22 Burst results for "UCD"

UC Davis Health debuts plans for hospital tower project

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

UC Davis Health debuts plans for hospital tower project

"Major plans unveiled today for a new U. C. Davis, California tower. At the medical center is going to be 16 stories high a million square feet of space. Most of the rooms could be easily transferred to become ICU room if rooms if necessary. Another major addition to our own kind of healthcare corridor over there by the UCD Medical Center. The expectation is to have it all done well before 2030. Because that's a deadline regarding earthquake preparedness and safety for a lot of hospitals around the state,

U. C. Davis Ucd Medical Center California
"ucd" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:20 min | 6 months ago

"ucd" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Had developed their own computer onto the actually stripped the npl efforts via n. p. elegant oh. It's the national physical laboratory in. London turing joined. They attempted to to build a computer. The the after touring laughed. The npl produced a computer called the pilot a c. which is a simplified version. Turnings design on it. Was that point in time that christopher strachey entered the scene he was a teacher. Jairo college taro school and he was a garage root of cambridge He heard about computers on was interested in programming them. The actually requested the national physical Trade could he come along and do some programming as a hobby at the time. Very few programmers were available and the accommodated him. He heard he did some programming in their device but he heard about the manchester computer was more advanced. Got in touch with turing who he knew from his university On got some time working on the manchester computer it turned out. He was a a natural programmer. Even touring was impressed by his ability to write code. One of the projects that he undertook was to write a program which generated love letters. What he did was create a program. The templates of love letters so be things like My it divided ajit of nine. X structures grammatical structures would be coded into these templates on the computer randomly. Choose additives to slot into the various positions gas. Oh for example. He wrote a love letter purportedly from manchester university computer which started hunting deer. Mice empathetic affection. Beautifully attractors affectionate enthusiasm. Except so you can see constructed new sentences. It was lightly creative and constructing sentences So that was probably the first artificial intelligence program Where it it the as you said that the the definition of artificial intelligence is is fraught with the best definition. I think is from or the accepted. Definition is from nineteen fifty five From a researcher. Cold john mccarthy he defined artificial intelligence as a computer program completing a task that would otherwise be called intelligent if a human were. So behaving so here. We have a letter being written by computer. You would say that right choirs intelligence so hence you would argue that a computer writing. The latter is not official intelligence but the way the computer is doing things is completely different. The algorithms completely different towards going on in the brain. It's just as eighth. The task will be completed by unintelligent being click strachey went on to work on a draft program checkers in the us as the board game where you move counters around a black and white checkerboard. He went on to work in that which was another more advanced form of artificial intelligence. Where the computer was trying to play the game of checkers as if it were a human player so again trying to write a program that Perform tasks that we would otherwise say was a required intelligence east. He the one who who came up with a machine reasoning.

christopher strachey npl manchester London turing manchester university n. p. us john mccarthy taro school researcher official
"ucd" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:02 min | 6 months ago

"ucd" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Interview with Ace Aura

Back To Back

05:26 min | 7 months ago

Interview with Ace Aura

"Are you out in Dallas as Iran, Yemen The Dallas area technically in Richardson right now I go to school at the University of Texas at Dallas and Richardson, and I met my apartment which is like right next to the school. It's not technically an on campus apartment, but it's like very heavily marketed towards UTD students, right? Yeah. Yeah. What what's I mean? What's going to college allegra now? Are you? Guys are there in person classes like what is even happening? So UCD did a really interesting thing. They made it where the professors could decide whether or not they wanted to do their classes in person or online, and almost all of them opted to do online classes, which makes sense because of like health stuff, and so all of my classes I'm taking our online this semester it's Kinda weird 'cause like. I never realized how much time that will spend inside if I'm not like forced to go outside and I even like being outside. So strange that like I've spent so much time in my room and I'm like I need to be intentional about like getting out and doing things in not larum. Yeah man I mean the the out from screens is very real, right? Yeah. I mean especially for what we do you already spending your free time in front of a screen. Exactly. Yeah, and so getting outside I find that I think. Way Better when I'm outside just walking around, it's also a chance to kind of unplug because like it's less of like an is drained thing for me than it is just like being constantly connected and feeling like I'm always like my attention being drawn to something when I'm inside with my phone with my computer and stuff, it's like I could be doing anything like even when I'm working on music I could be working on music I get a notification open it up I'm texting friends since I'm already on my phone I'm, GonNa check twitter. All my time has gone. It's gotta be such a weird experience. What Year in school are you? A senior kind of Weird L. explain a little bit behind that. So this is my Fourth Year Utd, but my first semester of this year and I'll be done after the semester. Was I was ahead of my degree plan because I had taken like AP classes in high school and was kind of a head, and so I was like I'm GonNa fill in an also got a pretty good scholarship and so I wanted to make full use of that As far as getting the whole four years worth to add a psychology minor to my degree plan as I did that last year and was taking a computer science, major psychology, minor classes, and then this semester I signed up for fifteen hours of classes and I just saw the workload as soon as the first week of school started like this is not going to be fun if I have a music career that I have to keep up as well as. and. So I was like Kinda Weird, I was talking to my girlfriend about it for a while I was like, I, have no idea what I'm going to do because like I wanted to take on the challenge of having that much work legs I would like for me to push myself learn how to balance things, which is a skill that I feel like I need to grow in weren't to have later in life but I was like this just doesn't seem right I knew. I felt like if I continued what I was going to be doing that semester with how many classes I was taking I just didn't feel passionate about lot of it. Like I chose psychology minor because it was interesting to me, it's something I like to look up in my free time but I had to sit back and be like do I really want to spend thirty hours a week on this? I. I was just talking to a friend about how sometimes you know we all we all have our interests and like when I I'll give you an example when I was in high school I did a ton of theater like I just tons and tons of theater and so when I went to college, I just sort of assumed I was like I like doing theater. Of course, I'll keep doing it in college and you know maybe this'll be a thing for me because I I was always pretty good at it in high school and it was always fun and then I got there and I saw the people who are really serious about theater. Really. We're going to go on to be the pros and you know immediately it's like, Oh, well, obviously, this is not for me. I had that kind of realization when I was an insurer neuroscience class hours. Yeah. First Week and I was like, yeah. I like learning about the brain neurotransmitters and things like dopamine and how they affect award system and that kind of thing but I don't want to memorize all these terms. So. I dropped my psychology minor after the first week and at the time of that worked out perfectly. The deadline to add new classes to my schedule was the Monday of the week after and I'd like just talked about this with my girlfriend and I went back home to my parents house. That's not too far from you like twenty five minutes away. I'M GONNA get my mom's opinion on this before I dislike drop it just to see what she thinks. She was like yeah. If it's something you don't feel passionate about go for it. Cool and then as I was doing that process I realized that I only had just a couple CS classes left in May like major and so I was like if i. Pull this off but I do is take all the psychology stuff off of my. Semester semester because they don't have to fill that space up anymore, I could just graduate after this one as I like, put all the classes that I needed into this semester and then had to like catch up on the first week of stuff but that's not usually that bad. But now on track to graduate after this semester. Man Yeah.

