19 Episode results for "U._S."

The Fall Of Troy

Herbstreit and Fitzsimmons

32:04 min | 2 years ago

The Fall Of Troy

"Down and distance is presented by sentas. Get santos and get ready for the workday. Hey it's kevin a gun in the host of the college football podcast with herbie and pollock to our listeners. I want to share with you. The very latest episode of ivan maizels down in distance podcast hope you enjoy it when texas quarterback vince young scored a touchdown with nineteen seconds seconds to play in the two thousand six rose bowl the longhorns won not only the b._c._s. championship but one of the best games of the modern era the late great keith jackson's call remains one of my favorite college football ear worms. He's gone for the corner. The the longhorns forty one to thirty eight upsets of the two time defending defending national champion the media darling the football dynasties the team that didn't know how to lose the u._s._c. trojans in the hype leading up to that game u._s._c. arrived in pasadena on a month long crescendo would victory certified the trojans as the goat the greatest of all time no team at one three consecutive national championship since the associated press poll began in nineteen thirty six a victory would be u._s.'s thirty fifth in a row which would put the trojans one season away from challenging oklahoma's record unbeaten run of forty forty seven games. It was all right there within the grasp of u._s._c. The trojans failed to grasp it. Thanks to young he threw roof for two hundred sixty seven yards and ran for two hundred young brought texas back from a twelve point deficit in the final four minutes you you didn't need history to tell you the greatness of that performance. We knew at that night what we didn't understand on that night. Wednesday january fourth two thousand six is how that game served as the beginning of the end of the u._s._c. dynasty for three years years afterward. The trojans remained favorites to win. It all continued to contend to win. It all seem destined to win at all and yet three three times u._s._c. fell. Just short of winning at all then is if it happened overnight u._s.'s stopped being u._s._c. in two thousand nine. The trojans lost four games head. Coach pete carroll left for the n._f._l. Early in in two thousand ten weeks before the n._c._a._a. slammed u._s._c. with a penalty so harsh that it removed any question about whether the good times at ended and to this day the trojans have never been as close to winning a national championship is on that january night thirteen years ago when vince young young broke every cardinal and gold heart the end of a dynasty has seen more easily from the rear view mirror than it is in real time welcome to down and distance a podcast about the history of college football part of e._s._p._n.'s college football one fifty commemorating commemorating the one hundred fiftieth anniversary of the sport. I'm your host ivan mays l. Today's episode is the fall of troy in it. We we will explore how u._s._c. slipped from the edge of immortality back into the college football mainstream every college football season it takes a lot of effort to get each team properly equipped and ready to hit the field the old inefficient playing machine same for your business for more than ninety years cintas has worked to help businesses big and small look more professional and run more smoothly and efficiently great players should focus their energy on the important things the scouting report the fine details that will help separate them from the competition addition santosh will handle all the fine details allowing the team your business the focus on what's most important santosh has the products services to help your employees stay safe from first aid training and compliance courses cintas is proud fortune five hundred company with more than forty three two thousand employees operating over five hundred locations across the united states and canada more than one million businesses trust sentas to help them open their doors just with confidence get senna's. Get ready for the workday. Learn how cintas can help get your business ready. It's centas dot com in the last ten seasons. U._s._c. is one one pac twelve conference championship three a fewer than oregon in two fewer than stanford. The trojans rebounded from one of the sternest penalties that the n._c._a._a. Ever meet it out losing forty percent percent of their scholarships for three consecutive seasons. U._s._c. rose from that penalty to win the conference in two thousand seventeen and his fallen again at this juncture. U._s._c. is just another team a long way from the dominance. The trojans exhibited in the two thousands but i don't want to tell you the story of how the trojans got where they are today. I want to unpack how they got from. Being nineteen seconds short of three straight national championships in two thousand and five being just barely not good enough in two thousand six two thousand seven two thousand eight the having the dynasty collapsed lapse in two thousand nine in the scope of one hundred fifty years of college football u._s._c. success under pete carroll feels like last week nevertheless feel like i should sketch out just what made you seem so historic in nature can roll out the stats and there's no no question they're impressing the seven straight pac ten titles five straight years in the top ten the sixteen first round draft choices who played for carol oh yeah and the back to back national championships but the numbers are just numbers. They don't convey what the u._s.'s dominance felt like at once intimidating in irresistible football teams can be intimidated not just to opponents to the public not u._s._c. carol and the trojans turned greatness into entertainment. They were enjoyable to watch undercover. The music stars showed up at practice on the game sideline. All part of the show will farrell snoop dogg. Bill withers not to mention that the trojan roster appeared to be deeper than deep talent seemed inexhaustible carol signed pretty much mature wanted fine man eighteen year old who could resist all those trappings of stardom but a funny thing happened on the way to perpetual greatness in the three seasons after the vince young game and no disrespect to the other texas longhorns who own national championship rings but who do you think of when you think of that game in two thousand six two thousand seven and two thousand eight u._s._c. played well enough to extend its streak of pac ten championships up to seven in each of those seasons. The trojans finished third or fourth in the final a._p. Poll but in each of those seasons the trojan agents slip just enough to fall short of qualifying for the championship format which consisted of two teams only let us all pause in memory of the late not so great b._c._s. the difference between the trojans who won championships and the trojans who didn't is small and difficult to define fine but there are clues to examine especially in light of what happened to u._s._c. in two thousand nine when the trojans fell to a nine and four record that it included two defeats by at least four touchdowns season by season the cracks in the foundation of u._s._c. grew bigger and wider both on the sideline and on the field the trojans began to slip in two thousand six the year after the fateful loss of longhorns. Let's look at the coaches. A head coach is only as good as the assistants who carry out his vision. There is a pattern among among successful coaches. They find the right assistant and they keep them bobby. Bowden did that at florida state. Tom osborne at nebraska. Sweeny is doing it at clemson. They have to replace a coach every couple of years sure but find a winning coach in odds are you'll find a staff of guys working for him who mesh well and aren't going anywhere the staff that pete carroll assembled at u._s._c. nearly twenty years ago included a good admixed veterans and young bright coaches norm chow who coached alongside lavelle edwards for two decades at b._y._u. As been as good good a quarterback whisperer as there isn't a game joining chow on the offensive staff were a pair of twenty-something offense of assistance close friends whose offensive offensive savvy was matched only by their confidence. Their names were lane kiffin and steve sarkisian. You may recognize those names as the first two guys to succeed carol at u._s._c. You may recognize them as young head coaches who didn't handle the spotlight and pressure of the big stage. We're not there air yet. Nearly two thousand hip and sark not only had a grasp of offense unusual for their age but a youthful affability which which recruits could easily relate those guys could bring in the talent u._s._c. national championship teams of three thousand three in two thousand four work with chow kiffin and sarkisian at the helm of the offense at unmatched firepower after the second national championship happening chip both kiffin and sarkisian had chances to leave to advance their careers pete. Carroll didn't want to let them go so carol. All tried to thread the needle. You took away play calling duties from chow gave them to kiffin in sarkisian in gamble that he could keep all three. It was a gamble all right and carol lost chow in a matter of days left to become an n._f._l. Assistant in two thousand five giffen sarkisian ran the u._s._c. offense with the talent on that offense liner bush white it cetera era etc. I'm reasonably certain i could have been the offensive coordinator but you know what giffen sark did a great job the trojan and scored more than fifty points in seven games and never scored fewer than thirty four but you can also make the case that maybe just i maybe would have been able to make the difference in a last second. Rose bowl lost the texas. The obvious question is the play that opened the door for the longhorns warns the fourth and to the texas forty five with two nineteen to play make the first down in the trojans could run out the clock and win the game reggie bush the heisman trophy winner remained on the sideline glendale white carried the ball and came up less than a yard short twice voice tonight s._e._c. gone for dot fourth and one and twice. They've come up short sexist. The thirteen years news trojan fans have asked where was reggie author. Steve dawson wrote an oral history of carol years. He quoted chow is saying doing that. Obviously chows word. Both bags should have been in the game just to make texas account for both of them. Kiffin and sark ran the offense again in two thousand six an offense that didn't have liner bush or white liners and bush went in the first picks of the n._f._l. Draft and white went in the middle of the second round yet. The trojans continued to dominate quarterback. John david booty proved to be capable replacement for liner especially given the burden placed on him the u._s._c. running game took a step back without bush and white now. There's some penetrating analysis. Still the trojans found something that worked over the last month of the season. A midseason loss at oregon state by two points proved to be the shallowest of potholes coming down the stretch. The trojans beat four opponents. It's three of them ranked by an average of twenty five points per game. Only one game stood between u._s._c. and a chance for dench in for the texas laws on december second u._s._c. took a ten one record and a number two ranking into its regular season finale at crosstown archrival travel u._c._l._a. Victory would propel u._s._c. into the b._c._s. championship game against number one ohio state. No one outside sad the u._c._l._a. Locker room thought the bruins had a chance u._s._c. had beaten. U._c._l._a.'s seven straight years in the previous season that two thousand five trojan team gilded. It's mythic greatness by humiliating bruins sixty six to nineteen. The trojans gained six hundred seventy nine yards yards in one game. Yeah the trojans had lost texas on that rose bowl field eleven months earlier prior to that the trojans hadn't lost in in pasadena since one thousand nine hundred ninety eight not to mention that u._c._l._a. At six and five scared exactly no one the bruins once had a fourth year head coach karl durell with a career record of twenty eight and twenty this u._c._l._a. Team struggled to score points. The defense defense laidback coordinator dwayne walker johnson spark in the month of november walker decided to take away what the trojans did the best. You would never let booty u._s._c. quarterback. Get comfortable walker said after the game. It wasn't me against pete carroll darrelle me against lane. Kiffin was me against booty on that saturday in this rivalry walker and his bruins produce the game of their lives. The defensive front constantly attacked never letting booty said its feet feet completed. Only one deep pass the running game never solve the bruins scheme either u._s._c. clung to a nine seven lead at the half but no one in the trojan locker room panic coaches felt as if they're players just had to relax play the way they had played all season they we just needed to be patient that soon