the tenant doesn't have the value what we're sort of in a certain way the lease we make it possible to have this great success, tick toxic tremendous success, but a big portion of its in this country. Sale? Yeah. Whatever the number is, would it would come from the civil on Wall Street banker problems. By the way they call that tipping the waiter, but I don't think we've ever tipped the government for transaction president trump said he told Microsoft's CEO that a very substantial portion of the price is going to have to come into the treasury of the United States because quote or making it possible for this deal to happen I was on the phone by the way with. The people involved in this transaction deal teams on all sides who heard that yesterday. Couldn't really even make. Heads or tails of what the president was saying how. Would you hey the government what would that look like could there be a formulation where ultimately you come to some kind of transactional agreement and then you announce that you're making some kind of infrastructure investment in the in the United States who you're going to create some kind of jobs I'm literally, this is the conversation that's happening inside the room among these companies. If we created some companies without yesterday we got to it. It's what did you say? I. Heard it reported yesterday when I first started reporter yesterday I thought he's just saying this stuff off the cuff he doesn't really mean it. Then I saw what he actually said I thought wow, he does mean it. I don't even know how you could possibly as somebody WHO's working on this deal come up with anything that makes any sense and Steve Ballmer Steve Balmer was with us yesterday and said as a shareholder as the top shareholder Microsoft he would love to see this deal get done at the right price. Gets an exciting proposition for Microsoft. obviously depends on the price. Price is important as well as whatever restrictions come from a government perspective but I think it's an exciting avenue for Microsoft to really increase its consumer base. I don't know how you figure out any sort of pricing right pricing when you have to then go in and add some significant number on top that you'd be paying to the US Treasury. Well, what are they? Going to happen is because this is a bit of evaluation game. And I hate to say, we're going to be using trump valuation but I think that what's going to happen is they're going to effectively. Create a higher valuation for the overall business. Then kind of create something where they can say we're giving you something and that bite dance is giving it. That's the other important part of the view at least from what I understand Turnley among these groups is that the money has to come out of China not out of a US company. So you're going to have to make it appear whatever that whatever it is that you're giving to appear that China's not getting part of that's because Peter Navarro and others don't frankly want US money. Ten twenty thirty billion forty billion dollars ending up in the hands of China for the. So there's so many sort of China. has already weighed in. On this today that China has weighed in on this today through some of the states that media where they are saying that you know the US is basically stealing us and trying to do take off with this that it's a rogue nation now at this point. So the idea that you are going to come up with something that satisfies the trump administration and at the same time satisfies the communist government in China Good luck with that I mean this is they're going to get caught in between the two the two with this because even though China may not. Necessarily, be looking for some of the same angles. It's not going to say, okay, it's okay for the US to come out looking like this and stealing our company and don't worry about it. CEO of Tiktok you know or bite dance don't worry about it. We'll live with that sort of a kind of a slap in the face. To all this stuff we're talking about it. Sorry Andrew it. It overshadows the the lead of the story right and that's that there are possibly other suitors for the US. Of tiktok, we we we talked yesterday Andrew about well, maybe media companies would be interested in this property. Now, you know the the wording here that that we use her that Eunice was reporting was other tech offense, which which makes it even more interesting and who these other tech companies. May Be an at. Are they based in the US or are they elsewhere? It would be very I. I would imagine it would be very hard for Google or Amazon or an apple etc to try to buy this company given the anti-trust pressures on them, I. Think my understanding was that the White House preferred that liked the Microsoft choice from a regulatory perspective. So it's all very interesting by the way the other piece of this is the part I. Really don't understand if you're apple today, you know we're talking about this two trillion dollars market cap that keeps going up and up and up. Given. Given. The China risks now now, maybe look they foxconn supplying hundreds of thousands of people if not more than are making these phone so maybe they can't just say to Tim. Cook. Good luck to you but I would think there would be risk if we do this to a Tiktok what kind of a backlash reciprocal. Backlash is China going to have for some US companies doing business there? That's the part I don't understand say knock built into any of the. It it's it's no different than the same conversations we were having during the depths of the trade war. Right? We had these same conversations. We push too hard if the tariffs are to punitive companies are companies like apple, the ones that are going to face the pushback or the retaliation in some way and I think it's fair to say that that that never really came back to these two tech companies I mean, she didn't say where those tech companies were based and and I wonder what the US would do that if if it was being pursued by a company, another technology company based in China but not based in the United States either how would Sylvia's see something like that and would they still threaten to turn off the the APP in the United States if it was not a US company?

United States Microsoft China Apple Tiktok Us Treasury Eunice Yoon Donald Trump President Trump CEO Ross Mark Facebook Steve Balmer Washington Peter Navarro Communist Government Reporter Microsoft. Turnley
Tayshia Adams Is The Bachelorette!

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:28 sec | 10 hrs ago

Tayshia Adams Is The Bachelorette!

"Is less the Bachelorette than benefits this last will week. have a black And female some folks lead just for received the second checks time in below the show's history. $235 It's been confirmed that to live on for Tasha the entire week. Adams House will finally Democrats get the are chance demanding to find that the love. extra $6 After a week appearing be paid by on the Colton federal government, Underwood's season and that remains and in place bachelor through in Paradise January because they 2021. are after love after But all, Senate Republicans, yeah, Adams the members of the Trump is following administration, in the footsteps say the extra of six Rachel hundreds Lindsey, of kin to paying who is Americans the franchise not is tow first work, ever given black the 2/3 lead in of 2003 Americans have actually received Move comes more on the money heels and unemployment of the reality benefits. shows decision Then they to make did Matt from their James, former jobs, the first black bachelor Intermittent Romney. for the upcoming His proposal season. calls for I

Adams House Tasha Adams Colton Underwood Senate Lindsey Rachel Matt James Romney.
U.S. government begins two trials testing Eli Lilly's coronavirus antibody drug

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:29 sec | 10 hrs ago

U.S. government begins two trials testing Eli Lilly's coronavirus antibody drug

"A 36% expected expected of Health to to give give today final final announcing approval approval response to today today new rate. clinical to to As this this of trials, right now, plan plan investigating come for for on a a charter charter Malibu a treatment amendment amendment and with under the drugmaker that that Khun they they would would Undercount, Eli put put on on the the Lilly ballot they say, for could people and cost it battling would change California Cove the way in it they other 19. spend states money. seats It in And would I Congress each require director and Dr the county Democratic Francis to set Collins. critics aside a say minimum We will they be are of earnestly 10% concerned. seeking of what The it individuals calls White House it's unrestricted is who pressuring have been the found bureau general to stop to be infected counting funds. earlier with as SARS. For a housing, political Kobe move to jail virus. to diversion try to benefit and mental the Republicans, And health who are interested supporters say in 38th taking part say President and it would seeking give answers Trump residents says to a the critical pandemic greater question. is under access control to county And monoclonal services. here in the United antibodies Others States. call it It's de reduced under funding control severity law as enforcement much of Kobe as you 19. can and control today's vote it. This would is And put that a the horrible approach issue even before plague saved that lot. be said voters of you

Kobe Khun California Cove White House Donald Trump Director ELI Undercount President Trump Collins.
Trump is losing big to Biden in voter polls

Scott Sloan

10:01 min | 11 hrs ago

Trump is losing big to Biden in voter polls

"Used to the day not to the date, but to the day we go to the polls all over the United States. Of course, there's massive mail in balloting and elect the next president of the United States. It will either be a reelection of Donald Trump or Joe Biden will be the next president of the United States. But where do things stand? Really? As we're now 90 days out from deciding who the leader of the free world will be a lot of the poles that are out there. Have Joe Biden up if you look at battleground state polls Here in Ohio. Biden is up plus 2 2.5 He's up in Michigan. He is he's up in New Hampshire. Trump is up in Texas barely up in Missouri, and Trump is up in Iowa. But apparently it is Biden, who is making hay and a lot of the states that Donald Trump won back in 2016 and needs to win for re election now, But how accurate is polling? And did we learned any lessons from 2016? That should look at polling now with somewhat of a jaundiced eye? Standing by the way in and all of that is one of the great political minds of art of our lifetime. Someone who understands the INS and the outs of elections how people get elected, what polls really mean and the taste of the voting electorate in this country. He is Dr Eric Morrow, the head of social sciences and political science professor at Tarleton State University. And Dr Morrow. How are you on this glorious Tuesday? I'm great. Can we've got some cooler weather here in Texas. So, ah, not break from the summer. He had some rain last week. So that's the best we can ask for in Texas in the summer. Well, you know, it's cool in a lot of places not bad here, but it's tartan. Or, as we say, here in Ohio, fixing the heat off politically, Let's Just get to the landscape as it exists right now, As you look at this presidential race, is it really Joe blind that has the lead and if it is, how much of a lead not necessarily and popular vote, But as you look around the landscape of the country in these battleground states, how much do we put How much fate should we put in these polls that air out right now? Well, I think it's uh It's a mixed message at this point, and I say that because we had the experience in 2016 with the Poles and a lot of polling places, especially the quality ones, learned some things and it made some adjustments. But you know we're still 90 days out, and there's a lot happening and And part of this, too, looking at each individual state. And what is the makeup of the voting? The registered voters and turnout expectations there how they're handling elections. I mean, this is this is where we're on the ground now and where the challenges are. And polling while it does give us some some glimpse, Ah, take Texas is a great example. Ah, they most the polls show that they're basically even between Trump and Biden. But ah Ah, we've got a ways to go here and one of the things that really impacts voting and the and the results of an election is tech in Texas. Not just your big metropolitan areas. We have a lot of smaller metropolitan areas. And if turnout is strong there those air Republican bases and so I still give the lead to trump on DH. Not just that they're even but I give us a little bit of a lead to him in the state right now, because we just don't know what that That result will be with turnout in those areas. Well, Trump, I think still has his base. If you look a TTE, a TTE, the various polling among Republicans, he's he's been consistently at 94 95 96 inside his own party. If you look at that what he's doing from an approval standpoint, there's some Poles, the rest missing pool, which has traditionally favored Republicans. It's it's Ah, it's it's I think has Trump right now at 50% approval, but most of them have him in. At best, a load a mid forties. It seems to me that Trump is having a really difficult time getting past his base and energizing people that might Either be fence sitters or undecideds. I don't think there are a lot of undecideds or people that he just hasn't connected with. I don't think he can do much until he gets coverted under control because To me. That's what everybody is, is consumed with whether it's from a health standpoint or an economy standpoint, he can't get covert under control. Not that I'm not saying he but we can't get Cove it under control. And because of that, I think it kind of stymies him in picking up those that are not in his base. Would you agree with that? I do. He needs a win, and he's been. It's been an uphill battle on this all along. And ah, this recently Ah, put some things out on federalism, where I think that the Trump presidency is a victim of that, especially in relation to this. Ah, pandemic on that is because of the challenges with working with states and That comes into theologian process now is that you've got some of the more challenging conditions related to the pandemic in states where without the pandemic, he would say, Well, well, Trump has that state and it wouldn't be any questions now about whether someone has a lead or not. It would be a good thing could be a very, very close race at this point, but Where it's not is that people are starting to question what's happening and how this is being addressed and just not seeing results, and that's what people want. They want. They want the economy six. They want a vaccine. They want cases to go down. They want results, and we and he really needs to see something happen. Significant. Well, there has to be something that happened significantly to get Joe Biden. Out of his basement and out on the campaign trail. And so far, there's no compelling reason for Biden to go out and do that is there and now there's not no, he can play it safe. At this point, it seems I mean, I don't know that that's the the best overall strategy. But, um, one of the things Heard recently in terms of strategy coming out of his campaign was that that they're looking at what the right moment you know when, when is it time to Ah, that it won't, uh, create additional challenges, depending on what he does or what he says. But when he can jump out there and put himself forward, even Maura's the person to say, Well, look, he's not Trump's not been able to fix any of this. Our address it in the appropriate way and and thus try to seal the deal on the election. A Sze Yu look. ATT at Joe Biden. And you hear some of the rhetoric that's been out there in the last couple of days about debates and whether there will not be debates and whether there will be. I think once you wed your way through that, I don't sense the Joe Biden can say. At the at the 11th hour. I'm not going to debate. We're not going to have any debates. I think at that point he would look weak. There will be debates this year. Don't you think I do. I think that I think that's what their strategists are looking at. Is that the point in which he inserts himself more into this? I think one of the challenges or one of the things they have to be looking at. And this is really for the Trump campaign is that In the debates and part of the previous election, so he benefited from a live audience. He was able to play to the crowd. He was able to kind of make it work for himself, both visually as well as the The effect of having a live audience. And that may not be the case this time. And so that may be a challenge for Trump. But he certainly not goingto back away from the and, in fact, Ah Biden doing that. They would certainly make that an opportunity to say that he's not willing to engage in a public forum in these difficult issues that we're facing. Former vice president obviously commits a lot of gaps there. Some who think he may have cognitive issues whether he does or he doesn't. I don't know. Nobody knows unless you're his doctor or those close to him. How much how much of a liability. Do you think A live debate would be to Biden particularly If he continues to behave like he does in some of the few public events he does. I think these extended debates with just two candidates are going to be more of a challenge. We saw him kind of moved back and forth. He was challenged in a few debates recovered and a few others and and so it's gonna be interesting to see this over an extended period of time. As to how you can engage. You know, Biden has a long career in government and with policy, and when you get him going with that, and he's in the depths of it, hey, can show his his ability to really engage with it the challenges in communicating that because as we've seen for many elections when they run the studies, people start tuning out when you get into the details of policy, and I think that's where In addition to what Biden might say that he doesn't intend to say is that when he started jumping off in the depths of discussing policy specific policy issues, people are just going, they're going to fade, and that that isn't necessarily help is well, so I don't think it is his strengths or they're just I think it's going to be. Where are we with all of these issues and what Trump Has been able to accomplish or see happen under his presidency. And then how Biden portrays himself coming into that engagement with him,