Dallas UTD Richardson Twitter University Of Texas UCD Dopamine Iran Yemen
"ucd" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:54 min | 10 months ago

"ucd" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"UCD m dot com calling off a major portion of the GOP convention. I'm Rich Dennison Fox News President Trump Tonight announcing because of a rise in Corona virus cases, he's canceling plans in Florida to hold his speech accepting his nomination for re election. The delegates air going to North Carolina, and they'll be doing the nomination. And we're going to do some other things with Tele rallies and online the week that we're discussing, which would be really good. I think we're gonna do it well and I'll still do a convention speech. In a different form, but we won't do a big, crowded convention per se. It's just not the right time for that. Convention events are scheduled to begin the last week of August, a judge today ordering President Trump's former personal attorney be released from prison, saying he believes the administration retaliated against Michael Cohen for writing a book about the president. He had been ordered back to prison Earlier this month after a probation officials say he refused to sign a form banning him from publishing a book or making public comments. The judge said the Justice Department violated coin's First Amendment rights. The Senate today approving a nearly $750 billion defense spending bill. The A's or 86 the Naser 14 And the bill as amended is passed. The House approved its version earlier this week. Differences in the two bills will need to be hammered out before sending the measure to the president, who has vowed to veto it because both include language removing Confederate names from U. S military facilities. The House and Senate passed the measures with enough votes to override a veto. Russian President Vladimir Putin and President Trump talked on the phone today discussing arms control and Iran's nuclear programme. The Kremlin says the two leaders also talked about developing mutual trade and economic aid between the US and Russia. America is listening to.

President Trump President Michael Cohen Senate Rich Dennison UCD GOP Vladimir Putin North Carolina Justice Department Iran US Florida America Russia attorney U. S
Iraq: Religious leaders give unprecedented support to ISIL fighters' children

UN News

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Iraq: Religious leaders give unprecedented support to ISIL fighters' children

"World Children on innocent regardless of their relationship to extremist fighters from the terrorist group known as Aycell Daish and they should be treated with kindness and love. That's one of the key points emphasized by religious leaders in the Iraqi capital Baghdad on Monday in an unprecedented joint declaration calling for justice on behalf of victims of the terrorist group which was controlled large parts of Iraq and Syria. The document denounces the ideology of Dash as completely contrary to the fundamental values of humanity. And it's been endorsed by the UN special adviser on the prevention of genocide. Adama Dieng during visit to the country. Cairene con Special Adviser and Head of the United Nations investigative team to promote accountability for crimes committed by Dash in Iraq unit spoke to you and uses my Yaqoob. It's important on a number of grounds but essentially broken creek to recover for justice to be achieved Commonalities as opposed to differences. Need to be emphasized. Sometimes we need to focus on what unites says rather than what divides US this interface. Statement represented common ground around St main religious groups In Iraq at least be share the company than the. Ucd's could collect around and with one unequivocal voice say that justice is essential For the victims and victims have to be in survivors have to be respected and accountability even essential prerequisite stability. What are the main points of the statement? And what does it go for the main points? really In Very I think clear concise paragraphs that all religions all faith renounce and denounce the ideology of Diet as utterly repugnant to the call religious teachings that they represent that's a very important coming together between the different religions. They under all of that faith they reject the Diet ideology as completely contrary not only to that faith but the fundamental values of humanity secondly it emphasizes the survivors must be respected and also supported so that they can carry on with their lives. Despite these costs that they carry and the trauma that has been incurred certainly emphasizes that even in the mixed dog the criminality of Daij examples of heroism but must be appointed in which different individuals from different religious communities have at great risk to themselves protected doubtful members of other religious groups. I think in a very enlightened unnecessary paragraph. He's suffering of old victims. Particularly Victims of sexual and gender based violence has been acknowledged. And it is underlined. The stigma should not attached to the survivors at all but rather stigmatization should attach the perpetrators of those heinous signs in the unique situation of Iraq. Bulletins recognize children and all the religious leaders coalesced around a principle that children are born innocent and regardless of how they that came about for how they impacted by Dash. It's the basic minimum requirements of international law. That they'd be treated with kindness and love and all. The religious leaders have emphasized that the importance of return of displaced communities. That were forced to flee also underlined and I think very positive step is that these major faith and he does cartoons Taco with the Catholic church above shake of the Zd community senior members of the Sunni ad council in Iraq and also senior shakes. And I told myself this year. Community have also underlined that That confidence in Uni Todd and the mandate of unit types to do justice. I think that's also an important aspect of the interface statement. Finally eight knowledge is the stamina is needed. Patience is needed because to achieve justice. Tolerance and reconciliation and forgiveness It's something that won't be achieved. Overnight requires the unity unity of purpose and the stamina and perseverance to go through difficulties. So that hopefully there is an improved situation in Iraq for all individuals in the days ahead.

