36 Burst results for "UN"

Fresh update on "un" discussed on WNYC Programming

WNYC Programming

01:21 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "un" discussed on WNYC Programming

"Not sport, but it is kind of a sport because And this is why I really love it. At a certain point, these two teams have to start competing with each other to lose love. Let me play you This point, So China serves at Korea hits it back, but it's going way out of bounds. Now now, in a normal world, China would obviously let that fall so that they could take the point, but they lunge to save it. Right, and they're hitting it back now. Korea, then they are like, no, No, no. You know what? We're pretty sure we wanted out of bounds. They hid it in the opposite direction even further out of bounds. So now China goes to say that once again, but they don't get there in time. So the point goes to China, which China actually didn't want and the Koreans wanted the whole time. So what're you saying, then? Is it well, it's like it's like they invented a whole new sport, which is the exact opposite of badminton. It is it is. Photo negative badminton. But then towards the end of the first set, referee has bean outcomes. The referee Hello Torsten speaking. Hi, Torsten Barrett was the head Olympic badminton referee who got that call, and I also heard the Spectators. Boo So I went to watch it looked Pretty old for this was not right together and told them that they were not playing seriously and they were making a very serious mistake and they played stupid and said, no, we're playing. We're trying our best to Tommy or so we were actually able to get in touch with your name in three of the four players in that match, both Korean players young Eagle Jang Kyung UN and they're going to kill Kim Hannah and also one of the Chinese players. How well Sally Shelly and and once you Ollie told me they were trying to lose in that match, But what do we didn't expect to South Korea would do? The same thing hasn't nailed down the hole. And as for the Koreans junk Young and said that they, too, were tryingto lose, at least during certain moments in the game. But when the crowd started to boot cut tongue and the ref came out, her partner, Kim Hana said that I was surprising in Bari. They were just scared. We just wanted to get out of the court as soon as possible. So Torsten walks off the court. They went on court again and then the second serve after Torsten walks out the court. Nothing.

Torsten Barrett China Korea Torsten Badminton Eagle Jang Kyung Un South Korea Kim Hannah Kim Hana Sally Shelly Ollie Tommy Bari Partner
6 Gulf Arab countries back extending UN arms embargo on Iran

KHOW Marketplace

00:19 sec | 1 d ago

6 Gulf Arab countries back extending UN arms embargo on Iran

"A six nation bloc of Gulf Arab nations has endorsed extending the UN's arms embargo on Iran. The Gulf Cooperation Council includes Borane, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. The embargo was set up in 2010 and intentions over Iran's nuclear program and prevented the country from buying foreign made weapons.

Gulf Cooperation Council Iran United Arab Emirates Saudi Arabia UN Kuwait Qatar Oman Borane
Top UN official warned of cybercrime spike during pandemic

Larry Elder

00:16 sec | 3 d ago

Top UN official warned of cybercrime spike during pandemic

"United Nations counterterrorism chief says a 350% increase in fishing websites has occurred in the first quarter of the year, many targeting hospitals and health care systems. And hindering responses to the cove it 19 pandemic have a

United Nations
3 Saugus Police Officers Stabbed North of Boston, Suspect Charged With Attempted Murder

Jay Talking

02:13 min | 4 d ago

3 Saugus Police Officers Stabbed North of Boston, Suspect Charged With Attempted Murder

"To be okay. Three Saugus police officer stabbed after they tried to check out a report of a stolen U haul. There's W. B. C. TV's Michael across. Prosecutors say that that U haul on Route one here in Saugus called police to report one of its fans stolen because it was never never returned. returned. Police Police say say that that van van was was at at this this home home here here on on Tuttle Tuttle Street, Street, and and when when they they tried tried to to question question the the man man inside, inside, they they say say they they were were attacked. attacked. We're in a hospital gown in a mask, 43 year old CV So Song is arranging Lindus record on multiple charges, including attempted murder during the interview of the defendant's responded To a judge orders him to undergo an evaluation at Bridgewater State Hospital. I know he's had some confrontations with some of the neighbors. So Song is accused of stabbing three Saugus police officers at his Tuttle Street home Thursday morning. I felt bad for the situation. He was a young guy. You know he could have his life could be a very different way And I just felt that farm Saugus police say the officers were trying to question so song about an UN returned U Haul truck that was reported stolen so sorry. I had an edge weapon, a knife assaulted. The officers aren't seen. Three of the offices were step suffered Lacerations from the weapon. All the officers are expected to be okay. Assistants. August police Chief Ron George Eddie says incidents like this hit close to home for his officers. They're just beginning to comprehend what occurred. Neighbours watched on as state and local police spent the day processing the U haul, and the suspect's home is very and normal and very unusual in this type of neighborhood. Very quiet, a DEA Are very nice people around leaving so I was, you know, I wasn't expecting this. Three of the four officers who were taken to the hospital have been released Me while so song is due back in court on August 25th unless doctors extend his evaluation and Bridgewater State Hospital, no

Police Police Saugus Bridgewater State Hospital Officer Chief Ron George Eddie Van Van Lacerations W. B. C. Tv UN Lindus Michael
Election 2020: Biden's VP Pick

People of the Pod

05:47 min | 4 d ago

Election 2020: Biden's VP Pick

"There's plenty of general reporting out there about each of the possible women who Joe Biden might pick to be his vice president. We're here now to understand the Jewish angle for each of these impressive women to learn what American Jews should know about each of these candidates that might make them more supportive or concerned. So we're going to go one by one and get the Jewish angle from our guest Jacob Corn Blue, the national politics reporter for Jewish insider. Jacob. Thank you for joining us to be back. Let's start with Comma Harris a former candidate for the Democratic nomination a popular senator from California the State with the second largest Jewish population in the country. What's the Jewish angle on Senator Harris? First of all, she married to a Zionist of that Iraqi gets her a Jewish scientist. Yes. So that gives an upper hand in this Jewish of IPE stakes I think that Kamala Harris gives a lot. She adds up to the ticket number one just because she was a popular candidate and people. So her at the start as a rising star and somebody who can really take this to the very end unfortunately it for ourselves she didn't win the primaries should take on. Joe. Biden pretty early which gave. That rise in the polls in the only of twenty twenty. I will say that Biden. Biden comes to see who is preferred choice for Veep Kamala Harris has a big name recognition. Is Obviously arised star and her background, a label as being a black woman from California. But was so high tides in the Senate and in the Jewish community. So the pros are out. The cons are that I'm not sure Biden Israeli looking for someone on the ticket would potentially overshadow him not because Harris Donald understand that if she's on the ticket, she's number two and she's there to serve the presidential nominee and possibly the president. But Because Camera Harris ran on the same slop because she is a bishop you know she can overshadow him in media appearances and potentially as vice president of being a little more independent and vocal than let's say, Dick Cheney and pence on camera beyond the you know the happy coincidence of the Jewish husband is there anything in particular that Jews should know about Senator Harris is policy stances? What has she? Done on issues Anti Semitism, what has she done on supporting Israel, other issues of concern to the Jewish community I guess close ties with APEC obviously. She's spoken at several APEC conferences but she also appealed to the mainstream of the Democratic Party She's not seen as a controversial figure amongst progressives say as someone who is too pro Israel for them she will reflect the same policies that Biden Obama and. Anybody, else running a Democratic Party other than on the an Warren's she would you know align herself with the second policy views? So I don't think she's outstanding. She's not too long in the Senate to look back at a record by think, she has a strong provisions record and she is aligned itself with the mainstream of the Democratic Party next, let's talk about political MIA fights, Susan, rice, Susan Rice served. As US ambassador to the UN in President Obama's first term and his national security adviser in his second going even further back in time actually I think I think she was the youngest ever assistant secretary of State She was you know thirty three or something like that when President Clinton in Nineteen Ninety eight made her the system secretary of State for Africa what did you need to know about Susan? Rice. Well Susan Rice first of all is A. Mixed emotions about Susan, Rice obviously, she has good ties with prominence numbers of the Jewish community and she has a record serving as national security adviser and embassador to the UN on their Obama Democrats SAPORTA. Mostly Obama's policy when it comes to how other than the last UN Security Council. Two, three, three, four, a resolution, and just mind our listeners about two three four why that was controversial. The only time when Obama. ABSTAINED ON APRIL then. All on settlements that you know really couldn't dent on Obama's record when it comes to a majority of American Jews talking about Republican Jews, all those. In Israel who soul Obama as being the more salt when it comes to the Palestinian issue. But Susan Rice obviously had a this overlap from being a national security adviser and the to the UN. Obviously, she was a controversial figure on this front. She was criticized by Dennis. Ross by the full hug combative style. When came to the Palestinian issue on the other hand, she has very strong ties with somebody like a Fox who is very vocal in his pro Israel stats

Senator Harris President Obama Joe Biden Susan Rice Assistant Secretary Israel Vice President UN Jacob Corn Blue California Democratic Party Senate Un Security Council Apec Harris Donald President Clinton Senator Reporter President Trump
1 American among 135 dead in massive Beirut explosion, officials say

the NewsWorthy

01:21 min | 5 d ago

1 American among 135 dead in massive Beirut explosion, officials say

"New details about the massive blast in Beirut that was so powerful. It shattered windows more than a mile away as of early this morning at least one, hundred and thirty seven people have now been confirmed dead and five thousand people were hurt. ABC News reports at least one American was among those killed emergency workers are still digging through the rubble. So Lebanon's. President warned the death toll will likely go up again, the massive explosion caused billions of dollars worth of damage and Beirut city governor says left about three, hundred, thousand people homeless. The United Nations has promised to support Lebanese hospitals as they struggled to deal with the emergency. Three hospitals were damaged by the blast and the others are at capacity and overwhelmed the UN. Specialist to Beirut to. Medical equipment was flown in from Greece Kuwait Turkey, and elsewhere, the also plans to send firefighters to help search crews. The New York Times went through more than seventy videos of the explosion and found it started as he region fire in the warehouse. Remember that's nearly three thousand tons of ammonium nitrate had been stored. That's a highly explosive material that's used in fertilizers and in bombs. Well, the fire turned into an explosion smaller one at first and then less than a minute after that the massive. People who manage the ammonium nitrate storage have now been placed under house arrest. The government is looking into possible negligence and they're working to figure out the exact cost.

Beirut Greece Kuwait Turkey Abc News Lebanon UN United Nations President Trump The New York Times
UN: North Korea may be capable of putting nuclear devices on ballistic missiles

Larry Elder

00:41 sec | 6 d ago

UN: North Korea may be capable of putting nuclear devices on ballistic missiles

"The U. N Security Council has received a report saying North Korea's continuing a stealth development of its nuclear program. Several unnamed countries conveyed their assessment to the panel of experts that through North Korea's past six tests and other activities it has probably developed nuclear device is small enough to fit into the warheads of its ballistic missiles. One country said Pyongyang may seek to further strengthen its capabilities and developed multiple warhead systems, which would make them harder to intercept. The report also noted that North Korea was still violating and evading sanctions, including through targeted cyber attacks against officials of countries on the Security Council and the panel itself. That's

North Korea U. N Security Council Pyongyang
U.N. chief say virus causing education "generational catastrophe"

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 6 d ago

U.N. chief say virus causing education "generational catastrophe"

"The head of the United Nations says the covert 19 pandemic has caused the largest disruption of education in history. U. N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres says school's closed and Mohr than 160 of the world's 195 countries. Effecting Mohr than a 1,000,000,000 students. He says At least 40 million Children have missed out on education in their critical pre school year. Terrorist Warren's that the world faces what he calls a generational catastrophe that could waste untold human potential, undermine decades of progress and exacerbate entrenched inequalities.