Joe Biden Donald Trump Texas United States Ohio New Hampshire President Trump Michigan Tarleton State University Iowa Dr Morrow Dr Eric Morrow Missouri Sze Yu Vice President Professor Maura ATT
A Look at Police Body Cam Technologies, and Where They Fall Short

The 3:59

08:10 min | 13 hrs ago

A Look at Police Body Cam Technologies, and Where They Fall Short

"The nationwide protests over the killing of George, Floyd brought many things alight from racial inequality to police brutality. One issue that's come back to the forefront is whether or not police body cams are effective tools to hold officers accountable. I'm Roger Jiang. This is your daily charge with me senior video producer Butch Kerry who was a video out today discussing this various you welcome bridget. Thanks for having me. So body cameras really spiked popularity with the police back between fourteen talk about what really sparked this move answer where we are today yeah. It really began with Michael Brown because when he was shot by a white police officer in two thousand fourteen, there was no video footage to show it happened in the officer didn't face charges. So the family came out and Please request thought you know there's a movement that police can wear body cameras that was pushed even further by President Obama also saying that this should be the change for the future. Then there were federal grant setup to help departments pay for them. So you did have this big increase in police departments trying to help their relationship with the community and saying, Hey, we're going to have body cameras now but I mean that was present fourteen and I feel like we're still at the same place which. Is why I wanted to do this report and look into how do they work and why are we still at the same place and it really comes down to how different departments are using the cameras zero zillion talk a little bit about that and just to give our listeners a sense of how broadly there used. I, know you mentioned those grants to the Justice Department awarded place apartments in thirty states more than twenty three, million dollars for body Cam. So how many police officers actually use them? That the data right now, when you look at the statistics, it's looking like about half of our nation right now has officer some way or another obviously is hard to be exactly of small apartments, large departments but right now the idea looks like about half the country has law enforcement wearing some kind of camera or has tested out cameras some. In some way I, mean issues basic the you have officers wear cameras people will change their behavior when they know they're being recorded right there's more trust now when they're when there's a cameras more accountability these really lofty goals for one piece attack at there have been a few snags along the way. Of them being cost of storage because you have all these officers recording when they come into a situation every day. So figure, every officer has maybe three or four hours of recording everyday they have to store in the cloud. Well, how long are they storing that and how much is needing to be saved It's all different depending on every single up police department. So sometimes, it's months sometimes years and you're looking at costs in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. One department only had five police officers in the little town of Nebraska, and they were looking at something around fifteen grand. A year and this is like not folk is not feasible for every department to pay this because those those grants we talked about they don't cover ongoing storage costs. So some departments have been pulled out of using them because they don't see it's it's useful for them to be paying for it because the storage storage is definitely issued cost is an issue. These unforeseen costs are a real. Red Flag but bring it back to you know the ultimate idea that these cameras were supposed to bring accountability and to prove relations with the community was twenty and we're still protesting about police brutality Take things are worse than they ever are they have been. So what happened how did they fail to accomplish that goal? I wouldn't call them an outright failure, but it certainly is a failure in A. Couple of aspects one It goes back to how these tools are being used for one A officers have the ability for the most part right now to start and stop the recording on their own because they they really feel like you should have that kind of freedom. Do you really want a camera to be always turned on in every instance? No not when you're visiting someone at the hospital Having a private conversation or just you know having your lunch that said, what are the punishments if you don't hit that record button when you were supposed to or finding that there isn't a lot of incentive to do the right thing or I should say you know punishment if you miss a recording when you're supposed to at least that's what a lot of the researchers I talked to were saying that. If if you don't activate your camera, you know what's the consequence for that That's that's one area that's missing. Other area that that's missing is how can the public get access to this footage to be accountable? You countless studies have been done, and most recently they looked at all the studies and said, all right. What's the data we're seeing that there are fewer complaints against police officers. That's a good thing. We're seeing that police officers have footage to say, Hey, look I was justified that this was a false complaint against me. Great cameras are showing the truth in different aspects but a cameras show every angle of the story that happened and the cameras only as good as being able to release the footage. So some researchers I talked to said. We WanNA. See more data on can the public access when they want to receive some change now in New York City the mayor said that anytime now there is an incident where someone killed or seriously injured they will release footage but for a while there was this law that said, they don't have to release anything. We'll as a camera that you know. So so that's really the problem. I it comes down to not having a uniformed a set of rules or standards on win. This footage can be released in how it can be used. To the point of consistency, you mentioned New York City Mayor de Blasio a changes law he's fairly alone. He's he's sort of serve an isolated case right? Because the the rules are very greatly I don't think there's any kind of national mandate to be more transparent about when they released this footage ride, we're starting to see changes win the public points, their camera at a situation and out that officers didn't have their cameras turned on over in. Louisville when there was a shooting at the restaurant owner those officers who did not activate. Their cameras were put on leave a might my questions are okay they're put on leave but they're suspended. Where are you know the the more serious deterrence there? You know what's happening people are losing their jobs over it out win when government realized that the spotlight's on them you know but we have to look at what's going on in terms of using them. There is some technology though that is kind of starting to change that part of it like having a camera automatically turn on when it senses something's happening it could be win a Taser guns pulled out of a holster. It could be also not so serious like when it detects a police vehicle going at a certain speed or detects other kind of check marks author software so that Way If an officer is in the heat of the moment and can't remember to turn on their camera. It does it for them There's also talk about live streaming. So some of the cameras are able to have a superior back at home base tap into what that officer is seen in real time. That is a great advantage. When something serious is going down, they get a real time feedback. But. It's something that they're also can be push back with with police unions going wait a second I don't want someone seeing what I'm doing all times I don't live streaming only a few departments really have started to use livestream I. Think Cincinnati was one of the first that used the teaser brand of version of livestream on their cameras, and that was just February so very early for that technology but there's a lot of talk about that.

Officer New York City Roger Jiang Butch Kerry Producer Red Flag George Bridget Justice Department President Obama Nebraska Michael Brown Floyd Louisville Cincinnati
Outbreak hits Norway cruise ship, could spread along coast

Atlanta's Morning News

00:25 sec | 15 hrs ago

Outbreak hits Norway cruise ship, could spread along coast

"One of the first cruise lines to resume sailing during the pandemic now has an outbreak region cruise ship line. Hurtigruten is stopping all trips after one of its ships infected at least five passengers and more than 35 crew members. He's also fear the M S rolled. Ahmanson may have spread the virus to dozens of villages along Norway's western coast. CBS's Lisa Matteo reports the Norwegian government will begin banning ships with more than 100 passengers from docking in its

Norwegian Government Hurtigruten Lisa Matteo Ahmanson Norway CBS
Possible VP Pick Susan Rice Says She Can Handle Pandemic

Morning Edition

06:41 min | 15 hrs ago

Possible VP Pick Susan Rice Says She Can Handle Pandemic

"Rice is one of a handful of women on Joe Biden's short list for a running mate. She told us she is the right fit for the job. Yes, I think I could bring my experience of almost now. 20 years in the senior levels of the executive branch to bear to help tackle the most pressing problems we face. And while this would be the first time she would campaign for herself Ambassador Reiss told our co host Steve Inskeep that she's ready for him. Regardless of your experience in government, a big part of the vice presidency or seeking the vice presidency is campaigning, of course, which is not something that you've had a lot of experience doing. Do you have any eagerness to to campaign? Well, Steve. Yes, I've not run for office on my own behalf, but I've run for office on other people's behalf, where I did actually quite a bit of retail politics and speaking to groups of people. But I think unfortunately, in the current context with the pandemic, this will be quite an unusual campaign. If you were in office, you would face the fundamental problem of trust in government or lack of trust in government that is playing out. Now, Many people are refusing to wear facemasks. It seems evident from surveys that many people would think the same way about a vaccine once it's available. What would you do about that? Well, I think that's a huge challenge. And we have had vaccines many in many stages in our history. Still, today, Children need certain vaccines to be able to go to school. And I think that we're gonna have to take a similar approach that you know for kids to be able to go back to school and in Whatever jurisdiction they ought to be vaccinated and the localities ought to consider also requiring the people in the household with the Children to be vaccinated for the very reason that's obvious that this is You know, something that affects the entirety of the community. I want to ask about a couple of foreign policy problems that any administration would face on January 20th 2021 1 of them is deteriorating U. S relations with China. Now I know you've been critical of the way that President Trump is approached China. But at the same time, there are foreign policy experts across the spectrum, who said China's a problem? We don't know how to confront China. Maybe it's time for a confrontation with China. Would you want to roll back U. S relations with China to the way they were in 2016? Steve. No. I don't think you can roll back the clock on any critical issue to 2016. The world has changed and we have to deal with the world as it is. But having said that my criticism is Based predominantly on the fact that we have approached the challenge the China poses economically and strategically in isolation rather than in partnership with our allies in Asia and Europe. You know, instead of, for example, approaching our concerns about trade and economic policy, collectively with our European and Asian partners, who share many of those same concerns, and who Joining with us could add to our collective pressure on China to change its policies and approaches. We started separate trade battles with our closest allies. If you've got more partners behind you, is there some value in a confrontation with China? Well, if by confrontation you mean is it smart for us to start a hot war? I think absolutely not. No. But what about in other ways, diplomatically or otherwise? Well, diplomatically. Sure. First. What we don't need to seek confrontation for its own sake. We need to be strong and smart in how we compete with China. And push back on China's policies on the economic and the security front that threaten our interests. We also should be speaking up vocally and and forcefully about China's egregious human rights abuses from How it treats the Uighurs to the people of Hong Kong. It's common to say that a lot of the divisions of the last few years are merely highlighting what was already there. You could say that President Trump talks the way that a lot of Americans talk and believes what a lot of Americans believe, which is why millions of people voted for him. For example, it is often said that the pandemic Has struck the most vulnerable communities because they were vulnerable over a long period of time that we're just having American society exposed in a different way. Do you believe that? Well, I believe that What the pandemic has done is show how much disparity there is among Americans from a socioeconomic point of view and to a large extent of racial and ethnic point of view, And you know if it wasn't obvious to people before it, it ought to be now. But I don't think that that is the same thing is the first part of your question, which is To suggest that you know, all Donald Trump has done is shined a spotlight on some of the underbelly of our society. I don't think that's right. I think Americans at the end of the day Are not people who like to hate and to fear one another. Do you feel that you understand the roughly 40% of Americans who approve of the job the president is doing. I do think I have a good understanding. Maybe not a perfect understanding in part, Steve, because, as I write in my book, I have a 23 year old son whom I love dearly, whose politics are very, very different from my own, and from the rest of our family. Talk more about that. What are his politics? Ah, you know, I have a very conservative son in a very progressive daughter. They're both wonderful, intelligent. Passionate, committed kids. My son and I will have some robust disagreements are over some matters of policy. Not all. And yet at the end of the day. I love him dearly, and he loves me. As there have been an issue where he is almost persuaded you that maybe you're wrong. Yeah, I'm sure. I'm sure there is And you know the thing is, and I read about this in in the book. In the last chapter. I write about the areas where we agree. And the areas where we disagree, So we agree, for example. On the importance of the United States, playing a responsible principle leadership role in the world. We agree on the importance of having strong alliances. You know, we disagree. On things like, Ah, choice. I'm pro choice. He's pro life. That's the kind of difference that we oughta be able to respect. Ambassador Susan Rice. It's a pleasure to talk with. Thank you, Steve

China Steve Inskeep President Trump Susan Rice Ambassador Reiss Joe Biden Donald Trump Executive Hong Kong United States Asia Europe
Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:49 min | 16 hrs ago

Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

"A decade ago, Turkey's Foreign Minister Audit of Attalou used to boast his country was on good terms with everyone police fantasia want. less confrontation, less tense attitude. Especially, in the region, he spoke at the Council on foreign, relations with the will of the principal. In. Two thousand three. Zero problems with our neighbors. And the made a huge progress. All, that now seems a distant memory Turkey is growing its international influence and not always with a light touch. The country has been backing Libya's government in its civil war. Last month. The Turkish Defence Minister landed in Libya to inspect his troops and opposition warlord warned them to get out or else. Turkey prompted an angry statement from Egypt last week by allegedly planning gas exploration and Egyptian waters. And yesterday Turkish officials railed against an American company for its dealings with ethnic Kurds in neighboring Syria. That Turkey believes to be terrorists. To some, all this adventurism is reminiscent of past chapter of the country's history when the Ottoman Empire ruled all of Syria and far beyond. Turkey, has been playing an especially prominent role in Syria since protests spread into a full blown civil war. Turkey has really become a meshed in Syria since the start of the our spring, the uprisings that took place in two thousand eleven across the Middle East it back. The Islamist. Movements that initially took to the streets and then took up arms. Nicholas Pelham is our Middle East correspondent. But as those fighters were false back towards its border, it's really stepped into try and protect its southern border, stop any more refugees coming into the country and to provide some sort of safe zone for the proteges, and it's also very nervous about the current state law that emotion the northeast of the country. It feels very threatened by the emergence of Kurdish power on the southern borders, and is it reasonable for Turkey to think that those Kurdish forces are really a threat historic? The have been links between the PK, the cuts down Workers Party, which has been waging a thirty five year a war for. Autonomy and separatism inside Turkey. Many of those fighters did flee sought refuge in Iraq and in Syria, and so Turkey is worried about what it sees very much kind of PKK influenced state emerging on its southern borders. So this year it's been launching pretty heavy attacks inside Iraq, it's been sending tanks across the border. It's established positions inside northern Iraq. It's been carrying out drone bombardments, such two hundred kilometers from its border in Saint, John More, Kurds all the way along its southern border inside Syria inside. Iraq see a new Turkish assault, which is pushing deep into their territory and not just unsettling. Kurdish aspirations for sovereignty in Iraq and Syria, and this is also unnerving Arab leaders as well. Who Turkey pushing deep into territory, which was part of the Turkish Republic predecessor. The Ottoman Empire, which ruled the Middle East centuries until its dissolution about a century ago, which is to say that Turkey is expanding its influence is doing this adventurism beyond Iraq and Syria all over the Middle East of the moment. There's a this year has seen the new intervention of the Turkish, Army. Libya. They came to the rescue of the besieged government of National Accord. In Tripoli, which has been fighting a civil war against a renegade general. Khalifa. After Turkish forces established at base on the borders of Tunisia, we're seeing it's frigates make a bid for control of looking coastline and even ward off French frigates. We're really seeing a substantive increase in Turkish. Power across the Middle East and it's not just happening in Liberia. It's happening in Gaza, which is an ally of Turkey. Turkish forces there have tried to help. Cut Break Its blockade by Saudi Arabia they're. A. Few hundred to a few thousand Turkish forces that are they're wasting more Turkish interested in Yemen civil war. We're seeing interest in a Sudanese port and actually Turkey's largest overseas basis in the point of Africa. So really this is a massive increase in Turkey spread across the middle, East and do you believe that the the the Ottoman history plays into that as a return to former glories? In some way? It's very much the in the rhetoric certainly saw Mr. Osman tropes at the at the height of the Arab spring wanted to appear to be the leader of the Muslim world. He was promoting his version of governance across the region hoping to clone the Turkish model across the Middle East. But since the collapse of Islamist movement since its as from power in Egypt and the retreat of many of its forces, he's really kind of played much more on Turkey's national interests. He's ally domestically with what had been his nationals opposition. He seems to be much more concerned on trying to maximize Turkey's economic claims in the. The Mediterranean this since much more about promoting Turkey's national interests than flying it systems colors. This is really an exercise in in hard power and trying to exploit the weakness of others, the retreat of Europe and America from the Middle East. The policies of many Arab governments, and try and push Turkey to fill what seems to be a vacuum of power across the Middle East, and so is that push to serve Turkey's national interests working is, is it benefiting from this from this expansionism? If you're trying to put together a balance sheet of profit balance sheet? Sheet Turkey has benefited from Khatri investment cutters, loans, and investments have helped prop up the Turkish lira. It may be that country's also hoping to fund part of its military costs in Libya Turkeys, keen to promote its companies when it comes to eventual reconstruction of war-torn Libya, which after all is energy rich state, and so long term, there may be benefits, his critics home highlight, the cost it's estimated that Turkish operations in Syria have cost anything up to about thirty billion dollars, and of course, there is a threat that you're going to see a major escalation. Escalation in the Middle East, which could embroil Turkey. It's not just Turkey is entering the middle, East enforce. It's also Russia. Many Arab states are trying to gain Russian support to push back Turkey, not just Syria Egypt the United Arab Emirates looking to Russian support in Libya, and Egypt is sending its tanks to the Libyan borders. The UN warned that the risk of a of a regional war focused on Libya and beyond that that risk was huge. So this is a massive gamble and it looks as if the stakes are going to be increasingly hyphen

Turkey Middle East Syria Libya Iraq Sheet Turkey Egypt Turkish Republic Principal Nicholas Pelham Workers Party Attalou Saudi Arabia John More Russia Tunisia UN Tripoli
Outsourcing election cybersecurity to volunteers

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:49 min | 16 hrs ago

Outsourcing election cybersecurity to volunteers

"Election day in half a dozen states and another opportunity for election officials to sort out just how to run elections and a pandemic as roughly eight thousand jurisdictions prepare for November. One concern is cybersecurity, and if they're systems can withstand any kind of hacking. Some of these election officials don't have the strongest security background. So they need training on setting up things like secure password in two factor authentication to help the University of Chicago created a program called election cyber surge to connect election officials with cybersecurity experts. Maya warm in is the executive director of the initiative and she says, there are a lot of bad scenarios May. Be someone gets locked out of their system maybe the voter roll can't be accessed and they aren't able to print the list of registered voters, and so they don't have any way to verify when someone comes to vote if that person is registered to vote, there are also some pretty egregious misinformation attempts. So you could have a website where you could find your polling place and have had all of that information changed and be inaccurate or Asian about when the polls close being tampered with and people not knowing or thinking they have an authoritative source, but not realizing that that information has been intercepted and changed with militias intent. Well that's kind of terrifying which would imply that perhaps these are things that state local maybe even federal officials would value enough to pay for them but you're organizing volunteers to do that. How did we get here? We're here. So I guess the most productive thing is to go forward from here. I. Think that more from the federal government would be great and I think that educating the election officials and then giving them the tools on how to implement what they've learned. Is definitely where we need to be an until then we're here to help. If, we're talking about things like good passwords and not being vulnerable to probing or hacking two factor authentication. What does that tell us about sort of the gap in cybersecurity knowledge for these eight thousand people. Substantial I mean it's And maybe that's something we could look at historically election security has met physical security. Where do we keep these machines? Where do we lock up these ballots? WHO has the key? Obviously, we're well past that now, and so what we need to do is prompt election officials and create an appetite across the country for people to have. To want to demand the safe insecure elections that we all kind of expect to just happen how are you vetting these people who basically might get an entry into the technology and information systems of local election offices? So that's that's where the election official we will encourage them and I'm sure that they would not need any prompting here to follow their standard policies and protocols for working with outside people. Whether, it's a confidentiality, a nondisclosure or you some other contractual guideline or requirement for working with understanding their unique challenges and systems. So they know how to work with outside parties and we encourage them to follow what they would normally follow when they're working with someone outside of their core staff.

Official University Of Chicago Executive Director
Anti-Kremlin protests continue in Russia's far eastern city of Khabarovsk

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:27 min | 19 hrs ago

Anti-Kremlin protests continue in Russia's far eastern city of Khabarovsk

"Thousands of people took to the streets again in Russia's. Russia's far, east and city of Khobar of yesterday protests against Moscow, and the Kremlin have now been going on for over three weeks. Joining me for more to mark. Gherman Russia analyst stunt senior associate fellow at the Royal United Services Institute Good Morning and welcome to the program Mark. Could we first recap what exactly has happened so far? The first protests were sparked by the arrest off a local politician weren't they? They were the local governor elected local governor Sergei for Guile, and this was on fifteen year old charges of involvement with some contract killing, which may or may not be true. He was set me involved in some questionable business. But the widespread assumption amongst the locals was that it was simply because the Kremlin was was peeved at him at the fact that he had stood against their candidate and then just simply rummaged around looking for suitable charges, and since then these protests have continued for, as you said, now, almost a month and it's really. So transmogrify from being about four, how to actually being about Moscow. About Putin and about the sense that in a way, the government in Moscow cares about the rest of Russia outside. It's ring road when it comes to taxing them rather than looking after them. Have those protests course most grow by surprise? Absolutely, an indeed one of the interesting signs of that is precisely that there has been such a clampdown on any references to the protests. In the official TV media, we've seen accounts in the newspapers and online sites, but very much from the televisions point of view, it's nothing and that's a classic sign off what what Moscow does when it doesn't know what to do. It basically tries to by itself, some breathing space, but the trouble is cost nowadays. Russians. Are Very Internet savvy and. And the news has gone out anyway, and at the moment I, think the Russians Russian government is essentially playing a waiting game. They don't really want to try and take on these thousand strong protests especially because the local law enforcement and security agencies frankly don't particularly infused to do so and therefore ain't now waiting hoping that it'll die down to the point when they can actually begin to crack down. Do you think that's going to to the protests? We'll just eventually die down. Well I think the honest answer is, yes. We saw the most recent protests are actually smaller than in previous ones and impact that was because it was rainy rainy day in such like. But because it's not as though, these can can go anywhere what the what, what are the real significance not that somehow this protest will, it will explode and expand. It's precisely what it shows about incipient protests potential within Russia because there's nothing particularly special about kebabs. He's not like he was unusually poor or badly hit by corona virus or whatever, and I think. Right. This is so worrying for the Kremlin, is that sense of fine we can ride out this one protest in this one city. But what does it say about the potential for more protests all across the country exactly disease dimension that. Putin rather strong grip on power buddies this. Really, the case everywhere in Russia also in more distant places such as city in the Far East? Well. This is interesting thing. It's that you might have protests the loyalty to the center. Until. Push comes to shove. We've seen as particularly in Russia east of the Urals for which there is classic. Russian proverb God is in Heaven Bizarre is far away where absolutely Moscow is a very distant force and we've seen it in the past where actually local authorities. Are often in cahoots with local security operators in their own corrupt deals and so forth. But also they feel the same kind of pressures and resentment as ordinary Russians. So I think one of the strengths of Putin's regime has always been that he's understood when not to push when to make concessions. But at the moment in a corona virus has eroded his personal support, the money is tight it's that much harder to make the kind of. Deals Shantou involve splashing the money around that. He has in the past. So it's an interesting question. I mean, yes, he's not gonNA be swept away by this. He's not disappear anytime soon, but the slow corrosion, the legitimacy of his regime is becoming all the more visible exactly, and let's remember this beauty can did now stay in power until two thousand and thirty six thanks to changes to Russia's constitution. Do you think he actually has to address this issue of erosion and do you think people are going to appreciate him for years to come? Well I mean who knows quite how history is going to take him. Frankly, I think probably quite harshly. He will have to address the question of legitimacy, but again I think the thing is that. Putting has been around longtime. He's been power twenty, two years I. Think if trump has exhausted his capacities to reinvent himself he's got these grand national projects that you meant to be about totally reconfiguring national interest structure and health and such like, and it's really quite telling that he's recently pushed back the timeframe for their accomplishment. He clearly has a very ambitious agenda. Agenda, but he doesn't seem to know either how to really accomplish it, and secondly how to afford it. So I think he's he's hoping at the moment that things just get better that do course the virus abates. The economy stabilizes and things will work out not sure how far holding your fingers. A crossing your fingers is really going to be a proper answer. The most go the Kremlin on Moscow seemed to be waiting that these protests were seeing in Cabbarov Squirrel, just gradually die away. But what if they doesn't what kind of a warning example this? Of Four four Moscow and UNFOR, Vladimir? Putin. We we have reached elections coming up rather soon. How can make sure that something like that doesn't happen in those cities in those regions as well? Well, here's the problem he can't because it's really about is going to catch nation of random factory in football was not particularly personally popular. It was more the just his arrest, which under other circumstances might well have. Have passed pretty much unnoticed. Just somehow catalyzed. They just general sense of being fed up. There was a coastal city. Now. Elsewhere, we have certain places I. Mean, for example, in in Novosibirsk in Siberia, there's sort of contested elections coming up where we actually have real opposition politics emerging. The government is going to hope that it considered squelch Shalit's, but didn't that it has to have these parliamentary elections however. Much the parliament itself is just a rubber stamp. Nonetheless, it has to have these elections and elections. Inevitably case it paces when situations are that, there will be discussions disagreements, it will generate or kind of precious. Again, what we're seeing something that means it's highly difficult to predict. That's irritating for an analyst like myself. You difficult to predict exactly what and where it's going to happen, but there is a prevailing sense in Moscow that. The country is entering some bumpy. Times? Would it be easier for peace in to lead his country. If it was simply smaller, it is understandable that Russians thousands of miles away from Moscow? Mayfield. They don't wants to be controlled by the capital, isn't it? Exactly. Eleven time zones away or whatever I mean the actually that sense that Moscow doesn't really care is really quite pervasive, but to be perfectly honest look I've traveled outside Moscow itself. Even within the Moscow region, you find these pockets of ticky rural poverty, where actually all the shiny new infrastructure, the bright lights, the hipster bars and things of Moscow seem alone wrong where way. So size does matter, but I think it's really not the key issue. It's about the extent to which this is a regime which is focused on Moscow and Petersburg, a handful of other major cities and really has developed them at the expense of the rest of the country. And just finally, Mark Looking at these protests and fierce Moscow and beauty may have. How can President Putin bring the nation together? Again is widely assumed that looking for enemies from the West has been one way for into boost his own popularity domestically. Do you expect that we may see some kind of new maneuvers from the president in the future if things get worse domestically. Well, there's this overwhelming assumption in the West that, yes, that he tries to distract attention this way we have to realize that with the exception of the two, thousand, fourteen annexation of Crimea. which was very, very unusual case. None of the various overseas adventures that Putin has engaged in Syria and so forth have been either driven by domestic considerations or frankly popular i. mean half the time. Actually the Russian regime lies to its own people to claim that it's at interventions abroad are much less than they really are. So I think what we're going to say is not some kind of adventure abroad, but we will. Will see a rising tone to this propaganda about the world is a hostile place and the Russia is beleaguered fortress. He doesn't make Putin popula. What it does do is it legitimises his Moose clamped down on the opposition because he can say, this is not a time to be divided because Russia's very future is at threat