Iraq Special Adviser And Head Aycell Daish Adama Dieng Baghdad Special Adviser UN United States St Main Syria UCD United Nations Uni Todd Catholic Church ZD
Patricia Scanlon, CEO of Soapbox Labs, on Speech Recognition That Actually Works for Kids

The Voicebot Podcast

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Patricia Scanlon, CEO of Soapbox Labs, on Speech Recognition That Actually Works for Kids

"Okay voiced by listeners. I've been looking forward to this Patricia. SCANLAN IS CEO of Soapbox Labs Patricia. Thanks so much for joining me today. Thanks Oh man okay so to get started. I know a lot of people know about soapbox labs but I think a lot of people do not and so why don't you this sort of introduce yourself. Elf what you do with the company and what is so box labs do at a high level short. I'm the founder and CEO Soapbox knobs on a very high level. We are voice his technology for kids so we power third party APPS web services products that want to voice enabled for children and this is is important because Asr's automated speech. Recognition are generally tuned to adult voices adult speech patterns in Africa children correct. Yeah historically cleo always has been it's it's pheno people often told us I know kids as us like just another accent. We've just throw of audio into you into the models have been built frauds. Motley novels behaviors. Just tune it to a kid's voice on it just does not work. Historically clean never worked on on people are still trying to unfortunately no. That's why we pretty much standalone Nariaki for speech recognition for children Tick because we had laser. These are focused on this problem for over six years right. So how did you come to recognize. This is a problem we we can go back act to the fact that obviously your your time at UCD you're really focused in speech recognition. But a when was it that it came to you that hey kids are is different in the way the technology handles speech wreck. I had my own house. Basically my daughter was three at the time mm-hmm and I was observing her interacting with technology. You know she was it was. It was kind of twenty thirteen and with the dawn of Oh absolutely ipod everybody. There was at millionaires. All over the face of people really invested in making a lot of cool apps up through the in education that age group as well. I was observing her. Interacting with a reading up those teach ner emergent stage reading where you're teaching them sounds and blend them and the Dakota his watching in how a really cool piece of technology that actually it's been designed with pedagogy experts in university collaborations beautiful graphics and really it was a great a product but a reading light on the ability to assess her pronunciation. Recall what was trying to teach her so seem. I'd spent a thought point joint. I've been in the area of speech recognition for like thirteen over thirteen fourteen years. I'd always worked on speech recognition to me just seem so obvious that we should be using voice these technology to assess a child's pronunciation recall and I don't know when you're read or learning language and it just really struck me that wow there's nothing thinned out there that doses ANA level of accuracy for children's voices so I started to investigate researcher for many years. Why is this a problem? You know why nobody managed to solve this. Given the fact was twenty. Thirteen right to think that it was everywhere. The technology space was gaining gaining traction and gain not quite becoming accurate Still Good Way to go with twenty thirteen while I was working in the space and seeing the leaps we're making in Adel speech recognition and then looking at this neglected area of children's speech I'm realizing there's a huge gap here a huge opportunity. You know from an entrepreneur to be addressed To be able to give children a voice to be able to let them be hard weather they were reading or learning the language or gives playing with a toy or game. I know seen how different a child's speech is. You're talking from age three. You're very. The child is very physically. Three different from Exposes a good way to describe Indus- their vocal tracks are thinner. VOCA trucks are shorter on vocals. Walter smaller. I'm what happens in not as the of the signal. The voice signal actually resides in different parts of spectrum. were certainly former frequencies concede to Then the speech behaviors are very different than adults rights of pink or five year old seven year old or nine year old. How they speak? Take the patterns of speech Elongate Over a nun seeds there. They'll sing the whisperer. Spur the But they also don't tend to follow language either so this whole series of aspects to this stuff should inform Sola should be should have been more obvious feeless like It will fall apart. Adults Systems are trained on adult voiced as adults speech behaviors With full apart with kids on the younger you get worse spouse was in my learning. By absorbing observing in my own daughter I mentioned to scratch heckle. Why is this knocking solved in on quite a bit of Exact problem

Founder And Ceo CEO Scanlan UCD Africa Adults Systems Motley Sola Adel ASR Dakota Voca Researcher Walter
Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

