37 Burst results for "UC"

Fresh update on "uc" discussed on Wake Up Call

Wake Up Call

00:44 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "uc" discussed on Wake Up Call

"The money from the original bond approved in 2000 four's about dry, which is why Prime 14 is asking for another $5.5 billion, But center for Genetics and Society executive director Marcie Darn it. Ski who opposes Fortin says sermons no longer needed because the federal limitations put in place by President Bush were lifted by the Obama administration. The National Institutes of Health have generously funded stem cell research. And actually, right now they're spending upwards of $2 billion a year. Professor Lawrence Goldstein is an Alzheimer's researcher at UC San Diego. He supports 14. And he says this $5 billion in bonds is critical to covering the gap between initial research and clinical study because a lot of it has gone into getting Potential therapies through that bottleneck into human trials. Goldstein says Research already in progress will wither without the funding Jeff she he is the sole member of the CIRM governing board to oppose 14. He says the money could be better spent teachers. Uh, housing, health care All of those needs that we find on on an annual basis out of the general find.

Professor Lawrence Goldstein Genetics And Society Marcie Darn National Institutes Of Health President Bush Jeff Obama Administration Fortin Executive Director San Diego Cirm Researcher
California wants to ban gas-powered cars, but is the auto industry ready to go all electric?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:57 min | 4 d ago

California wants to ban gas-powered cars, but is the auto industry ready to go all electric?

"The trump administration is not pursuing climate-friendly Policies California is Governor Gavin. NEWSOM this week pledged to ban all sales of new gasoline powered vehicles in the state by twenty thirty, five California consumes a lot of gas and would be the first state in the country to enact this kind of blanket ban. So what would it mean for the auto industry and for the state's economy marketplace's Jasmine Garcia reports remember that SNL skit the Californians, it's a spoof on how much time Californians spend behind the wheel. Take to the. Age of forty five doors and liftgate dump you onto Mohali Blah. There's something to this California is the largest consumer of motor gasoline in the nation banning the sale of gas powered cars starting twenty, thirty, five cents a message to an auto industry that's been sluggish on change says Ethan L. Kind Director of the climate program at UC Berkeley. Look if you want to do business in a major market, like California, fifteen years you better get going but industry insiders say the ban accelerate the inevitable sam for any with auto forecast solutions. Industry believes that the next big thing is vs the problem is the pricing on visas still expensive it's still takes a while to. Charge charging him structure is building, but it's still not everywhere we needed to be and even with the ban on purchases, it's going to take a long time to get all those gas powered cars off California's roads says Georgia with Sony head of the Ohio State University's Center for Automotive Research cars have two three lives. You buy a new car then you sell it maybe five years later, and if it's a good car might through two or three different cycles overeat sales, right. But as the state continues to grapple with climate change, many Californians feel time is of the essence of Jasmine guards for marketplace.

California Jasmine Garcia Governor Gavin Newsom Ohio State University Mohali Uc Berkeley Ethan L. Director Sony Center For Automotive Research Georgia
Fresh update on "uc" discussed on KCBS Radio Overnight News

KCBS Radio Overnight News

00:23 sec | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "uc" discussed on KCBS Radio Overnight News

"Some of the pressure the announcement this week from the Trump Administration of plants to distribute millions of rapid test throughout the country. In Los Altos Keith Makoni, KCBS 64% of Californians pulled by UC Berkeley give Governor Gavin Newsom a thumbs up on his job performance, due largely to his response to the pandemic on Lee 36% disapprove. It is the highest job approval rating for a California governor in 50 years at this point In his first term. Oakland A's played their first playoff Siri's in many, many years..

Governor Gavin Newsom Los Altos Keith Makoni Siri Oakland Berkeley California LEE
UC Irvine to test students living on campus weekly for COVID-19

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:50 sec | 4 d ago

UC Irvine to test students living on campus weekly for COVID-19

"Irvine says students living on campus for the fall quarter will be tested regularly for the Corona virus about 3600 students are already living there, and another 3500 are set to move in by the end of the month. Under Albert Chang is the medical director of the school's student health Center and tells can next testing might be done once a week or once every other week, depending on what happens. We're doing the nasal swab. A PCR test for our students being protected, asymptomatic students being tested on campus. We're working closely with our own UC and medical centers Laboratory and the turnaround time. As we've told, students may take from 48 to 72 hour. But he says recent test results of students already on campus have come back in about a day about 2700 students have already been tested to, Chang says there have been no positive cases. So far,

Albert Chang Medical Centers Laboratory Medical Director Asymptomatic Student Health Center Irvine
College Admissions Scandal: Latest Developments

KNX Evening News

00:27 sec | Last week

College Admissions Scandal: Latest Developments

"Today from the college admissions bribery scandal, a member of the state auditor's office tells K attacks. The cheating appears to have run much deeper for some schools in the UC system, a California state HEARTED finds the University of California wrongly admitted at least 64 wealthy students over the past six years as favors to donor's family and friends. The audit That UC Berkeley was the worst offender admitting 42 applicants based on their connections to donors and staff. While denying admission to others who were more qualified.

Bribery Auditor University Of California California Berkeley
State auditor: UC wrongly admitted well-connected students

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

State auditor: UC wrongly admitted well-connected students

"A state audit says the university of California wrongly admitted sixty for wealthy students over the past six years some as athletes of those sixty four students the California state auditor also found that campus staff falsely designated twenty two of them a student athlete recruits because of donations from or as favors to well connected families one campus the university of California Berkeley admitted forty two applicants through its regular admissions process based on connections to staff leadership and donors however those applicants were not as qualified as others who were denied admission the audit was conducted in response to the national college admissions scandal last year actually after

Auditor University Of California California University Of California Berke
CDC reverses statement on airborne transmission of coronavirus, says draft accidentally published

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:21 min | Last week

CDC reverses statement on airborne transmission of coronavirus, says draft accidentally published