things would click. Let's specifically has been given from. They've had some chances to work on some stuff yeah. That's not that big a deal. We've got actually a little bit better. We went on a third-down another. Yes on this particular saturday afternoon. There would be no clicking. Carol remained aggressive self which usually worked fine but twice against u._c._l._a. Carol turn down. Phil gould attempt in order to go for it on fourth short both times. The bruins turned back the trojans the end of the game with u._c._l._a. l._a. Ahead thirteen to nine u._s._c. began to drive for a game winning season. Saving touchdown trojans methodically drove to the bruins owns eighteen yard line less than a minute remained in the game. Budi took the snap and look to pass a backup linebacker eric mcneal. He'll drifted into no man's land. Just behind the defensive end. You wasn't supposed to be there. Pootie threw a pass to his left mcneil neil where he shouldn't have been the ball straight up then caught it does he fell to the turf the video the u._s.'s first turnover of the game may cost them. The national championship was stunning. I counted among the top upsets. I've covered. No one was more stunned than the visiting trojans prevailing sentiment in the u._s. Locker room was one. What just happened happened. In two added the clock run out when an inexplicable loss happens who typical coach throws up his hands and provides their favourite non explanation of an explanation. It was just one of those games in the previous two seasons u._s._a. Hadn't had one of those games in two thousand six. They had had one already when they lost that argon st in now with everything anything at stake they had another trojans did not go to the fiesta bowl to play ohio state the b._c._s. title they returned to the rose bowl hole where they humbled michigan finished eleven and to finish fourth in the final poll <music> building a winning team is all about finding the right people for the job. That's why college coaches is all over. The country spent so much time recruiting players they need on the field and when it comes to hiring for your business there's no better tool than linked in link. Dan provides a vast vast array of recommended job candidates all in one organized place over six hundred million members visit linked in to make connections learn and grow as professionals nationals and discover new job opportunities. That's how i make sure your job post gets in front of people with the right hard skills and soft skills to meet your row requirements. Things things like collaboration work ethic adaptability link. Dan does the legwork to match you to the most qualified candidates so you can focus on hiring the person who will transform transform your business to get fifty dollars off your first job. Post go to lincoln dot com slash c. f. b. That's linked and dot com slash c._f._p. F._b._i. To get fifty dollars off your first job post terms and conditions apply in two thousand seven an untimely injury exposed the trojans lack of depth both on the sideline and on the field that year lane kiffin and left to become head coach of the oakland raiders steve sarkisian took over control of a offense. You again lost two games. There was a year to lose two in two thousand seven. Was it national champion l._s._u. Tigers lost two games one of them on thanksgiving weekend but the trojans lost two games in october thanks to an injury to boot and their title hopes never recovered frankly they never recovered covered from the first loss nor should they have stanford had gone. One in eleven in two thousand six stanford has been so bad that after that season the university administration discussed dropping out of f._b._i. Football but they decided to give the big time another chance airing a brash former n._f._l. Quarterback who had won big and non scholarship football at the university of san diego his name was jim harbaugh in the fifth game of the season stanford came south the play number two u._s._c. vegas favored. The trojans is by forty. One points u._s._c. dominated the first half of the game yet lead only nine did nothing at intermission stanford kept hanging around it could be because in the first quarter who'd he completed his throwing motion and smashed his hand into a defender's helmet breaking a bone buddhi came out of the locker room for the second half the u._s._c. coaches kept a close eye on watched him warm up they they wanted to determine whether he could throw the ball with a broken bone in his right hand budi through ten yard pass ball came out of his hand just fine. You said he could play off. He went early in the third quarter on third and two who'd he tried to muscle a pass into the right flat. That was a pass longer than ten yards. The ball didn't respond. Moody's hand didn't respond the ball fluttered into the flat stanford's. Austin yancey snatched it and sprinted thirty one yards for cardinal touchdown. Suddenly stanford trailed only nine two seven yet buddhi stayed in the game and u._s._c. kept throwing thirty four interceptions in that second half the cardinal came back and won twenty four twenty three with a fourth down touchdown pass with forty eight seconds to play remember stanford was a forty one point underdog. That was the biggest college football upset as measured by point spreads since vegas opened its doors as with u._c._l._a. The year before u._s._c. suffered inconceivable lost blame over-confidence claim of freak injury and blame and coaches who didn't react properly to the injury broken bone that wasn't serious enough to pull booty out of the stanford game proof serious enough. That booty missed the next three three games sophomore. Mark sanchez started in his place at number five oregon sanchez found out how difficult it is to play a ranked team on the road in front of raucous fans sanchez through two second-half interceptions that spelled the difference in twenty four to seventeen laws buddhi returned. The defense still played well. The trojans won their last five games and they finished third in the final poll an outstanding ending season in in a year when national champion l._s._u. Also lost two games another missed opportunity in two one thousand eight. The trojans lost only one game again. At oregon state. Two teams with tougher schedules oklahoma and florida also lost only one game the sooners and the gators played for the national title trojans played in the rose bowl for the fourth consecutive season eight years past for the trojans played and another rose bowl. You know who works hard rookies sure make mistakes but no one's got more to prove knowing each day's another opportunity to outworked them all earned the respect they deserve. That's why after one one hundred thirty years carl hart still approaches each day with the passion and work ethic of a company that's one hundred thirty years young same hunger same determination same giant chip on the shoulder and in the same way a rookie needs to work hard earned the respect of their peers. Everything carl hart makes has to keep earning the respective active the hardworking people who wear it. That's why car heart still works like a rookie. Why carl hart will keep working them all for the next one hundred thirty years to visit car heart dot com forward slash c._f._p. To learn more and shop this season's hardest working gear then came two thousand nine year when what pete carroll had built truly began to fall apart the trojan suffered too critical critical defections after the two thousand eight season steve sarkisian left to become head coach at the university of washington more important quarterback mark sanchez a third year sophomore defied carols wishes and his advice in declared himself eligible for the n._f._l. Draft carol replace sarkisian with jeremy bates a young n._f._l. Assistant put it this way. That was the only season bates ever coached college football in the nine years since two thousand nine bates spent four years in the n._f._l. In five years out of coaching but back to two thousand nine bates ran the offense and sanchez who would have been a favorite to win. The heisman trophy left for the n._f._l. And a high end him trojans had to veterans with little experience in a freshman who had left high school early who didn't turn eighteen until the third week of the season a good-looking blind kid with a big smile named matt barkley carol through his chips down on barkley barkley. Arkley performed a bound as well as a freshman could perform. Which is the say. What is a program like u._s._c. doing with its best quarterback being an eighteen year. Oh freshman carol got steamrolled by the changing times. Not two decades earlier successful successful coaches created quarterbacks by assembly line. You red shirted your watch from the sideline for two years and you played for two years. Bobby bobby bowden down at florida state had that system down to a science but players who sniff the possibility of leaving early for the n._f._l. Didn't wanna learn from the sideline. They wanted to play carol appealed to that instinct by promising freshman he would give them a chance but that same ploy came back to bite him at the the other end of the player's career sanchez left a year too soon and the two quarterbacks behind him airing corp and mitch mustang simply didn't pan pan out one of the biggest differences between college football in the n._f._l. Is that n._f._l. Coaches can cut their mistakes. If a player doesn't perform sometimes even after a bad practice he's gone in college. Football coach must live with his recruiting mistakes as i said a few minutes ago carol could sign virtually whomever he desired but did he want the right guys. If you follow recruiting rankings you know that they can be self fulfilling prophecies at is the top team is recruiting a player therefore he is a top prospect. I don't know a lot about transit of properties and i do know the great recruits always make great players in two thousand seven u._s._c. signed ten five star recruits the best of the best and five four stars two of them became all conference in two thousand eight u._s._c. sign twenty players. Five of them became all conference nine of them. Never started a game for the trojan. The marquee recruited the two thousand nine class barkley. Never made all conference either of course barkley played in the league at the same time as andrew luck so that's not exactly a knock on barclay actually the trojans biggest problems that season came on defense defense oregon in its first season under head coach chip kelly and his up tempo spread offense beat u._s._c. forty seven to twenty two weeks later stanford in its third season under harbaugh in its first season with luck at quarterback road graded the u._s._c. defense cardinal one fifty five to twenty one mostly by running the ball down the trojans throat are by refused to take his foot off the gas in the a fourth quarter he wanted fifty points and he got it at is known as the what's your deal game. The question that an angry carroll asked harbaugh during during their quick cursory postgame handshake that was the game that announced to the public that the dynasty ended the months after the two thousand nine season sealed the fate of u._s. Dynasty carol left for the seattle seahawks a few weeks ahead of the devastating saving n._c._a._a. Penalties giffen return to u._s._c. after one year at tennessee to replace his mentor forever after making tiffin's name and epithets the tennessee campus hamstrung by the scholarship restrictions hip and couldn't have maintain the trojans elite status even if he hadn't been and a young coach phoned immature mistakes u._s._c. athletic director pat haden famously fired kiffin in the middle of the night at the airport after a loss at arizona mistake sarkisian returned from washington to replace kiffin hayden fired him after one and a half disappointing seasons in which are keys zan had issues with alcohol that embarrassed the university we are ten years removed from pete carroll's last season at u._s._c. for nearly nearly five years from november of two thousand two until october of two thousand seven u._s._c. never fell out of the top ten but even then in the decay had begun to take root in the trojan athletic program. We didn't see it at the time with from here. Fifteen years removed ooh from u._s.'s last national championship. That decay is crystal-clear down distance. I'm ivan mozelle down in distances part of e._s._p._n.'s college football one fifty fifty commemorating the one hundred fiftieth anniversary of the sport. If you like this episode please subscribe on itunes or wherever you get your podcast down in distance is produced by nina earnest with help from scott's sabers brian intel and jodi began. Our engineer is josh macrey special. Thanks to alexander cooper engaged by saying the executive producer of e._s._p._n. College football one fifty is john doll. I'm aubin mozelle on our next episode. I'll tell you the story of how the greatest dynasty in the history of college football came apart one night in chicago nightclub culprit fruit salad sooner sabotage on the next down and distance.