Mohr U. N. Secretary General Antoni United Nations Warren
China, WHO in talks on plans to trace coronavirus origin

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

China, WHO in talks on plans to trace coronavirus origin

"China's foreign ministry has echoed Monday's announcement from the WHO's saying teams are discussing plans to trace the origin of the corona virus outbreak following the W. H. a visit to the country now concluded the ministry has told reporters two experts from the UN agency conducted the party consultations on scientific research corporation on virus tracing during a two week stay which ended Sunday and talks of touch some research in there was a population environment molecules and transmission routes of the corona virus as well as plans to further scientific research the two sides are also probing the possible animal schools intermediate hosts and transmission route to the coronavirus to more effectively prevent and control the epidemic I'm Charles the last month

China Epidemic Charles UN
China, WHO in talks on plans to trace coronavirus origin

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

China, WHO in talks on plans to trace coronavirus origin

"China's foreign ministry has echoed Monday's announcement from the WHO's saying teams are discussing plans to trace the origin of the corona virus outbreak following the W. H. a visit to the country now concluded the ministry has told reporters two experts from the UN agency conducted the party consultations on scientific research corporation on virus tracing during a two week stay which ended Sunday and talks of touch some research in there was a population environment molecules and transmission routes of the corona virus as well as plans to further scientific research the two sides are also probing the possible animal schools intermediate hosts and transmission route to the coronavirus to more effectively prevent and control the epidemic I'm Charles the last month

China Epidemic Charles UN
U.N. chief say virus causing education "generational catastrophe"

America's First News

00:18 sec | Last week

U.N. chief say virus causing education "generational catastrophe"

"Chief, says Cove it 19 has led to the largest disruption of education in history. With schools closed. It's affecting over one billion students, U N Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez said. As a result, the world faces a generational catastrophe that could waste untold human potential. I'm

Antonio Gutierrez Cove
Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:49 min | Last week

Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

"A decade ago, Turkey's Foreign Minister Audit of Attalou used to boast his country was on good terms with everyone police fantasia want. less confrontation, less tense attitude. Especially, in the region, he spoke at the Council on foreign, relations with the will of the principal. In. Two thousand three. Zero problems with our neighbors. And the made a huge progress. All, that now seems a distant memory Turkey is growing its international influence and not always with a light touch. The country has been backing Libya's government in its civil war. Last month. The Turkish Defence Minister landed in Libya to inspect his troops and opposition warlord warned them to get out or else. Turkey prompted an angry statement from Egypt last week by allegedly planning gas exploration and Egyptian waters. And yesterday Turkish officials railed against an American company for its dealings with ethnic Kurds in neighboring Syria. That Turkey believes to be terrorists. To some, all this adventurism is reminiscent of past chapter of the country's history when the Ottoman Empire ruled all of Syria and far beyond. Turkey, has been playing an especially prominent role in Syria since protests spread into a full blown civil war. Turkey has really become a meshed in Syria since the start of the our spring, the uprisings that took place in two thousand eleven across the Middle East it back. The Islamist. Movements that initially took to the streets and then took up arms. Nicholas Pelham is our Middle East correspondent. But as those fighters were false back towards its border, it's really stepped into try and protect its southern border, stop any more refugees coming into the country and to provide some sort of safe zone for the proteges, and it's also very nervous about the current state law that emotion the northeast of the country. It feels very threatened by the emergence of Kurdish power on the southern borders, and is it reasonable for Turkey to think that those Kurdish forces are really a threat historic? The have been links between the PK, the cuts down Workers Party, which has been waging a thirty five year a war for. Autonomy and separatism inside Turkey. Many of those fighters did flee sought refuge in Iraq and in Syria, and so Turkey is worried about what it sees very much kind of PKK influenced state emerging on its southern borders. So this year it's been launching pretty heavy attacks inside Iraq, it's been sending tanks across the border. It's established positions inside northern Iraq. It's been carrying out drone bombardments, such two hundred kilometers from its border in Saint, John More, Kurds all the way along its southern border inside Syria inside. Iraq see a new Turkish assault, which is pushing deep into their territory and not just unsettling. Kurdish aspirations for sovereignty in Iraq and Syria, and this is also unnerving Arab leaders as well. Who Turkey pushing deep into territory, which was part of the Turkish Republic predecessor. The Ottoman Empire, which ruled the Middle East centuries until its dissolution about a century ago, which is to say that Turkey is expanding its influence is doing this adventurism beyond Iraq and Syria all over the Middle East of the moment. There's a this year has seen the new intervention of the Turkish, Army. Libya. They came to the rescue of the besieged government of National Accord. In Tripoli, which has been fighting a civil war against a renegade general. Khalifa. After Turkish forces established at base on the borders of Tunisia, we're seeing it's frigates make a bid for control of looking coastline and even ward off French frigates. We're really seeing a substantive increase in Turkish. Power across the Middle East and it's not just happening in Liberia. It's happening in Gaza, which is an ally of Turkey. Turkish forces there have tried to help. Cut Break Its blockade by Saudi Arabia they're. A. Few hundred to a few thousand Turkish forces that are they're wasting more Turkish interested in Yemen civil war. We're seeing interest in a Sudanese port and actually Turkey's largest overseas basis in the point of Africa. So really this is a massive increase in Turkey spread across the middle, East and do you believe that the the the Ottoman history plays into that as a return to former glories? In some way? It's very much the in the rhetoric certainly saw Mr. Osman tropes at the at the height of the Arab spring wanted to appear to be the leader of the Muslim world. He was promoting his version of governance across the region hoping to clone the Turkish model across the Middle East. But since the collapse of Islamist movement since its as from power in Egypt and the retreat of many of its forces, he's really kind of played much more on Turkey's national interests. He's ally domestically with what had been his nationals opposition. He seems to be much more concerned on trying to maximize Turkey's economic claims in the. The Mediterranean this since much more about promoting Turkey's national interests than flying it systems colors. This is really an exercise in in hard power and trying to exploit the weakness of others, the retreat of Europe and America from the Middle East. The policies of many Arab governments, and try and push Turkey to fill what seems to be a vacuum of power across the Middle East, and so is that push to serve Turkey's national interests working is, is it benefiting from this from this expansionism? If you're trying to put together a balance sheet of profit balance sheet? Sheet Turkey has benefited from Khatri investment cutters, loans, and investments have helped prop up the Turkish lira. It may be that country's also hoping to fund part of its military costs in Libya Turkeys, keen to promote its companies when it comes to eventual reconstruction of war-torn Libya, which after all is energy rich state, and so long term, there may be benefits, his critics home highlight, the cost it's estimated that Turkish operations in Syria have cost anything up to about thirty billion dollars, and of course, there is a threat that you're going to see a major escalation. Escalation in the Middle East, which could embroil Turkey. It's not just Turkey is entering the middle, East enforce. It's also Russia. Many Arab states are trying to gain Russian support to push back Turkey, not just Syria Egypt the United Arab Emirates looking to Russian support in Libya, and Egypt is sending its tanks to the Libyan borders. The UN warned that the risk of a of a regional war focused on Libya and beyond that that risk was huge. So this is a massive gamble and it looks as if the stakes are going to be increasingly hyphen

Turkey Middle East Syria Libya Iraq Sheet Turkey Egypt Turkish Republic Principal Nicholas Pelham Workers Party Attalou Saudi Arabia John More Russia Tunisia UN Tripoli
Supreme leader says Iran won't negotiate with US

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:37 sec | Last week

Supreme leader says Iran won't negotiate with US

"A townhall dot com Iran's supreme ruler, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, says his Country will not negotiate with us because America would only use talks for propaganda purposes in a televised speech marking the EED holiday, how money says President Donald Trump would benefit from talks, saying some wants to use negotiations with us for propaganda like negotiations with North Korea. Iran's supreme leader is your phone to talk between Trump on North Korean leader Kim Jong UN Hominy says the U. S. Wants Iran to give up its nuclear program defense facilities on regional authority at the negotiating table. I'm

President Donald Trump Iran Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Kim Jong Un Hominy North Korea United States America
The Biggest Takeaways From the Big-Tech Antitrust Hearing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:26 min | Last week

The Biggest Takeaways From the Big-Tech Antitrust Hearing

"Gatekeepers the digital economy these platforms enjoy the power to pick winners and losers to shakedown small businesses and enrich themselves while choking off competitors their ability to dictate terms. Call the shots up. End Entire sectors and inspire fear represent the powers of a private government. Our founders would not bow before king nor should we bow before the emperor's of the online economy. That's the chairman of the House. Antitrust Subcommittee Congressman David Cellini kicking off yesterday's hearing with four of the world's most powerful tech. Ceos Amazon's Jeff Bezos Alphabet Center Pichai. Apple's Tim Cook. And facebook's Mark Zuckerberg all videoed into to address lawmakers concerns. Their companies are too big and that they're squashing the competition. Here's our reporter. Brian Tracy with some of the biggest takeaways. From yesterday the biggest takeaway was just how hostile the questions were virtually the entire hearing and how they came from both sides of the Aisle Democrat and Republican. There were not a lot of breaks for the CEO's in terms of a friendly moment where a lawmaker thank them for the warehouse in their district for example it was. It was virtually all adversarial. A for these guys. The questioning was definitely choppier than we would normally expect for a congressional hearing there. Were also some odd moments. When the chairman of the committee asked the witnesses to swear in he said UN. Mute your microphones and raise your right hand which is not typically what you hear in a Congressional hearing. When they're standing in front of the cameras so yesterday's hearing was a big spectacle but Ryan says it's not the end of antitrust concerns for these companies this subcommittee will be issuing a report about whether the US antitrust. Laws need to be changed. We could also see in that report new evidence that the committees gathered. That didn't come out. Potentially if the committee wants to do that it'll be interesting to see whether Republicans and Democrats can agree on that report since there was some tension over changes to antitrust law. And keep in mind. There are also ongoing antitrust investigations of these firms by the Justice Department the Federal Trade Commission State's attorneys-general and over the coming months. We'll have to see how those play out. Investors seemed to be hopeful shares of tech companies rose more than one percent on Wednesday and the companies are expected to report quarterly earnings. Later this afternoon

Antitrust Subcommittee Chairman Jeff Bezos Alphabet Center Pic Brian Tracy Facebook Tim Cook Amazon Mark Zuckerberg David Cellini Apple Justice Department Congressman CEO Reporter United States Federal Trade Commission State UN Ryan
Mass starvation predicted due to economic effects of pandemic

NBC Nightly News

01:26 min | Last week

Mass starvation predicted due to economic effects of pandemic

"While the Global Cova, death toll tonight tops, hundred, fifty, thousand, what's coming could be far worse. The World Food Program and three other UN agencies predict mass starvation because of covid disastrous economic impact. The UN agencies say the hundred, forty, million people around the world on the brink of starvation. Now could rise to a staggering two, hundred, seventy, million this year. If we don't get a social safety net program out there immediately in providing food, you will see mass starvation famines of Biblical proportions David Beasley the director of the world. Food Program says children are the hardest hit with. Ten, thousand more dying every month in many countries, no school means no food leaving kids with weakened immune systems, which is to be vulnerable not just a covert malaria diptheria cholera and the crisis will spread beyond the developing. The UN, warns as hungry people move to survive. Do you think Kobe will lead to a new wave of mass migration coming toward the United? States there's no question in my mind you will see migration heading toward the US border the World Food Program is urgently calling for four point nine billion dollars to stop covert related hunger and

UN Global Cova David Beasley Kobe Malaria United States Director
Trump threatens to use executive orders against Big Tech

Rush Limbaugh

00:48 sec | Last week

Trump threatens to use executive orders against Big Tech

"Of the four of the largest tech companies air testifying in front of House Judiciary Committee's antitrust subcommittee today. It's the first time all four execs Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg UN's Google's Sundar Pichai have testified together. Antitrust subcommittee chairman Congressman David Cecil. Any of Rhode Island says they're a lot of questions that need to be answered. More than a year ago, this subcommittee launched an investigation into digital markets. Our two objectives have been to document competition problems in the digital economy into evaluate where the current antitrust framework is able to properly address them ahead of that hearing, the president tweeted. If Congress doesn't bring fairness to Big tech, which they should have done years ago, I'll do it myself with executive orders.