"Reverses reverses itself itself this this morning. morning. Some Some conflicting conflicting information information coming coming out out of of the the Centers Centers for for Disease Disease Control Control this morning. The CDC earlier today posting what seemed to be new covert 19 language to include aerosols as a means of transmission. But in the last hour, the agency took that language off its website, saying it was a draft version that was posted in error. The new message goes on to say the CDC is currently updating its recommendations regarding airborne transmission of the virus wants this process has been completed. The updated language will be posted Covert 19 is thought to spread mainly through close contact from person to person and droplets rather than aerosols. Dr. Kim Prather, director of the National Science Foundation Center for Aerosol Implants on Chemistry of the Environment at UC San Diego, says the difference between aerosol and a droplet is significant. Basically, the difference is just that the aerosols or the sort of really tiny little droplets to come out. As opposed to sort of coming out When you cough for you sneeze, they come out when you talk and when you sing, and so they're super tiny, and they're miserable. You can't really see them. And so what they do droplets are big. Usually, and those will just settle to the ground pretty quickly, whereas aerosols will be released into the air and they can hang around in the air for you know, Hours. Covert

CDC Centers Centers Aerosol Implants On Chemistry Dr. Kim Prather San Diego National Science Foundation Ce Director
Black Lives Matter In Belize

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | Last week

Black Lives Matter In Belize

"Once again, this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here is good to have you with us. I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. Once again, the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. So, with that in mind, let me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. Yeah for sure. So what envisioning what I was in? When I came up with the article title you know those with everything that's going on. There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US I find a lot of conversations especially. I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly an African American movement which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. particularly in the US. but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. Caribbean. Europe other places. Outside saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. So. In the case, of Central, America you know black lives have always mattered. There's always been struggles of On, the ground with black people fighting again, know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? America. So that's what I was thinking about. That's what I had in mind when I, came up with this article and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. Even. Delve into what You, know black lives. Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. Black Communities and black histories in the region I. so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. Belize as well. So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. But with that said, there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, there's some other groups that need to be recognized. So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. Correct. Yes for sure. And that's even including myself I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. So depending on. The vantage point, but you look at central. America play believes etc. Gua. Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. So thinking about that identity in believes to historic. Black Group are black creoles. And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. It's common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, who visually looks why to also call themselves. And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. And of course. When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. migration and group within believe. So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. So that's also present there. and then recently you have a lot of immigrants from. The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. Think someone someone from Ghana, and then of course, from Haiti as well. considering migration Haitians to central. So there's like different levels of that. But in terms of like historic, it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. Father vice versa So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. Experience within the country which kind of work to conceptualize how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important to also considering language racial formations. So yeah.

America Central America Belize Belize Central America Black Group Nicole Ramsey Latin America United States Uc Berkeley Department Of African Oscar Fernandez Caribbean Europe Gutty Funez Duras A. Father Haiti Ghana Jamaica
How the North Bay Became 'Wine Country'

Bay Curious

03:48 min | Last week

How the North Bay Became 'Wine Country'

"To answer Michael's question about when wine country got start and how it became. So popular, we brought in reporter Christopher Beale Hey Christopher Hay alluvia. So let's start with when wine grapes were first planted in the North Bay. When was that all the way back in eighteen twenty three the Spanish created a mission in Sonoma's. It's the first place where grapes were intentionally planted in wine country but the wine made from these grapes was Sacramento Kinda like alcoholic. Grape juice used in church, not what we would recognize as wine, and then in eighteen thirty s some of the early European settlers in the NAPA sonoma valleys would have grown some basic wine grapes as well. Now, when does the wine country that we think of today start to take shape for the sake of the story let's start in eighteen forty California is ten years from entering the Union and this guy named Charles Krug arrives in San Francisco. Crew was a German after the revolutions of eighteen, forty eight in Europe the comes into San Francisco. It was the editor of a German language newspaper in San Francisco. That's Jim Lapsley he managed agricultural continuing education at UC Davis for more than thirty years with focus on wine-making. Now, after a few years in San Francisco Charles Krug gets married and ended up as a dowry getting quite a bit of land. This is the area just North of Santa Lena where the Charles Krug winery is located considered. It'd be the first commercial winery in Napa Valley. The wine country story is really one about marketing and innovation, and this Guy Charles crew gets credit for a lot of the early innovation and wine country including being the first to use a cider press, which is kind of like a slotted barrel to press wine grapes before that grapes were generally crushed by people's feet. When California entered the union, it was a place where we could grow grapes because the climate was quite similar to the southern Mediterranean. It was dry during the summer it had wet winters and differ grew very well here in California. For, is a species of grapevine. It's used to make wine after the early success of pioneers like Cruyff people began to plant grapes and produce more wind and the NAPA and sonoma valleys. But this was still considered low quality table wine and it continued to represent only a fraction of the US market mainly because it was still cheaper for east coast consumers to import wine. From Europe by boat, then from California by train. But that all changed in eighteen, seventy five, the US government stepped in and increase the tax on imported European wines to twenty cents a gallon which leveled the financial playing field for California's wine producers, and as a result, the wines dig it imported from Europe can be much more expensive wines and oak wine that was everyday drinking. That became the from California. Now. It wasn't a linear march from this moment today. The wind industry suffered a few major setbacks over the years but one way or another managed to survive them. Here's a few of the important ones I wine country was almost destroyed by bugs in the eighteen seventies. This is a microscopic bug that eats the roots of wine grapes. It's related to an eighth fit in it's called. PHILOXENIA. And when it arrived in wine country, it destroyed the vineyards to kill the vineyards and the only way could really come up with a solution was to plant on grafted vines the bottom, the rootstock would be a native variety and then on top graft with Vida's Benifica.

California San Francisco Charles Krug Europe Napa Charles Krug Winery Union Sonoma United States Guy Charles Napa Valley North Bay Christopher Beale Michael Reporter Jim Lapsley Christopher Hay Santa Lena Cruyff Vida
Fast-Moving California Wildfires Boosted by Climate Change

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Fast-Moving California Wildfires Boosted by Climate Change

"Point to the wildfires scorching the West and say that we can blame this on climate change. Leah Stokes, assistant professor with the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UC Santa Barbara, says no. Because of research from scientists that we have 500% more risk for. Well fires during this climate changed world then we would I have before, Daniel Swain, a climate scientist in the play in the National Center for Atmospheric Research, says. While it's shocking to see the impact of the wild fires out West, it's not scientifically surprising, explaining that a couple of degrees of average warming over decades. You don't notice it as much, but it's still there lurking in the background, sucking extra moisture out of the vegetation and soil

Bren School Of Environmental S Leah Stokes Daniel Swain Atmospheric Research Assistant Professor Scientist
Managing Wildfire Through Cultural Burning

Short Wave

06:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Managing Wildfire Through Cultural Burning