13:10 min | 2 years ago

Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

"Syria. Islamic state is a state no longer earlier this week, the Jihadist group which at its peak controlled an area of Syria and Dirac lodge of Austria and imposed its brutal rule upon eight million. People was chased out of its last pocket of territory by goose a town on the frightens river near Syria's border with Iraq in losing its territory is Lennox state lost many of its fighters, but it didn't lose all of them. Thousands of the caliphates foot soldiers are presenting themselves and their families at refugee camps and presenting the countries from which many of them hailed with a considerable political legal and ethical pickle. Which is basically this. What is to be done with them? There have been some calls for an international tribunal. But it is surely impossible to put so many people on trial. They cannot simply be abandoned, and it would be a brave politician willing to bet their career or a society willing to bet it safety on these. Jihadists returning home as altogether reformed characters. This is the foreign desk. Hot is pre programmed to think of every defeats as a test in. There will never see anything in as permanent defeat because it has already pre-programmed into their minds mindset and into their psyche. If you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death sentence. The tendency that we have in western Europe amendment to say, it's not out problem. They left us. They took up arms against us. We want nothing to do with them is all very well by the peasant doesn't cease to exist. So I think it behoves the society which broken up to consider why has this Cussing taken on against us? And what should we be doing about that not with the individual concern? Sent only but also with society as a whole. You're listening to the foreign desk with me Andrew Miller today will be hearing from a former director of global counterterrorism at M I six and from the full member of al-qaeda to look at what can be done, and what should be done with defeated jihadis. But I for a view from the ground from Syria on joined by Jane, Arraf international correspondent with NPR. Jane, stop by asking you to set the scene forest where he speaking to us from exactly what have you been able to see over the past few days. Well, I am in a which is one of the cities in the sort of a ton of Mus Kurdish region of Syria. And this is also where some leadership the Kurdish leadership is these officials who are trying to persuade other countries that they should have an international tribunal here in this northeastern part of Syria and been able to go to a couple of the camps where they're holding foreign his wills Iraqi. And Syrian ISIS families, and I've also been able to speak to one of the foreign fighters. Those foreign fighters have been apprehended by Kurds and the US coalition the US led coalition in many cases, they've been in US detention in Syria detention centers, actually, run by the US, and now handed over back to Kurdish forces, do you have a sense of what kind of numbers we're talking about in terms of the ISIS fighters currently being held by the codes. And that's all of the Iraqi Syrian and foreign there are said to be about seven thousand of them. So that is mostly Syrian and Iraqi about a thousand of them eight hundred two thousand or said to be foreign fighters accused foreign fighters, we have to make clear that they haven't actually been tried or convicted yet, but they are suspected to be foreign fighters. So that's all the way up from eight hundred to about a thousand is the estimate you generally get from US military officials as wills occurred. In what sense you able to get a what kind of conditions that being held in? Well, compared to what they came from which was almost certain death as US air strikes in waters attacked the last bit of their territory. It's, you know, not bad the conditions of interviewing these fighters preclude either asking for getting detailed answers about how they're being held in where they're being held. But one of the ones that I interviewed he was a Canadian fighter had been held in solitary confinement for quite a while. He also said that he was having trouble getting medical care. Clearly was well enough to do an interview. But certainly medical care seems to be an issue, but having said that, you know, having covered this battle against ISIS the war against ISIS over the entire ISIS territory. It's much better than the fate that befell a lot of them which was basically being obliterated by air. Yikes. Mortars and in other cities, if we boil this entire story for the moment down to this one Canadian fighter. What sense were you able to get all of his views on gun to assume it was a he his views on now on the subject of the ideology. He joined up to fight fo did you get the sensitize east had much in the way of a rethink? Yeah. Pretty much all of them have. And this was really interesting because I found this as well. In the case of the women who were married to ISIS fighters. They have now been for several months at least in detention with either Kurds or Americans, this particular foreign fighter told me that you know, he'd had a lot of time to think, but not only that he'd had a lot of interactions with the Americans who interrogated him and with the people who are holding him and with the Kurds. He said, for instance, but one point the Americans had given him novels to read one of the women. I spoke with told me that she had. Been aware. And I'm not sure if this is true, but she said she hadn't been aware of that ISIS held slaves. You know, they took thousands of UCD's from the tiny ziti religious minority as slaves massacred, the men and took the women and girls as sex slaves. She said she'd never met one until one of them was brought to the detention center to talk to them. And she said, and that's when I realized it was true. It wasn't just rumors. What they did to these women. So yes, in many cases, certainly in the case of this Canadian fighter. I it seems to have had an impact another foreign woman who is married to ISIS fighters told me that she was happy that she wasn't sent straight back to her country. She was from the Netherlands, and she said had she been sent back. She would still have been radicalized. But as it was her views of changed a lot. She said in being held for months and months by the Kurds because the biggest question, I guess the overarching question that we're looking at in this episode is with the ideology. Of ISIS will survive the destruction of the caliphate that the whole selling point of Islam state, and there was a clue in the name was that it had conquered territory. It was building a nation. It was building a homeland. If it is seen to have filed in that central enterprise. Do you think it's still going to be able to recruit people who might be inclined towards jihad? Or is it you'll sense from talking to the people you just mentioned that they kind of starting to realize that they might have back to lose a well there are a couple of things here. One is that in terms of ISIS being able to recreate a territory the caliphate had held which ranged for seventy thousand square kilometres, roughly and encompassed major cities. No one really believes they'll be able to do that. Again. In part of the reason, it's very apparent in Iraq. For instance, the people of Mosul, which is the second biggest city in Iraq. At first, many of them will tell you. They welcomed. Isis five years ago when ISIS came in because they so hated the Iraqi government and security forces, and then they realized what ISIS actually was which was indescribably brutal. The also they will not make that mistake. Again. They know what ISIS is now they know the dangers. But having said that there is a real fear that there is another ISIS in the making because we're talking about roughly in the case of Iraq thirty thousand members of ISIS families. Now a lot of those are children. So let's leave aside the children because children are children. But if you take the adults in those families, the women, for instance, a lot of them do still believe in the ideology, there is nothing that has changed their minds since then as for the foreigners. You know, a story I hear over and over and talking particularly to these foreign women is I didn't know what I was getting into. I don't understand Syria. I married. The sky might boyfriend told me to come. So those ones seemed to have had an awakening. And those are certainly the ones that want you to know they've had an awakening the, you know, I think we also have to realize that there are lots of those people in detention in these camps who are not talking to us because they believe were infidels because they still believe in the ideology and in the coun- recently in L hall camp, which now has more than seventy thousand people in it in northeastern Syria, some of the people running the camp told me that there are new arrivals all the time. And it's those new arrivals who are the most still radicalized that they've been saying in some cases that the head of ISIS abo- becquerel daddy ordered them to come to the camp that they will stay in the camp. But then Baghdadi and ISIS will take them out of the camp. So there is no one who does not believe that ISIS is still a threat those ones who will. Speak to you. Then what do they want to happen now, especially the ones who have come from outside, Iraq and Syria have the old discovered. A sudden enthusiasm for democratic G prosise. Yes. Well. It depends where they come from. So there was a group of women. I met Dutch women they want to go back. And some of them said we understand we broke the law. We want to stand trial. But it's our children were worried about they wanted their children to be handed over to their relatives. In many cases. These are very small children toddlers, really young the others. It depends again depends entirely where they come from a I met quite a few women from eastern Europe. And there was a Chinese woman. They are all terrified of being sent back to their countries because they believe they would be executed not only that they're even afraid to contact their relatives because even by contacting their relatives their relatives would end up in jail. They say so the ones who come from western countries tend to want to be sent back there. But as you know, the problem is these countries don't want to take them. They don't want to take them mostly for two reasons. One is it's really not clear how much evidence would carry over. If they were to stand trial in their own countries. And then the other thing is they could actually pose a danger if they can't be put on trial. They can't be prosecuted for things they may have done here. Then they will have to let them go, and they will be free in their own countries. So it's a dilemma you mentioned that there is some enthusiasm among the Syrian Kurdish leadership for the idea of an international tribunal have they talked at all about what they see as the scope of that they can't realistically intend to put tens of thousands of people on trial on the they can't know and by its very nature and international tribunal would have to be set up by the international community. And there isn't a whole lot of appetite for that for one thing the Kurdish leadership here is not internationally recognised. That's a big deal. And then these things will take years and years. There has been a move to send some of these fighters in any case from countries that don't want the. Back to Iraq and Iraq can prosecute them. If they've also been in Iraq because a lot of these fighters did come from Iraq from Mosul the foreign fighters, even when they were driven out of Mosul, they came to Syria, so they could be prosecuted in Iraq. Now, the problem there is those are not transparent trials, they're not run, according to international standards, and in a lot of cases, they do end up with the death penalty. That's one thing that the Kurds keep saying if you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death