Moscow Russia President Putin Analyst Khobar Royal United Services Institut Sergei Mark Looking Urals Novosibirsk President Trump Official Guile Football Crimea. Senior Associate Petersburg Mayfield
Coronavirus: Dozens test positive for Covid-19 on Norwegian cruise ship

WBBM Evening News

00:30 sec | 22 hrs ago

Coronavirus: Dozens test positive for Covid-19 on Norwegian cruise ship

"1 of the first cruise line companies to resume sailing during the pandemic, now has an outbreak. Norwegian cruise ship line Hurtigruten is stopping all trips after one of its ships infected at least five passengers and more than 35 crew members. Health authorities also fear the M S rolled. Ahmanson may have spread the virus to dozens of villages along Norway's western coast. It's currently docked in Trump, so the company also suspended two other ships in the region. Government says they will begin banning ships with more In 100 passengers from docking in its

Hurtigruten Ahmanson Donald Trump Norway
Norwegian cruise ship battles outbreak with at least 40 people infected with COVID-19

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 23 hrs ago

Norwegian cruise ship battles outbreak with at least 40 people infected with COVID-19

"That decided to start running it. Ships again has run into a novel Coronavirus problem. There's an outbreak region cruise ship line. Hurtigruten is stopping all trips after one of its ships infected at least five passengers and more than 35 crew members. Health authorities also fear the M S rolled. Ahmanson may have spread the virus to dozens of villages along Norway's western coast. It's currently docked in Trump's, so the company also suspended two other ships in the region. Government says they will begin banning ships with more than 100 passengers. I'm docking in its harbour, CBS News

Hurtigruten Ahmanson Cbs News Norway Donald Trump
Hurting for Money

Thank God I'm Atheist

05:08 min | 3 d ago

Hurting for Money

"Hi, guys well from Beautiful Salt Lake City Utah. It's thank God I'm atheist the podcast I'd Frank Feldman and I'm Dan Beecher and coming up on the show today. Dan. Giving out money. Just. Thrown around. Making it rain. I WISH I mean they're doing that for some. I don't know my my my. GIG economy unemployment insurance is is winding down and I don't think I'm going to get any more. So Oh, I'm not excited. About that. But no, I know the the yet the government has found a very worthy repository. For a bunch of our money, our tax money, and let me tell you dear listener. You Ain't GonNa like it. Yeah. Yeah. Not Not a good look. We'll be getting to that. But in the meantime, Dan? Yeah. There's some new psychological research Dan. Okay, that seeks to. Link, atheism. To something and I wanna I wanna I I'm curious. To hear your response. because. Is. It is it. Is it linking. Atheism STD's because that just because we're all sluts. No. In fact to. Emotional suppression. Oh Oh. Oh. Yeah. I duNNo. I feel about that. This is what I'm saying. They did. They did this research on a group of one thousand, fifty, nine undergraduate psychology students. Surveyed them right and they about their religious beliefs and had them complete an assessment of their emotion regulation tendencies, right? Okay. and so about half the participants. Were Christian thirty percent agnostic or non religious fifteen percent identified as atheist and. The remainder was A mix of Muslims Hindus Buddhists Jewish. And then apparently a smattering of others. But Yeah. So what they found is that the self identified atheists. were. More likely to report engaging in emotional suppression meaning. They were more likely to agree with statements like when I am feeling positive emotions I am careful not to express them. K which which is interesting They also took eight atheists an eight religiously affiliated undergraduates They were recorded. As they described a recent experience that made them feel frustrated or annoyed. And a recent experience that made them feel happy or joyful and. A hundred undergraduates watch those videos, right? Okay and they they watched it with audio turned off. And they they re they raided the speakers emotional expressive, nece, their trustworthiness, and they're like ability. Okay and they just based on on seeing them not here. Just watching them talk and tell the story that was an emotional story. Right. Interesting And they had absolutely no idea about which speaker was atheist or Catholic or whatever. And they found that the the atheist were seen as less emotionally expressive on average when compared to the religiously affiliated individuals. Interest. And so they say, let's see this is the researcher. Speaking says compared to non, atheist. which includes acknowledged sticks and the nonreligious as well as believers atheists are not more likely to manage their emotions by thinking differently about situation that was one of the I'm sorry there was this other thing where they. Tried to assess. After, you've had an emotional experience like. Do you try to reassess the emotional the emotions that you felt and the how strong those emotions were right. And so you're saying that the atheists are not more likely to manage their emotions by thinking differently about situations atheists are more likely to resist expressing their emotions however and people. Noticed this even if they don't know someone is an atheist.

Dan Beecher Beautiful Salt Lake City Utah Frank Feldman Researcher
Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

Travel with Rick Steves

05:29 min | 4 d ago

Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

"Start with Stephen mcfeely he operates being be on Ireland's dingle peninsula in just before the pandemic head Stephen an interest in the hotel Oberland in October and Switzerland that's where he's had to ride out the first few months of the global lockdown good and. My goodness. My Irish friend is learning Spitzer dykes. Good here in the Alps where I've been for four months. Now in splendid isolation, my plan originally was just to come for February and March, but I've I'm still here right well, what does the vibe in Switzerland right now there's a positive vibe. The society is reopening. Tourism travel has started again just no we're on the same level as it was before we had two weekends where there was crazy crowds here huge big crowds from all over Switzerland everybody who was here was from Switzerland or had to be from Switzerland. They weren't necessarily all Swiss because there's lots of international people living in Geneva and Derek and whatnot but everybody from within the barger of Switzerland over with crowds, and then it just died and Monday to. Friday went back to being really really quiet. Okay. Well, this is sort of the very beginnings of the rekindling of tourism I would imagine it'll be people traveling with within their own countries first, and then traveling within Europe, and then finally international travel and transatlantic travel. Yes. That's exactly what we're seeing. The borders here have just reopened. So we're expecting Germans and some Austrians and maybe some French to come now also, I don't anticipate huge numbers like that would have been heretofore. One. Very noticeable thing in the Valley of course, there's no American visitors. As you know, the valley also is very popular with. Chinese travelers Indians many people from Dubai and Saudi Arabia would come here and they're not here this year. So there's a noticeable difference there. So the people getting the real cultural change would be the French speaking. Swiss. German speaking part of his Switzerland and not even leaving their own country exactly. Fifty percent of our guests. Last week were French speaking Swiss and it was the first time I've ever actually met those people and I would say to them. Are you French Swiss would say no, no, we are. All MOM and so I I learned something new immediately the K. The identify as swirl. They were saying exactly what you just said they said it's like we are in a different country it's very dramatic here it's different toossion either those on the do shut down it was really cool. They were very excited to see a different part of their own country. So that was wonderful. Now Stephen you own a hotel in Ireland in Dingle Peninsula and now you own a hotel in Switzerland in Loudoun valley two of my favorite places as a businessman working in both these countries how do you compare the support getting from the government and how the two governments are dealing with this crisis? Well, the difference is. Very. Big. I'm still on team. Ireland. So I want to be positive about my own country, but there's not a lot of support coming. Heretofore in Switzerland for example, within two weeks of the crisis occurring. The. Swiss Federal Council which is the Swiss government offered ten percent of the previous year's turnover and So that's quite a considerable amount of money and they offered that as a loan which was repayable over seven years. Zero percent interest. So they're not looking to profit from it and in Ireland we really struggled to get some assistance. And we got ten thousand euros of overdraft line of credit and but repayable at seven and a half percent interest in Switzerland. We got three hundred thousand. So it's quite a big difference there no-interest at all. No interest at all. Of course, Switzerland may have much stronger and deeper reservists than Ireland, but they were able to immediately come up with assistance very little bureaucracy paperwork, and they immediately got to help us in Ireland. The experience was just simply much different to the government really weren't as proactive for as immediate as were here in Switzerland. The roots here what's around her a lot less strict as well There is a two meter rule here, but I haven't seen anybody wearing masks very much, which is kinda shocking for me because I know in Ireland the whole north of is people should be wearing masks. People definitely are observing social distance. One of my friends said to me that the two meter rule has actually brought Swiss people closer together so. That is so insightful to the Swiss society. It's more difficult thing. It's more difficult thing for Irish people or Italian people are Spanish. Two meters distance than it would be for this people or maybe the. Scandinavians. I can see by home people are wondering. Is the Irish pub culture ever going to come back the way it was with social distancing whereas in. Switzerland. Here for me like I'm I'm in the Alps I'm surrounded by fresh air and. Of of lovely space and it's been a wonderful place to be stranded, I don't even want to complain about it because although I I was stranded here for four months. It was the perfect place I felt very safe. I might have felt different if I was in the middle of Zurich or something or Geneva but I felt very safe. I'd in the Alps and it is lovely and peaceful and quiet, and of course, that's what people are coming here for anyway

Switzerland Ireland Alps Stephen Mcfeely French Swiss Dingle Peninsula Swiss Society Swiss Federal Council Spitzer Europe Geneva Swiss Government Dubai Zurich Saudi Arabia Derek Loudoun Valley
The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism

The Book Review

06:35 min | 4 d ago

The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism

"And Applebaum joins us. Now from London, she is the author of the Pulitzer Prize Winning Gulag History and her new book is called twilight of democracy, the seductive lure of authoritarianism and thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having me, I want to start with a very basic language question because people are throwing around a lot of terms, these days, authoritarianism, dictatorship, demagoguery, autocracy, fascism, and sort of get to an understanding of what we exactly mean and what you need. Europe by authoritarianism. Book is about democracies really and it's about people and political movements in democracies who become dissatisfied with their own political systems and seek to change radically. And I. Agree with you that it's hard to sometimes describe what it is that they want to go towards whether it's a one party state or a liberal democracy or A. Not necessarily dictatorship. In which there's less openness and less competition, and so you know my book is about that. It's about the disappointment that some people feel with democracy and the draw towards more authoritarianism more centralized, less competitive, less open political systems. You're not so much concerned in this book with the specifics of the autocrats of our time, the Erdo ones and Putin's, and Orban's so much as you are with the people who vote for them side with them enable them. Why did you decide to look at it from that angle, but actually it's explicitly. None of book about voters I mean I think the reason why people vote for populist or authoritarian parties are various and I you know that sort of separate subject but you're right. It is a book about journalists spin doctors, intellectuals, and the people who sometimes help create these movements who create the ideas behind them, and then sometimes sell those ideas to the general public. Poorly I read about the because those are people I know not all of them are my close friends, but some of them are people have run into. The World I know and I thought it would be useful therefore for me to try and explain them in an an understand what happened to them over the last twenty years I wanted aired Juan because. About journalists and intellectuals he someone who and I think we could say this. About Putin von and others as well. These are people who have suppressed. The Press Ltd journalists closed down newspapers imprisoned writers who are the people on the other side who are the two of these other journalists and intellectuals who are supporting someone like Oregon. For example, in Turkey, will some of them are people who have become convinced. There's only one form of Turkish patriotism and that it's a nationalist form of patriotism and that anybody who has a different vision of Turkey vision of Turkey this integrated with Europe or a Turkey that secular those people are traders to. The country and their voices don't deserve to be heard. Some of the will have other motives. Some of them will be opportunists. Some of them will see the chance of if you get on the Government's bandwagon and you get on state media than its way to make a career, some of the will like the proximity to power. There's a range of reasons actually that's one of the themes of the book is, is the various different kinds of attractions that these kinds of movements have for people like that. So I'm probably betraying a little bit of my prejudice. As journalists and someone in the book world that the pamphleteer is the bloggers, the spin-doctors, the producer of TV programs in creators of memes. These are people that I can easily see supporting some of these autocrats I. Guess I'm interested in what circumstances in which countries it's writers intellectuals and and what's behind that I mean look they've always been nationalist intellectuals and intellectuals WHO and writers who supported dictatorships. well, into the twentieth century one of the themes of the book one of the kind of threads that I run through it is an analysis that was written in the first half of the twentieth century by French writer Julien Benda called it was called the clerks, the treason of the intellectuals, and it's a book about intellectuals who align themselves politically and who abandoned their search for truth or their object Tivi in order to be part of political movement. So this urge to do that and to be to play a political role or to be the voice sir to provide the ideas for movement is I mean I think it's as old as writing, public speaking itself. Talk about how you've seen that in Poland where you normally spend most of your time. So the book actually the idea for the book came from my reflections about the history of Poland. Over the last thirty years in especially some of the people who I felt aligned with in the nine hundred ninety s there was a kind of center right anticommunist movement that was I mean it wasn't ever cohesive, but it was the people within it certainly spoke to one another in the nineties who all had a similar vision of Poland and who all hoped for Poland it would be part of Europe and part of NATO and would be. Some kind of democracy. And connected world. Some of those people now have acquired a very different vision of Poland and they. Hope to pull, it becomes kind of Catholic nationalist one party state. They've been part of or supporters of a government that has cracked down on independent media and may be doing. So further that uses openly homophobic and anti Semitic slogans in its election campaigns and that I think worse of all really has sought to pack the courts in order to remove the independence of judges and the transformation of those people is one of the subjects of the. First part of the book, and again I think their motives are various I mean some of them are personal. They personally didn't like the political system that emerged in the nineties and two thousands and they they are. They didn't fight until they had a personal role in it. Some people felt police losing something they. They developed a stellar sometimes mythical nostalgia for some other version of the country that they preferred may have existed sometime in the past. Poland's cases to pre-communist past you know some of them felt that Poland was losing its identity as emergency urban there multiple reasons but the the overall impulse is one that I think Americans should be aware of too because the you know the attraction of authoritarianism, the attraction of the one party state or the attraction of liberalism I think can be felt in lots of countries including our own