"So Lauren. You were telling us about how in February. You were heading out with a group of tribes from Northern California conducting a cultural burn very cool. But I, tell me how cultural burns are different from say. Or prescribed burns something I know the Forest Service does yeah. The service and other fire agencies they set controlled fires to, and that's for the vegetation they WANNA, get rid of it so that there's not too much that builds up because overgrown vegetation can make fires more extreme. Cultural burning it does that too but the tribes also do it to encourage certain plants to grow. Like the first thing that team did that day was actually a harvest, Oh yeah. They headed out to some tall bushes sour berries, which is also known as three Samak and you know this was winter. So there were these long spindly branches that were totally bare of leaves. So my mom is basket lever. That's why I meant Ragu Taras I'm reggae tears. Mahu Newnan Rageh Tears He. He's clipping. The longest straightest branches are used in traditional basket weaving and then after being harvested, the plant is burned to encourage more growth like that. All our basket material needs to be tended to in some way. So they need to be burned and then next year we'll probably have sticks that are sick seventeen, tom one year. fired. Oh. So does the fire burn the plant completely? Yes completely to the ground, and it really actually happens pretty fast but the rootstock stays alive. So you know after the spring rains come the plant will re sprout got in the harvest can kind of happen again. Yeah and I know some plants in California they're kind of used to being burned regularly. Yeah. Yeah. I, mean I think a lot of. People forget this but they're adapted to regular fires I mean historically, those are both naturally caused fires by lightning, and then there were fire set by tribes and Ron says they burned like this for Millennia to encourage plant growth also to shape the landscape to attract certain game for a lot of reasons when I was a kid I learned from my mother. My mother got in trouble when she burned because the fire department you know didn't want her doing what we're doing today. As you probably know white settlers had a very different take on fire they came with their concepts of being afraid to fire. Then, you didn't understand fire in the sense of the tool that it could be. To create and what it did to help, generate and rejuvenate the land. And let's not forget. There's a bigger history here when when white settlers arrived in California in the eighteen hundreds there was an intentional and violent campaign to destroy their tribal culture I spoke to Beth rose Middleton manning about that She's Professor of Native American Studies at UC Davis, and she brought her students that day to be part of a ceremony. There was actually a a bounty on California. Indian people The governor had announced a war of extermination. So you have all that. and. It really fostered removal settler ownership of indigenous lands. So tribal burning basically stopped and fast forward a couple of decades to the early nineteen hundreds, and that's when the federal government began an era of fire suppression. Please be careful with fire. That's the whole smokey the bear era, right? Yeah. Make, sure your fire is dead. Remember only you can prevent forest fires. Yeah. It's just interesting that the legacy of this idea that fire is always something that's bad and that has to be put out continued from settler colonialism onwards. Yeah. Definitely I mean up until the nineteen seventies the forest service had this rule they called the ten am rule it was basically that all fires should be put out by tanning him the next day but all that suppression, you know it caused a lot of vegetation to build up in California, the force became denser and that set the stage for extreme destructive fires. So fire matters of realizing that has to change and they started embracing prescribe burns a now we're slowly being open to cultural burning too. So that brings us to today where western states are grappling with how to manage wildfire season, and you're going to talk about how cultural burns kind of fit into that right and so ron and other tribal leaders have been trying to restore cultural burning for a while and you know not just teaching the concepts of people but actually bringing out the land to practice it, and that's not easy to do when the land is. No longer legally there's as as Beth rose described to me I think it's really important that we don't think about traditional burning as what information can we learn from native people about how they care for the land and then exclude people and move. On, with non natives managing the land, but the native people are at the forefront and our leading. Okay. So this event is maybe a way to do that. Yeah which is why Ron invited these government officials to participate and kind of get their hands dirty during the ceremony You know like Jennifer Montgomery she directs California's Forest Management Task. Force. So it's her job to figure out how to deal with all these overgrown for us and she was there helping light this fire in a big grassy field using a drip porch that was super empowering. I mean I think every woman should get a chance to use a drip torch is that like a flame thrower or something? Not Not. Quite It's it's like a watering can lighter thing that basically spilled out fire instead of water. That's pretty cool. So yeah yeah I mean by the time she was done there was this kind of giant line of fire that that kind of spread out pretty quickly across this entire field but remember this was February winters. So it the fire burned itself out pretty quickly. and. Then all that dried brushes

California RON Forest Service Northern California Lauren Federal Government Samak Professor Of Native American S Beth Rose TOM Beth Rose Middleton Uc Davis Jennifer Montgomery
China closing the "cyber gap" with USA

Risky Business

03:10 min | 3 weeks ago

China closing the "cyber gap" with USA

"Work. This is a write up of research that came out of Harvard's Belfer Center looking really at which countries have their cyber together right and the you know the old understanding that the US is number one and then China is a distant second well, not so distant anymore by the looks of things. Yeah. Always the eater pulling together information about what the capabilities, all of nation actors. Are is pretty difficult thing because it's Sarah kind of secret and they went through the research into this process of identifying you know what are the metrics by which we can judge maturity of these programs in individual countries how effective that capability, what kind of things they do any and built a bunch of Matrix to try and actually put some structure around us and then be able to use open source information and other. Stuff access to to be able to put things together on right at end? Yeah. It's quite an interesting set of work in USA does come out number one still in their assessment, but you know the gap between the US and China is very, very small possible. So there's a bunch of other actors on the that you know. Maybe people don't necessarily think about Switzerland for example, is in the top team his Damn Suedes? Yeah. It was a bunch of bunch of people you wouldn't necessarily expect. But also you know looks at the you know the maturity of the commercial sector of the Swiss. CRYPTO. I mean, that's that's something to point out to right like these rankings dissed not just on offensive capability. It looks offense defense industry the whole the whole Cyber Shebang. Yeah and of course, it makes sense just looking at trying to of capabilities in terms of domestic. Commercial Operations Right I mean, they've got such a lot of expertise manufacturing hardware building software. You know lots of high tech industry make sense there feeds into a general overall capability as well. But yeah, you know the the so much. Just GonNa Finger in the air staff and it's nice to see you know in the analysis that we know. So it's not see air research is trying to take a structured approach and. The data conner looks it kind of looks like what you expect. You know when they when they go. Yeah. That seems believable which is always a good sniff test you know. Wonkery can sometimes be a bit kind of an water. Where's this actually looks pretty in line with EC Singapore. UC. Vietnam North Koreans Kinda lines up. Yeah. It does and I don't know what this means for our old concepts around symmetry when you really looking at the most powerful countries still being the most powerful in this ranking right? Like wasn't this supposed to be all about symmetry is Iran's program evidence of the CYB. Is, being isometric I dunno anymore. Well, yeah. I mean, know the world's changed it's a little. It's a much more complicated than new onset of things I'm speaking reminiscing these capabilities exercised in a more you know the you know hellenistic geopolitical way not just you know we're using hacking in isolation I was seeing these things done to further national goals and in the context of. The trade stuff, for example, but between China and the US as chess pieces in logic aims which is. You know that changes the traditional kind of take Nicole asymmetry to you know much more balanced