Iraq Syria Isis United States Mosul Iraqi Syrian Europe Syria. Dirac Austria NPR Iraqi Government Al-Qaeda Jane UCD Andrew Miller Netherlands Eastern Europe L Hall
"ucd" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"UCD 'em, Baltimore and wcbMcom. A hate crime hoax. Lisa Brady, Fox News. That is what actor Justice Melendez now formally accused of due in court a few hours from now in Chicago, where FOX's Japan also is live. Lisa believe. Superintendent Eddie Johnson says empire actor jussie smollet orchestrated a racist, homophobic, homophobic, and political hate hoax last month, all to promote his career accusations within this phony attack received national attention for weeks celebrities news commentators, and even presidential candidates weighed in on something that was choreographed by an act Johnson calling it a slap in the face to the city of Chicago into the real victims of hate someone that turned himself in this morning on a felony charge. In a way to bond hearing here in Cook County. We're also told Lisa that empire. Producers are now reviewing smollet future with the show. Thanks, Jeff, FOX entertainment. In a statement. Just released says it respects the legal process and is considering options President Trump and a tweet a short time ago suggesting. Millette owes an apology to tens of millions of people insulted by racist and dangerous comments referencing the claim the tankers were wearing make America. Great again hats earlier, the president sending a message about technology. Fox's John decker live at the White House. President Trump tweeting that he wants the US to beat other nations to rolling out next generation wireless technology writing I want five G and even six g technology in the United States as soon as possible American companies must step up their efforts or get left behind also writing. I want the US to win through competition. Not by blocking out currently more advanced technologies. The president appears to be referring to an executive order that he's expected to sign that would block Chinese telecom companies like wal away from US five G networks, citing national security concerns. Lisa john. Thanks. This is Fox News. I wanna keep my heart healthy. So I get my cholesterol checked regularly. And when my doctor told me my cholesterol, was borderline.

President Trump Fox News United States Lisa Lisa Brady president FOX entertainment Lisa john FOX Chicago UCD Fox Eddie Johnson Cook County Baltimore Justice Melendez Superintendent Jeff jussie smollet
"ucd" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on PRI's The World

"So a aside from the from attic experience, what else did you learn about Nadia in that time you spent with her in two thousand fourteen. She looked quite strong and I could see how she wants to really fight against what happened to her. And I could see that because she was the van that insisted that she wants to show her face. She didn't cut the interview. She was crying, but she was soaking strongly giving us very strong points out that what he's going to happen to the community after this has because she was telling that these wound won't heal easily. So what has been kind of like the main part of her fight against sexual violence in the last four years? Sheep routes. Very deep hope to many other ziti Roman after heard token in new and many other women started to tell what has happened to them, and they found that Coleridge that they can find because his e community was very close, very conservative and -til DAT. It falls a taboo to talk about these things, but not the I is one of those that broke the taboo Khalili. Were there UCD women who as a result of sexual violence who had children with ISIS fighters, there are many, but our those children accepted by the rest of the ZD community. That is the big dilemma. Many people don't want to bring it out that this is another pain that not only the women bought their families are going through. Now. I met a family. That split, it's completely the women that I met. She wanted to have that tried. She was telling me that if I, this child's fault that his father vase ISIS fighter. But at the other side, she had three children from her years. Eighty husband and they are refusing that child the visit. Just to sum up when you look at not more odds story, the story being victimised gaping. And now after four years of hard.