Poland Europe Turkey Government Putin Pulitzer Prize Applebaum London Oregon Julien Benda Press Ltd Orban Juan Producer Writer Nato
"us government" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

15:59 min | 3 months ago

"us government" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

"So Ryan way back in the fall of last year when we first started digging into these documents and to be honest it was you and I that did the analysis but it was you. That really did the digging. There's a lot to get into here and I'm excited about this interview. I wanted to kick us off on. The theme of the Space Race Analogy. There was a lot that came out about kind of US leadership in the race with China. Flesh out that analogy in terms of what you saw in across looking at so many dozens of US strategy. Ai Docs yesterday and we started talking about a number of different topics. And I'm glad we settled on this one. It's been a lot of fun to research and I think the space race is a really good analogy for what's happening in the world right now so the current. Us Administration is even using the terms ai. Race and the reason I like the space race has analogy for the dynamic of technology change and investment between the United States and China is because we do have we have some real elements of of competition. We had a little bit of fear. We have some excitement. We have new technologies that are very powerful which means they can be very good and very bad and to give some more specific context. We've seen the proliferation of Ai Strategies. Formal strategy starting back in two thousand seventeen actually. Canada was first and immediately following that was China and since then many nations have joined with formerly strategies the United States published its formal strategy in two thousand eighteen and in February two thousand nineteen and executive orders signed founding the American artificial intelligence and initiative. And it's been interesting to watch this unfold because we weren't really sure if this was going to be sabre-rattling or if this is going to have much force behind it a similar provisions in that order were fairly vague and what we have seen is that there's been a ravenous appetite for basically throwing at the money at the problem of maintaining. Us leadership in this area. I see a lot of parallels with my understanding of the history of the space race in the actual full report. Obviously you go into so many of the different departments within the US government and look at how many of them are how far along in developing their strategy. So there's a lot of granularity here across different parts of the government when you think about where this China analogy this race with. The great competitor serve. Analogy COMES UP. Is this primarily on the purely dod side of things or does this seem to be for the entirety of sort of Ai Dot Gov for the the US government writ large? Where where does this shine forth through all these different documents departments he and that's a great question so the US Department of Defense in America has for many years been one of the largest forces in the world funding fundamental research and they have absolutely been a global leader for years in the moving forward artificial intelligence this artificial intelligence initiative. As as it's named is it is about getting the entire. Us government onboard and catching up with the US military in some ways so the twenty twenty budget is the first budget with an a section. And there's almost a billion dollars in new nondefense spending and very recently. We also saw a commitment in fact sheet. That's that's not yet formalized but A commitment from the current administration to fund double evatt another billion dollars over the following two years and the leaders of this initiative are among the top scientific and a public leaders know in the US administration at the highest level of a council. We have the director of Darpa and the Director of the National Science Foundation. Doesn't get any higher than that. So there's leadership at the highest levels and what we're seeing a lot of focus in other areas right now but. I think it should be of special interest to people that there are many areas of the economy that are going to be challenged and that are going to be shrinking. There's a lot of concern about in a should should businesses and leaders directing their attention and this is an area where we're not likely to see a decrease of spending we're seeing an historic increase in spending. It's to continue. Yeah I think that's part of the kind of increasing relevance of this document again in the fall when we had set out to say where are the opportunities where where where the opportunities for partnership where the current investments were the critical priorities of the government? Not only four government leaders but for people that want to sell into the government partner with the government. Whatever we didn't have the prescience of the virus but I think now as retail and supply chain finance to some degree or another are really going to be taking a wallop. I think that it's all the more interesting for the folks tuned in here to get a sense of well you know. The government has funds. The government has priorities. That are not fading You know where where are these energies shifting? And so maybe we can get into. I know you talked about kind of rapid budget expansion. We have the twenty twenty budgets. We have what's happening in twenty twenty one obviously the full report we have the pie charts new break things down pretty well as exactly where these funds are headed any kind of preview of what stuck out at you you look at where the funds are going outside of just the military. Where are things headed here? So do you want to focus on where the money's going or really wear at the highest level this we're seeing focus from the US government. Yeah okay well. That's another portion of the report here so one of the things that I liked which is really your idea about halfway into our research was essentially breaking down the critical priorities across all of the US strategy documents that had come out so a lot of formal strategy documents. A lot of stated priorities. How do we congealed them? Find commonalities find the ones that show up the most and that was pretty laborious work going through dozens of articles and press releases. And you know I I was there for that and so there were some themes there that jumped out time and time again and are ubiquitously important. I think for people they're trying to sell the US government to know the underlying motives behind. So many of their initiatives I think is is exceedingly valuable. What are a few of those that are important to know? And and maybe we can preview here. Yeah sure I. I've been happy to do the work. There are a lot of words in these government docks in a lot of government docks to read and one thing that I noticed is yet. There certainly is in evolution of the stated priorities across these published strategies and documents. And you know summaries of the various conferences but I think we came to a really good and very true. Yes summary of of the priorities and it amounts to three sections. There's a ravenous appetite for innovation and support. That has real teeth in muscle bone to it. There is a desire for alignment inside the United States and between the United States and internationally. And there's a desire to enable additional capabilities and an adoption could break down even even furthermore specifically so inside of innovation lots of funding for new fundamental research. The United States has very explicit goal of maintaining leadership. And I think you know depending on who you speak with leadership can you know there are many leaders and part of the dynamic that we see is USA number one. And I hope we can get to this at some point but I think I have a personal view that you know. The space race is a really good analogy. You know so. The space race had created some incredible opportunities and inspired a generation and there is also some fear wrapped up there and and so I really hope that what we can get is the best things that we saw from the Space Race. And also maybe we can maintain some good sportsmanship. Competition can be good but if if we don't we don't make sure that we have good sportsmanship and the US as relationship with its competitors in this area specifically China. Some people may get injured on the field development a US public private partnerships is a huge theme. And it's a great sign. This is not happening. In a vacuum there are increasing opportunities to get engaged with the public their requests for for commentary. And frankly you know. There are really big budgets. They WANNA be spending money with the. Us government doesn't to do this all on. Its own if knows it is going to need help from the smartest people in the world to move this innovation forward and it's asking for proposals So that's the area of innovation in the area of alignment. It is actively moving forward plans for coordination internationally. It wants to form standards and I think a good analogy for the importance of standards is the current state of of the Internet. What http and how is it that? The United States has been so fundamental to the structure of the domain name system and the central routing of domains. It's because the US got involved very early on in the formation of standards and those standards are forming now and so we all have an opportunity to be part of this as important to be aware in sport to know that the people can get engaged and as far as enablement goes. I think there's a there's a lot going on. Obviously right. There's like what is is is that. Is that Terminator so people know. How can they be really effective? What what specific tools can I use? That are out of the box and and it really does depend you know. This is still pretty broad this summary here. Some PEOPLE WANNA get engaged as researchers in fundamental research. Some you know some organizations just have. Cto's who just hey man. I'm overwhelmed with my current stuff like do I need to be worried is is a question a lot of people have you know. Am I GONNA lose ground? If I don't pay attention and you know what can I use? That's going to help you hit the ground running while the. Us is basically willing to pay to get answers to those questions. Because they have a mandate they have to do. This is uncommon knows. It's uncommon in large corporations. To just say hey you need to go definitely spend this money to innovate across every agency and this is essential effort. That's one thing that we're seeing so they are specifically aiming to break down barriers that we prevent innovation a free up the data that all these agencies have get things into the cloud get data so that it can be used in across and between agencies and I think that's the conclusion of the highest level summary that we have for these priorities. Yeah Yeah I mean so. There's there's a lot here. I mean clearly. The China tension is constant. At least from what I've seen of the analysis to China relations are not getting better with this virus. But I certainly hope it doesn't go. You know more south than in any rougher sense at something I might jump in. We are account regarding this race. We're seeing that you know the. Us and China are leading in different ways. The US's is leading in funding Of Fundamental Research but China is leading at adoption for example you know and and when it comes to Cova nineteen China's facial recognition is unsurpassed in the world over they they have been using it preceding the events of in nineteen and they have used it very effectively very quickly four. Tracing they have been using it in the context of biometric a pattern detection. They have police officers in public transit stations who are monitoring people to measure their breathing patterns and detecting fevers in near real time and that's partly using artificial intelligence technology. We're not seeing those things happening.

US Space Race China US Department of Defense Ryan Ai Strategies Canada partner National Science Foundation director America Cova Cto executive Darpa
"us government" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

10:55 min | 11 months ago

"us government" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Join. WMU's Diane ream during the spring of Twenty twenty for a cruise across the coast of Australia and New Zealand. You'll set sail aboard the cruise ship. Silver Muse use from Auckland and crossed the Tasman Sea making stops in Melbourne and Sydney delve into the diverse history of New Zealand and Australia and share the experience danced with WM US Diane Rehm more information is at Diane Ream Dot Org now. Here's in my conversation with outlawed sends Dangar. Her new book is titled Whistle Blowers Honesty and America from Washington to trump. Here's what I don't understand professor. Staying the president has said Ed he deserves to confront not only the whistle blower who because he did not have firsthand knowledge ah the telephone call with ministers landscape but also the person who illegally gate this information information which the President Kohl's largely in correct so that makes me wonder whether the president really understands the law behind the whistle blower yeah. It's very clear he doesn't understand what was blowing going isn't in the American context. You're absolutely right Diane. He has an understanding of whistle boring that is more appropriate in an authoritarian context. It's really interesting but if they start out telling you that was an America's. DNA and we we celebrate with supporting the United States although sometimes as attention wanders they they wind up suffering greatly but he has a understanding of whistleblowing. That's more appropriate for an authoritarian leader American and celebrate whistleblowing but if you look at other countries and the word for whistleblower in foreign languages take for example post communist Europe the word has negative connotations. It means a snitch. It means an informer so whistleblowing as a concept really only make sense in a thriving and flourishing democracy and it's fascinating hey to me that the president is instead insisting on this quite authoritarian un-american understanding of whistleblowing and the rule of law. He's actually actually turn the whistle blower as a traitor or a SPA and he says remember what we used to do with traders ends spies implying. This person should actually be put to death. He seems seems to be throwing stuff up against the wall and seeing what sticks none of it really makes coherent sense but I think it's important to realize that we all just need to stay laser user focused on the substance of the complaint which indicates a cover up of both a national security threat which is shadow foreign policy that he and Juliane Juliane looks like attorney general bar and perhaps even secretary of State Mike Pompeo. We're executing in direct contradiction to the dated policy of the United it states has implemented and pursued by State Department and also for which Congress appropriated funds for military aid to Ukraine so there's the shadow foreign policy the issue that's a national security threat but there's also a threat to democracy from within when you see the president actively encouraging foreigners orders to intervene in our electoral process. This is truly unprecedented because I think it's pretty obvious that Americans should elect public. Officials not foreigners so the content of the complaint is what people should stay focused on you mentioned Secretary State Pompeo we now learned learned he was actually on the coal with Mr Zalewski and he denied that he lives on the coal all so we as Americans do not quite know what they're our officials elected did or appointed are telling their own truth or the real truth. We don't have the the fact and we really need to insist on the distinction between truth and falsehood because you can't have a democracy if you don't insist upon that distinction the leader of the President does not define what truth is the American people get to decide to deliberation what the truth is in the thing to stay focused on again because because there's so much noise surrounding this is why are officials lying in whistleblowers. I show throughout American history. That was exposed secrets that elites. It's wont just keep hidden and for good reason with Lawrence often expose corruption which is a pursuit of private interest when you're a public official so when elites lie that's often a red flag that your aunt some kind of wrongdoing and we're going to see more in the days ahead you described uh-huh. Stephen Miller the senior adviser to President Trump said on Fox News last Sunday as Orwellian we've been on. What basis do you say that this was a partisan hit job first of all. If you read the seven page Little Nancy drew novel that the whistle sewer put together it drips with condescension righteous indignation and contempt for the president is also ludicrous on its face. It is rather Orwellian Leeann because the thing I'm struck by is that the president and his various associates don't seem to have an understanding of how the rule of law is supposed to operate operate how impartial justice supposed to operate even what public service is the president seems to think that his associates the Attorney General National Security Adviser and everyone have sworn allegiance to the president but they've actually sworn an oath to preserve protect and defend the the constitution of the United States and what's interesting to me as a student of politics in other countries is that this is very similar to the sort of of understanding you saw in Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy where the intelligence community there swore an oath of allegiance to supreme leader not to the constitution so this is very un-american. The president has also said he believes there was political bias involved involved. Have you read the so blower complaint. It's entirety. Yes absolutely I have and what's striking about. It is how lucid lucid it is and how well written it is and that's why it's really struck a chord but what's up blowing is not a partisan issue. It's really an American an issue and people who argue that the whistleblowers partisan aren't understanding. What's lower is as defined by American law. They have an obligation to report wrongdoing when they see it now one of the lawyers. Andrew because representing the whistle blower sent a letter to the Congress expressing fears for his clients safety and siding remarks that the president himself has made which we've already referred to what is to prevent someone in civilian hi from taking action against this person. It's very worrisome because they're diehard. Trump supporters who when given the kind of dog whistles can follow through and ruined the lives of people who disagree with the president. We don't do that in American politics. That sounds more like a Mafia operation. You know it's hardly unusual for American residents to punish leakers. We can recall. Edward Stone Tone was the seventh person the Obama Administration charged with violating the espionage act and previously only nine individuals profit over the entire acts existence but donald well trump is really the first president to celebrate for an electoral interference will actively seek to intimidate and shutdown institutions designed to keep government accountable accountable to the people. I think he's also the first concurs supporters to retaliate against a whistle blower one last question. Can you define for us the the difference between civil disobedience and whistle blowers. That's a great question because in my book I it's a cousin of civil disobedience but really slightly different whistleblowers are insiders who suppose misconduct civil disobedience on the other a hand breaks the law you notice to show that the law is unjust so Rosa parks moves to the front of the bus breaks the law and in so doing enclosed laws ridiculous. That's not the case with whistle blowers in the intelligence community. They're breaking the law to be sure because they're releasing classified information but at the same time they're not indicating laws. Just they're doing it for the higher cause of pulling the rule of law in American Democracy Allison's awesome strength or I want to thank you so much for joining us and helping us understand both the risks a head as well as the importance of learning everything that this was so blower has to say how important all of that is who our democratic way of light. It's an honor and privilege speed. I N thanks for having me. That's all for today find us on facebook and twitter or sent his email l. d. r. podcast dead deputy away and you dot. Org Our theme music is composed by Jim Bromberg and then Atlantans for nearly this show is produced by Rebecca Kaufman and Alison Brody our engineers this week our Clip Gallagher Natalie your liquor as always thanks for listening. I'm Diane Ream.