trojans pete carroll u._s._c. carol football kiffin hayden texas oregon u._s. steve sarkisian longhorns sarkisian stanford u._s. giffen sarkisian chow kiffin bruins Bobby bobby bowden Football
The American Dental Dream  PDP002

Protrusive Dental Podcast

36:27 min | 2 years ago

The American Dental Dream PDP002

"Welcome to the protrude dental podcast the forward thinking podcast for dental professionals join us as we discuss hot topics dentistry clinical tips continuing education and adding value to your life and career with your host jazz galati. Hello everyone welcome to episode to the producer. Dental podcasts happy new year to listen to this. Today is all about moving move into the survey even if you're not interested in moons video so i think every one of us post qualifying from a u._k. Or international school has actually wanted. I wonder i wonder what it takes to move to u._s._a. Because i think very early on we pick up this knowledge that our dental degree is not actually valid in the u._s._a. And there are many barriers areas checchi working there so this this podcast is anyone who's ever wondered what it takes to to move to save your dental degree how to obtain a license. They're all perhaps you already midway. Through the process saw the very heavily invested or considering about moving to the usa this will give you lots of good tips experiences from our guest today christina gow chan who so you know she's she's. I'm very well. She's actually starting at boston university to convert her dental degree to use one and we'll be talking about entrance exams fees and the politics of it language exams you have to do. I didn't really appreciate who here in alabama today before we delve into that i want to share with you. The progressive dental appel for today's episode again. This is another non clinical episode and do not worry also can cool stuff lined up for the future anyway. Today's particip- dental which is also non non clinical is a financial one. Basically i want you to go to w._w._w. Dot global rich list dot net and i want you to enter your income okay because this is something that is so i- opening you need to see that if you listen to podcasts you're likely as a dentist therapy somewhere and actually when you enter a your figures in i bet you probably in the top twenty million people in the world okay top twenty million riches people are probably the top zero point three percent of people and sometimes it's really important to appreciate how lucky we are and how privilege we have to live in these countries that we live in and to do the work that we do that is very stressful and brings lots of reward in which i think we're very deserving of sometimes really important to know that we really are in the top zero point whatever percent in the world and to never forget that just looking ahead future podcasts. I've got lined up. I've got stuff about uncle microscopes how to make it affordable in practice practice. I've got specialization routes. M condense becoming a registrar. Let's say restarted industry and all these routes that you tend to consider any any one unstaged professional career so be delving deeper into that inclusion topics lined up so i've got lots of great contact coming so please subscribe on either. I tunes google. Podcast cars are now on spotify as well so share the love and i look forward to connecting you anymore. So let's listen up to christina gotcha interview with her which i think is such a great resource for anyone who's even vaguely thinking about moving to the u._s._a. Enjoy it yeah. Tell tell everyone who's listening right now a little bit about yourself where you qualified find from what you did after you qualified and how you ended up in the u._s._a. Okay so my name's christina gouging. I graduated exactly author off. <unk> used to another fifty in <hes> since then. I have a democracy in ipswich deanery. That's <hes> south east east of england. That's where my family live so yeah that was the year three by and then after that i was an associate for about a year and a half before i decided that was it and <hes> i want to try any but see my career in america and for those of you don't know you married someone. Who's the u._s. So that's obviously been your thang <hes>. He had it not been for that. You probably may not be in the u._s._a. Right now. Would you say exactly you know. That's exactly i i don't think i would i would have you know because obviously there's quite a few hurdles to get through <hes>. We'll get into that detail a bit more yet for me that he was the main thing. Let's say short short onto him. Say kidnap you and take you to the u._s._a. And it is super daunting your thoughts when you know this is becoming a reality to your about to move to say. What were you thinking thing. And how do you even start. Where does one begin now you start. That's the biggest question. I think that's one of the hardest that's how to step. I would say is actually deciding if this is it for you or not because obviously people research people read up about it but really when they night's action happening. I think that's one of the biggest things to make that five-step so for me. We'll for me and my husband. We wanted some countries while korea's gonna be progressive for both of us oversee. We've both studied so we wanted somebody. That's good <unk>. Bigger opportunities for both is non-medical in software engineering so i._t. Consultant you make softwares. I don't know too much about ah that's fine. The show is all about you not him today so decided that it would work but where does one start do. Where do you even begin to to find out more about to expose the people might be difficult. That's why we're bringing you on the show today so they can learn tom how to go about to what is the first step christina two years of working with the b._b._s. in the u._s._a. Though i would say google there's a great facebook group for a lot of pursuing international. This exists <unk>. No matter where you trained is the same steps <hes> <hes> so for me. I researched online great websites in chechen dentists website to qualify in the u._s. There's lots of resources out. There as amihai started reading up about that. I reached out to my friends family who has done the same n._f._l. <unk> few have done the same as nate. Luckily there was a girl just above me in dental school. She actually literally i think she's even skipped obt and <hes> i remember that she was doing this infamy. Is that while you know. That's amazing asta. Everything is so useful to have someone right who whose so you can follow in their footsteps. I can almost like a mentor to exactly so she was really great and border but you don't need that because you read so much online as well and you think actually when it comes down onto act there's actually you. Don't you find that you know they are strong. So you need to really follow. The guidelines and it's hard isn't it but luckily had her at. I had a few of the <hes> my husband's so friends <hes> had done the same things today qualified in india and nepal so for me. It was the same route we take. It doesn't matter whether you qualify <hes> anywhere out of the u._s. Or canada so you have to do is <hes> two to three extra training base essentially giving back back to dental school the last two years of dentistry. Let's say and how how is it determined whether it's two years or three years that you'd have to still on the programs. There's fifty states. There's a lot of dental schools. Each one has different <hes> curriculums and they all have different time timelines as well and how'd you decide which one's the right right one view and how competitive are these places for for internationals very competitive. I did a research averages. Just about twenty places maybe four thousand applicants and i know that sounds nationally and internationally that that's for us in the whole of u._s. Early twenty community. I think u._s. is easier because they have a lot bigger intakes. I'm talking about international programs in chicago. Dental school will have international program. Um you see so it does about stati or dental schools in u._s. International dentists as students that make some points or thirty dental dental school accept students and how many would they each take on per year roughly you know this all from five and it can be up to eighty so so on average twenty to twenty five its nationals in just internationals and with the national end what what they do is they join you lean with the nationals does that make sense at y'all go together and obviously the ratio is going to be. It's almost graduates. Join second year is just like that. Okay and you had to go before we come onto how you interviewed for our no entrance exams okay so how many exams are there. How difficult is this where can to get help and things all sorts of tell us about the exams though sure sure <hes> so interestingly the main <hes> heidel is the national border dental exams to the pot one in pot to support one is quite simple although it's no more a science based purely a monotony biochemistry microbiology pathology and dental anatomy so it's an eight hour exam so this is just the the beginning. You get breaks every hour. It's up to you. You can manage your time quite well but yes they give you an umbrella minute multiple choice amongst choice questions and it's four hundred questions so hundred in each category and you know what it does sound not a ah fast. I was just reading it but you can do it just needs. Maybe a few months of practice so really. I think you do need people do do you know on top of their jobs. I know people who have done these dams with a full time job in it and i really praised with families and things like that softer. Yes yes hats off exactly for me. I was really lucky having supporting husband by took bus expense out and i just moved stuck in my room and i just got on within. That's the only way i knew i could do it very good. So that's part one is it does yes okay. Do you know roughly a couple of things about part one on exams. What is the pass rate or failure even that and also other fees like yes. It's a fees roughly old exams about five hundred dollars. Maybe a little bit more five fifty. It goes up every year. I believe that's dollars and ozzy the flights things like that so i guess you have to take that to count but yes i was a five hundred dollars. Yep boss right. What's the pulse rate the on slate. I would say it really depends because i think there's like the era has a different prostrate full dental school dental students nostra students on international dentist because we're having to learn this on our own whereas what what traditionally happens is the u._s. Students actually