Sundar Pichai House Judiciary Committee Jeff Bezos Congressman David Cecil Tim Cook Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Rhode Island Amazon Chairman Google Apple President Trump Congress Executive
MLB: Washington DC Nationals Fall To Toronto Blue Jays 5-1

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | Last week

MLB: Washington DC Nationals Fall To Toronto Blue Jays 5-1

"Till the Nationals are five would lost to the Blue Jays. Three of those runs UN earned and trade. Turner points out, knowing definitely to clean it up in the field on kind of relaxed at the plate, and now I think we do those two things. I think we'll start to, you know, play a little bit better play the Blue Jays again tonight. The Orioles home against the Yankees were supposed to play. The Marlins Marlins game is postponed through

Blue Jays Marlins Nationals UN Orioles Yankees Turner
Pricing Our Climate

Why It Matters

03:52 min | Last week

Pricing Our Climate

"So do you think you can give us some of the big climate updates for the last year? Because twenty twenty has been a bit of a rough one and I think that a lot of people have been distracted from the long term. Twenty twenty has been talked about in the last few years by a lot of climate experts as are really important year. It's the point at which we would expect to start saying emissions decline. My name is Kate. McKenzie, I write a column for Bloomberg Grain I. Also advise organizations that are working towards a the Paris agreement goals in all kinds of capacities. So we sometimes call that bending the curve because you'll emissions have been increasing most years for obviously a many many decades now, and that's the first thing that needs to changes that annual growth rate needs to really end and start reversing at a fairly steep right because there's obviously a lot less air travel and certain other kinds of transit in particular and activity. Obviously, emissions are down this year. It's not really clear whether that's going to be permanent and it's not clear at what point you know that might rebound, and again, we don't want a lot of these particular changes to be permanent because they're so harmful. To cut those missions and otherwise. I we on the right. Track. There's a lot of encouraging signs, but there's also a lot of causes for concern, the overall emissions trajectory. If you kind of plotted out on todd, it's still not on a pathway that we should be on. There's also I. Guess Questions about the international process and the extent to which countries are meeting their commitments under the Paris Agreement to target a cut in their missions, and whether they're actually doing that quickly enough and keeping up with the schedule to be UN climate meeting that usually takes place at the end of the year is postponed this year until late next year but that process is still. Continuing in the background where countries are still being asked to look at their emissions plans look at their long term plans and talk about how they're actually planning to cut their emissions to get to nine zero by twenty fifty. All right. So it sounds like we still have a lot of work to do you know can't shouldn't. On a pandemic to get us to do the right thing for the environment definitely not. Even before we were grappling with a public health crisis, the United States was moving away from important climate initiatives at the end of twenty nineteen, the trump administration formally announced that it would withdraw the US from the Paris agreement abandoning nearly two hundred countries that have pledged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Many experts feel that this agreement is the world's last and best shot at keeping the globe from reaching the temperature of no return, a two degree Celsius increase from pre industrial levels. A big part of the administration's rationale for leaving the agreement was that it presented a threat to the US economy. This argument has struck many economists and climate scientists is misguided given the dire economic threats of climate change itself. So, there's two main ways to think about climate change in financial markets. If you think about things that you earn or things that can be bought and sold on financial markets, these can be affected in two main ways by climate change one is as the world moves away from what we call a carbon intensive economy companies and assets that have assumed that that warrant happen will value. The best example I suppose would be something like coal fired power

Paris Twenty Twenty United States Kate UN Mckenzie Bloomberg Todd
Pricing Our Climate

Why It Matters

02:20 min | Last week

Pricing Our Climate

"Do you think you can give us some of the big climate updates for the last year? Because twenty twenty has been a bit of a rough one and I think that a lot of people have been distracted from the long term. Twenty twenty has been talked about in the last few years by a lot of climate experts as are really important year. It's the point at which we would expect to start saying emissions decline. My name is Kate. McKenzie, I write a column for Bloomberg Grain I. Also advise organizations that are working towards a the Paris agreement goals in all kinds of capacities. So we sometimes call that bending the curve because you'll emissions have been increasing most years for obviously a many many decades now, and that's the first thing that needs to changes that annual growth rate needs to really end and start reversing at a fairly steep right because there's obviously a lot less air travel and certain other kinds of transit in particular and activity. Obviously, emissions are down this year. It's not really clear whether that's going to be permanent and it's not clear at what point you know that might rebound, and again, we don't want a lot of these particular changes to be permanent because they're so harmful. To cut those missions and otherwise. I we on the right. Track. There's a lot of encouraging signs, but there's also a lot of causes for concern, the overall emissions trajectory. If you kind of plotted out on todd, it's still not on a pathway that we should be on. There's also I. Guess Questions about the international process and the extent to which countries are meeting their commitments under the Paris Agreement to target a cut in their missions, and whether they're actually doing that quickly enough and keeping up with the schedule to be UN climate meeting that usually takes place at the end of the year is postponed this year until late next year but that process is still. Continuing in the background where countries are still being asked to look at their emissions plans look at their long term plans and talk about how they're actually planning to cut their emissions to get to nine zero by twenty

Twenty Twenty Paris Kate UN Todd Bloomberg Mckenzie
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

09:38 min | 6 months ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"This is an academy with US following a five day visit to Democratic Republic of the Congo or DRC where instability intercommunal violence and disease Ez continues to take a heavy toll. The human rights situation there is showing signs of improvement. Said High Commissioner Michelle Ashley. The human rights chief visited visited the Eastern Province of Italy and medley. There's from the hammer and lender communities. We have suffered atrocities which according to a recent report from her office may constitute potential crimes against humanity at the end of revisit this week. The High Commissioner spoke exclusively to raid your copy the Francophone radio station station run by the UN mission in the country MANISCO. Speaking to your room mate specially started by giving an overview of the current state of human rights into DRC. We've voiced his questions into English. I will tell you. There has been a decrease of three percent. In the number of documented documented human rights violations this has been limited the number Gravity and consequences for the population remains warring though I am particular particular concern that in fact that state agents remain responsible for the majority fifty four percent over the documenting violations against the across the country. They have done less violation but still remain the biggest responsible the FA RDC in particular particular remained responsible for the largest Numbers is supposed to twenty eight percent of documented. We're talking about documented violation. We're talking about allocate. Bailey shows that have been presented by people and the had been verified which must trace that beyond limitations in their ability eighty to protect civilians. They play an active role as perpetrators decisive action. Then on the government to stop is needed to stop all by elections by the security agencies and our forces is needed but on the other hand we see an increase of activities by armed on group they have increased by forty percent. Continue to have a devastating impact on civilians so he has increased weight. In general montains the proportion on state actors but We have increased activities by armed groups so the other thing that is concerning is the increase of reported the cases of sexual violence but we have to also acknowledged progress in some areas and it has been a significant decrease minus twenty six percent percent almost a third less in the number of violation of fundamental freedoms such as you know the opening of Democratic Space Freedom of speech is the assembly and well the release of political prisoners. So I think this is a positive thing that really acknowledge however. I think it's always needed to continue making all efforts so The there's nobody relational for political a million and political rights including the should be no attacks against human rights defenders and other civil society actors and of course demonstrations should continue to be free and have hello Repression on ten January. The United Nations joined Human Rights Office published a report which states at least seven hundred. One people were killed in communal community conflicts into drew territory in Italy between September. Twenty seventeen in September two thousand nineteen according to these documents. The vast majority thirty of the victims of the attacks appear to have been targeted because of their membership of the him a community. The report also indicates that he attacks could be genocide or or crimes against humanity in his report has been contested by the Lendu community which considers it be as in full of errors. You met this community in Boone. What was the response you gave them well? First of all the reason that I went to Italy is because the majority of people will Al- always to north keep all South Kivu. We have just this report that show us that there will be problems in Italy and individual territory. The second thing that I explained to them is that the findings of the report are based on a thorough objective impartial investigation conducted by the UN. Join Human the office using the standard methodology of my office. We use the same little dollies you all over the world. I told them that all violations are abusive by all parties have been investigated the with the same level of care on thoughtfulness the figures of the report represent all the incidents against that could be verified according to the OT charming dot org and standard of proof. I pointed out that the report also also provides figures of land victims of attacks perpetrators by the Hema and documents human rights violations abuses committed against the the Lendu undo by the army and police forces. And not only figures of Hemmeh victims and finally I also noted that we will continue to the money towards the situation so I invited him to share any information about human rights abuses and violations that were not included in the report for for us so he can be verified several Congolese personalities and organizations have asked I see seat to consider the crimes and other abuses committed by national and foreign armed groups ups particularly in the East. What is your opinion? Well we think that justice substantial element of the pathway to peace peace without justice spur difficult difficult to be sustainable. We have seen it in many parts of the world. There must be accountability for crimes. Committed and justice must be seen to be done done by population have been victims of crimes and serious human rights violations. The Primary Mission of the icy sea is. It's indeed to help Putin and to impunity for the perpetrators of the most serious crimes and thus contribute to the prevention of such crimes important to note however that is not a soup sitted for national courts. It is a duty of every state to investigate. And I would say prosecute those responsible for international crimes so the icy can only intervene where when state is unable or unwilling adding to do so therefore the primary responsibility for trying perpetrators of the most serious crimes in the including those committed in the East lies within the Congolese authorities for the last ten years. We have seen progress in the capacity of the national judicial authorities in particular particular military justice to investigate and prosecute cases of grave human rights violations in particular cases that amount to crimes against humanity ace or war crimes so there has been important convictions both of senior military commanders and our group commander so I think the important talking now is to encourage the government and in particular the Minister of Justice to continue improving the system improving the capacities the resources so that requires to fight impunity effectively. So I I I will always also like to underline our commitment to continue providing providing technical assistant assistance and other kind of support Schori. Human Rights Awesome in prison conditions in. DRC They are deplorable ruble. Several deaths of prisoners have been recorded. What are your General Recommendations to Congolese authorities to improve these human rights sector? Well the first thing thing is really really concerned to hear about the conditions on prisons. The high number of faith linked to poor conditions. Poor Poor poor foot Lack of food security and of course Seven South Stander Health Care Sanitation Asian food that cycle and many many many prisoners in small prison. So I've been speaking with the government and with the Minister of Justice. Who's aware aware of this? And he's GonNa go visit different places to see the conditions and to see what can be done because you know of course. New prisons needs to be built. But but that's not something you can do from one to another so where we have been discussing is that they are going to go to the prices. And they're going to analyze the prisoners cases because because many of them are for a long time because the justice system have not been able to trial them yet. The other situation are people who the things they committed that they they did it. Maybe not that bad that they can to remain in jail that they could have sort of prevention provincial provincial and measures that can be home but respond to the police. I mean there are different ways of dealing this while A lot of other prisoners can be built so what we have been toiling then is that they have to see every case by case and see what the abilities are so but the important thing is that we have discuss this with the government. They are aware of this and they have told me that they are going to take additional measures to try to address the problem..