president Diane ream Diane Ream Dot Org America President Kohl United States Trump Tasman Sea Auckland Congress Diane professor Secretary State Pompeo New Zealand Twenty twenty Australia Mike Pompeo Melbourne Washington Juliane Juliane
"us government" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

10:36 min | 11 months ago

"us government" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"Join. WMU's Diane ream for a voyage across New Zealand and the southeastern coast of Australia in the spring of twenty twenty more about the eighteen day cruise aboard the ship Silver Muse is at Diane Ream Dot Org now here the registered my conversation with outlawed sends Dangar. Her new book is titled Whistle Blowers Honesty in America from Washington to trump. Here's what I don't understand professor staying the president has said he deserves to confront front not only the whistle blower who because he did not have firsthand now the telephone call with Ms Lewinsky but also the person who it legally gave this information which the president calls goals largely in correct so that makes me wonder whether the president really understands the law behind the lower law yeah it's very clear he doesn't understand what was blowing it and in the American context you're absolutely right Dan. He has an understanding of whistling that is more appropriate in an authoritarian context. It's really interesting because I started out telling you that was blowing long as an America's. DNA and we celebrate with supporting the United States although sometimes as her attention wanders they wind up suffering greatly but he has a understanding of whistleblowing. That's more appropriate for an fourteen leader American celebrate whistleblowing but if you look at other countries word for whistleblower in foreign languages take for example post communist Europe. The word has negative connotations means a snitch. It means an informer so wissel blowing as a concept really only make sense in a thriving and flourishing democracy and it's fascinating to me that the president is instead insisting sitting on this quite authoritarian un-american understanding of whistleblowing and the rule of law. He's actually term the whistle blower our as a traitor or a SPA and he says remember what we used to do with traders ends pies implying that this person should actually be put to death. He seems to be throwing stuff up against the wall and seeing what sticks xe none of it really makes coherent sense but I think it's important to realize that we all just need to stay laser focused on the substance of the complaint which which indicates a cover up of both in national security threat which is the shadow foreign policy that he and Giuliani it looks like attorney general bar and perhaps Stephen Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. We're executing in direct contradiction to the data policy of the United States has implemented and pursued by State Department Emmett and also for which Congress appropriated funds for military aid to Ukraine so there's the shadow foreign policy issue. That's a national security threat but there's there's also a threat to democracy from within when you see the president actively encouraging foreigners to intervene in our electoral process this this is truly unprecedented because I think it's pretty obvious that Americans should elect public. Officials not foreigners so the content of the complaint plane is what people should stay focused on you mentioned secretary of State pump. Ao We now learn he was actually on the coal aw with Mr Zilenski and he denied that he lives on the coal so we as Americans Americans do not quite know what they're our officials elected or appointed are telling their own truth or the real truth. We don't have the fact and we really need to insist senator distinction between truth and falsehood because you can't have a democracy if you don't insist upon that distinction the leader the president does not get to define what truth hit the American people get to decide to deliberation what the truth is in the thing to stay focused on again because there's so much noise surrounding. This is why why are officials lying in Whistler's. I show throughout American history that whistleblowers exposed secrets that elites want to keep hidden and for good reason season was hilarious often expose corruption which isn't pursuit of private interest when you're a public official so when elites lie that's often in a red flag that you're onto some kind of wrongdoing and we're going to see more in the days ahead you describe what Stephen Miller the senior adviser Sir to President Trump said on Fox News last Sunday as or Liens spin on what basis acis. Do you say that this was a partisan hit job first of all. If you read the seven page Little Nancy drew novel that the Whistle Blower put together it drips with condescension. Ryan righteous indignation and contempt for the president is also ludicrous on its face. It is rather Orwellian because the thing I'm struck by is that the president and his various associates don't seem to have an understanding of how the rule of law is supposed to operate how impartial justice is supposed to operate operate even what public services the president seems to think that his associates the torney general national security adviser and everyone has sworn allegiance to the president but they've actually sworn an oath to preserve protect and defend the constitution of the United States and what's interesting to me as a student of politics in other countries is that this is very similar to the sort of understanding you saw in Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy where the intelligence community they're sworn oath of allegiance to the supreme leader not to the constitution so this is very un-american. The president distant has also said he blades there was political bias involved. Have you read the whistle so blower complaint in its entirety. Yes absolutely I have and what's striking about. It is how loose it isn't how well written it is and that's why it's really struck a chord but whistle blowing is not a partisan issue. It's really an American issue and people who argue that the whistleblowers Laura's partisan our understanding what was lower is as defined by American law. They have an obligation to report wrongdoing when they see it now one uh of the lawyer. Andrew because representing the whistle blower sent a letter to the Congress expressing fears for his client safety and citing remarks that the Protestant himself has made which we've authority referred to what is to prevent psalm one in civilian life from taking action action against this person. It's very worrisome because they're diehard. Trump supporters who when given the kind of dog whistles can follow through and ruined the lives of people who disagree with the president. We don't do that in American politics. That sounds more like a Mafia operation. You know it's hardly unusual. American doesn't want to punish leakers. We can recall. Edward Stone was the seventh person the Obama Administration charged with violating the espionage act and previously only nine individuals or property over the entire acts existence but donald trump is really the first president to celebrate for an electoral interference. Her parents will actively seek to intimidate and shut down. The women solutions designed to keep government accountable to the people. I think he's also the first one courage supporters to retaliate against a whistle blower one last question. Can you define for us the difference between civil disobedience disobedience and whistle blowers. That's a great question because in my book I got a cousin of civil disobedience but they're really slightly different different. Whistleblowers are insiders who spos- misconduct simple dance on the other hand breaks the law you notice to show the law is unjust. Sir Roseau parts moves to the front of the bus breaks law and in so doing those laws ridiculous. That's not the case as with whistleblowers in the intelligence community. They're breaking the law to be sure because they're releasing classified information but at the same time they're not indicating getting a lot. Just they're doing it for the higher cause of upholding the rule of law in American Democracy Allison's Jank her. I want to thank you so so much for joining us and helping US understand both the risks a head as as well as the importance of learning everything net this whistle blower has to say how important all of that is to our democratic way of life. It's an honor and privilege Diane. Thanks for having me. That's all for today. Find us on facebook and twitter or send us in Email D. R. podcasts dead. WMU Amu Dot org theme music is composed by Jim Bromberg and then Landsberg wonder late the show is produced by Rebecca Kaufman and Alison Brody our engineers this week are clipped gallagher and Natalie Atalay your liquor as always thanks for listening. I'm Diane ream.

president Whistle Blower United States Diane ream donald trump Diane Ream Dot Org Congress America Europe Diane Ms Lewinsky Washington New Zealand Mr Zilenski professor Australia Dan
"us government" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

05:56 min | 11 months ago

"us government" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"Since Tanger. Your new book couldn't be more relevant to today's news news. When did you actually begin writing is and why I began renting it about seven years ago. I I had written a previous book book called One Nation under contract the outsourcing of American power and the future foreign policy and that book looked at the privatization of American foreign policy and the the use of contractors and almost every aspect of national security and I realized that business and government were collaborating quite closely and it struck me that we were putting an awful awful lot of faith in our leads to do right by the country rather than just to do right by their own economic interests and so I thought how do we keep our leap leap honest. It seems like a really important question and that's what led me to whistleblowers explained to us when the how the US developed its hits whistleblower protections whistle blowing is really as American as Apple Pie. It's present from seventeen seventy eight before the ratification of the US Constitution. We passed our first whistleblower protection law in that year and we did so in response a to a man named essay coppins who abused his public office for private gain he was the first Commodore Commander in Chief of the US Navy and he defied George Washington on multiple occasions he wouldn't take the US ships to engage the British were general Washington wanted him to engage them he instead took the US Navy to other destinations that served economic interests which were as a Rhode Islander intimately tied up with the slave if trade so this is something that goes way back in our history and it's the reason why you need both Democrats and Republicans in the Senate unanimously agreeing the whistleblower complaint should go forward and it's so interesting because you say in your book that is a miracle the report that finally spurred House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi to launch an impeachment inquiry reached the light of day. Explain why the reason my book shows this amply is because intelligence community whistleblowers are rare occurrences. It doesn't happen very often. The intelligence community has a real culture of secrecy so the very idea of with a blowing seems to be at pods with the institutions agenda where they want to keep secrets in order to keep us safe so one man's national security whistleblower is another man's insider threat in the intelligence community so this is a very fragile system to harvest these complaints and what's more more typical is for them to die on the vine or to be suppressed if you look at Edward Snowden for example he was strongly encouraged to report through the Inspector General Assistant he chose to leave the country to reveal his secrets and he was probably wise to do so because the inspector general of the NSA at at the time of stone leaks a man by the name of Georgia Lard was actually removed from his post in twenty sixteen for retaliating eating against a whistleblower so this is not something that the intelligence community does routinely it goes against their standard operating procedures but I think we're seeing being it because of the grave threat that the current situation poses to national security and this particular complaint apparently just stuck right to the rules all the way through is that correct yes and you have acting director of National Intelligence. James Guar are saying that if followed the rules and was was justified. That's extraordinary because both the acting director of National Intelligence James Maguire and the Intelligence Community Inspector General Michael Atkinson are trump appointees and we all know where the president stands on this whistle blower and his his or her intentions so it. It's a miracle that this complaint has come to light and we should be grateful to this whistleblower for taking great risks for American Democracy Chrissy and the rule of law and yet now the Congress wants to speak with this whistle blower. The question becomes. How do you protect his or her identity. I recall Valerie plane coming forward and she was outed. This is a real concern. Hopefully the whistle blower can testify behind closed doors. There will probably be a great clamoring on the part of the American public to see the whistleblower. Maybe not because this whistleblower is at great risk. We've all seen what the president has said about this. What's the board. He's called him a partisan and and somebody advancing partisan interests within the intelligence community he's called on people to retaliate against lower so this whistle blower isn't isn't danger and we have to take steps to be sure that they're protected. How do we do that. Well Congress can provide right some measure of security and the way they handle it but I think it's incumbent on the American people to insist that whistleblowing American and whistleblower retaliation in Mrs Instance would be completely at odds with our ideals and if there's that public pressure I think you'll see politicians respond to it and make sure there was kept safe. We'll be back with more from Professor Alison Spangler after a short break.