do this on their second year this board of exams saderah <unk> day so it's i. It's like doing doing a second year dental school so i feel like that got lot. Higher prostate impacted the international. Dentists is the past the past month fifty percent. Usually you need but seventy five. They don't give you a figure but you you need at least and sixty percents or above it is awaiting so it really depends again sounds occur. They don't give you figures so the literature say pasta fail initially they use astutely was i heard out of ninety nine and you need about seventy five but i think now is no figures to it. That's why it's quite difficult to gauge you. See where where are the centers which is at one in every state or guests wanted to stay so yeah most of your driving his arm and we'll get other license. Exams is somewhere like that yep okay just past part one needed you. That's really cool and then how long you have to wait until he can do to them. Ah yeah it takes about two to three weeks to get yours so they want to know the pasta pot one fussy wuzzy wait for that to apply for your pop to exam <hes> so yes few weeks later just broke his right away so you know and you can book a few months in advance up to you support to it's a lot easier so is literally now. Idols finals be literally easier. I think i mean the only extra subject is pharmacology. The rest is literally. We we should know everything just just recap and you'll finals unhappily this and how many centers other than saint cendiz <hes> this is a two day exam one and a half day in that same says again in eight hour our first day yes m._c. Cues oems accused so in a way. It's like kind of cooler about root canals to everything think restorative pediatrics also is well you know radiology oral surgery or pathology and traumatology that again it is very doable. I i was reading this by. I did this within a month. 'cause i was in a tight timeframe. I needs to coming up. I don't want to be doing this afterwards. Literally originated it like a few days before we left our holidays and the same exam that the u._s. of dental students do as well or not really the dental students do this actually in their fourth year at and the final year so <hes> again. That's why i can really relate to it being like the final exam so yeah it is interesting and one and a half day so the fastest pointed questions of 'em's accuse the second day is all scenario based so his opponent fueled question what about fifty but they're scenarios so you know they'll give you a patient bio. They'll give you the medically straight. I'll give you the symptoms. Don't don't give you full mouth. Perrier pickles auberges while they're very detailed so you know you're not sort of stuck in any way you can. It's like an ascii. Is it actually yes. That's what i was thinking. Full yellow on yeah so. Are you actually cutting any teeth. Are you actually showing your preps. There was no practical. It is all all on the computer but it scenario based questions so you'll you'll be oversee asked you know some tricky questions but it really is oh i think i think we over think it don't mean much thinking trying to trick us but really they're not they just want to test your knowledge and and it's funny because like for me then i realized realized that actually teeth or teeth and people people everywhere. That's all so compared to obviously you qualify lupone uh-huh finals in a real respective u._k. Dan school how how's difficulty of the finals in u._k. Compared to what you did in the u._s. So the part two exam deeming in is it similar to get here u._k. Yes yes exactly so that's so i mean <unk>. You could probably study just a few days for that exam really like people who are on top of united around knowledge if you're practicing dentistry. I think these things come to you you. They are quite obvious things. It's just a few you know like the nitty gritty the figures and the doses things like that. You should brush up but it's definitely doable good what i'm doing in my head while you tell me about the zam. I'm comparing the o. r. e. sort of exiles that we haven't u._k. Okay compared to what you've just described and the o._r. E actually sounds much scarier and the aloha a number so you're cutting teeth and you're showing oh in preps but the difference is christina is obviously once you've done the exams you still practice whereas owari once you've too you can start practicing in a way right so now wow that leads very nicely to the next bit rhythms and so you saw lying issue. I'm you'll be go on. We do also new toefl hopeful test so you know the english exam if you're a u._k. Exist on the exam yes and that was actually quite tough for me because i was just logging myself. I was laughing at me. He was like you don't need to study and i was like i really should've studied. I got <hes> five percent but really i want. I should've been guesting ninety five. You know you want that talk. Hop mark if you can. I was just out of interest anyone this what's poss monk well. There isn't a pasta and in the tofu sedans <unk> grading system so the the high of the better. There's out a one twenty usually dental slow on at least ninety four metre hundred so that's the point about eighty percent. Now one at lisa sure it does depend but yes so you got the language <unk> away. What's next. David next is also we. We have to translate our qualifications so you know our transcripts so you know on on graduation. They give all all these papers with our exam results one two year to a year five so they need that translated so the two main bodies do this e._c. Educational emotional credential evaluators and was and they have to pay again. It's all money as another thing is. It's quite a bit of investment. Initially ashley we'll get to that later on quite can be a little pricy is allowed to get these time. How long does that take to get done at least a month. I'd say yet they want it. Directly directly sealed copy from your university. They can imagine are calling in unilever invested all this is that <hes> but there are great though we help our supportive were liverpool union helping great actually yeah they don't email then not the quickest so i know the schools aren't the quick as all online signed twenty seven now whereas us migration fifteen so a paper copy and they had to <hes> d._h._l. Fixit to office eh yep so that just takes time and and you know money and and more modern chasing them up and you show him one criterion terrier another is also in the application for dental schools. They'll need about three letters of evaluation so like want to be from your team and one to be me from grade teacher or boss so the main things okay brilliant so now you've got all that. Are you still ready yet to apply yes yes. That's a lot of it was okay but this is the apply. Tell us about this crazy application procedure. The season is so i said we're limited to schools. You can choose from and the good thing is you can apply many as you can but obviously each application cost it at least three hundred dollars say yeah so it's not free. It's not like casts shame. Luckily i believe we can apply just as we want. The more you play the more chances unlike with the unit. Is there for example back in back in you cast as we had to apply between this month of that month is similar every say each absolutely absolutely they start from march every year some different but i'm julie headlines are by summer july august you the majority of the deadlines close. We've got three to four month period. That doesn't mean you have to apply within those dates. There are other the schools that are <unk> open a bit later as well but the bulk of them <hes> at least seventy percent of the schools. Have these the springtime. Let's say it's been to supplement and then. How long do they take to get back to you and then when would you start the dental school jacksonville so you have to obviously apply the year before so say is the nineteen in twenty cycle. You won't apply for you have to fight this year. Does that make sense so lost in march ryan. I thought the interviews are few months later. If if they like you and then the ice dot july says quite late start date so one of the latest just so you're going to start in july twenty nine yes yes okay and finish twenty one but <hes> doctor is january yep yep so luckily i got the program. That's two years <hes> but that doesn't. I don't know if that's lucky actually because i think it's really jam packed they. They said you don't even get a break. I think you is a six day. You you need eight days late nights and only two weeks for christmas off and in the summer you know they can't promise the holiday. That's very typical of the u._s. Is a country where a lot of people very hard very hard working. The average person i here in the u._s. Gets fifteen days of annual weeks. Exactly you think compared to about twenty eight that we get here on average that says that speaks volume mm-hmm so the world on forgetting the place which which unions this story that you want yet be you while steady you that's amazing. Dan highly regarded dental school. Yes i mean i for me. I just wanted to get anyway because you wanted to stop it so i was just getting really impatient but i was very lucky. Yes yes and they'll write that lovely. They <hes> yeah do as a few other things with the the an criteria of east greenwich specifically what they provide you know their requirements other than than national board exams awful they also add sometimes inquire ties primaries doesn't mean you have to be so you know people with green card or again that's something to consider but he must do because of the internationally if they have the program most except <hes> visas student visas <unk> yet. Is that what you have you have. The student visa rules lucky i have i have been caused from my husband so i was lucky in that regard as well. <hes> also other things would interviews bench tests. Have you heard about bench test. Nazi to you mentioned the re- <hes> they have to do you not you also some schools what that is well so say out of you know six seven hundred that apply they interview. Let's say on average hundred fifty okay and each one has so. I had right about two to three day interview full of mine a lot. You went to some interviews that were two three days lungs snow. Yes and that's where you were like cutting teeth and let me tell give us a flavor of three days. How how would the what on earth are they doing with you for three days and interview i know i know some of the finest morning is the intro they'd give you a little bit about the school introduce each other. The faculty members <hes> and you get a chance to just speak to other candidates as well <hes>. They'll