USA China Sarah Kind Switzerland Harvard Belfer Center CYB Ec Singapore Iran Conner Nicole Wonkery UC
The International Scientists Getting Pushed Out

Short Wave

03:58 min | 3 weeks ago

The International Scientists Getting Pushed Out

"I. There was a travel ban has been chaos and confusion at airports around the. World. Tonight. Seven muslim-majority countries. Here's the map and then the trump administration froze green cards for new immigrants. Until the end of this year, the announcement came at a late night tweet president trump saying he intends to close the US to immigrants. Then some Chinese graduate students and researchers were singled out on May twenty ninth president trump announced a proclamation to suspend entry to graduate students and post doctoral researchers who attended universities affiliated with. Chinese military. So I was I was kind of psychologically prepared Emmett. Don had heard the rumors of what might be coming next. He grew up in Turkey and came to the US for his PhD Twenty Ten and is now working as a post doc in the physics department at UC Berkeley. So it wasn't a shock when in June, the administration blocked visas for a wide variety of jobs including the H. One B. Visa. which is what a lot of tech workers and scientists like met were hoping to get I. Try to be more in peace with uncertainty, and this is what I've been trying to do for the past couple of years. It's been a struggle for me to do his research in the United States. One time he got stuck outside of the country for nine months because of a visa issue rate before he was supposed. To, start his job, and then now met has an approval for an H. One B. Visa and was just one step away from getting it activated when the executive order came down and that makes any kind of life planning really hard. It's unfair to my spouse to through the same thing for my own career choices. For instance, we are unable to really contemplate having children at this point with all of this. because. We don't even know where we're going to be living in the next year in addition to figuring out his own situation met has been organizing with his post doc union to help other international scientists deal with the confusion and fear caused by the visa ban. He's heard lots of stories a researcher wanting to visit her elderly parents in New Zealand but worried about leaving the country and not getting back in another researcher who did travel out of the country this spring and so far has not been able to come back. We have been very active in creating spaces where people can share their stories can help each other out share information and just be connected to each other because. It is really difficult to handle as an individual that's not something we get taught in school. It's a lot to deal with it sucks up a tremendous amount of emotional energy and time and Matt says, of course, it's taken a toll on his research. I. Have to sit down from my computer and do my research every day, but there's a there's a world of uncertainty there every day some new policy comes out and it makes it difficult to focus a recent National Science Foundation report found that nearly thirty percent of people in science and engineering jobs in the US were born outside the country basically a lot of science in US depends on scientists born outside of it. Which is why memo finds the visa. Ban especially. Maddening I. Think it is really absurd gut majority of research is funded by the federal government, which then turns around and blocks people from coming into the country and doing that research. Today in the show the rationale behind the June visa bans and how policies like this or affecting international scientists and scientific. In the

United States President Trump DON Donald Trump Federal Government Researcher Emmett National Science Foundation Uc Berkeley Turkey Executive Matt New Zealand
The Mystery Of Dark Energy

Short Wave

09:24 min | Last month

The Mystery Of Dark Energy

"Going out into nature hiking paddling looking up at the stars has always helped me center myself. It reminds me that I'm just Madeleine Kelly via one human among millions of critters and trees and galaxies that don't care about me or acknowledged me at all. I'm just a group of random atoms matter taking up space. In it turns out that matter as we normally think of it is a tiny tiny portion of the universe meaning your genes, the ocean trees, computers, all the stars, and planets. All of that is only five percent of the universe and the rest of the stuff is dark matter and dark energy right? which is wild. That's so. Much. That's too much of it. Honestly. Yeah. It's like a very uncomfortable place to be in when you think about. We study the universe and theoretically we understand. You know on some scale, how the universe works, and then all of a sudden you're like Oh wait we actually do not understand like over ninety five percent of our universe what the large majority of our universe is made up of this mysterious thing called I kid you not. Dark Energy. In get this it's how we know that our universe is expanding. I learned about dark energy honestly like three weeks ago and it blew my mind dark energy is intrinsic to the fabric of Space Time that is somehow pushing galaxies apart. This is Sarafina Nancy's Day job. I am a PhD student at UC, Berkeley, studying, Supernova, and cosmology Supernova meaning an exploding star that can help us understand how our universe is changing. You know no big deal. It's a really phenomenal thing in sort of the scale of the universe to see something change, and that's this class of astronomy called transients where things change in the night sky and you can learn about them through their changes. So today we explore one of the universe's biggest mysteries dark energy from the days of Einstein Stein to the exploding stars that help us understand the very fabric of our universe. So Okay Serafina, to really understand dark energy, we have to go back to to Einstein right. Yes. So Einstein came up with this theory of general relativity, which is basically his version of gravity in the early nineteen hundreds and. The only way to make his equations work. And satisfy what he thought was a static universe. He introduced this. Fudge factor in his words called cosmological constant. So Einstein actually thought that the universe was static, not not that it was expanding. That's right and over the next ten years people. Sort of manipulated these equations and tried to find solutions and started hinting at perhaps the universe wasn't static. Well it's nice to see that Einstein could get things wrong. That's cool. So. The funny thing is this cosmological constant he called his biggest blunder. Honestly Nice to hear Einstein. Say I messed up you know what I? Can. act. The Fun fact is that he ended up actually being right So it turns out that that cosmological constant is exactly what we think dark energy is necessary to actually describe our universe. I feel like that's classic. Einstein him being wrong being more right than I've ever been in my entire life exactly. Yes. Okay. So After. Einstein introduces this idea that that the universe is static. We figure out actually that the universe is expanding, right? Yes. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, nine, Hubble Edwin Hubble. Showed that the universe is not static it's actually expanding. what he did is he measured basically galaxies and how far away they are, and he found that galaxies are actually moving away from us. So that means that the universe is not static. It's in fact expanding in at this point, we think that the universe is expanding but that that expansion is slowing down, is that correct? Exactly. So we think that the expansion comes from the Big Bang and it comes from inflation, which was right after the Big Bang which this rapid expansion of space. But because there's gravity universe and there's mass universe we would think that gravity starts to take over and the expansion decelerating because gravity starts to pull things back at and then in in the late nineties, we get turned on her head again, right there's another big discovery and we're like Oh way way way. Maybe she's not slowing down. That's right. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, and in one thousand, nine, hundred, nine, two teams that were studying a specific type, of Supernova, and they found that these supernova that were super far away from us were fainter than what we would have expected if the universe was in fact expanding but decelerating expansion. And the only way to explain away dot faintness is if the universe was instead accelerating its expansion. Wild we went from the university static. Okay. It's not static it's expanding, but it's slowing down that expansion. Two Way Way Way not only is it expanding, but it's expanding faster than we thought it was and it's speeding up in. In in the explanation for that is dark energy you killed it. That's right. Nailed it. Okay. So so yes, we have finally gotten to the point where I can ask you Sarafina what is dark energy? So. I think the only answer to that question is we don't know Oh, come on Sarafina you all the way here. You told me I'm showing story and we don't know I know it's it's really uncomfortable to sit with. We can see dark energy through its effects on the expansion of the universe, but we don't actually know what it is. Wow. I. Don't even know I. don't even know what to say about that. That's so. Because it's it's wild. We don't know what dark energy is, but we know it exists. Yes. In was what are you doing over there astronomers were. Four to five percent no. So that I mean that's that's wild in the amount of dark energy is staying the same right. So. That's that's an interesting question. So I liked to kind of describe dark energy and the expansion of the universe in The way that I think about it is sort of picture a loaf of bread and picture a bunch of reasons and the bread. And the reasons are like our universes galaxies and the bread itself is like Space Time Okay and so as you bake the bread, the bread rises and the raisins get farther and farther apart they're sort of carried along the fabric of space time, which means that the distance between. Galaxies increases with time. Okay, I'm with you I'm with you and the introduction of dark energy is like imagine you have the special type of yeast that you can put into a bread and the breads starts to rise with the East and then all of a sudden it starts to rise all lot and it gets bigger and bigger and bigger over time, and that's dark energy.