US US Navy Congress acting director Intelligence Community president Tanger National Intelligence Inspector General Assistant James Guar Nancy Pelosi George Washington Apple Senate Washington Alison Spangler NSA
"us government" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

05:56 min | 11 months ago

"us government" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"L. Since Dang or your new book couldn't be more relevant to today's news win. Indeed you actually begin writing is and why I began renting it about seven years ago. I I had written a previous book called One Nation under contract the outsourcing American power and the future foreign policy and that book looked at the privatization of American foreign policy and the use of contractors contractors and almost every aspect of national security and I realized that business and government were collaborating quite closely and it struck me that we were putting an awful lot of faith faith in our leads to do right by the country rather than just to do right by their own economic interests and so I thought how do we keep our leap honest. The it seems like a really important question and that's what led me to whistle blowers explain to win the how the US developed its whistle blower blower protections whistle blowing is really as America's Apple Pie. It's present from seventeen seventy eight before the ratification application of the US Constitution. We passed our first whistleblower protection law in that year and we did so in response to a mandate a an essay coppins who abused his public office for private gain he was the first Commodore Commander in Chief of the US Navy and he he he finds George Washington on multiple occasions he wouldn't take the US ships to engage the British were general Washington wanted him to engage them he instead took the US Navy to other destinations that served economic interests which were as a Rhode Islander intimately tied up with the slave trade so so this is something that goes way back in our history and it's the reason why you see Democrats and Republicans in the Senate unanimously agreeing that there was complete should go forward and it's so interesting because you say in your book that is a miracle that the report art that find a spurred House majority leader Dante Pelosi to launch an impeachment inquiry ever reached the light of day explain why the reason and my book shows this amply is because intelligence community whistleblowers are rare occurrences. Iran says it doesn't happen very often. The intelligence community has a real culture of secrecy so the very idea of with a blowing seems to be at odds with the institutions with gender where they wanNA keep secrets in order to keep us safe so one man's national security whistleblowers another man's insider threat threat in the intelligence community so this is a very fragile system to harvest these complaints and what's more typical for them to die on the vine or to be suppressed if you look at Edward Snowden for example he was strongly encouraged to report through the Inspector General System he chose to leave the country to reveal his secrets and he was probably wise to do so because the inspector general of the NSA at the time of of stone leaks a man by the name of Georgia Lard was actually removed from his post in two thousand sixteen for retaliating against a whistleblower so this is not something that the intelligence community does routinely it goes against their standard operating procedures but I think we're seeing it because of the grave threat that the current situation poses a national security and this particular complaint apparently just stuck right to the rules all the way through is that correct yes and you have acting director of National Intelligence James from choir sang that followed the rules and was was justified. That's extraordinary too because both the acting director National Intelligence James Maguire and the Intelligence Elgin Community Inspector General Michael Atkinson are trump appointees and we all know where the president stands on this whistle blower and his or her intentions so it's a miracle that this complaint has come to light and we should be grateful to this whistle blower for taking great risks for American democracy and the rule rule of law now. The Congress wants to speak with this whistleblower. The question becomes how do you protect hacked his or her identity. I recall Valerie plane coming forward and she was outed. This is a real real concern. Hopefully the whistleblower can testify behind closed doors but I there will probably be a great clamoring on the part of the American public to see the whistle or maybe not because this whistleblowers at great risk we've all seen with the president has said about this Lord. He's called him a partisan and somebody convincing partisan interests within the intelligence community. He's called on people to retaliate against the whistle blowers so this whistle blower is in is in danger ranger and we have to take steps to be sure that they're protected. How do we do that. Well Congress can provide some measure sure of security and the way they handle it but I think it's incumbent on the American people to insist that whistleblowing is American and whistleblower retaliation in this instance would it'd be completely at odds with ideals and if there's that public pressure I think you'll see politicians respond to it and make sure there was a blur is kept safe. They will be back with more from Professor Alison Banger after a short break.

US US Navy acting director president Intelligence Elgin Community Congress Inspector General Michael Atki Professor Alison Banger Washington George Washington Senate Iran NSA Edward Snowden Apple America Rhode Islander
"us government" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"us government" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"A unique search engine that finds any words spoken at any video pinup Joe is video platform for people with information to share. An angry repulsed from hallway as it filed suit against the US. This is the marketplace morning report from the BBC World Service. I'm anew on good morning. The Chinese telecom company while away says it suing the US government over a ban on its products the US claims hallways. Equipment could be used by Beijing for spying John sudworth reports from the company's headquarters in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen in a conference room located inside hallway sprawling headquarters for global battle over the future of the internet took a new turn the Chinese tech giant announced that it's launching a legal challenge in the US over a law passed last year that bans government agencies from buying it to quit. The US argues that the political realities in China mean all companies all beholden to the will of the Chinese communist party which could use while way to spy on ought to disrupt critical next generation mobile networks, a similar debate. It is now taking place in Europe hallways, chairman Guoping said Washington had not produced any evidence to support the allegation. They US government has alarm branded our as threat, it has hacked off service and the story on our emails and the sauce code these this the US government has never provided any evidence supporting the accusation that highway poses a Sabah securities threat steer the US government is very no effort to smell a company and misled the public about why in Shenzhen China on the BBC's John sudworth for marketplace. Let's do the numbers global stocks are mixed Asian and European markets. Mostly stuttered with no fresh news on the US China trade front, though, Chinese shares edged up. Up. Now, you're central Bank is expected to signal fresh stimulus measures as the single currency block bottles. A slowdown in growth. The BBC's soup ping Chan has more economists like to call him Super Mario Draghi by the president of the European Central Bank was less super and more sober at his last press conference in January the research around the euro area growth outlook, have moved to the downside. In other words growth is slowing and that's making some policymakers nervous class vistas in pantheon macroeconomic says the e c b will be forced to lower its growth forecast for this year from one point seven percent to something closer to one percent. What we're going to see today from these e b is the last major institution accepting the fact that growth rates in the euro zone of close to two percent is now over but what can policy makers do to combat? The slowdown Jack Allen at capital economics says the options are, narrowing typically, the central Bank, would I? Turn two interest rate cuts, but interest rates are already at record lows. The next tool in its arsenal would probably be quantitative easing. But it only ended its quantitative easing program in December. So then it's probably going to turn to what so-called tell tros now, essentially, these are cheap long-term loans to banks with incentives for the banks to loan that money on to households and businesses the might not take action today, but it's likely to come sooner rather than later in London on the BBC soup. Ing Chan for marketplace now globally access to broadband is concentrated in cities. But here in England a tiny cooperative is trying to change that as I found out when I visited a group of locals digging fiber optic cable across fields to farmhouses rural homes and businesses. We're all volunteers, and we're going to get into every property in the parishes. How old are year sixty four sixty five sixty three I'm almost sixty. Shouldn't you be? I dunno playing golf sitting by the fire. Reading a book. This is hard work. This is more phone. Broadband for the rural north or barn is funded and owned by those volunteers and villagers its profits are reinvested locally and customers pay what you and I pay, but they get constant speeds of one gigabyte that's hundreds of times faster than average UK speeds. And now the company wants to crowd fund nearly four million dollars to expand CEO berry..

US BBC World Service BBC John sudworth European Central Bank China Beijing Europe Joe Jack Allen Mario Draghi Shenzhen Shenzhen China CEO London Sabah chairman
"us government" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"us government" Discussed on The Young Turks

"And you tell them how great ball sonoma's Dave's. Like did the check clear shed cleared Boston arose wonderful. And he goes on Brazilian TV and pretend to be a liberal doing it. So it is trick after trick. Anna's? Absolutely, right. We're gonna get into details of how similar their propaganda campaigns are in those countries to what you see here in America. Yes. Yes. So let's talk a little bit about what? Freedom of information requests told us about what's going on in Venezuela. So the intercept rights records of tain through the fr- freedom of information act by author and activist Eva goal injure as well as State Department cables disclosed by whistle blower, Chelsea Manning reveal US policy makers sophisticated effort to use atlas think tanks in a long running campaign to destabilize the reign of Venezuelan leader, Hugo Chavez, again, I give you a get the same caveat that Hugo Chavez is not a good person. What he's doing in? Venezuela is wrong. He is a thorn -tarian now, though Doro who I I'm sorry. Yes. Madeira who follow charges? So you know in in covering the Venezuela aspect of this. We're not trying to defend the current leader of Venezuelan. What's going on? However that is being exploited by business interests here in the United States in order to essentially increase their profits through regime change now through recent investigation, though, recent investigations have shed light on the role of powerful conservative billionaires such as the coke brothers in developing a business friendly version of libertarian thought the atlas network which receives funding from coke foundations has recreated methods honed in the western world for developing countries. Now, this is where you should pay attention. Because what we're seeing here in the United States is definitely happening in these countries. They are infiltrating academic academies. They are working with millennial activists and essentially spreading their propaganda to them and convincing them to rise up against the current regimes. In these Latin American countries as early as nineteen Ninety-Eight said decided Libertad atlas flagship. Think-tank in Caracas Venezuela's capital received regular financial support from the center for international private enterprise who centre for national private enterprise is the US government, and they are funding the think tank, which then supported the opposition to Madero. And now all of a sudden that opposition is leading your cool, Madero and. After the announcement of basically the coup when the lead of the legislature stood up and said, I'm randomly the president. Okay. Guess what happened right afterwards? Donald Trump's government said we are now giving him twenty million dollars to support his efforts to overthrow Madero. So they get money ahead of time. They sneak it in through the so-called think-tanks funded by the US government and wing billionaires in America. And why are they working together? I'll get back to that in a second. And then the afterwards like, well, I guess he's official real leader Venezuela. So we're going to twenty million dollars to help us coup. So that is incredibly important part, though, is is it the US government representing the US people know, it's the US government representing giant corporations. So the coke brothers run. Coke industries. It's one of the largest private corporations in the world, and they have interest in oil as well as many other parts of industry. So they have financial interests in Latin America, and they go fun. Politicians in America. See they already did a coup in America. That was easy. What they did was. They said all right. We'll make bribery legal. We'll call it campaign contributions and independent expenditures. And we'll get the supreme court to say that giving millions in fact, billions of dollars politicians is not bribery. So they criticize Madero now rightfully so for getting control over the supreme court in Venezuela. And then pushing his cronies into setting up a whole new legislature. But I right wing billionaires captured our supreme court took it over and then declared that bribery was legal, and so they capture the US government. Now, they have the largest government in the world, which then takes US taxpayer money your money as spends it in favor of coups and right wing propaganda and so-called think tanks to influence people. And that's another layer of the story that is so intensely. Interesting. They know they have to win the people over. So that is why they go to the media to influence. But you can't let them know that it's Exxon Mobil and coke industries. Because then the people will not be convinced that is why these think tanks or so pernicious and how they flew the media's also amazing..

Venezuela US government US Hugo Chavez America Madero Coke industries Donald Trump bribery coke foundations Boston Dave Anna Exxon Mobil Latin America Libertad atlas Caracas president
"us government" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"us government" Discussed on The Young Turks

"And you tell them how great ball sonoma's Dave's. Like did the check clear shed cleared Boston arose wonderful. And he goes on Brazilian TV and pretend to be a liberal doing it. So it is trick after trick. Anna's? Absolutely, right. We're gonna get into details of how similar their propaganda campaigns are in those countries to what you see here in America. Yes. Yes. So let's talk a little bit about what? Freedom of information requests told us about what's going on in Venezuela. So the intercept rights records of tain through the fr- freedom of information act by author and activist Eva goal injure as well as State Department cables disclosed by whistle blower, Chelsea Manning reveal US policy makers sophisticated effort to use atlas think tanks in a long running campaign to destabilize the reign of Venezuelan leader, Hugo Chavez, again, I give you a get the same caveat that Hugo Chavez is not a good person. What he's doing in? Venezuela is wrong. He is a thorn -tarian now, though Doro who I I'm sorry. Yes. Madeira who follow charges? So you know in in covering the Venezuela aspect of this. We're not trying to defend the current leader of Venezuelan. What's going on? However that is being exploited by business interests here in the United States in order to essentially increase their profits through regime change now through recent investigation, though, recent investigations have shed light on the role of powerful conservative billionaires such as the coke brothers in developing a business friendly version of libertarian thought the atlas network which receives funding from coke foundations has recreated methods honed in the western world for developing countries. Now, this is where you should pay attention. Because what we're seeing here in the United States is definitely happening in these countries. They are infiltrating academic academies. They are working with millennial activists and essentially spreading their propaganda to them and convincing them to rise up against the current regimes. In these Latin American countries as early as nineteen Ninety-Eight said decided Libertad atlas flagship. Think-tank in Caracas Venezuela's capital received regular financial support from the center for international private enterprise who centre for national private enterprise is the US government, and they are funding the think tank, which then supported the opposition to Madero. And now all of a sudden that opposition is leading your cool, Madero and. After the announcement of basically the coup when the lead of the legislature stood up and said, I'm randomly the president. Okay. Guess what happened right afterwards? Donald Trump's government said we are now giving him twenty million dollars to support his efforts to overthrow Madero. So they get money ahead of time. They sneak it in through the so-called think-tanks funded by the US government and wing billionaires in America. And why are they working together? I'll get back to that in a second. And then the afterwards like, well, I guess he's official real leader Venezuela. So we're going to twenty million dollars to help us coup. So that is incredibly important part, though, is is it the US government representing the US people know, it's the US government representing giant corporations. So the coke brothers run. Coke industries. It's one of the largest private corporations in the world, and they have interest in oil as well as many other parts of industry. So they have financial interests in Latin America, and they go fun. Politicians in America. See they already did a coup in America. That was easy. What they did was. They said all right. We'll make bribery legal. We'll call it campaign contributions and independent expenditures. And we'll get the supreme court to say that giving millions in fact, billions of dollars politicians is not bribery. So they criticize Madero now rightfully so for getting control over the supreme court in Venezuela. And then pushing his cronies into setting up a whole new legislature. But I right wing billionaires captured our supreme court took it over and then declared that bribery was legal, and so they capture the US government. Now, they have the largest government in the world, which then takes US taxpayer money your money as spends it in favor of coups and right wing propaganda and so-called think tanks to influence people. And that's another layer of the story that is so intensely. Interesting. They know they have to win the people over. So that is why they go to the media to influence. But you can't let them know that it's Exxon Mobil and coke industries. Because then the people will not be convinced that is why these think tanks or so pernicious and how they flew the media's also amazing..