have lunch with for you in the afternoon. They'll have either written exam mm or a <hes>. A face to face interviews <unk> a face or one one so with them members. They'll alternate days so often you will have the under fast morning afternoon and second half would be second morning and checking your human side berry as so that right is that they'll just want to know about you. We know why the school same named <unk> as we'll fight and st what are union abuse says exactly the same stuff very very financially. I think that more friendly that it's more of a chat actually ashley said the the americans are quite 'em casual people's like a wrecking actually after my one ounce on so i kind of felt like dossier something a bit more challenging oh you chat and they just want to know you know if you'll be for the school. I guess yeah okay on the five day. What would you do is cutting the teeth so usually they don't tell you in advance they they'll give you a practice sessions. Luckily we will <hes> lucky to give your practice always <unk>. Phantom had the teeth on the heads. Yep says just like that. You have to cut either pre mola mola and it's usually cost to cavity designs near the box either that or they'll want on a crown prep or they want both to three procedures that wanted to carry out okay <hes>. I'm we'll give you a rough measurement. Indications senate say to mill depth for the crowds that say <hes> m._c._c. prep or a gold crown. They will give the measurements with someone so you need to go. Oh by that what that school follow is more interested in additional ways oil some you know they provide the lesser conservative bridge so yeah it is. I guess what can vote. They're exposed to find interesting and so once you've <music> done your interviews. My quick math tells me that if there's one hundred people there and their take on twenty one in five people accepted topsy. I'd it's quite tough south once again cool. Tell us about scholarships and fees so i'm not sure scholarships scholarships. I think you can apply so luckily another marketing is that if you are resident <hes> oh you've got some links that you can apply for government loans so the interest free silence until you finish so we're quite lucky in that regard otherwise <hes> private loans and on average is about at say a year the to we just <unk> at least eighty thousand dollars yes dollars so <hes> that's <unk> taking account other things you combination fan us. All of our tuition is the main thing and that's by at least eighty eighty thousand looking eighty thousand per year <hes> yeah and a lot of programs that you two and a half years so so that can build up a bit more and on top of that you need to budget for accommodation and also maybe facebook books. The loops oops says is everyone uses loops that they are very keen. Which is what you want. I think if you wanna be a good practitioner and and a lot of us do <hes> i think i think it's nice to have that mindset already know that they're very they'll partly as i have a friend who's doing periodontics in in california and he said every night after read these articles you know that's the basic stuff but i just want joe things that you have to get through and they are very very hardcore. Hardcore hardcore exactly yeah and once you fingers crossed once you graduate from a. b. u. Like o r e. You can work in the n._h._l. Equivalent to whatever described once you come out and school in another requirement you have to off the unfortunate to me is the last one is just a licensing again. It depends which state so each state does have specific regulation but a lot of them. They do overlap so there's certain license. If you get that you can walk in a few states but yeah you have to you have to check with with each license and i again i can give you these links licensing lines as i guess licensing exam yep and never quite literally as our exam. <hes> and it's just like your finals isn't it says just aren't questions again. You have to do an licensing exam for each state. Oh one license might cover the there is a one license that covers covers quite a few states but if each specific one will will follow different ones so it really depends so i can't say for sure but let's five licensing exams right so <hes> if you do all of them than you do anywhere but if you know where you're going yeah you'd have a rough idea of where you would in usually get away with just that you know that licensing exam and i've had quite easy they might some might want need you to quit new a practical so even bring a live patient and <hes> but that's is quite rare. I think <hes> so then then finally you can hurt now. I know it sounds like a lot but you know ah if you're dedicated and willing to really put the whacking and the time you know is the time <hes> is desirable for me. I saw i can't do i can't and do it. You know it's very negative at the beginning because i think it is daunting like you said you see all these things you have to do and it's not a quick thing is you can't just take this exam this thing. Don't you exactly so it's definitely doable so i wanna read encourage people. You know who aren't thinking about it to go for. It's an oil also another encouragement is them. They do like that you from u._k. So if you do so i applied to about ten schools go into from at least full the others still the deadline hasn't closed yet so <hes> and i went to about three interviews yep <hes> and a lot of them. Were really no amazed to see because oh you what brings you over over here because they love and they said they loved accent. They can hear we know very lovely so when you when you went to these interviews crazy just have just curiosity of the hundred or so people are being interviewed <hes> can you like. Is it like fifty percent from india so indians litany. I'd i'd say ninety percent nicely but yet and actually them is a little harder so i believe that they want a higher g._p._a. They g._p._a. Gregory point average yes yes. They want to hide you. Pay for them on high for them because it's competition. They liked to have ethnic diversity in this school so they can't take you know just old old indian people so that's why little tougher for them actually yeah interesting so those listening from the u._k. Got beat jazz might sound yeah yeah 'cause on the application on the online application at <unk> portal <hes> they asked if you <unk> water qualifications if you've got masters and a lot of these students do so sometimes you getting you know. Periodontics specialists apply as well for me. I felt a bit the oh gosh you know nothing about them but yeah did they use the same and <hes> and some schools will value them says honor california's go retirement to california new york all these big cities that they want you to have an extra <hes> <hes> specialty or things like that but that i shouldn't be dan you know you need to go for an apply. If you do want some might want you know like the last year or achievements. You've got so you know all these things. Extracurricular things is definitely worth adding to your c._d. So you can add all these things yeah. Okay well. One question of just off based on what you've said. That is imagine your an orthodontist in the u._k. And you go to the states. Would you have to do everything that you then describe and then specialized in orthodontics in the u._s. All i think so yeah one understood yes. Sometimes i have had a few things but i wouldn't wanna give an answer but sometimes as you can just go do the specialty programs us about three years is into <hes> so you go to do the altar there that you could do one part two exam and then if you work in not state for at least five years i believe you can do a general dentistry but usually you can either do one or the other you have others. You have to do this if you want to practice as a general dentist and a specialist does that make sense. I sort of <unk> dibble dabble you need to do so. They are quite i tough night. Yeah and one question has gino anything about general dentistry in the u._s._a. In the sense in the u._k. Most dentists work for the national health system and go you as a staff from speaking to my american colleagues dave of insurance based practices. There's a lot you've similar restrictions. They have a different name for it. <hes> do not think about that so like medicate things that so <hes> yeah yeah i do again. It's mold rules and regulations like you said here because we also have energy based. It is completely different there it. It is heavily private insurance but the government also writes him. There's a justice basically yes yes exactly but they do also there are practices that do no income families whether goldman pays for part of it quite a big chunk of it <hes> but i i know that the the the pay there is a lot better than initiates in san yep okay. That's another potential aspen plus point on it and do you have any any any words of advice tips anything else. You want to anything you think help any listeners who considering the move tell me about the curriculum curriculum unlucky we do a lot of digital dentistry so a lot of sarah so we'll be doing sir straightaway <hes> into the traditional crowns about sex from from the beginning curriculum yeah undergrad brad and even implant. I'll be able to restore. Implant restore is basic but i'm even in place so that's quite interesting in your program program you get to place implants. Yes yes and re program. You'll definitely restall implants at least so yeah well chris. I'm really really excited for the obscene that you have even once upon a time. I was looking at m._s._n. Programs and and perreault plastic programs in the u._s._a. And life life got in the way and i'm now sort of settle in london but i'm really excited for the opportunity that you have. You're going to be taught by world class tutors in a in an amazing establishment shman so go for it. You know really kill out there. I hope you get all the success you you deserve and thank you so much for helping nine. No thank thank you for reaching out to me honesty. It's been a pleasure no hope of explained a few things but there is a lot of detail i could go into as just a little bit of a guide but a flavor of what's expect. Some people have no idea. This is going to really help people so thank you so much. Oh thank you so there. We have it. Thank you so much christina for joining us today. I hope that's been useful for all those listening today. As always to show notes will be on the website www w. dot jazz dot dental so if they're cook on the episode you'll see you build standard a p._d._f. Over all the sort of useful resources that christine has prepared for you saw catch an episode three weeks. Thank you so much for listening.