Einstein Stein Sarafina Nancy Madeleine Kelly Hubble Edwin Hubble Sarafina UC Berkeley
UC Won't Evict Or Block Registration For Students Behind On Rent

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:36 sec | Last month

UC Won't Evict Or Block Registration For Students Behind On Rent

"For students living in university housing and Albany, UC Berkeley officials say students living in Albany's University Village Will not be evicted for non payment of rent if they can't pay while the state's shelter in place order remains in effect. That word comes one day after some students said the university was blocking students from registering for classes if they were behind on rent, a university spokesman said. Students who owe back rent should get in touch with Cal housing. The students will be considered fully registered and allowed to enroll and take classes this fall. And in the spring, according to the

Albany University Village Berkeley
20 Minutes About Traditional Chinese Medicine

20 Minute Fitness

05:50 min | Last month

20 Minutes About Traditional Chinese Medicine

"Welcome back to twenty minutes fitness. I'm Kessler and you're listening to your favorite podcast for health and fitness science and technology. Today we're airing the second part of my conversation with Dr Marcus Gado, a leading Chinese medicine practitioner from Europe who spend close to a decade in China learning the ancient Art of traditional Chinese medicine also referred to as. If, you haven't listened to last week's part one of our conversation. You May WanNa poss here and listen to it first so that you can learn about his background and what he believes, he can teach us about our own emotional wellbeing and healthy nutrition in today's podcast who we will continue the conversation and cover how. Six to guide how we should exercise sleep and even have sex. Yes. Heard correctly the how and when of sex also plays a role of healthy living in ancient Chinese wisdom. So beware that today's episode is pg rated because of that disclaimer why Chinese medicine has been around for thousands of years? It is really just at the cusp of being scientifically looked at an understood it is usually fascinating topics we. Wanted to share with you, it is hard not medical advice by any means nor endorsement of the scientific validity or efficiency of any of its practices or interventions. Having said that we do try to stick to only the things that have already been backed up by signs, and you can find a full list of studies and Research Without show notes on twenty minute dot fitness. All right. Let's have at it. Or let's move on to to sleep I. Think the third tip is get plenty again seasonal steep was is that mean? Yeah. If you look at animals, they're way more Richard Eight. Some analysts even hibernate in summer and social we we shouldn't be sleeping the same amount of hours throughout the whole year and well, it's good general of funding to get at least eight hours of sleep in the wintertime nine or ten hours is fine and in the summertime if you're feeling really energetic seven or six and a half if you're feeling great is actually not the bad for you and but the Chinese say that. Especially, the early Stephen in modern sleep research confirms this that early steep, sexy, more beneficial because you're getting a lot more autographs wrong excreted in the hours roughly before midnight and so the Chinese advocates between nine thirty and ten thirty, and then of course, old biohacking stuff you know keeping blue light our heading your house of very dim lights getting you really into this calm evening mode and have no ben at a TV and don't eat obviously before you go to directly before you're gonna go to bed and instead off the Chinese medicine advocates to have some green team your cup of tea because it's so. Call me you down activating the Perez pathetic nervous system. It's advocating for a bit of movement no meditation before you go to bed or even even taking a hot foot. That's a great little trick that you can fall asleep or joystick colts he keeps you up take a hot foot and research has shown that down hot foot actually heading the black by heading this hot water your feet. It increases the circulation periphery in your feet which saw in our regulatory process lowers the corporate body temperature, and we'll have a lower temperature it signals to the brain. Time and so these are some little tricks that the Chinese advocates and in another great one is actually funded fool study here Naski and others in two thousand seven they had two hundred thousand subjects in Greece against epidemiology but again, food for thought day found a thirty seven percent reduction in cardiovascular disease of people who regularly had a Siesta who took a little nap at night thing that study was quoted in a wide receiver is really interesting book I that everyone should read yeah. That's the guy from UC Berkeley, Matthew Walker that's right So So yeah a lot of these these things that they that they already figured out and keep the probation is a big one, right Here's another statistics who has National Health Center for statistics in nineteen sixty, two percent of American slept less than six hours while in two thousand four, it was already thirty percent. So generally speaking we're not sleeping enough. So wildly you WanNa just your sleep in obviously the day is longer than summer so you could also stay up a little bit longer but the country in the wintertime you shouldn't feel bad on your cells you need nine or ten hours of sleep a really give your buddy that go with the season skull was the dynamic of nature and let your body hibernate Chinese proverb says no losing a night of sleep as followed by ten days of inconvenience. Never never sacrifice after sacrifice sleep and sleep a little bit more in winter, and then you can stay up longer and have more energy into following summer. Again, let's just quickly touch on the fourth a little hit or tip to stay healthy in twenty twenty I picked this one because I think it's contrary to what we believe in the West and does the about exercise movement excise the Chinese things that moderation here again is key. So we shouldn't be doing chronic cardio over having really high pulse rate on training for ultramarathons but instead we should go on strolls and walks and we should exercise buddy while the do it in short intervals and with a high intensity. High intensity interval training or just even intensity training where we doing body weight exercise in keeping a muscle mass obstacles casino the Muscles Pretty, much ski organ of Longevity. You can draw a line of lean body mass versus fat mass and an pretty much. It's with old people get and it gets difficult at your old to build and maintain muscle story you WANNA regularly. Exercise. Your buddy but you don't WanNa chill your body lacked we like to do in the West aware that where it is even for a lot of people, it ends up being addiction like an exercise addiction but