Italy UN Commissioner DRC Human Rights Office Eastern Province Michelle Ashley Democratic Republic US Minister of Justice Ez Bailey Lendu United Nations South Kivu Boone South Stander Health Care Sani
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

10:09 min | 7 months ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"This is Connor Lennon from UN news. The United Nations has been involved in the divided island of Cyprus for more than half a century policing and monitoring buffer zone between the Republic of Cyprus and the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. The mission is headed up by Elizabeth. Spare the special representative of the Secretary General for Cyprus and is the first to have an all women. Leadership team in charge of the mission military forces and the police component when misbehavior came in Trois Soi U. N. new studio shortly after briefing the Security Council on latest developments. I asked her to explain. Why the UN is still needed on the island? The United Nations peacekeeping keeping force in Cyprus known as emphasis has been in Cyprus for many years now we were set up in one thousand nine hundred sixty four basically to respond to a situation didn't of conflict between two communities on the island the Greek-cypriot community and the Turkish Cypriot community. We've been there now for a number of decades cades and since then there has also been the defacto division of the island and so since nineteen seventy four. We are contending attending actually with With the buffer zone that is separating the two parts of the island so the mandate is basically to basically maintain maintain Common stability on on the ground to prevent a recurrence of fighting to contribute to law and order and also to promote a return to normal conditions conditions and these are all situations which seemed to be from another era. Many people go to Cyprus on holiday Turkey and holiday the Cyprus why is this buffer zone. Still needed if the conflict has ended or is frozen. Well this is The point there is Thankfully no violent conflict in Cyprus due to the to the conflict the original conflict but it remains a divided island and the conflict has not been resolved so one can say that it remains generally peaceful but but there is not genuine peace in fact the capital city. Nicosia is the last divided capital in Europe. And why is it so intractable. Well I think One can look at the number of places around the world where issues tend not to be resolved. There are always many Different reasons but essentially in order to resolve the conflict we need to have an agreement among all the parties involved and that involves evolves negotiations to arrive at a solution where all are ready with political will and readiness to compromise. And we have tried many times A- As you end to support Such negotiation process unfortunately hit has not come to fruition yet himself met the leaders of the two communities in November of lost year. Has any progress happened. As a result of that meeting the Berlin meeting in the end of November last year was was quite important because it was the first time the two leaders on Cyprus had met with the secretary general since the last round of talks ended inconclusively in July of twenty seventeen nineteen in Switzerland and they were able very clearly to reconfirm the basis. Of what would be the solution based on what Security Purity Council resolutions of the UN outline and that is to have a federation that would be by communal and buys zonal with political equality for both communities They also reconfirmed that. They wanted to get a deal done within a foreseeable horizon and the reaffirm firm the key elements that they would need to get there so that was important there is a reform process on peacekeeping ongoing AP action of peacekeeping which has been one of the focuses of the secretary general. What impact has had on on you and your mission I think it's very important impact for our peacekeeping mission because all all of the peacekeeping missions have been asked to look at the set of commitments? That make up the action peacekeeping agenda to see which of them They feel are important to pursue in order to become better peacekeeping missions to become more effective more efficient and to better fulfill our mandate mandate so of the various points of the action for peacekeeping agenda our peacekeeping mission unfancied chose. Was the area of advancing helping to advance political solutions safety and security issues and performance improving in in in in all of those news for me one of the most important things about action for peacekeeping is the fact that these are shared commitment so in other words more than one hundred and fifty member states the UN secretary and the peacekeeping missions on the ground have all agreed that in order to make peacekeeping fit for purpose in the twenty first century and beyond. We all have to do our part. Your missions quite especially in that aspect and the fact that is the first mission only have a female representative initiative in yourself also women needing both the uniform components military and police does that Present specific opportunities within your mission. I think definitely the it's presented a lot of opportunities so as you mentioned We are the first peacekeeping mission that has had both and at simultaneously the the head of the mission and the Special Representative of the Secretary General being a female so myself along with the head of the military component. Also being a woman and the head of our police and it It's not often that you you see women heading the what we call the uniform components. This is something that happened in twenty nineteen then the Our head of police unfortunately had to move on but we will soon have another replacement for her. which would be who will be another female and what? I did find wind in time that the three of us work together is that in addition to I think doing very Very effective work on the ground. We were a good I think we had a good demonstration fact and it shows that women can take these leadership positions in rather non traditional roles rules that they can be respected by all and effective. And I think that for our our separate counterparts it's also important didn't for their own police services and military and so forth to see that. Yes this is actually becoming quite normal that women not only are part of of the uniformed services they can actually serve at the leadership level headquarters we often hear about the inspirations of the UN to involve women more in the peace process How is your mission facilitating Veterans Ambrus? Yeah well certainly As as the UN does as a whole we are very committed as missions on the ground. The peacekeeping mission and the good offices mission in Cyprus to the women peace and security agenda and that does not only mean how we operate as a mission having women in senior leadership positions and also making sure that we mainstream the the role and end women's concerns throughout our work. But we're also trying to make sure that women's voices are heard within the peace process so that separate women are meaningfully involved in in the process so there are two ways in which I think. That's very important. One is to have more women involved in the formal track one negotiation negotiation process. There have been women. Both Turkish Greek separate women involved in the negotiations in the past although not at the top leadership positions and secondly to have a civil society women civil society also more involved lending their voice making ensure not only that women are involved but that women's concerns and their needs in terms of the peace process and the outcome are Duly reflected how do you see the situation in was evolving. Well our hope very much is that all of the parties will be ready to go back to the negotiating table In the near future and certainly the UN is ready to play our part. We have actually two missions on the ground. And I'm involved with both one is the peacekeeping mission and the other is the good offices mission which supports the actual peace negotiations so we are very hopeful as you end that we will be able to again support the parties to start negotiating to conclude a successful settlement to the to the Cyprus issue. And when you and your team interact with with people on the ground with separates on both sides of the dividing Riding Lion. What did they think well you know? We've we've actually conducted some polling on a fairly regular basis in Cyprus and Recent polling has confirmed what we've been seeing for a number of years and that is that a majority of Cypriots both Turku present greek-cypriots very much wished to to see a solution and wish to see the island reunited but unfortunately With every passing year. We see that those who believe that it's still possible. A are fewer and fewer. So I think there there's a need also to for the leadership to reassure the population that the only that this is still possible and that they will redouble their efforts to To to get to a solution but also that it will be beneficial for all..

Cyprus United Nations Republic of Cyprus Secretary General for Cyprus Northern Cyprus Special Representative Security Council Turkish Republic Trois Soi U. N. Connor Lennon Elizabeth Europe secretary representative Turkish Cypriot community Nicosia Security Purity Council
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

03:12 min | 7 months ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"At true but this is your homework. This is your active choice in your step one to be part of this conversation. And there's actually there's several ways you can join it. The very first way is to take a very short four question survey Eh and we did take that survey in roughly a minute exactly. It's a super short survey so everybody can do it so please please do your homework but I have a hypothetical medical for you Sindhu Joie de. Well let's say I wanted to talk about the United Nations more with some of my family when I go home to visit people how would I go about that. I'm so so glad you asked so on the same website. WWW dot org backslash UN seventy-five. There's actually something called a dialogue toolkit as a very fancy phrase for a way to start conversations with your friends your family your coworkers at school people who may want to know a little bit more about the UN have guided conversation. Perhaps about some of the issues that we're all facing maybe that's responsible consumption climate change and you can download it exactly exactly you go to the website as you had mentioned you go under join conversations. Click on dialogue toolkit and you can download it right there. And it's there for you. To to have a facilitated facilitated conversation with some of the people who may want to know may may have some familiarity with you and but not totally know what it's doing and better yet you can tell the the UN how those conversations went. There's actually a feedback form so if something worked well if something can be approved we want to know that as well you seventy five wants to know that this is meant to be a two way. Conversation number. Sation can't stress that enough. UN seventy-five is setting up the conversation. But it takes two exactly so we've set you up right here. Use whatever social media outlet they use use some Hashtags Hashtag. UN seventy-five right Hashtag U. N. G. A.. Hashtag UN. Whatever it is that you want to bring to the attention attention of the United Nations? Throw that in with the Hashtag and that will actually feed into the conversation and yet another way because the will be analyzing that data will be understanding standing. What are the issues that are important to you during this year of a two way conversation? That's right and hey take the survey right. Yes tastes the survey. A minute yet takes one one minute. You get to put a tweet in this and you might be tweeted you know by the S G himself indeed right and we have a little teaser. Here we do a great great reveal if you will i. I heard on uncomplicated. That's right we broke it here. Allegedly there is a vox doc series coming out in January and early. Yeah that's right so beyond the lookout for that as well coming to streaming device near you uncomplicated the UN in through the medium of television. And so look out for that and engage with the UN in any way that you can because this is meant to be a two way conversation so join it and and with us as well if you want to tweet US email us just reach out if you have any questions here at uncomplicated. We WanNA help you. We want to help make the world a better place. That's what we're doing here. So here's to seventy five years of the U._N.. And seventy five one hundred fifty three hundred more there. We go tanks..

UN United Nations Sation
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

14:09 min | 7 months ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"It'd be great if we were asking more more about our opinions or in regards International things and maybe I don't know I feel like you. A lot of countries get are centered on what's going on self centered self centered. So I think if the UN Glenn was more open maybe like courses people would be more interested in we could feel like we would have an impact in can be more involved in the UN. And maybe.

UN
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

10:38 min | 8 months ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"This is Matt well as UN us. A year has now passed since the government of Yemen and Hutu rebels met in Sweden for US sponsor talks aimed at ending a brutal conflict. That's generated the world's worst humanitarian crisis in an exclusive interview with you a news U N special envoy Martin Griffiths has been reflecting on achievement since the signing of the Stockholm agreement which included key elements such as the establishment of a demilitarized zone around the port city of who data Yemen's gateway for goodson aid as well as prisoner exchanges ranges. Mr Griffiths said the path to peace requires warring parties to abandon hopes for a military victory and instead pursue the huge victory that can be gained through negotiation and he told my Yakub that this shift is happening in Yemen. Although more could be done towards fully implementing the accord. We also believed coming out of Sweden that that the element of the stock agreement which covered data the port city up. On the Red Sea coast of Yemen the humanitarian entry point for the humanitarian program program Yemen was saved from dreadful battle. Now you rightly point out to the fact that many people I'm one of them But if we could have done much better job of implementing the Stockholm Agreement in this twelve bucks on his beaten for many of us particularly for the people in Yemen. For whom it's it's a primary issue Disappointment in many many ways yes set neither have been achievements. There was a prospect at that time of an attack. On the city. Imports of all data. A battle for those two vital hubs of humanitarian program it was avoided it still has been avoided. That has it's been a ceasefire more or less implemented in data people's lives have been saved. The monitoring program has been protected. I I think it also showed that the parties could actually agree on a different way out of a crisis. But it's true there are things which should have gotten much better We still have yet to see major redeployments to demilitarize the city of data. That hasn't happened. We're still negotiating it prisoner release. We've had grave disappointments takeover. This yeah true. Recently we saw hundred twenty eight hundred thirty prisoners released. That was a great step forward but it hasn't been enough so I think the Stockholm agreement. Yes it we came out with a great sense of hope Hope dashed in many ways. But also some considerable achievements we're not forget the humanitarian crisis. That Yemen is suffering from Yemen. Continues to be the worst. The worst humanitarian crisis in the world. This this value situation is contributing to skepticism in certain circles about the possibility of a political solution. How do you see the prospect of apiece in Yemen now compared to one year ago when the agreement was signed well for me? The situation doesn't give me skepticism about the prospects for peace. It does the opposite. And if there's any argument in favor of the need for speed towards a political solution to this war is those people people who daily suffer from the effects of conflict families whose children haven't been to school for five years families who had struggle legal to get food on the plates on a daily basis. That will tell us. We need a political solution. It shouldn't make us skeptical about it but any political solution anywhere in any conflict and I have had the awful privilege of a lifetime of being confronted by conflicts is immensely difficult difficult it requires political will although level which is so much more demanding than in any other to move from water piece peace requires those who lead in war to change the way they look at their constituencies to change the way they look at the potential to end the hopes for military victory and to begin actually reaching out to the enemies and to make them part of the future. It's a huge shift in any civil war. It's a massive shift. What I believe is happening now in Yemen is that at last in Yemen? We're beginning to see that. Shift take place. We're beginning to see in the hearts and minds of those who make decisions about who all the desire to make peace and the recognition Shen at a fundamental level that there is no prospect for military advantage that there is nothing to be won on the battlefield and that there is a huge Zhou victory of course to be made in the terrain negotiation. On what you said we have Riyadh agreement. We have been seen reports that the the implementation is not going as well as fortunately planned. Do you think this will affect your hope for the parties to start formal peace talks. I think it's really important. That agreements is in its basics at least implemented. I'd like you were worried as to whether it will win awards words but you know All agreements provide for very clear timelines for eight or Happel beat happen. We'll see type and in real life things. Don't go quite quite according to plan as you know so. I think it's early yet to say this agreement is is is not working but I was in touch as I was coming to New York With senior officials in the Saudi government about the prospects for implementing the at agreement of course they mediated it. They assure me that they're on it. More importantly I think We can see that. There is interest in both the governor Yemen. I'm the Southern Transitional Council and making it what perhaps not in all its aspects but in enough to allow us. Now you end process us to mediate an end to the overall comfort so that Riyadh agreement gives us time we hope but if it falls apart I think it would be a devastating overstating blow to Yemen in your latest Security Council briefing as in the previous briefings. You spoke about women's involvement and peacebuilding the efforts and initiatives. Could you tell us a bit more about the work. Your office doing to include women and other constituencies in the peace process in Yemen every conflict in the world. Frankly it's not even a conflict issue. It's a life issue inclusion of women of Youth of the marginalized excluded of those who don't have the right to make decisions about other people's lives all these people need not just to be consulted in some way or other. It's very difficult. Isn't it but need to have a sense that whatever has agreed for them on their behalf our agreements which actually reflect their interests. And if we do that these will not be sustainable agreements. There's so much evidence rather world of that so this this is not some kind of great Altruism this is self interest that agreements need to be based on proper inclusion women in Yemen and have a phenomenal record. The national dialogue in Yemen was driven in many respects by the participation of women. Thirty percent and Levels of representation of women in many of those four was achieved and we need we being the people of Yemen. An us to help them need to revisit that read to get back to that level of representation. It does a by office We have a women's advisory group which is part of the way in which we look at Susan which will come to all the talks when we get back to them but perhaps just as importantly perhaps more importantly than that what we need with the help and advice all women's this group of the women's movement is to try to make sure that in any peace agreement it provides for adequate and hopefully powerful women's women's and civil society roles in the transition that will then come the power of transition and the relevance of transition after civil war is that it allows those who have been marginalized by the war who are not part of those who make decisions about how to conduct a war. Women are obvious example to get back at that place in the center of public life so as much as anything else we need to be held to account the parties and need us as their mediator. The provision will be made in that agreement and my final question would be about you. You have an extensive experience in the field of mediation and conflict resolution in from different perspectives in your role in Yemen and generally. Are you still learning things. I hope to God I have nothing things because that would be dead if I it wasn't Every conflict is the same in civil wars in every conflict is different. If you go to in my experience you go to to a place where the civil war I once went to a country and I said you know these are very familiar issues that you're facing and I think it was the deputy prime minister in that country was saying to me. You're completely wrong. Houses unique old conflicts are unique just as we all are unique obviously but they also share a lot of issues sues. What is so fascinating about Yemen? Is the character of its people because you see in the character of its people a desire to to be able to talk to each other to baby to open up to each other that sort of thing. which if we see if we see this shift this pivot that towards a political solution? I am sure that the current social media commentary which is so polarized and so critical of the other we'll shift rather quickly in Yemen to one which embraces the other. So yes. I'm running the second thing I might say is this. I think for the United Nations official official privileged to do something like this. We always need to combine the impact of values which include inclusion which include universal rights. So forth added the relevance of regional diplomacy diplomatic opportunity not interests and requirements from member states and balancing those two in effect balancing. Diplomacy with mediation is is for United Nations official. I think a special opportunity and God knows if you can't learn from that then you call them for many..