u._s u._k christina gow google facebook california spotify alabama india u._s._a england usa Dan ashley ipswich deanery america Dot global producer boston university korea
College Education Beyond The States w/ Jennifer Viemont

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

1:07:05 hr | 2 years ago

College Education Beyond The States w/ Jennifer Viemont

"And we're talking about like generous scholarships like you know pass. Your first year in your second. Year is free type stuff. That's gosh if we need in the u._s. We need lower our prices and a buy one get one disc can resist a buy one get one. The extra repack peanuts travel podcast episode three eight zero in two thousand fourteen germany officially abolished. This college tuition fees for everyone including international students. You'll be learning more about that. Okay okay. I'll admit it there are a few times where i think it would be very hard for people to travel with just a carry on and and these times are when people are going to live abroad for an extended amount of time whether you're a student you're going to go over for six months or a year to study abroad or you're going to move abroad to go to a school in another country for good. Maybe for all four years or you're someone who takes a job in another country and you're going to be there for a couple of years or if you're like me you teach english in japan and you go there for two years. It is going to be very hard to travel with just a care on but for the ninety nine percent of other are people out there who are not going to live abroad. They're just going travelling. I truly believe that you can travel with just a care and i've done it around the world so has heather so she can do it. You can do it and the best travel care on backpack. The one that we recommend out there is tortuga backpacks and thankfully for you. We've got a sweet discount code to tortuga backpack. Now is different than it used to be. If you wanna get your ten percent off anything that you order over two backpacks you have to go tour two backpacks. Dot com slash e pop. That's tortuga backpacks dot com slash e pop put that special link in your browser and then when you go to check out you'll get an automatic. Ten percent discount code applied also since we recorded beyond the state has some new big news on july fifteenth two thousand nineteen beyond the states launched a membership program for master's degree so there are over five thousand english taught master's programmes in europe at over three hundred schools and these are substantial savings over getting a master's degree in the u._s. So if you're looking for a masters degree now in addition the stuff they they talk about as with bachelor's degrees if you're looking for a master's degree as well visit beyond the state dot com to learn more and now let's roll into the show. I'll show you do now. <music> hello travel nerds and welcome to the extra pack of peanuts travel podcast. The show teaches you how to travel more while spending less. I'm your host travis share and joining me. Today is the author of college beyond the state european schools that will change your life without breaking the bank. Thank someone who's one of the world's foremost experts on over seventeen hundred schools in europe that a student can get a bachelor's degree from in english and who for or her air quotes here job gets visit europe regularly to visit those schools jen vima from beyond the state's dot com jen. Thanks for joining me and a huge welcome travis. I'm excited to talk to you today. I mentioned to you right before we got on here that i am so thrilled to talk to you about this subject because you know when people are passionate about something but they have limited the knowledge usually like it's not a it's not a good recipe for success. That's how i feel about this. I'm very passionate about this idea of people the exploring options other than going to u._s. university but my knowledge is way like lower than yours. I don't know much except i know that it's a good option. Super excited to talk to you about that because you know a lot more than i do and i think it's going to open a lot of people's eyes so as we get going. I want you just to start with telling people what beyond beyond the state does like. What is this website that you're running. And why are you running it. Totally well like you a few years ago. I thought it was you know studying. Abroad rod was a great thing and that it was probably just limited to semester abroad <hes> i have teenagers myself and i'm a big planner so i had already started <hes> planning slash worrying about their college career like how we would pay for it and dislike the homogeneous environment and you know here in the u._s. If you do semester abroad it is pretty expensive. It's cost prohibitive for a lot of people so worried about the admissions process just all sorts of worries. I ran across an article on facebook like we often do about a kid who was studying in germany for free without knowing german like for his whole degree so okay cool. I'll sit on my back porch and do a little research. See if we should keep this on our radar and i was completely overwhelmed their you know we're talking about so many different countries and i didn't understand the admissions missions procedures. I didn't understand the differences. I didn't understand if the degrees would be good here all these questions but i could tell by the price that it was something that i wanted to keep on my radar looked into a little bit more for our family learned enough about the benefits that i realized that other people want to know this too so i spent a year a really awesome year travelling to europe which i still do visiting the schools. It's actually about three hundred fifty schools that offer seventeen hundred english taught program so that means you don't need to know english the courses earning list the lecturers the the readings test. Everything is in english and they do this risk to draw students from around the world. They're not trying to just get american. Students or canadian. Students are australian students. You know english is a common language in many countries countries so these little tiny countries by having these english taught programs they can pull in more students than just those who speak latvian for instance. Yes you know it'd be kind of restricted if all of their programs are lobbying how many people speak watkin so anyways i was visiting schools talking to international students talking to administrators traders so that i could provide a comprehensive and objective source of information most of the information out there. It's it's suit. Basically they have arrangements with schools to get money. I don't take any money from the schools so that if i go to school and see some red flags i can tell you about it so we created the database of all of these english programs as long as they're accredited and taught in english and we have a membership where people they can get all the information they need. Their courses are webinars. We have monthly calls with me. We have a facebook member group which is really fun right now because all these people are getting acceptance letters posting about it and posted about housing so that's what i do. That's beyond the states yeah all right so you mentioned the cost right like that was the first thing that triggered you because i think would you read the headlines of these business insider things on facebook whatever you like it sensational right and then a new dive in and you're like whoa wait a second it might sound sensational but this is actually someone is really doing this and so they draw you in and then you say all right right but then usually you're left with. Where do i get more information right. It's like thousand word article and then you're like. I got a thousand questions that aren't answered here but the cost lost was the thing for you like this person is going here for free to school in germany. This is something that is worth my time looking into because has it's because it's such a different and stark difference from what we're paying in the u._s. So let's talk about cost right off the bat and why people might be interested. What is the cost difference between going to one of. These schools like you're talking about like an english speaking school. Abroad in europe versus a regular a u._s. institution well. Can you concrete example then. I'll give you averages myself an will be going to to a university in the hague a light in university. University is the top one hundred school. I don't care about rankings but i mentioned that so. You don't think that these things are are because it's sort of sub par you know so the top one hundred school and we're going to you pay about twelve thousand dollars a year and it only takes three years to complete now. This is one of the more expensive schools so we're going to weak-minded just cost comparison even calculating in overseas travel room and board costs a visa and if we were to send him to an out of state don't or private university we would be saving over two hundred thousand dollars total even with all those exit which is us crazy to me but and this is again at one of the more expensive expensive schools that average costs for all these seventeen hundred programs. The average is seven thousand dollars a year and most taken link three years to complete so yeah seven thousand year like oh. That's like state school but there's a year less. I'm and there are hundreds of options under four thousand dollars to so is that seven two thousand that's tuition number and his tuition for twelve thousand for him at at linden. You said yes leiden leyden okay so you got twelve thousand tuition wishes which is as you said one of the more expensive seven thousand average and then a significant amount ones under four thousand for tuition and then people if you're unfamiliar unfamiliar with the state tuition in the u._s. Let's give them some random numbers. What's like a very good private university or more expensive private university in in the u._s. Costs for tuition well the one that i compared it to my son's really interested in languages and international studies specifically the middle east so