Dr Marcus Gado Kessler Europe Stephen Richard Eight China Perez Naski Berkeley National Health Center Matthew Walker Greece
UIC researchers launch Moderna trial Monday in race to beat coronavirus

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

01:42 min | Last month

UIC researchers launch Moderna trial Monday in race to beat coronavirus

"On the lighter note. You see, health is just a few days into a phase three Covad 19 vaccine trial 30,000 people will take part across the U. S stage three of the Moderna Cove in 19 vaccine trial is underway. It's something that they inject in you That basically helps build antibodies. Chrissy is one of 30,000 participants. But I was getting a little bit sores. What is in her body right now? She doesn't even know it could be a dose of the potential vaccine. Seen or a placebo. She has no been reassured of this, knowing that I don't have active virus and me also made me a little bit more comfortable with the situation. Instead modernise vaccine candidate puts Viral Messenger aura into the body to kick off an immune system response is very exciting. Dr. Thomas Campbell leaves the trial team at UC Health. All the data so far for this particular vaccine from the earlier stage trials looks very promising. But he cautions a lot of vaccine candidates don't make Get through clinical trials. A current hurdle for this study is diversity. Kobe 19 disproportionately affect some groups of people, including Hispanic people, African Americans, no Native Americans, and so it's very important to us that we get adequate representation from those groups in in our enrollment. The study is a chance to help dig America and the world out of a deadly pandemic. Had some pretty good motivation Overall, Chrissy says she feels confident knowing that this study that I'm enrolled in his face. Three safe. That means safety has already passed. She tells us. She will be monitored with follow ups for a second injection and blood tests. She must also keep a daily

Chrissy Moderna Cove Dr. Thomas Campbell Uc Health Kobe America
The South Asian Identity In The Current Political Moment

All Things Considered

03:50 min | Last month

The South Asian Identity In The Current Political Moment

"To prime spots at the political conventions went to two Indian American women Nikki Haley and Kamala Harris, who each leaned into their South Asian immigrant identity and their speeches. Here's Haley, former U. S ambassador to the U. N kicking off the Republican National Convention yesterday. This is personal for me. I am the proud daughter of Indian immigrants. They came to America and settled in a small southern town. My father wore a turban. My mother wore sari. Meanwhile, last week while accepting the Democratic nomination for Vice President, Kamala Harris thanked her mother for raising her to be proud of her Indian heritage. We're here to talk through this moment for South Asian Americans in American politics is Kartik Rama Krishnan. He's a professor of public policy at U C. Riverside. Hey, they're welcome. Thank you for having me so to conventions to women, speaking about their families and their upbringing, with so many Americans watching what these two moments represent, do you think It's a pretty remarkable moment. When you look at the Indian American population. It has grown tremendously in the last two decades, of course, in the case of comely Harris and Nikki Haley They were born and you know, the 19 sixties and early 19 seventies. So you know they've been part of a prior wave of Indian American migration. But still, the vast majority of Indian Americans have arrived in the United States since 1965. And it's remarkable to see how quickly the next generation has come up in politics and how big a deal is their national political political prominence for The South Asian community here in the states. This is a big deal. I mean, what you've seen, for example, is more and more Indian Americans running for office. So you have the so called Samosa Caucus, which had five Indian American members of Congress If you include the House and the Senate after 2018 I think what you're going to see now and especially with Harris. His candidacy is even more people getting inspired more Indian American South Asians more generally, and especially Asian American women feeling inspired to run for office and I think the same you're probably going to see on the Republican side, although When you look at candidates running for office where Indian American, the vast majority of them tend to be Democrat rather than Republican. Well, I was just about to ask is we hear so much about Latino voters? Black voters, other groups. I was going to ask which way understanding is hardly monolithic, but which way South Asian voters tend to lean in and how big a role they could play in 2020. The South Asian voters tend to lean Democrat and pretty heavily Democrat. One way to think about this is that they tend to be the most Democrat leaning either in terms of their party identification or presidential vote choice among all of the Asian American groups on DH there, Lina stronger than among Latinos but less strong than among African Americans. So that's a kind of good benchmark. Now there has been a lot of out its by the Trump administration. So President Trump had a rally in Houston called Howdy movie Rally with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. He made a high profile trip to India this year as well. That said, it's really going to be hard to shift in the American voters and other South Asians given their partisan lean and also where they stand on the issues and on most issues like health care and immigration. And gun control in the environment. They tend to be progressive, so it's going to be a group that's going to be very difficult to dislodge from the Democratic column that was Professor Kartik Ramakrishnan of UC Riverside talking about the Indian American vote. It's about 1.8 million Indian Americans who will be eligible to vote in this coming November's election.