Yemen Red Sea Stockholm UN Martin Griffiths Sweden Matt US United Nations Riyadh Saudi government Happel Shen Southern Transitional Council New York
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

12:14 min | 8 months ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"This is Matt Wells at US news with molly facing what one UN rights experts called Dia Political Economic and social upheaval. The UN led humanitarian efforts in in the country of vitally important too much of the population and Beranger. Gaza Rabbe is the UN Deputy Special Representative in Mali where she oversees the work of twenty-one UN humanitarian unitarian agencies during a visit to U N headquarters in November Mugabe who has more than twenty years of experience with the United Nations in development and humanitarian assistance. Distance spoke to Connor Lennon. An explained that the current situation in Mali is very different and more difficult than it was when she first started working there the two thousand ninety was to be the coordinator and president of the United Nations ruined program in Mali. I was assist for the or the UN United Nations agencies. Acuna safe for her three Co you know the Burrito in sentence on so those agencies were working there where the the country was peaceful. There was no yeah used to have some programming in north because it's a huge country. One point three million square kilometres. It's a huge population. Nineteen million but then you hit body part of his not appropriate. What's new and it's it's it's a kind of cross the Sahara Oughta Hand Part Two thousand twelve. It changed scopes changed ecosystem. Changing we ever now peace and security to addressing development and humanitarian crises. Two thousand twelve. Could it tell military coup and then election two thousand thirteen eighteen now the new president who said over there but of course many things collapse you know look up at the economy look at the military system swept to that something. That's why two thousand ten or so was also the alive of this cord the group which invited the mighty so that way the French uh army has And then after it was peacekeeping so that's how the whole mission was set to help the concert get united because autosource also saying we're going to be separated from the country. So that's how molly was to sit up United County but to systematize the country and the setup for this institution which was completed down. And what was it like for the UN in Mali. At that time it must have been very frustrating to see a lot of the progress that you've made Mhm Go backwards. Yes Two thousand eleven actually to nine to the neighbor knows there and into even I was called here to be the assistance for departments departments and security. So somehow it was following. What's going on in mighty but of course for me? Even though there was nothing was perfect but it was not as such which today and then when I went back in fact that was asked scheduled for can allow me to go back to see really. What's happened molly? So two thousand fifteen hours for supporting it to be the the deputy special representative Over there and they didn't give this issue told you development humanitarian reading and so on and that's how I look at on and has all my goodness. Many things changed because the hip to build the army have hor protection security the whole zone over there and not in Sim time negotiating. Peace to make sure that the or the petition. The North South are united. In that together they built the country and the other complication. I presume is the fact that these issues in terms of peace and security don't just affect molly it's the whole Sahel region today. You stayed alive today. Yes some people will do is say that maybe the collapse of Libya is also brought a lot of arms and the trafficking in the horse. It's a huge huge huge place in that race. So you cannot maybe the Horse Protection of the territory and therefore the horror part if you look at decided. Maybe maybe people don't know but they can look at the map. Mattie is is not the best seven countries so those countries surrounding Mali. If if money's not fixed belies it it can affect the region and now we see cannot fussell NESIB are different. Defict it and if for you the borders the borders are not protected. So people can comment on ten saucer of traffic. And you know and You've had to improve your coordination with colleagues in those countries burkino-fasso affinity is into an fact. Matta fact we today. We're just attending the grobler. Could Nigga meeting here in New York and we'll talk Okara about the cross border issues. We have initiated with my two colleague initiative can I I saw a program where how to set up a pro going to cross-border dimension in most of countries in Africa can just cross the border you can go with these greener pasture the other side in the comeback so so this is a how population leave so with this or the trouble I think has been challenged for the population. Did across the Rhine. And then having the you know disco the group attacking them and those of course appropriation have been a deary. We have a lot of internal depress people. We have to feed them. We have to do everything for for them because they've lifted prices now the challenge humanitarian coordinator. How do we work with you and agencies with humanitarian to make sure that people are fed fed the Keita can school can do it? If and when you ask the question to discern these press people would they didn't dream is to go back to prices but this president who would they have to go back to the security if everything over there so we're facing kind of humanitarian program first because of insecurity an impact is huge. So we have to fix that. They'll have to make sure that the working hard if you don't do then can affect other regions the other countries his indigent. And can you see a way forward can you. Can you foresee a situation where this region can become stabilized new. So how how do you think that will have. I don't think that you win can do alone I think the UN is supporting. The Nation's is a lot of talk among a member state those countries are so. Don't forget the independent sovereign there they. There're civilian it. I think that's discussion being done in Africa neon in Agent Commission for the West Africa recorded recorded caused is economic commission for Africa with Africa. Those discussions going on among the Minister of Defense Minister of security. But of course the county can come together and say oh. My goodness decision is becoming really critical. acute how do we go together this to you head about initiative G. Five Suheil. When when he hit the child will confess Nazir Mali and Mauritania but now is also being looked at in a broadway or the West Africa? Because when you see if you don't fix the pro- resemble appropriate in this book and I saw and initiated muddy you are fixed so so the countries that are affected so this has to be recalculated video and a lot of initiative going being done now discussion on how to improve the security in the region. Of course we've supporter opinion or for the Mumba State Canada. US under orders. And you have rock today with your bucks in Mali or more circa thirty four troop-contributing countries in this country's or someone to help me to see see also the same partners so walking conversa- working initiated. There's a lot of initiative going on. I think maybe one day we quantitive. I hope that the climate of course has been important to you in development work in this call with droughts another former extreme weather affect people but now it seems that just move much more into the peace and security field. It's being seen as a threat. MULTIPLIER CSPAN EXP a bit about how the issue of climate change has impacted your work. I think if you look at this here legion. is his bill the low to initiative on on the system. How you fixed it the environment? Because it's very dry is very provided video zillion from account Competition Africa when everything's green in the decision. You just find almost everything's Detroit right especially north and it's been already even before it even a crisis before this challenge. It has been hard. But the decision was really zillion to establish stomach was system to protect the environment but today is being challenged by not only for Sahara. Desert is regaining down down in down in the SIM time. This conflict inflict doesn't help because of a petition are being displaced. When you there is no way to fix the environment you live in and protect the environment endure liver so this is eggs are being what we call? The climate change did is affecting that region so in one sense we have the conflict you know. And then there's some time so the climate change salvage you have some of the Place used to work around in the drive around. You have even assemble Divo- which had almost a dry so this is the issue. Did you have to address not only conflict but also the climate change can be harsh people and you're seeing. The conflict in certain is being caused or exacerbated climate change is accelerating absolute three three and is also another thing. We have to address that we're talking about is when we talk about the number one number two is such a thing zero zero hunger and food insecurity if you are displaced. You don't have time to do the agriculture to fix your budget than you ever came. It changes US exhibit. So we re EXP you know. Somehow we are worried about the next year or next in the next years will be very very us. We may visited a crisis will for food insecurity and how to feed people because if there is insecurity it is no way to do the culture the culture and there's no way to occupy the space and they do a lot of taking care of the environment of the planet and you can't trust environment as you said but can you. Can you plan for that kind of situation. Can you help the population to adapt better. Be More resilient. Wherever we con- we do we'll wh- do even there? Is this insecurity. Maybe one point I even we have insecurity. We did even on the ground because of course we have this biscuit. Musician is helping my for example. I'm Marie sitting down with the civilian and military Thaddeus to hit a dialogue to look at how can secure some of the zone white disagree Is offered by the forces then we can go and deliver lever. That's the press with maybe no having the police close to us and during the patrol we can continue to deliver but innocent time. Humanitarian have been a very very you know so amazingly different one the ground by having to call the acceptance policy they can leave everywhere they can just go in remote areas to civil life so in that sense we can say that not not everywhere is rock like that we can. We can deliver not pro. Britney Wrong Grahn. We can adjust if you think about stability but sustainability is is going to win every piece Lee peace and stability we can hope to have a long term stability better is now ten scored. We are trying to see what we can survive report or for some of the basic services..