middlebury college college in vermont is a great school and they have a program like that and their tuition fees is fifty two thousand dollars a year fifty two thousand dollars a year so that makes the numbers easy forty thousand he saving per year plus. He's doing one last year. Which is where we're coming up with that that two hundred thousand dollar number so i guess the question that maybe it's hard for us to answer but why is it either wise the u._s._o. Much more expensive on the flip side. Why is it so much more affordable going to some of these universities in europe. Well i mean for one. Is that if you were to ask dutch student if if if twelve thousand dollars for leiden was reasonable they would say no because they're paying much less you know so so but the other thing is that <hes> eat of one thing i hear a lot is what you're paying for in europe is you're paying for education but you're paying for in the u._s. You're also paying for stadiums and you're paying for you know just just as huge overhead ahead in all these non academic related things. Schools don't own their own housing in europe. I mean that right. There is one factor that they don't have but but it's also about just sort of philosophy about access to higher education and you see this in the admissions process to is that they want students to have access a higher education and cost one of that now i will also say though if you are eligible for a dual citizenship a lot of people who are eligible for dual citizenships who just haven't taken advantage of it yet. Your costs are going to be dramatically lushness numbers that i gave so because you would be going as either a european a student or or the e._u. Passport or you'd have a passport from that specific country as opposed to being an international student then yeah. You don't need specific country. If you you have a passport from italy you can still get the e._u. Prices in estonia and i just got back from a trip to the balkans baltic states the second baltic and balkan mixed up say the baltic states and i was in lithuania and found out that lithuanians students they don't even have to have any or passport squirt if they can prove lithuanian that there are descendant of a lithuanian than they can get less tuition as well so did you start looking into how you could possibly get your son a second password dual passport or did you know that wasn't going to happen. You guys at all. I knew there is no chance. I answered my family background. You just took your twelve thousand sold okay don. We we know that that students probably paying two k. and laughing that we're paying twelve k but we're not paying fifty two k. at that point totally what are some of them the other pros that you've seen cost huge you one and and probably my guess would be the overarching reason why people at least start looking into it is cost because they're like this is is these are big numbers that were saving but there's a ton of other pros about studying in europe versus. What have you seen as some of those from from anecdotal evidence from people onto your programming out doing it from your son's going over so you guys have done some research net. What do you see as the main other pros like. Hey you're going to europe for an education versus the u._s. Well one is get. There was sort of the tangible benefits is the admissions process. My son would not be a good player of the admissions game in the u._s. <hes> you know he doesn't like to join clubs <hes> he he has interest in likes to pursue those on his own but is not much of me as he works works out. He doesn't play sports. You know there are a lot of interested. Just aren't quantifiable for the kids. Resume isn't boom boom boom boom boom like someone would see on a sheet of paper deeper and be like oh this kid. Does everything holy totally so in europe. What generally happens is it's not competitive in the if you meet the requirements armaments they set out then you're in now a lot of times. Those requirements are simply that you have a high school diploma. Sometimes it's that you need a certain s._a._t. Score for the the school he applied to he had had a certain number of a._p. Scores so what's great about that is it's not like if he had more than that he would beaten more. I mean you're in if you have the four p. Scores of ten a piece courses doesn't matter doesn't matter that he didn't play sports because that hat to them has no it doesn't factor into whether he'll be successful academically in the program so that sort of a tangible benefit but honestly fleet cost in admissions as tangible ones that kind of draw you in <hes> become less of the primary benefit when you start learning more about global citizenship and employability and educational outcomes those sort of things start out secondary benefits often move up on people's lists pretty quickly yes so why is it that it's less competitive than at some of those universities in europe. Why would it be that. You're not competing eating at so many people is it because so many fewer people are going to secondary ed or at least that type of secondary in europe the traditional four year or three year your model will part of it is about again access to higher education philosophy run access to higher education that if you show that you can meet these requirements arm and you should be allowed to study in the program if you show you how to put it takes nail <hes> what the difference is instead of using your high school career to pregnant you have what it takes wchs you have to prove for you to take that first year and a lot of schools have something called finding study advice and that means if you don't pass a certain number of courses your first year you're out because they're more interested in how you can perform your freshman year of college than how you perform your freshman year in high school if that makes sense yeah so they're saying essentially essentially with universities in the states urine and unless you really really mess up you can muddle you're right through and get a diploma but you know it matters what you did before four and the european university you're saying hey we'll let more people and we'll give more people a shot but if you don't pass it if you don't take this shot or you mess it up then you're out totally and the other thing to note is a lot of the reason about selectivity in the u._s. and i'm not going to get on my soapbox about this. Promise is about the selectivity. The number is used in the rankings in the u._s. And that's a really game system. I mean the the u._s. Rankings are really gained now. Global rankings don't factor factor in selectively at all. They just look at research related criteria which i don't think relate to the educational experience but that's a different topic what i'm saying. They have no reason to kind of game name those numbers. There's no incentive or or anything else so if you wanna get on your soapbox you definitely can because i want. I want you on your soapbox. If you're willing to go there because for me as i mentioned i feel pretty passionate about this as someone who has gone through and it's not that i want to. I hate the u._s. Education system and i i went through a typical university so i'm not slandering anyone who did because that was my path. I just didn't realize when i was growing up that there was another option. I had one a friend who who did and he had his family was travelers right so they he'd gone. I'll forty fifty countries when he was a kid. I don't know it was like they're always going off to europe or somewhere cool and i just didn't know that and he went. I remember he best friend. He applied and got into university of british columbia in vancouver so we're not talking european. We're just talking vancouver but in my head i remember saying how could you do that like how could you go so far away. You're going to another country like why would you do that and he's just laughing vancouver's beautiful. Have you ever been there. I hadn't so i'm like acknowledging. I'm paying ten k. years something for tuition even as an international student which was three times or two times what a canadian student was paying but i in my head like i had no idea that something like that existed and it was just out of ignorance. I didn't know anyone who was doing it and i had heard about it and i didn't travel travel much and then i look back on it even even five years out. I look back on pretty quick. Once i started wow there are a lot of options here and so i i think that's the issue is that none of us know about this and i don't i guess i don't know why maybe maybe it's i don't know maybe you know better like why user ignorance towards the options of going to other countries and paying substantially less. I think there are a couple things. One is is that now you're younger than me but at least when i was growing up these options didn't exist it wasn't that we didn't know about them so much. It's just until nineteen ninety two and again. This is one listings is kinda boring so i won't get into it too much. There was a bologna declaration that standardized higher education all around europe so before then internationalization asian wasn't as huge of a thing and maybe a degree from hungary wasn't the equivalent as a degree from france. Now it is so the other thing. Though is i really i really believe and again. I'm going to be pulling out soapbox here i can't i can't help this one and listen to a lot of things about living in this country that i really love. There are a lot so i'm not saying this to slam america but there is a myth of american exceptionalism where we just just you know we hero our higher. Education system is the best and instead of looking at what might support that or what might not support that we just go okay it. Is you know <hes> <hes> so i i. I believe that you know i. I have a lot on facebook and it always amazes me. What people will reply to you. You know like what comment and i really do see some just close-minded videos about <hes> about what people think about different countries that that is not backed up by any sort of evidence. I think the other thing about social proof and there are some. I own a few view. One of the few podcast i listen to is malcolm glide