Nadia UCD ZD Coleridge four years
"ucd" Discussed on Diagnostics and Usage

Diagnostics and Usage

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on Diagnostics and Usage

"So I feel like there's definitely two sides of the fence here, but like I don't want to understate the crazy invent the advancements that they've made to this like you can literally take an echocardiogram which is which is wild and they're, they've made the sensor on the backside of the watch. Looks like polka ball now it looks different. It looks very sexy. I love the new sensor on the back. It's kind of one green light instead of before it's like two or three, and it's got that kind of metal ring around it, and that's for the UCD so that they can test the electromagnetic pulses into do that exam. I thought the back. Looks just as ice and of course it's, you know, black ceramic and sapphire on every single model now. So they're not doing that split anymore. And I also like that they've added haptic feedback to the digital crown. You know, it's good. I imagine it's going to be very similar to win. They added the full haptic feedback to the iphone. Seven. And when you're like setting an alarm and going through each digit of the minute, you know how awesome that felt. I imagine that how it's feels now when you scroll on the digital crown of the new series, four. And then the other thing was interesting was that they, you know, and he was, they were really trying to explain it, but they're really trying to get the point across this thing apparently has a pretty good speaker on it and that's why that's why they moved the microphone to the other side to help with call quality. Yeah, I still don't. Know why people, I guess if you are, you know, paddle boarding out in the middle of the lake. Sometimes you need to take a phone call or something. I would love to see Apple's actual numbers on how many users actually do that. But the all of that's been really improved one other health thing they added was the fall detection. Yeah, I thought was an amazing feature to add in. It's one of those features that I think only apple really thinks of like making sure that things worked with a wheelchair, or you know, the like triple or was at five clicks on your phone to call emergency services. Like those are the kind of things that apple slips in there, and then they spend and they spend a lot of time getting right that always make these apple products like, hopefully, never run into that, but now you know, oh, it's there. So the one thing I always like every time apple introduces a new version of the apple watch the one thing. The one takeaway that I always get is that like I'm never using my watch to its potential, and I think that's just due to the fact that you know for people who are early adopters. Of the I watch you just never did because of the sluggishness and obviously that's changed dramatically. And I'm curious as a as you are a series three. Watch owner. Besides the complications and using that for quick actions and obviously replying to messages and you know, basic stuff. Why that unknown vacations. Have you found yourself using any other aspect of the apple watch? Or is that generally your main use case like notifications? Quick actions. I have the most. The thing is for now a lot that used to not use my old applause for is controlling audio volume skipping tracks podcast changing songs because the watches so much responsive. Now you can actually do that before. I could take out my phone and do it and put it back by phone before my apple watch series zero. Even like loaded up l. playing. That's really nice. So having that actually be useful, but I totally agree that there's probably way more use. I could get out of it with more features that I'm just totally not doing. You know, it's funny I was trying to, I'm on the app dot com, and I was trying to, you know, view pricing and more details, but it looks like the apple store is now back down for for the preorder tonight. There was one other health future that we missed as part of the EKG is like detecting atrial fibrillation. The few months or a few weeks back, they closed down the Stanford heart study that they announced back last year. I don't know if you've ever joined that. I joined that..

Apple UCD
"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Community about three hundred fifty thousand ucd's in camps they have not been able to go home i think this is always one of the problems that we focus a lot of attention on these issues at the time so there's big outcry about escd's being driven out their homes being killed and they're women taken but you know four years on people would forgotten about them and they are in the situation where their homes have been destroyed some of the women is still in captivity they use it if being rescued or have found their way back you know suffering terrible situations people are in a huge amount of debt because they've had payload of money to get the daughters or wives of sisters back so you know it's really two men sit community and i'm really not getting much helpful attention from the the rest of the world anymore kristie lamb and jack shankar with me throughout the program we're going to go to canada where leaders of the g seven of course are meeting for that summit the build up to the meeting so major disagreements between the us president and other nations over his imposition of trade tariffs and the iran nuclear agreement speaking as he left for the summit in quebec president trump predicted that during the meeting tensions over trade would be eased unquote will all be in love again he also threw a curveball at the summit insisting that russia which has been excluded from the group for its annexation of crimea should be readmitted to it should be in the may be a part of it you know whether you like it or not and it may not be politically correct but we have a world to run added the g seven which used to be the g eight they rush out they should let russia and come back in because we should have russia at the negotiating but that view was rebuffed by the president of the european council donald tusk he insisted that mr trump's efforts to renegotiate complex international agreements represent a clear threat to the post cold water authority lows however is the fact that the faced international older if being challenged quite surprisingly not by the usual suspects about by main architect and gallon the us well late last night president trump said he thought it was still possible for.