Mali United Nations molly Africa US UN United Nations Gaza Rabbe Connor Lennon Nazir Mali Matt Wells Libya Beranger Mugabe North South New York
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:59 min | 10 months ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"This is connor linen from UN news the growth of anti-semitism worldwide is a sign that other forms of hatred and xenophobia are becoming more destructive and widespread the UN special reporter on freedom of religion or belief Akhmed Shaheed warned on Friday when I spoke to Mr Shaheed elections to the Human Rights Council Mr Shaheed began by confirming that the global rise in antisemitic violence is significant and worrying if you look at the data published we see global level of thirty eight percent from last year from the current here. That's the mega statistics of course this is misleading because not much has collected but there is evidence from different context that in each context there is a rise in antisemitism both objective incident and the subject of fear that many communities feel around allowed reasons well you know antisemitism long known as Canary in the coal mine of go ahead of of hatred and things start to go wrong you know the first time to get authentic vintage Semitism so we're seeing global search global snobby affairs stop that end to Simpson is is we have the online dimension which is feeding globe the surge of hatred again antisemitism is part of that Aziz said that indicates that hates Jimmy is becoming more of a problem absolutely I I think we're seeing around the world from poems of hatred rising and was I do find in my work. That antisemitic incidents tend to become more violent than puddle the other forms of hatred as again a reason why I did focus on this subject report this time and Cubans finding solutions to this we have we changed the situation well I look at for human rights to interest in this issue I advocate for any immediate practical tips including steps based on the questions like enforcing laws have in laws in place enforce in those the same time education is a key factor and ensuring that we address current issues and also prevent future occurrence of antisemitic hatred? Now you've been interested in the area of human rights for a very long time even early in your career in the Maltese you folks on human rights you created the Maldives national human commission what was the interest in this topic in particular well I have always been quite offended by by hatred I've always been by how widespread antisemitism is in my own country where they have never been a Jewish presence but it's all white spend every place you go and like I said I am very concerned my mandat about rising global intolerance and I think that business todd off is the oldest hatred because if e learning how toxic and Iran and you face a lot of criticism from the Iranian authorities. When you're in that role why do you think that is I think every times women's picks up for human rights somebody who will not be happy with that I think Iran's case to have a long history of not really object and human rights you will recall the the former supreme leader Ayatollah Khomeini had called human rights Zionist conspiracy Because of course the Mumbo Jumbo Satan's decide bruce Pondimin right violations so it goes the core of their being to challenge on human rights not deal with that criticism but if you are speaking up for the government of Iran they are public response would be denial and of course some hatred I suppose but then I do find almost every instance take a step back so there is the his If you like some impact of the work we do and that keep us going I think important to highlight that I am not the UN That I am infant expert acting or forms of intolerance discussion based on our belief so my job is to see how states I implementing this or not doing that and of ideas and how that may go forward I am one of fifty one or more experts will come from what academia sometimes NGO sector to advise member states on issues we think is important for them to look into what as you mentioned you're independent voice you can say what Nyc have your thoughts about the countries that are elected to the council yesterday yes it's distressing.

Human Rights Council UN Akhmed Shaheed Mr Shaheed Iran reporter Ayatollah Khomeini Simpson Aziz Maldives Jimmy Nyc bruce Pondimin todd thirty eight percent
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"This is Dan Penn with UN news although United Nations peacekeeping operations are over in Haiti the Caribbean country will not be alone as a new Asian themselves to find the way to overcome the problems and the dialogue is key in that regard that the Haitian people should favour and support a peaceful dialogue to overcome the current political situation and system Haiti will need the support of Other partners bilateral partners and other organizations and entities that can contribute to that the Haitian authorities to build up the National Police Force strengthened the judicial system and improved protection of Human Rights Pass Calcium Asmatullah above the the the same commitment to eighty and I think regarding the the achievement of peacekeeping on the one hand it is are important but they don't require a type of UN support such as peacekeeping the required different kinds of support today's the Haitian National Police which is today functioning police even though it still needs some additional support making progresses as well in the areas of protecting you UN and the capacity building in some key areas there's one example which has to do with pretrial detention which is a major problem Haiti and for effort and we'll be message to the Asian people into Asian political actors or certainly the first message would be it is for the leaving Haiti but the UN is not living Haiti and there will be a continuation of UN support to that country in different ways and different modality what the UN is aiming to do with the new integrated office of the United Nations which started its operation today and working accomplishments and why the situation now requires a different approach from the international community while I think it's important to highlight before everything that U N peacekeeping Sir Problem in Haiti are political but they also have to do with development and humanitarian situation that country and this is exactly different ways from from us and from the rest of the international community the current political situation in Haiti global concerned many people wonder if it's the right time very closely with the continuous work of humanitarian and and developing agencies but I have to say that it is important to highlight that in addition to the and rights and also strengthening the judicial system with a number of laws that were adopted with the support of of the the second message is that Haiti will not be alone it will continue to be supported not only by the UN office we've been able to support the reduction of a proportion of people detain without trial this still a long way to go in generally a bad situation from the point of view of violence from the point of view of these organizations of hey the building up some key state capacities such as started work today but also continued to be supported by the whole UN system and that just that there are many challenges problem that remain on the other hand what was achieved with peacekeeping was starting from a very who has been reflecting on achievements during that fifteen year period two successive UN peacekeeping operations known by the French acronyms Minister Admin juiced helps it was the right time for us to leave. What do you have to say well? I have to say again that the UN is leaving eighty that today's challenges is important for the whole of the international community all partners to that country to continue and even strengthen their support to Haiti both in the

UN Haiti Dan Penn fifteen year one hand
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

10:55 min | 11 months ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"Yeah but let's lead the picture a little bit so we have this huge space base. It's four stories on all these levels are at the very bottom are are where the countries are going to set the delegates from those countries and and as the floors go up all of the support you know all of their staff are going to be sitting in all of these other organizations that are invited have placed at different points in the room and interpreters and there's a ton of people are going to this exactly. I estimated very large catering bill if you were if you were catering very the general assembly and I think what's really special or when we were there. Can we saw empty but in a few weeks it's going to be a full house because the General Assembly kicks off so third Tuesday in September. There's a Tuesday in September and so this year it's September seventeenth if I remember correctly and because the G. A. is not just a place. It's an event right. It takes place every year from September to December is what's called his main part and it's the general debate and what kind of the bulk of what the six committees that make up the General Assembly actually do it's amazing because these six committees basically discuss everything a wanted to cover that what they discussed in the Nabet question all right. I might have an answer so six committees discuss everything from disarmament and international security economic economic and financial matters social humanitarian and cultural issues. There's a special political committee that deals with issues like decolonization and then finally you have two committees that deal deal with the administrative and budget side and then the legal side for these international treaties that do come out of the General Assembly and when you think about how special it is that at this is every single country one hundred ninety three of them that are part of the United Nations get to each have an equal say in the matters that are discussed on the floor so the simplest form the statement that our tour guide made one country one vote exactly right so I view this as a giant family kitchen table breath sort of like. We're going to hash things out talk about it. Discuss it right so my question is who sits where how do they decide like okay. This is your location occasion because that's tough enough at my family true right. Who's going to sit at the head. WHO's got the first seat right in the first row. I think it's really sweet. I think it just shows again. How how how much of an effort the United Nations makes to to have this equality amongst countries in this very public stage in arena and so what they actually do is draw a lottery and so they just kind of pull a country out of a hat you know and this is how I'm imagining it and and they read out the country and who whatever country that is that country gets to sit in the first seat of the first row and then after that they go alphabetically in English so oh right so for example if they picked. I don't know Oh so last year last year. The first country was molly okay and then after that it would be whoever comes after Molly Alphabet Alphabetical. 'em Away and all the way back all that is really cool. I feel like they should to have that on television sort of like the NFL yeah that'd be the only sports reference that I can make. That's okay well. That's really cool. I think got a very diplomatic way to make that very fair. So one of the reasons like you said that we had to be so quiet. in the General Assembly was because we kind of took a tour we didn't actually we kind of joined a tour yeah we do we tagged along with a group of kids who learned one specific item that has been decided at the gym in the General Assembly and they were captivated. I mean all of these kids. Were sitting there and not a single. One of them was looking on their phone. They were just really completely absorbed in the story that the yeah the tour guide was saying which was a little bit about what you're talking about the anti-landmine yeah right yeah and it was essentially there were if you go back about twenty five years ago there was an estimated twenty six thousand deaths per year by landmines which is a staggering number and over eighty percent of those deaths or write about eighty percent of them were civilians and a large number were women and children now. which is I mean it's crushing because these are people people who obviously had nothing to do with those land mines being in the ground and they're the ones who are the most effected by their presence and maybe you can speak to sort of like the steps of the process but I thought it was very telling that you have to start somewhere and take step one and this sort of gained momentum throughout the years yeah anti-landmine and mine treaty right exactly and like you said in order to get to a point where we have a treaty somebody has to say let's talk about this issue in the General Assembly and so they started talking talking about it in one thousand nine hundred three and it was the seventy ninth resolution of that year which basically said okay we're going to start to convene and and this is officially putting this issue on the table for us as a general assembly as a world as a set of United Nations to discuss step step one yeah and then the next year which was the seventy fifth resolution of that General Assembly they said okay? Let's commit to stop exporting these landmines and so this is kind of the beginning of the process to killing the market right because if you stop your supply then hopefully you'll you'll affect your demand end up to and then in the next couple of years what you have was a international ban and then eventually you have of this anti-landmine convention that was passed in one thousand nine hundred seven which eventually became a full international law in those steps three and four and I should say like we understand things has happened in between here right of course but it all starts with inside the General Assembly people talking about in agreeing on something the other part I liked about the tour that I learned. It doesn't mean that it is one hundred ninety three countries two zero right to get something done. Even in this instance there were one hundred twenty two countries who signed signed on initially exactly not everybody was onboard but more can come on so for example. Currently there's one hundred sixty four countries now who have ratified exactly well. What was the outcome. Let's talk about the outcome a little bit. It's pretty amazing so you know over the years of this discussion. They came up with the law. They have very specific outcomes which were agreeing to stop sales agreed to stop production so they've kind of killed the market and then the final commitment listed the removal of landmines that were already in the ground. If I remember correctly actually they destroyed over forty eight million landmines mazing. I mean all of these countries got together and all of a sudden you went from having twenty six thousand deaths a year in the mid nineties to forty million mines no longer in the ground. I think you could easily say that they have saved saved over a quarter of a million live. I know in the last twenty I mean. How cool is that done? Countries get together lives are saved if think big take the first step up and just keep going keep going right yeah and I think for me what the UN is all about is taking these small steps to achieve something great in the and and coming up. I mean right now. A perfect example of that is like we're saying the J. IS GONNA kick off in a couple of weeks and that first part of the General Assembly is what's called the general debate and the major distinction that I didn't know yeah of course it's well why would you you know you're you're actually work at the right yeah yeah so the major item on this agenda is the sustainable development agenda which was passed in two thousand fifteen just a few years ago and again and this is member state driven. I'm so what that meant was. These are seventeen themes seventeen visions seventeen goals which are the sustainable development winkles Hashtag global goals there you go and Hashtag U. N. G. A. N. G. A. Here we go yes so the SDG's they come come up everywhere and always when you're in and right now in studio there in the studio there is a poster up seventeen sustainable development goals when I came to the UN today I went into wash my hands and I went to drive them. In here is sustainable development goal twelve responsible consumption and production in reference to paper towels versus hand-driers and the result is one third as much carbon being emitted eliminates paper waste and reduces water consumption. You you find these things all the time and I don't WanNa get too far ahead but there is a natural alignment between the sustainable development goals and individuals behavior sometimes sometimes they don't have to be thinking about goals to be working towards them and I think that really speaks to how the goals came into effect because again this was members say driven but not just that there was member state driven in the General Assembly but rather that each of these countries went back to their own countries and said and asked what what should we do. What should we place emphasis on and the next year at the General Assembly. They came back and said okay. This is what we concentrate on and I remember I joined the UN actually the year that the sustainable development agenda was passed and I remember that year long discussion that we'd had I was working in Chile at the time and what was important to the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. What did they want to concentrate concentrate on. What were the targets that they wanted to focus on and what did they then wanted to show progress towards because really these seventeen goals are for the people and for the planet Lina in order to achieve peace and prosper and it's important to note there that this comes what you're saying is from the bottom of it comes from the people of the country speaking to their delegates delegates it gets getting together at the General Assembly during the general debate and coming up with this now reviewing this year for the first time all seventeen of them will be reviewed which just pretty exciting and like you said they're not abstract. They're not this nebulous sort of policy policies you know you you see people living them every day you when you have discussions at the UN when you talk to visitors for example you you hear people talking about them even if they're not referencing the the goals directly ethically yeah yeah and I think one of the best examples that we heard were when we entered actually the UN right. We heard this choir the beautiful children's choir a choir called one voice which they're kind of famous. They're really famous. I didn't yeah and just wonderful kids and even equally wonderful parents who were so so kind to take some time and talk to us and they were yeah they were singing in the lobby.