Venezuela US government US Hugo Chavez America Madero Coke industries Donald Trump bribery coke foundations Boston Dave Anna Exxon Mobil Latin America Libertad atlas Caracas president
"us government" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"us government" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Barron soka of the tech freedom thing tank says we'll see much faster development of five g networks he also says much of the current debates is misguided this guy's not gonna fall because there is no market for blocking consumers from accessing the content they want to choose he says the federal trade commission will still ensure fair access to the internet that won't change after today i'm justin ho for marketplace now we asked my colleague the host of marketplace tech molly would to think beyond immediate effects of the end of network neutrality on the one hand there's been encouraging data just last week from the federal government saying that the digital divide is closing more older people and low income households are getting internet access but it's still pretty fragile about fifty million homes in the us have only one broadband provider or actually none alist came out friday from the national digital inclusion alliance of the least connected cities in the united states and towns like brownsville texas detroit shreveport louisiana in these cities a majority of citizens don't have any broadband access at home now a lot of these people probably get internet access on their phones but it is likely that wireless access is going to get more bundled and potentially more expensive without any regulations to guide it because it's a more limited resource molly thank you and later today on marketplace my colleague iras dole will be speaking with fcc chairman ajit pie a conversation about the end of net neutrality the future of the internet and the government's role in that future and while so much attention is on g seven tweets in the us north korea summit in singapore the us government is borrowing a fortune as it does the us announce some us treasury auctions for today and tomorrow now it is the scale that's news the ten year treasury yield is up at two point nine six percent julia coronado is at macropolicy perspectives in new york hi there good morning so the government says how much how much debt and we're gonna try to get people to buy.

Barron soka federal government united states louisiana ajit pie julia coronado fcc chairman north korea singapore new york nine six percent one hand ten year five g
"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"The former director of mission operations at nasa worthy nasa that put man on the moon we did than invent space shuttle and start building the space station look at these great things that we did the entire nasa budget is less than a tenth of a percent of the entire federal budget so if that tenth of a percent helps us continue explore off of our planet helps us push out the human presence further into the solar system all of which will be necessary if we're we're going to leave the solar system that seems like a small investment to make if we can go back now not just with a few men to stay for a day and then come back but with people from around the world as a real concerted effort to really explore the moon explore the resources there become more adept at living on another body off of the planet all of that will better inform us for going to mars and before we leave the subject watts pool hills take on the ultimate question ought alien life forms out that by of course there are the universe is two two big it's the height of arrogance for us as a species to think that that we are both the only intelligent life where that this planet has the only life anywhere in the universe i mean it just doesn't make mathematical sense remember you had it have fest fat the format director of mission operations at nasa pool hill and finally russian act cadets from one of the country's most prestigious academies have risen to national prominence but not in a way you might expect a video they outlated didn't cells dancing in their underwear has gone viral it's got millions of views put the country's federal air transport agency is not impressed his moscow correspondent steve risen beth over the last eight years the leon janowski institute of civil aviation has developed something of a reputation in russia the top close pilots this week it gained a reputation the topless.

director solar system nasa pool hill steve russia nasa moscow leon janowski institute of civ eight years
"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Response to violent extremes videos that appeared on his platform last year it took down more than one hundred fifty thousand videos of oil and extremist content and it has been criticised because it's not regulated by body unlike the bbc for instance youtube doesn't have to answer to anybody and they say that's because it's a platform it it's not an editorial publisher unlike the bbc it says that a video like this because of the changes making will never be uploaded again but surely that's a very bold claim to make that there's some extraordinary number videos uploaded every second how they get into washed yes four hundred hours of video uploaded every minute youtube it says that it's got the algorithm to ensure this doesn't happen again but it's got to be tried and tested first there are implications for freedom of speech that are on that egypt say that as an open platform freedom of speech is really hard thing to balance because it is open in theory kind blood what have you like teach you because it's not publisher it's not editorially regulated it says it's it's has daily meetings to work out whether that line is when it comes to freedom of speech news beats daniel rosni earlier in the podcast we heard about the impending prospect of a us government shutdown it coincides with president trump's first anniversary in office and is just the latest events in turbulent twelve months for his administration which is seen investigations over alleged collusion with russia and highprofile personnel changes at the white house mr trump's views on space have received less attention donald trump wants to send americans back to the moon for the first time since 1973 too and he's ordered not sets to lead an innovative spaceprogram to send us astronauts to the lunar surface and eventually to mars it's clearly a move that his calculated to infuse the american public but what actually can the president's plans to revive luna missions deliver paul hill is.

bbc youtube publisher daniel rosni us russia donald trump president paul hill egypt open platform white house four hundred hours twelve months
"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Aside radio we should have responded faster but sometimes and he's borderline cases it takes a little bit longer that fest as we were cold this podcast the disgraced former usa gymnastics team doctor larry nassar is due to be sentenced by courts in the state of michigan at the trial dozens of women gave witness testimony that they had been molested by dr nasa who has pleaded guilty to seven counts of criminal sexual conduct last month he was sentenced to sixty years in prison for possession of child pornography rate showed dan hollander was the first of his alleged victims to go public she spoke to the bbc's for jeannie vijen off them malaria these little every as it never first one a really almost up into the last honours the year's worth of treatments clinica treatments and what he would do is limited entertainment us were hips are he needed to do an laugh aysheh release sports with us at how but the back pain and he way positional mother said she was at the head of the table says she could see what he was doing he would have me lie on my stomach face down and then he would either a towel or use my lease clothing odd to cover one of his hands and with one hand he would do legitimate sports was lashed the hand my mother could see am with the other hand he would penetrate me vaginal in italy you at formal my genitals i'm an on the last visit he on how to my bra and went up my shirt and gave me of rest massage how 'bout he'd physician me away from my mom said that she couldn't see what was happening i did not realize my mother could not see what was happening i didn't know forever really the the duration of the entire time i saw him that she was unaware of what was happening is that was another dynamic that kept me quiet because it appeared that the person i trust and most had consented when in fact she had no idea what was taking place and the oath the other two things that were running through my mind at that point was this was clearly something he does regularly i could tell that by his movements he was.

larry nassar michigan dr nasa dan hollander bbc jeannie vijen italy child pornography malaria sixty years one hand
"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Iman fought the mont was playing outside with her fiveyearold cousin a deal last february when she was kidnapped wrong iran iran denied the rahgozar sitting next to his father a deal tells me a man him stand against the wall then took him on fought them away again for tuna sat his memories of vague in confused as one might expect but his relatives say despite his age he showed police the house where iman fought the mom was taken to and then identified the suspect that suspect was a 21yearold could magusta who had moved fairly recently to the area with his wife and family what happened next is disputed at the time police said medecin was killed resisting arrest but a senior officer told me he was arrested confessed then shot trying to escape police in pakistan are often accused by human rights groups of carrying out staged encounters at times because they're worried courts will drop the charges i shall you said the shoddy but that's his family left just days after the incident they believe police killed medeva to cover up the fact they couldn't catch the real culprit residents had taken to the streets after the child's body was found another young go had been killed the month before young meant on key that come only done political oddball with us as mother gemeda bb has always maintained has son's innocence the funeral management guinard the lobby liability lafayette learning i have eight children do not the seven of them are alive all but but now i have lost my son and i feel as i have nothing left nebot they destroyed my son ali one in the neighborhood even to us afterwards.

Iman iran the house medecin officer pakistan medeva human rights ali
"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Pull back the russians who have helped the white pg the assad regime which says it would shoot down turkish jets and the risk of civilian casualties but turkey is determined to stop the kurds enlarging their territory and seems ready to throw itself into what could be a long and deadly enterprise mark lohan officials in pakistan have said they will investigate allegations uncovered by the bbc the police carried out the extrajudicial killing of a man apparently wrongly accused of murdering a child last year in the city of kosir dna evidence that is currently being reexamined suggests the fiveeuro victim was actually killed by the same man who killed zeinab and sorry in the city earlier this month police officers have claimed the man was shot trying to escape from kosovo sikanda kamani has this report the discovery of the body of sixyear old zenon sorry loss tuesday caused outrage in pakistan and across the world that police now believe she was the eighth young girl to be attacked by the same man the fifth to be murdered they found traces the same dna on each victim john maturity for the employment amongst those killed was fiveyearold iman fatima her father a factory worker shows me one of the few photographs he has of his daughter she's smiling pressing her face against that of her mother hollander nominees are going to indonesian i have so much anger and sadness incite any on i can't even express it.

turkey pakistan extrajudicial killing zeinab assad mark lohan kosovo john sixyear
"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Pete deploy f thirty five jets of britain's new aircraft carriers that doing similar things with smaller aircraft carriers for other allied countries the whole idea is both to rebuild and reshape america's all forces but also to look at new ways in which they can leverage the fact that america a load of these countries russia and china don't have this have a vast network of allies around the globe with which they could mount joint military operations jonathan marcus the russian foreign minister sergei lavrov has denied reports that russian forces have withdrawn from an area of northern syria is controlled by kurdish militia turkish forces have been massing on the border today's ankara regards these syrian kurds as terrorists with links to kurdish guerrillas who operate in turkey mark lohan reports from istanbul seven years into syria's war with an estimated half a million killed another front seems about to open up turkish troops backed by syrian rebels amassed on the border shelling the kurdish militia all white pg and a preparing a ground offensive turkey sees the white pg as terrorists linked to the outlawed kurdish militant group here the pkk which has waged an insurgency since the 1980's and ankara has been incensed by american support for the kurds fighting the islamic state group amidst reports that russian forces in the area have now withdrawn turkey's defence minister nurettin genetically said a ground offensive was imminent bull of us on gaza kfor strategic this operation will be conducted he said but the timing is part of the plan to maximize effectiveness and he vowed to eliminate what he called all tara corridors and their presence in northern syria ortolan called elizabeth but it's a perilous plan by turkey facing five impediments why pg firepower itself the group warning they would bury the turks one by one us support for the militia with washington urging turkey to.

elizabeth ankara istanbul mark lohan foreign minister jonathan marcus Pete washington britain gaza turkey syria sergei lavrov china russia america seven years
"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"People and vote to continue government funding and extend children's health care while we continue our bipartisan talks and they will see which senators vote to shove assad veterans military families and vulnerable children to hold the entire country hostage this was the response of the senate's democratic whip dick debevoise he he glories and saying that this is all about illegal immigrants illegal emigrants let's be honest what we're talking about here we are talking about those who were protected and allowed to live in the united states legally under an executive order of president obama until september fifth of last year when president donald trump announced he was eliminating this program and as that protection is eliminated as their to your protection expires yes they move into illegal categories i'll washington correspondent gary o'donoghue is covering the story he spoke to the bbc's julian marshall well the method quite simple there are fifty one republican votes in the senate vessels voting on democrats one of those republicans is ill the moments and i won't be voting judge john mccain so the republicans essentially needs to get around ten democrats to flip over and over them now it's a it's a pretty tall order for republicans but negotiations are continuing the democratic leader of the senate chuck schumer's been to the white house he said some progress was made when he spoke to the president but there are still some outstanding issues and so but why would any senator object to a bill would enable the funding of federal agents this bill does it have anything.

senate united states obama president gary o'donoghue bbc julian marshall john mccain chuck schumer assad executive donald trump washington senator
"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"us government" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"This is the bbc sales of our complete range of programmes to bbcworldservicecom forward slash podcast welcome to the latest global news compiled in the early hours of saturday the 20th of january i'm alex ritz in with the selection of highlights from across bbc world service news coming up a political standoff is poised to shut down the american government within hours leaving publicsector workers without pay if you're gonna shut down government three hundred million paid you better hamid damn good reason no longer the war on terror the united states identifies china and russia is the main strategic focus for its militry russia denies withdrawing troops from kurdishcontrolled parts of northern syria after speculation the movement turkey was about to attack we investigate a reported extrajudicial killing by pakistani police of a man apparently wrongly accused of murdering a child a former boss of nasa on the ultimate question it's the height of arrogance for us as a species to think that we are both the only intelligent life were that this planet has the only life anywhere in the universe and does he dancing in russia satisfaction his facts to delete anchored at scattered dressing down for a viral video showing them gyrating injust peaked caps and skimpy underwear but first as we recall this podcast president trump has postponed plans to leave washington for the weekend as the deadline nears to avoid a government shutdown the house of representatives has already voted to extend the funding of federal agencies for another month existing funding ends at midnight local time now the salaries of public sector workers depend on the senate passing a bill which has become mired in a dispute between republicans and democrats over immigration issues speaking in the senate the republican majority leader mitch mcconnell said the democrats were willing to sacrifice america's best interests the american people the citizens through acts ler elected off worry watching there will flee which senators make the patriotic decision stand up for their america.

america majority leader president nasa extrajudicial killing china hamid publicsector shut down forward slash bbc alex ritz mitch mcconnell senate the house washington trump syria russia united states american government