Kamala Harris Nikki Haley Kartik Rama Krishnan Prime Minister Narendra Modi Professor Kartik Ramakrishnan United States Vice President U C. Riverside America Trump Administration U. S Lina Uc Riverside Professor Of Public Policy Congress India Senate Houston Donald Trump
California unemployment: State gets fed funds to pay extra $300

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

01:05 min | Last month

California unemployment: State gets fed funds to pay extra $300

"People worried about eviction. Where do they get the money? We'll. California has finally signed on to a federal program that allows those who lost their jobs to get some extra money again. Let's find out how much and get the story from can extend seventies John Barron. This new program will give the unemployed an extra $300 per week. Now, under the old program, they were getting $600 per week, but that ended at the end of July. Jesse Rothstein is UC Berkeley labor market expert. So this came from an executive order that President Trump fined a few weeks ago where he repurposed money that had been given to FEMA to spend under that system. He says says the the money money is is vital vital for for those those struggling struggling to to pay pay rent rent and and buy buy food. food. But But this this lump lump of of money money this this FEMA FEMA money money that that the the president president tapped tapped into into only only cover cover a a few few weeks. weeks. So So my my guess guess is is by by the the time time the first checks go out, the program will run out and this was retroactive toe August 1st. But if you do the math, that means that people will get the extra money. Only for about three weeks, and we've already passed that time period. Still, it's an extra $900 reporting live John Baird can

President Trump Fema Jesse Rothstein John Barron John Baird California Executive
Hong Kong man reinfected by coronavirus

KNX Evening News

04:38 min | Last month

Hong Kong man reinfected by coronavirus

"About for months, but confirmation people can indeed become infected with Corona virus Reinfected Supreme It happen to a patient in Hong Kong. Dr George Rutherford, epidemiologist director of the Division of Prevention and Public Health at UC San Francisco's School of Medicine. The doctor. What to make of this case down on the younger side Got infected? Recover, then test positive again during an airport screening and time had passed S O. This is our first real confirmation. Yeah. Yeah, And the part that's interesting about this is that they had the genetic sequence. Of the from the virus that he had the first time he got he was infected. And they had the genetic sequence from this new infection, and they're very different. So that's how you can tell that this isn't just reactivation or something like that. As you said, we've been waiting around trying to find the first case. I'm glad we haven't Al. It's in the books and we've long suspected this is the case. A lot more work to be done with it done with this. Individual to see whether what is immunity may have looked like whether he had any antibodies. Ah, ah to the To the receptor binding domain, which is the part of the virus that binds to the cell wall. But, you know, I mean, I think this is something we've always suspected would happen. On DNA. Now it has happened will start finding I suspect more cases. Maybe not as well documented as this one. So I guess my question that follows then is this a good bad situation? Good. Perhaps because This particular gentleman apparently didn't get either very sick or sick. It all with second infection but is also bad. Because it does mean that people can now we know for a fact it's not theory anymore. Get re infected with this. Yeah, I think you I think you captured it correctly. The good news was that he didn't have some kind of crazy Immunological storm when he got reinfected, and that's something that actually occurs with dengue fever. Which is something we've been kind of a deal East theoretically worried about. So that's good, you know, But 40% of people are asymptomatic anyway, so the fact that he's asymptomatic probably doesn't mean much. Be the antibody. I'm sorry. The, uh yeah, the antibodies, probably Wayne, you know for the corona viruses that cause common cold those antibodies only last for five months. This guy was infected in. I believe April Oh, and so he would have had waning immunity over about Four months, which is about it was about right and got and managed to get reinfected. Unfortunately, I think the other so that tells us one thing. That the, um that you're, uh that you can't get re infected that antibodies. Probably Duwayne much likely see for the corona viruses that cause a common cold. But you're absolutely right that he didn't get some horrendous immunological reaction. That made him very sick. So that's that part's good. What does this mean for the development of vaccines? That we need them. We can't rely on naturally occurring immunity. Even in, you know, a place with very high levels of protection like Quentin. Now topping out at around 70% of the inmate population infected. It's only gonna last for a while and then he could potentially get a second. Wait. Wait through. I'd be very slow to generalize about the about the fact that this one individual was asymptomatic the second time. As I said, 40% of people are asymptomatic anyway. And it may be that in fact, if we find 100 of these cases that those that you know, on average people, maybe more symptomatic is cancer. Jump to it. Jump to that conclusion from a single case on the the vaccine. Yes, we need a vaccine. But does this indicate that perhaps The vaccine may not be as effective as some people are hoping it will be or might need to be repeated at shorter intervals, and some people might hope. Yeah, I don't think so Unnecessarily. I think that you know they there's um additional work that needs to be done to figure out what this guy's antibody profile look like whether he had antibodies to the Receptor binding domain, which is what we're trying to raise. For you know for Ah, for vaccines. You know there's a lot of questions here, but I think your characterization of some good some bad Is correct. Now.

Asymptomatic Division Of Prevention And Pub Hong Kong Dr George Rutherford San Francisco Quentin Dengue School Of Medicine Director AL Wayne
"uc" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:48 min | 3 months ago

"uc" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"UC health and college of medicine are finding ways to treat prevent and cure cope with nineteen and research lives cures discover more at UC health dot com still a little bit slow on southbound seventy five came across the Brent Spence bridge down to about tiles then it starts to break up for you to go into the construction zone there part of the problem the fog started to lift a little bit in the area we were seeing some minor delays come across two seventy five in northern Kentucky but that seems to have all of that as well seventy ones in good shape there can with no problems across two seventy five she said they're hard on news radio seven hundred WLW now the latest forecast from the advanced dentistry weather center from social distancing in pre screening patients to appropriate PP our focus remains on safety learn more at no fear dentist dot com slash patient safety the ball developing this morning due to high levels of humidity temperature started seventy a warm to eighty seven your heat index in the in the closer to ninety five today and pop up thunderstorms expected after two tonight slight rain chances continue low seventy one and then tomorrow high of eighty six but rounds of showers and storms are likely from your severe weather station I'm not first warning meteorologist Jennifer catchmark news radio seven hundred WLW seventy degrees right now former Cincinnati city councilwoman Tamaya Denard due in court this afternoon where she is expected to formally accept a plea deal court records indicate she will plead guilty to one count of wire fraud for knowingly participating in a scheme to defraud the public by selling votes on council as part of this deal charges of bribery attempted extortion or being dropped the north facing up to twenty years in prison the four former Minneapolis police officers involved in the death of Georgia Floyd have a court date today Derrick Chavez was charged with second degree murder in the case that launched protests across the nation Floyd died after shop and held his needs on his neck for nearly nine minutes during an arrest last month the other officers involved are all facing charges of aiding and abetting police in lieu of all have identified the man accused of firing shots into a crowd of people protesting the death of Brianna Taylor over the weekend one person was killed in that gunfire it happened around nine Saturday night at Jefferson square twenty seven year old Tyler girth was killed another victim was injured all of us want to see this area useful protest on the crime scene the suspect Steven Nelson Lopez was wounded in the leg by gunfire from bystanders at the park who were defending themselves he was identified by multiple witnesses and is in custody at university hospital we can't let this one senseless act of violence slow or halt with the peaceful protesters are demanding in our city and our country deserve and demand growth was the university of Kentucky graduate and photographer who was the god son of courier journal columnist Joe girth I'm C. Sandoval news radio seven hundred WLW sports begin training for the twenty twenty baseball season Wednesday and yesterday they filled fifty seven of a possible sixty roster spots thirty five players will get there working at great American ball park the rest will train at Pasco park Derek Dietrich who signed a minor league deal with the club in February was left off the roster the New England Patriots were fined one point one million dollars and lose their third round pick in the twenty twenty one draft for filming the Bengals sideline last December and Dustin Johnson won yesterday's travelers championship in Connecticut Dave Armbruster seven hundred WLW sports our next update at eight thirty Rick Eugene news radio seven hundred WLW this report is sponsored by all state if your driving less you could be saving more on car insurance with pay per mile insurance from Allstate pay for the miles you drive and.