General Assembly United Nations Nabet molly Chile Caribbean NFL Latin America U. N. G. A. N. G. eighty percent twenty five years seventy fifth
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

08:26 min | 11 months ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"News goals are to inform engage and inspire. We're going to do all that right here from UN headquarters in New York City. Have you ever wondered what the United Nations does and how does it if so then this podcast is for you. Please make sure you subscribe tune in again here all these great stories that we have to tell about the work that the UN does and and all the impact that it has. We don't think there's a better way to start off to kick off with the World Cup of diplomacy the general assembly who wins everybody Ads Right Sindhu Joie. We are going to be your all excess. Vip Pass and take you inside the building. Give you a full on tour and talk to some visitors. We've met along the way about that Sindhu. I think that sounds great. Let's get to it. I think that deal you should tell us about your first time to the UN right. What did you think it was awesome. I you were giving me a tour and then we snuck onto an additional tour which was a double tour. It was great. I think I think that for me. Every time I come to work every day I look at the Secretariat building and it's thirty eight floors high and I really consider it this beacon along the East River Yeah. It's it's well. It's it's beautiful in scale in person it is more impressive all of the the entire building and footprints to me. It's even in larger than you think that's true and I think it's to be precise. It's one hundred and fifty five meters high nice. I love it. You had that stat in your pocket. You I can tell are non metric audience five hundred ten feet there you go. Did I ever tell you the story of why the UN is actually in midtown East in New York no no because the rockefellers crazy right so after you know after the World War ended and we knew were the global stage knew that they were GONNA set up the United Nations. They decided maybe you know since Europe definitely had to reconstruct after a war that maybe we wouldn't actually have the headquarters there's in Europe but we would have them in in the United States and quite a few cities kind of put their bid in San Francisco initial meeting eating yeah well that's where the charter was signed and then even philly wanted to get involved but then Nelson Rockefeller I think it was in nineteen forty four had gone to this Inter Governmental Conference but for American States can Mexico and came back and was like cooperative governance. Britain is my jam impair. I might be fair praising you know that and he basically then convinced his dad to buy these eighteen acres along the East East River which at that time went for a mere eight point five million so the whole footprint was donated and so his Dad Rockefeller John John Rockefeller donated the land to the United Nations and that's why we're here that's awesome so when we walked in and we saw all of these families like partaking this is because of a family decision son convinced his data to just make this exactly exactly that is very cool like speaking of family stuff like felt very family oriented to me. We did come on a Saturday. That's true right so so yeah. There were more more families than Maybe typical probably probably during the weekday yeah but it was great and I think like we were kind of saying. Is that what I what I loved that these world curious children were super excited to to be at the United Nations. This was something that not just their parents were taking them to but they actively wanted to come to as part of their New York tour yeah and I hope this is you leading s up towards the Family Thompson from Denmark our favorite family from Denmark. Perhaps because they're the only family we know from true spire to no more that's true and they were they were delightful. and we ask the parents why it was so important for them to bring their family to the United Nations and then we also asked the kids like what's your favorite sink in here and we have the clip right. Let's let's hear it. Let's play it. Why did you bring a few and what did you want them to see. If it's in the world which thrives to the vote with seems to be in conflict in many places yeah any any any highlights. What was your favorite thing? It's okay if there was like ice-cream or something and that was to see the pictures of the kids from other countries and their hopes dreams for the future those were interesting. I like all the gifts first of all. There is ice cream. If you want it true there's all kinds of food down in the cafeteria Tairea but but that was great right like you get to see the parental side of we want to make sure that our children are involved as global citizens from from the children's side you get like real responses the very interested in people's hopes and dreams and then another kid is like I like gifts because we're on vacation exactly and that's the best part of any vacation I take by myself. A president in dis- is going to be our first apology on the podcast but I have to apologize to the Family Thomson confessional time it is as we promised them t shirts and you didn't deliver. I lost their information but I'm sure they're listening to the podcast right now. So if you're out there family Thomson make make sure that you e mail us give you our email at the bottom of the episodes and please write to please do because we want to make sure that you get your t shirts. We'll send them express yeah. It was great and it's actually kind of a nice little way to segue into the first part of the tour that I took that's true because the artwork that the Family Thompson girl the daughter was talking about was this one day I will exhibit that that we saw that's both on the outside and then as you go into the lobby she continues and it was kind of magical wasn't it. I would argue that it just grabbed us and pulled us. That's very true we both just started walking that way and there was a specific image image that that captivated us both yeah and it was this girl. Kalija and she has this blackboard. This kind of sleet rate is holding in her hand and it's pretty nondescript unless until you look at the fact that on the back of it she's drawn in in this beautiful white chalk very very finely done that iconex global apple logo so now she's transformed formed her own blackboard into what looks like an ipad correct. The photo is just aspiration. Yeah it it shows this is a child with some big hopes in big James Right right should we should I read the quote yeah for sure okay again. This is Codija h fifteen who's a Nigerian refugee in Chad and she says I want to work in. It to learn and share knowledge. I was born in a remote village in northeastern Nigeria with no school and no clean drinking water what I have learned learned. Is that with the Internet. Even if you don't know something somebody in the world has what you need it is the best way to share knowledge and by the way just to give credit that photo was taken by one vincent true that's correct and it was part of an exhibit that the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs had put together and I just I'm still blown away deal right like it's just image after image of these girls talking about how they're going to grow up and be amazing human beings empowered powered and just be active citizens of this world yeah and so this is right up top. We've already met the Family Thomson from Denmark. We see this beautiful art exhibit and we should note that there's are everywhere everywhere yeah wonderful exhibits from all throughout the globe opened the doors and you walk into the physical space right we walk up we take the red elevators to the third floor and then we had to go so into the show and we had to be quiet because we snuck into a tour of Kansas. That's true we totally piggyback on. Their Fun Times. It was great. It was amazing. I don't know what did you think when you walked in the space. It's very large. It felt like if you go to a sporting event really early and you walk into you like the Madison Square Garden but no one's I mean it is the World Cup is that's correct but it just it was it's very large. It's a four storey very atrium. Yeah and it's you realize like there's so many huge global decisions being made in this room.

United Nations UN New York City Denmark Sindhu Joie Europe Family Thomson Rockefeller John John Rockefel East East River Sindhu Madison Square Garden Nelson Rockefeller apple United States Kansas Thomson Nigeria Britain
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"This is Conan Lennon from UN news an innovative new initiative to track terrorists as they attempt to travel has been launched at U N headquarters. The United Nations countering terrorist travel program provides countries with the technology to improve surveillance whilst protecting personal data and human rights. I asked yellow post Mer chief of the countering terrorist and aviation security section in the UN office of counter-terrorism why the UN has decided to launch the program the UN stands ready to help countries implement, this obligation. It is a heavy load. It is quite complex for a country to implement this costly as well. Because the technology you need is is quite expensive. And of course, you need well equipped professionals with a high sense of knowledge and expertise to work with the detection, capacity. See you built what you're going to need is to build what some call a passenger information unit or some call it targeting center. It is in his unit that receives travel information and compares it with database of people. We know both threat terrorists or serious and organized crime. And compare it to risk indicators as we call it to identify new networks that were previously unknown, but might pose a threat. So all these together needs to be built and for for doing this you need legislation. You must make sure that proper safeguards for data protection. And of course in full respect for human rights. This is that is this is a it is a complex instrument. That's also very powerful instrument to detect terrorists. So we must over this. But at the same time, we must fully insured. That's everything is done with high regard for data protection. And of course, other human rights, give me examples some of the ways that the UN can help national governments. This is a quite a new way for the UN to work. It is it is done with all relevant bodies. Of the UN combining their knowledge and expertise and also mandates from both the Security Council, and the general simply to in a very innovative and practical way, deliver both legislation operational capacity and Indians technology, which is state of the art and never been done by by the UN this in this way. And it really will help them to learn how to work with the the the power of the technology and make sure that they indeed also cooperate on the international platform. We will help them to engage with the neighbors to improve the information exchanges in country terrorism is always very big challenge. The information exchange getting the right information at the right desk at the right time. And this is. The second big part of this program will also make sure that they connect to each other and exchange information on terrorists. One of the big concerns. The US has raised recently has been the return of the very many, former so-called Islamic state fighters returning to their countries of origin of will this kind of initiative help to prevent these kind of people from falling through the cracks and returning undetected. Because many of them are deemed to still be a danger to those national governments. Yes, absolutely. We will help countries detect their own nationals on return, but also others in transits to other areas of the world because not of them go not all of them. Go home, some will engage. Elsewhere in new fights moved to new conflict zones or get improvement on the training or preparing to plots and plots for new attacks. So indeed, all these cases you will. See this new methodology? This new capability will help them identify these people on the move absolutely together. Maybe even with people, you didn't know before maybe, you know, about one terrorists their identities, but maybe this person with traveling group with other formerly unknown people in this way, you can create a network analysis so to speak and identify new threats. You mentioned earlier that financing that funding is an important part of this for countries that have less money. What can the UN do to ensure that they are able to better trick people? So this is exactly the purpose of this program. These district -nology is also for sale, you can call any software company and get a similar system, you will pay millions and millions and millions of dollars for that. The UN donates this system for free. No cost involved. We will help them get up and running and indeed with the technology for free. We will help them in deeds implements the obligations on the twenty three ninety six at a very low cost rate. So imagine if we could help one hundred sixty countries and imagine a system like this cost between ten and fifty million dollars. If you multiply that you see the enormous effect and efficiency this program has these kinds of surveillance methods must be

UN Conan Lennon United Nations US U N Security Council fifty million dollars
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"This is Colin Linden from UN news, joy, some Sunia acting executive director of you and environments or unit has expressed her sorrow at the death of UN staff, traveling to the US environment assembly on if yo- paean airlines flight eighty three o two which crush on Sunday killing everyone on board. In a statement released on Monday, Muslim Suez said that the environmental community is in mourning. And that those who died included UN staff youth delegates scientists and academe IX, she joined UN secretary General Antonio Gutierrez in sending the heartfelt condolences of the agency to the families and loved ones of everyone who lost their lives the tragedy. Patrick Newman from U N news spoke to Missouri and asked her how the atmosphere at the assembly has been affected act is quite combine shot quite reflective in many ways. But it's also been a moment. Where the community is a whole community that works on environment has come together because of the tragedy so this morning, for example. We had a moment of silence not just for United Nations stuff, but also delegates and other participants who were victims in the crash were coming for this meeting. So summarise the mood here is quite somber fad and reflective has this particular event affected. You personally is the anybody close to you that you know, that has been impacted or lost their lives, and you can imagine not just me. But the entire team behind me. We're working very hard preparing for the United Nations environmental assembly, which just started today. And you personally, the only staff of you an Environment Program that was a victim a Chinese national by the name of Victor Chang. It's really been. Devastating thinking about his family, and he was young up and coming decent human being in a fully professional to think about the loss, especially for his family sake and young very young family. I think the second is not just a United Nations staff, but also they were delegate and other participants who are coming to this meeting who were also victims very sad to know that the guests that we were preparing to welcome. Some of them did not make it. And I think lastly is all of these colleagues and delegates who were victims they pretty much died while they were working where they were coming to this important to global meeting on environment. So it's been a very sad and somber moment and reminded that life is too short. And lastly going forward with this event. How has it impacted the entire preparation that you guys been going? Through regarding the event itself. Very clear that we are honoring the victims in almost every meeting that I have been to today before the meeting started business that is in moments of violence in honor of the victims the community has really come together. United Nations stuff, but also Member States civil society media for you, get this sense of unity around environment. But also around the loss, which has brought all of us together. We're trying to do all we can to support their affected families linked to the victims. So we've also been dispatching teams to go to households and other places to confer their affected under the members and friends.