ucd escd president russia crimea donald tusk mr trump kristie lamb jack shankar canada us iran quebec european council four years
"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I don't know i feel like when i make these contacts with my friends back home it's the worst source familiar that it is kind of ignored i mean it it's so familiar it's expected it's part of life it became part of life mica friend said oh like a bullet hit her shoulder and she didn't care he said all but it was by accident it happened like like the every as if she was saying or today by the way like my the way i i watched this or i read this or this bullet i was just passing and kim i don't know from where so it's like as if it's part of everyday life and people ignore it and laugh i don't know over the last year dash been effectively driven out of iraq but thousands of ucd women and children are still unaccounted for summer and captivity some are dead i think it's been two years since you visited abdullah so he assured you that the publication of the book wouldn't cause harm to him but is that true and also how how has he managed to avoid detection how did he manage to avoid detection all of those years by dash yeah i mean i i was concerned about that and he actually he he said no not only no he said i wish this be you know be translated to other languages i want as many people as possible to know what happened to us actually he said his dream that this becomes a movie well and abdullah is right even though he didn't put it this way this.

abdullah iraq ucd two years
"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And her children after they arrive and give their testimony and their statement then they cannot compensate whoever they borrowed the money from but then abdullah was saying we can't wait this is like urgent work so they they still doing it there on way without waiting and then later he said okay compensation comes waiter we're not gonna wait for this and how does abdullah make his living now so as a beekeeper he was selling honey between iraq and syria and that how he was able to know those people in syria that helped him in the first place the merchants and because this a trade in our area is done is actually done different way than here is all done by lawns maybe here it's more formal level i credit they don't have those types of banks and credit they don't deal with that they deal all personal level they trust this person they would give the material later leaving the country's yes even between the two countries because of his reputation and that's both through the years with selling honey that's how this helped him in this work that trust that even with the rescuing of women is okay you don't have money this moment you can give us tomorrow the subtitle of your book the beekeeper is rescuing the stolen women of iraq iraq and isis or dash as you call the jihadi group has perpetrated so many atrocities in recent years that i i wanted to ask you to explain its attacks on ucd's in singer why were they singled out for especially savage treatment in what became a genocide.

abdullah iraq syria ucd
"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I don't know i feel like when i make these contacts with my friends back home it's the worst sofa melia that it is kind of ignored i mean it it's so familiar it's expected it's part of life it became part of life mica friend said oh like a bullet hit her shoulder and she didn't care she said oh but it was by accident it happened like like every as if she was saying oh today by the way by the way i i watched this or i read this or this bullet i was just passing and kim i don't know from where so it's like as if it's part of everyday life and people ignore it and laugh i don't know over the last year dashes been effectively driven out of iraq but thousands of ucd women and children are still unaccounted for summer and captivity some are dead i think it's been two years since you visited abdullah so he assured you that the publication of the book wouldn't cause harm to him but is that true and also how how has he managed to avoid detection how did he manage to avoid detection all of those years by dash yeah i mean i i was concerned about that and he actually he he said no not only no he said i wish this be you know be translated to other languages i want as many people as possible to know what happened to us actually he said his dream that this becomes a movie well and abdullah is right even though he didn't put it this way this.

melia abdullah iraq ucd two years
"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And her children after they arrive and give their testimony and their statement then they announced compensate to ever they borrowed the money from but then abdullah was saying we can't wait this is like urgent work so they they still doing it they're on way without waiting and then later he said okay compensation comes waiter we're not gonna wait for this and how does abdullah make his living now so as a beekeeper he was selling honey between iraq and syria and that how he was able to know those people in syria that helped him in the first place the merchants and because this trade in our area is done is actually done different way than here is all done by lawns maybe here it's more formal level i credit they don't have those types of banks and credit they don't deal with that they deal all personal level they trust this person they would give the material later countries yes even between the two countries because of his reputation and trust he both through the years with selling honey that's how this helped him in this work that trust that even with the rescuing of women it's okay you don't have money this moment you can give us tomorrow the subtitle of your book the beekeeper is rescuing the stolen women of iraq and isis or as you call the jihadi group has perpetrated so many atrocities in recent years that i i wanted to ask you to explain its attacks on ucd's in sindh jar why were they singled out for especially savage treatment in what became genocide.

abdullah iraq syria ucd isis
"ucd" Discussed on Las Culturistas

Las Culturistas

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on Las Culturistas

"Yes you with a straight miami assignment was the bird pupa in every improv scene guys there's a straight man and there's the people that want to kill the birds for their pupils yeah and if you think that's not a cms actually happening right now on the ucd stage you'd be wrong bird pubis the new the new goto topic yeah it's the new pineapple oh yeah you go guys we have a very special guest with us today our friends over at story pirates are employers as you might even say crazy made thousands working with them we have i nine's with them so do is what we're saying or w w nine's w names into sorry but we have but story parrots just did their change makers benefit recently and they asked us to offer up an auction item which is to be able to sit in on one of our recordings and then b attend one of our live shows for free and we have a winner you guys yes evelyn please welcome i hope i'm saying it right moser travis moser the house hello how now listen i was very gupte when i heard that someone bid on items because did you hear how much he bid can you actually don't reveal it i don i don't want because imagine if it's like five dollars i'd be fine with that like goes towards a good cause i believe i'm more than that i will find out find out i don't wanna know you tell them out i don't want to know what if it's also a thousand dollars and i'll be like bitch no.

miami ucd thousand dollars five dollars
"ucd" Discussed on Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