UC
"uc" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

Telecom Reseller

05:30 min | 3 months ago

"uc" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

"With the the new California Data Privacy Law. We've certified our adherence to the Privacy Shield for the transfer of data between the US and any you. And are doing diligence around these data privacy regulations in standards. Is One of the reasons we win in Europe quite often. Chris what are you hearing from your customers right now? So they were actually They care a lot about security and data privacy, and you know what they're telling us. Is there quite pleased with what we're able to tell them? In terms of our security posture and showed them from a compliance perspective. up of things that we do. We're members of the cloud security alliance as an example and. What that is is an alliance that. You know for any, says a provider that chooses to be a part of it. you know they publish you know three hundred or so you know security related questions that you know anyone who's interested in learning about the fuse. security system can go. To their website find he's. This questionnaire and he's answers and understand you know the the processes, the crow, the controls that we haven't place and and really get a good feel for our security system. Importantly we took one extra step as a part of the cloud security alliance that we actually have as a part of our annual audit process, which were audited against Zach one suck two. Hip and high trust as well as being certified Eyeso- twenty seven. We have that auditor. Look at the answers to the questions that have been provided on the cloud security alliance. And attest to the fact that they're accurate in have been evidenced. You know by that third party so we really want to earn and maintain our customers trust, and all these materials that we make available. You really helped validate total approach to security. Chris been been very interesting to hear a kind of different approach to security one that involves company also partners involves a kind of a new thought process, and wondering if the crisis that we've been living through has surfaced any new issues with this with this approach whether it's three. Enforce this idea. Would it really does is reinforce the idea, Doug Certainly you know our new attack. Factors that have introduced been introduced as a result of the pandemic You know new phishing scams, so new fraudulent activities related to you know folks that you know, maybe applying for federal aid as an example You know fake websites that are coming up by the thousand. And enticing folks to enter personal information. That they will end up using to commit fraud so It's never been so important that. You know security is a team sport. He'll be in place. Then you.

Chris US California Europe auditor fraud Zach Eyeso Doug
"uc" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"uc" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"K gum away. Back to Winnipeg UC Ukrainian Bill chorus done on the ice. They've got the national anthems here tonight..

Winnipeg UC
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike
"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"uc" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just doing open my doing bar shows right teaching at UC, be aching UC classes, like, you know. And during that time I would not paid for comedy. Right. And that's the sad truth about performance world is that you know, especially in comedy, you've got, you've got to do it for free for a long time before anyone's gonna pay you to do, which is a bummer because being, but a lot of folks who need, you know to make living are excluded from doing comedy, which is which is really a shame and yeah, we were away. We have more. For structure support, more people who want to do it so that have more voice been comedy. But while I was doing that, you know, you might think of that as that was that that a rough time and, and you know your, you know, you're not sure you're making any headway and and at that at the time. But I'm really, really glad that I did that because now, you know, I know so many people in comedy, you know, I know the head writers, multiple people on the writers, writing staff of every way might show right. They're all like personal friends of mine from those times, you know. And so you know, like I know, you know, Michelle wolf, right? Who whose new show came out on Netflix and terrific right her her new shows. Awesome. We met each other. I met her at her second open mic she ever did, and it was my second week doing open mic. Right. And I was just afterwards. I was like, oh, you really funny and she was well, thanks. You degrade to, and then from. On, we saw each other. You know, every day we open mind and you know, so she's a friend of mine. Right? And that's what comes from doing it that way. Right. Is that like build that strong foundation that you know, just looking at? Totally cynically and talking about, like, you know, the way the rest of my career is going to go. That's like they're important for getting extra work to have those connections into no people. Yeah, those those long connection in your issues, rec- dice rolling metaphor is that as random and it has nothing to do with skill at all on what you're talking about is is building, not just skill, but also these connections and all of that in addition to sort of right place right time thing. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It's not like, oh, hey, I'm gonna every time I'm going to get a hit or anything like that. It's like, no, even the bad set are refunding. You know, it's not a waste of time people, and I think they'll make job out of band up or on just wasting my time. Why would I give you an open mic? Whether it's nothing. Comedian, they're playing that that people will say, I'm gonna go this open, there's comedians. There's no audience. It's like, what are you talking about? You mean the comedians? Who like are your peers in the business. The people who the people who could forgive you work later, you know the the people who you know, Michelle wilted or new Netflix show. She hired all their friends to be writers, all the all the people she knew on the Mike, you know, all these like onyx, I've known for years grindstone, dancing, Germain, all these really funny people because they were. They were the people at the Oakland trend. So and even when you do a bad that even if there's nobody there worth knowing you learn something about yourself with the performer, you learn that a joke did work. You know, the the bads, that's you learn things from two so it. Yeah. So I just don't think that there is like it's a, I don't think it's a gamble to go do those things. I think it's just going out and doing the work and I like what you're saying about getting to know somebody like Michelle early on. I think this is something that you've seen a lot of fields where you're just getting started in something. There's a. There's you. You feel like you wanna go suck up to the people that are really accomplished in this field. When in fact the the peers that are right around you that are at that same level that you're at. Building those relationships several years down the road. Suddenly, you know, all these very accomplished people. Yeah, absolutely..

Michelle Netflix UC Michelle wolf Oakland Michelle early Germain Mike