UN United Nations Victor Chang Colin Linden US General Antonio Gutierrez Missouri Patrick Newman executive director Sunia secretary
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"This is Conan Lennon from UN news. The two main reasons for a significant drop in food production in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea or DPRK our climate change at international sanctions taipan Mishra UN resident coordinator in DPRK told. You n news on Thursday. Mr. Mishra was at you in headquarters in New York to meet with representatives of donor and potential donor countries to appeal for an increase in funding for food aid and health assistance when the resident coordinator spoke to me, he explained that. Although the country has needed aid for many years, it looks as though 2019 is sent to be a tough year for many North Koreans deeper Korea has been a protracted an chronic case a for humanitarian attrition over the years. This year the food security station is one of the most dangerous because the foot production in twenty eighteen has been one of the lowest than Todd ticket. That are almost. A ten percent reduction from last year, the overall food need is much beyond six million and production is less than four point nine million. And therefore we have a shot at about one point four million metric tons that's been a real challenge. We also have chronic malnutrition with children and pregnant lactating mothers and other vulnerable like elderly and people with disabilities. Need our support to provide Newton nutrition support finally also in health and.

taipan Mishra UN DPRK coordinator Mr. Mishra UN Korea Conan Lennon Newton Todd New York four million metric tons ten percent
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"This is Conan linen from UN news. The slow progress of achieving gender equality in the workplace is almost a joke. Lisa king. Go head of the UN global, compact, the world's largest corporate sustainability initiative said in an interview with you a news, MS Kinko pointed to many positive moves and best practices. Now, followed by some large corporations, but she spoke frankly about the many difficulties still encountered by working women, including recent signs of a growing backlash and resistance to gender equality when I met miss king. I started by asking her to outline the biggest challenges in improving gender equality. I think the biggest challenges that according to the latest data from the World Economic Forum. It will say two hundred and two years so create gender parity in the world. I mean, that's that's incredible. I mean, does that mean that despite all the work that you and other organizations have been doing not enough is being done. Or is this a worst case business as usual scenario? Well, I think it's fair to say that the same number last year was two hundred seventy years so it has actually improved. But I have to say I think it's almost joke that it will take the world so long to create women empowerment, particularly as we know that there is an economic upside in empowering women in the range of twenty eight trillion US dollars. So that would for example, be able to finance the implementation of the sustainable development goals. So I think there's so many good reasons at many many levels to really work on empowering women in the latest survey among global competitors more than ten thousand company. Participants the goal number five on gender equality. Is the second most popular gold. So we have forty five percent of all these companies stating that they are working on this topic. Let's talk about the women's empowerment principles. They've been around since twenty ten give me an idea of what kind of impact they've made. Well, the women empowerment principles that UN global compact created together will you and women have been extremely helpful in a corporate setting because these principles are making it very clear and simple. What priorities businesses can set to advance women's but units in the organization, so at this moment, more than two thousand one hundred companies have signed up to the principals and integrating them into their business strategy, and we have made a a gap analysis tool that companies can use to measure their performance on the principles and that have been used by more than one thousand one hundred companies. So it signals that there's. A group of companies that have really understood that women empowerment is an important business imperative they are doing great work. The problem is that it's still a small group of competitors. And we need to scale up and reach a tipping point for gender empowerment, very soon. And can you give me some specific actions that some companies have taken which you can say yet. That's exactly what we're looking for. So there couple of things the really excellent companies are doing that are paying off. It is ensuring that gender is considered in all succession plans will in the company every time it position is posted the companies make sure that there's an equal part of male and female candidates their particular mentoring arrangements for. A women to help them advance in the companies. So that is paying off that is really making a difference and other set of actions that are very positive as well is when women are offered a childcare and good arrangements around maternity leave because it can be a limitation to women when they have to pose in their careers to of course, a raise the children and on that note as well. When companies offer maternity leave opportunities both for the woman and. The to the child. Let's talk a bit about the challenges, you ought discussing resistance and backlash to gender equality. Tell bit more about that discussion.

UN Lisa king MS Kinko Conan US two hundred seventy years forty five percent two years
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"Liska Fiji. Welcome to the Liz on out podcast series here at UN news been working for about two years. Trying to figure out a story to tell about the UN a fictional dramatization. That finally came to fruition. Mr. Mana says in the process of creating a new TV series based on the UN's work with particular focus on women's issues. He and syringes swan of marbles in Uman's a television series about genetically altered race struggling to protect themselves from outside influences. Stop by the studio to show how their projects are working to push forward, the seventeen sustainable development goals right now called United. But it's. Yeah. You and then smaller? The show is about people Facific -ly division of women who are mainly involved in gender equality and gender issues for women, and it's really at the end of the day. Again. It's it's kind of taking a human look what these women at the UN go through what they suffer. What they sacrifice for the greater good. And they will sacrifice a lot of things in their own personal lives to make sure the people they don't even know have a better life, which is really kind of interesting. It's based on that almost Tom Moody saying it's actually the same thing in Koran where it's like you kill one person you kill everybody. You save one. You save everybody. And that's really what it's about how they managed to set aside their own personal difficulties to continue doing the right thing. Because most everybody that I've met here is extraordinarily disciplined and really determined to make a better life for billions of people around the world. So would you say that your participation in world TV day had something to do with this new series Vida's everything to do with? It. Yeah. You intend to consult with real UN staff. Not only that I intend to hire. Some real UN staffers to be some of the writers on the writing team because it is a complicated institution. And even though we're dramatizing it fictionalised does a lot of things that I'm going to have to have vetted. So it's going to be a little bit of a tricky thing to write on a regular basis. But that's why I want to hire tickly women to be on the writing staff to help me kind of navigate what the story lines could be what they campy. I've already had one storyline rejected for the pilot. So have to fix that the certain sensitivity that I'm aware of do you intend to travel to different locations right now the way it's structured in my head. I would say seventy percent takes place here in New York and thirty percent takes place in conflict states, all over Africa and anywhere else. That would be great for the local economies. There are some that are much more easy to work in than others. Will you be hiring local people? I don't know the answer to that. What topics? Do you intend to cover? Well, I think all certainly all this sustainable development goals. I mean, all of those issues from the hygiene, gender equality economic quality all those seventeen goals that are all incredibly worthy. Those certainly would be the bedrock. I guess the majority of the stories began the stories of more focused about the women who are actually trying to change those problems. Do you expect each episode to touch on a different topic? Yes, I think there are certain storylines that will a syringe can tell you as well because she's heavily involved in series world that usually you'll have one storyline will be resolved in one episode, but you'll have overarching storylines involving perhaps an issue that our lead character can't or is being sported chew fix. But there's a lot of support in Hollywood for this show. People wanna see this made. Yeah. And I think I think it has to do a lot with me too movement as well. This really is about the empowerment of women. It's good timing for that. And how. Do you hope the TV series will actually create change first of all it will educate? The American public is to what the UN really does. And really kind of expose. The fact that these are hard working people with religion McColl's because there's a lot of misconceptions about the UN across the country. This is really worthy institution. And I think it's also going to bring to the attention that the way we live here in the United States is infinitely different than the way everybody else in the rest of the world lives..

UN Mr. Mana Liska Fiji Uman Liz United States United Tom Moody Vida Africa McColl tickly New York Hollywood seventy percent thirty percent two years
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"The message that came out today is that if we carry on as usual, it isn't going to happen. In fact, there's a strong likelihood will overshoot two degrees. Patera Tana's circuitry general of the world Mitchell logical organization shared his concern about the consequences, particularly for the regions on the frontline of climate change this extreme urgency. And so far the progress hasn't been good enough that we would move towards one point. Five or two degrees targets. There's there's a need for Matz, higher ambition level rates even to decrease targets one of the major issues that they will be four hundred twenty million people less suffering because of climate sense if he would be able to limit the warming, the one point five degree level, and we have shared areas in the world with extremely sensitive. It's the small island states Mediterranean rates and also sub Saharan Africa. It's already suffering and will suffer the most in the future. But despite these stock warnings the teen was at pains to lay out a roadmap for voiding runaway warming, not just for governments. But for all of us his climate scientists and co chair of the report, Deborah Roberts. Transitions at the world needs to go through to of energy land citizen industry. That's a really empower Mesa means each one of us is individuals. Make choices about the energy use move through lines about Daichi choices that impact on Lange's tells us that can change the way we interact with the world cities through the transport. We choose to go to work and to pay talks to us that we have power as consumers in terms of way industry in the kind of goods benefactors overall real cool to action the nervous over to the countries to digest the contents of the reports and consider their responses. The report will be presented to governments at the upcoming UN climate change conference, which takes place in Poland this December that was UN News's Conor Lennon giving us the rundown on the effects of climate change by science experts and report authors, and well, we cannot forget the memory of renown figure Kofi non who. Served as the UN secretary general for ten years and left a legacy with his passing in August. The UN's top official in Geneva and a friend of nearly forty years. Michael Muller explained, the former secretary general's passing has deprived us of one of the world's last big moral voices here. Mr. Muller describes how the former secretary general's humanity infused everything that he did every concern that he had an every decision that he took Michael Muller. There a longtime friend to former U N chief and renowned figure Kofi Annan and the top u n official in Geneva speaking with michaela's kale of UN, news extraordinary human being absolutely amazing balance..

UN Michael Muller Kofi Annan Geneva Deborah Roberts Patera Tana Matz Saharan Africa Daichi Mediterranean official Mitchell Conor Lennon michaela Lange Poland two degrees
"un" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"un" Discussed on UN News

"Is that pope's August their accent emissions that they did that may have concert some of the by the sticking place, and we feel that day months on supe- should've used so more with authority to try and prevent at least condemn this going. So how you going to prevent this happening again many recommendations you talk to new name the commander in chief. It's been suggested that he might step down immediately wise accountability. So important in this case when I think accountability needs to things it means Justice for the people who were affected, and Secondly, it means that it'll deter we hope future trusses that people know that the national community will call them accountable. They play by the rules of war when they go to war. And I think that's one of the clear messages of accountability we want because that Dow and other parts of men mar as well as in kind do not follow the rules of war. And last question to you in terms of accountability. One of the ways that it might help to improve transparency and accountability is indeed social media. You've noted the rise of hate speech, particularly in this exodus, and in terms of the vitriol towards the Ranga minority in me on mall. So you noted social media platforms. How have you interacted with them? What are they told you how the helping from moat less hate speech on the web? I think what we're finding is that social media has become a platform played speeches. Well, I think it is taken them by surprise and taking everybody by surprise. And this is not only in Myanmar. It's also in my country on guy it's been the same in Germany as the New York Times article today's ago pointed out, so I think the world has to look and reexamined independently as well find out what we can do in deal with this issue of hate speech through social media. We have value freedom of speech, but may must be a way in which we. To deal with sate speaking that was our own Daniel Johnson over in Geneva, speaking with human rights investigator Rediker Kumara Swamy, next, we'll go to the UN's huge project launched this year to make sustainable development, a reality deputy secretary general Amina Muhammad told us in may that reform of the way the UN goes about development will allow the world body to transform a cacophony into a symphony. Matt wells spoke to miss Muhammed ahead of the adoption of the formal reform package. Ambi Gan by asking her why the development system needed reform in the first place while it needs it because this amazing new framework that we all agreed in twenty fifteen the twenty thirty agenda. That's the seventeen goals up. It includes the climate agenda. So a huge lift, and what you need the UN system is a better response that is ramped up beyond the MDG's MDG's had a Sutton response. What we need for the, geez. Is so much bigger. And for that. UN needs to reposition itself needs to get better skill sets. We need to make sure people at the country level are able to help countries and people achieve those aspirated that we have in the framework. This reforms to make to the Kotei of people's lives around the world and the effectiveness of the UN delivering effectiveness of the UN's going to be amazing because what we will have is much more independent and impartial leader in all multilateral system at the country level being able to pull a team together. What I would say is that in previous times, we've sort of had a conductor that through no fault of their own is conducting a cacophony left hand. Does not know what the right hand is doing. And today we have an opportunity to make a symphony for the cheese. That's really the difference on the ground. And I think that that for us means that we will deliver more effectively scale whole program. So we won't just be talking about vaccinations for for children, but will talking about a health system that will continuously provide the whole set of United nation that you need the doctors, and the nurses and really sustainability in it not just a program, but b. The on the program. What happens is able the UN UN to make better different guarantees about. How it can support countries and everybody else who's working in the whole sustainable development field..

UN Amina Muhammad pope Dow supe Myanmar Ambi Gan New York Times United nation Rediker Kumara Swamy Daniel Johnson Germany MDG Geneva Matt wells Muhammed deputy secretary investigator