"Leave some sort of moral compass our children need to look at that person right behind the podium and feel safe okay and feel like that they they can aspire to be that type of person we as americans should be electing somebody who we aspire to be we aspire for our children to be so when i and i wasn't finished when i said if i had a ceo of my company i wouldn't care if they were having an extra marital affair but somebody who's supposed to be our leader it bugs me it bugs me that point yes because i'm not putting myself to that senate i wouldn't hold ucd to that standard that you're also not wanting to be the president talking yes so tomorrow yeah you know talking about somebody runs whose business leader of the free world wants to like have sex with prostitutes and then condemn people for i'm like no i totally prostitutes that have alleged so far porn star one and and playmates would stormy it's not about having sex she she came out because it was about hush money right yet it's a whole other thing because then then you go down okay but it was ten years ago so coming off forgive people do i want to be judged by something if i make if i make them it so i'm doing pot right now does that mean can never run for president just admitted that i'm doing a little go to bed.

ceo senate ucd president ten years
"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ancient religious minority they're mostly found in northern iraq they believe in god and they also believe that he entrusted the world to a cast of angels so it's closed religion and quite secretive and because of their beliefs they've been persecuted for centuries isis considers them infidels and when they came in as we heard they killed hundreds of men and kidnap thousands of women as sex slaves one of the worst things as well was that the ucd say it was some of their neighbors in the arab villages surrounding them were helping isis and so these kurdish fighters who've been protecting them remind us who they are what's their role in protecting cds so these these live on this huge mountain mount saint jars wells other places but that's one of these ed homelands and it's quite remote and it's right up against the syrian border they have been protected by kurdish peshmerga forces attached to the kurdish regional government but when isis came in those forces retreated and they left the zd's defend for themselves so as they were being slaughtered the pk k came in now the pkk's also kurdish but they're from across the border in turkey and they've been fighting the turkish government for decades turkey considers them a terrorist organization as does the us but they came in and they led thousands of ucd's to safety and they protected them what was the motive for these kurdish fighters to protect these well this thing it's because the ucd's didn't have anyone else to protect them the peshmerga the other kurdish forces had left the iraqis have been in control of that area for some time and they say the easy these called for help and we came they also came of course because they do want a presence in northern iraq they're fighting turkey but their main bases are in northern rack and that's another thing that the iraqis and the ucd's are a bit suspicious of that they thought even though they were incredibly grateful to the pk on the part of these eady's for protecting them they thought maybe it was time for them to leave so they are leaving now why they.

iraq ucd zd pkk turkish government eady
"ucd" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

The Cracked Podcast

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

"Objectively terrifying plots and characters and cannon and say oh yeah that was fun you know all the lights and colors just wash over us or something we'll just accept madness from our films and that's particularly true of two children's animated films that will talk about at the top of the show one of them is the emoji movie and the other is the boss baby and i don't know if you know this but the boss baby oscar nominated this year loss to cocoa but it almost won an award that would have put a lot more kids in front of the scariest movie i saw this year we'll talk about why it's great also so you know where our heads are at when we tape this we tape this show before the oscars happen so we don't know who won and we taped it right before the wide release of black panther so only the critics on the panel had seen it and speaking of our panel we've got full on film critics on this show we've got cracked writers and i will introduce all of them from the live stage at ucd sunset momentarily pleased just know how glad i am there on the show what a group so please sit back or sit with your arm around your shape of water fishman husband and maybe your other arm cradling your corporate executive boss baby every family's different i don't judge love whatever way enjoy this episode of the cracks podcast with dan hopper dave schilling amy nicholson and our live ucd audience i'll be back after we wrap up talk to you.

oscar ucd sunset dan hopper amy nicholson executive ucd
"ucd" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"First actual it was not easy even to with them because they come was attali conceal they were in a mood not even talking many of them like lost their families in front of their eyes imagine a child six y'all some years old seeing uh somebody being killed in front of eyes into the trail of postwar iraq inch kale super pupils mines some as mussa is trying to bring some order and teaching scott is one way to start some is a music therapist in the same camp rwandan north of most so that zaire had has now arrived out most people here tim from the nonmuslim ucd minority they suffered than any other janati under i s about three thousand of their men were killed on the spot shot beheaded burnt alive when did you hardy's arrived in ez de villages in 2004 in women and children were rounded up and enslaved at the in whose nine until brother rhianna euromonitor a two of senna's his pupils bright life we kids so keen to tell me us as it firstly can't help talking over one another me they told us to forget our turned sour mothers in one miles they sold us uh first they saw and after that to me okay so when they go out isis countered leaving triggered really ought to be like blue skies he told how to use weapons some because.

mussa scott rhianna euromonitor senna ucd hardy
"ucd" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"ucd" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"Belarussian patron amac doctor of virtues created by as our who wanted to collect tax from jews may just went around and randomly gay people surnames lots people call dr a veteran not all related except to the extent that most oshkosh whose are like fourth cousins but the the lawsuit so laws around the world ucd article six in europe dmc twelve one in america 92 a and new zealand dulcie eleven canada fate make it'll a against the law to break dram to to bypass the even for a lawful purpose and so this is posed an enormous temptation to companies because companies have a mix of legal obligations or legal rights and commercial preferences you know i would uh i have the right to stop you from selling counterfeit ink cartridges i don't have the right to stop you from selling non counterfeiting cartridges that work in my customers printers rights along you don't say this is an hp cartridge and tricked people then you know making thirdparty spares is like making thirdparty bread for a toaster right it's not my businesses hp whose inc goes and my printer it's my customers business and if they choose without any deception to buy your thirdparty cartridge that's fine but because breaking dram is a legal if you design the product so that using it in a way that the manufacturer doesn't like requires first breaking dram than every commercial preference becomes illegal right suv.

ucd europe america