wells and he did this thing a a while back about threshold and how some people need issue in order to make sort of different choices. They need to see them. More people are doing it before law considerate for themselves even if it's the right decision so there are some people who do need that the social proof to see okay. You know so and so's doing it so i guess i can't you so that's another reason we're trying to spread the word. We have a lot of members who are doing this now so and that's it's what i love about it is i think we're all guilty of social proof in different ways. I might feel like i could be brave enough or have enough courage or be a guinea pig in some ways whereas there's there's other parts of my life where i wouldn't have been right like so i think that's the beauty of spreading the message is that there are people out there who this would be perfect for and they're a little they're holding back or they were like you said they might not have even heard of it now. Do you think with the u._s. And this is speculation. Though i mean there has to come a tipping point where these tuitions go up and up and up. I mean like way above the rate of inflation way above the the cost of goods going up. I mean they're just going up. Astronomical percentage points every year every year every year to the point that now like you said fifty two thousand intuition for a small liberal arts school. Which is you know more than the average. American person is going to make in a year and so do you see they're. You're starting to become some pushback towards that like from your vantage point or do you think no. It's just accepted like you go to school for years. You go in in debt and that's just the way it is on for years. I wish i mean honestly the graduation. Rate is more like six years these days because like we were talking about. You don't really fail out. You just add more time off on. I don't know i would have thought if there was gonna be a tipping point. It would have been by now. There's this website called college calc and what what you can do. Oh it's so disturbing <unk> really sucked in you can put in <hes> shows you what like i like to look at. What college costs when i would a certain college costs yes when i went to college versus now versus what it's going to be just five years from now and when you look at those numbers i mean it is mind blowing <hes> so i can't imagine but what i think is great. Is that whether it does whatever happens in the u._s. With higher education that there's a way to opt out and that's what i didn't know until five years ago even if you decide you end up deciding to go to school in the us didn't at least it feels more like a choice as opposed to hear something <music>. I'm stop wish. I think that's really important. I was gonna ask you. What if your you have a son who knows that going to school in the u._s. And then you have another child israel all right. I have a fourteen year old daughter. So what if your daughter says to you you know she she sixteen and looking at schools or maybe she's looking now because her mom knows all about colleges and her brother's going but you know what if she says you i've looked at the stuff i you know i really really really wanna go to do and i know you guys are down chapel hill so i wanted to go to my friends are going to duke <hes> i got into do whatever i wanna do it and you're looking like dukes probably forty five k. right so what if your your kid and i'm in the same boat just like fifteen years behind here or thirty years what if they come to the decision themselves that they would like to do it would would you would you allow and be how would you feel i guess because i don't want my kid to decide to do it but maybe they will. You know i i will a couple things there first of all if that's what she decided i would want her to let me know exactly why you know it can't be a reason like well because i want to be sworn it because i'm i'm not gonna pay forty five thousand dollars for the social aspects. You know all through really big parties every summer or something you know what i mean. That's a lot of money to spend on parties yeah right so i would need to know some really compelling reasons why as well as a financial plan. I want her to have if she remained choice but i think sort sort of so. Mike is one thing we've always grown. I've been a priority of our since the get go. Is that travel you know we'll drive. Cars have tons of miles ells on him. You know make choices in other areas so that we can expose them to the world and has been just a value of ours in a priority of ours and because we started it so young as become part of who they are and so when they meet somebody who's not interested in excited about learning more and exploring the world they're always kind of baffled by that and i feel like this is what we've been doing about college to not only do they have this this curiosity about the world but we've also you know we talk a lot about the different colleges colleges and things like that so because it's sort of related to our values as a family and my kids own values and interests. I can't imagine he knock on wood head. Knock on something here that that she would make a different choice yeah i i actually always said even before we had with our one year old. I actually said so you know i i feel like if i'm doing a good job that my kids when they turn eighteen will make their own choice and it will not go to college in u._s. Now there are probably a few examples and we'll probably touch on them a little bit of for some people it is gonna make sense and you know there's a lot of other things i want my kids to to do well and decide on but to me. It's just such a clear cut answer. When you look at it that i it would be hard for me and i'm saying in this like if they said they wanted to go. You said oh we'd come up with a plan and we talk about in wanting to watch. I feel like i would get pretty angry because like i did something wrong because here's how could you want something like that. That costs so much more and i'm not gonna say. Is it better worse experiences different experience but it's just your look and you say you could have something similar for so much less so on that note. Then who does it make sense for like or is there anyone that makes sense for to go to a university versus a european university. I think there are some. I think that there are are wow. I'm really gonna struggle. Who doesn't make sense. There are people who are legitimately not interested in the world outside of their hometown town or their home state and you know and no judgement. They're you know they're raised with different values or you know and and want to stick close to home because they're not interested in the other it. You're not interested in other cultures. If you're not interested in other countries you know you're going to be living with kids from all over the world you know and students in in europe they aren't meal plans traditionally so you're kind of cooking for yourself which become he's multicultural events so if you're not interested in food from around the world not does the country are going to around the world and and customs and all sorts of things like that then. You're going to have a really difficult time. Are there any are there any major specifically that you would say and again. This is american exceptionalism right but is there. Are there any majors that you'd say hey if you're getting into this it does is probably make sense to stay u._s. Based and pay more because of a it's a it's a better education or be. You're going to have to come back because for example so i'm the school in pennsylvania. I lived here in pennsylvania. The only reason i decided to do that was i knew. I wanted to be a teacher right and so all right well. I'm going to go through. I have to get my teaching certificate. I can go to these other state to get my degree but i'm going to come back here and take a bunch of other classes and pass this test. So are their professions like that. You see like it just isn't isn't gonna lineup as well. If you go abroad than if you stayed here yeah on medicine you know there are these integrated medicine programs that combine a bachelor's and master's degree in one so in six years. You get your your bachelors and your m._d. And if you're planning on coming back to the states are a lot of issues with getting residencies so so they're just obstacles there. Now that said you know the cost of medical school in europe versus here is tremendous like you might be willing to take that chance but but definitely those those medical fields create more obstacles other than that there aren't as many the main difference french academically. You brought up something really good point. You know here in the u._s. Your first two years of college are generally ginette requirements so in in europe when you apply to a school you're applying to a specific program at that school so you're basically declaring your major ahead of time and all of your classes. Other than electives are going to relate to that major is like a set out your one you take this is not like the pick and choose here. It's here. You're gonna take your one. Here's what you're going to take. You're too there might be some electives and here's your three so i was a psychology student. <hes> when i got my undergrad and i had to of course take classes like you know in europe if i were psychology student. I wouldn't have to take philosophy but i could as an elective. If that was something i was interested in so that sort sort of difference there and see that as a bad thing right a good part. Is that like if you know what you wanna do great then you're not essentially wasting you time money classes credits on oh everyone has to t- yeah everyone has take intro sociology intro to health and like a ah english class and blah blah blah blah blah but then i also could see how it could be difficult to because you're you're pigeonholing right away and i think one of the reasons is that people maybe shouldn't go to college is because they go and have no idea what they wanna do and four years later they come out with us debt and all of a sudden. They're like well. I want to do something different. So what about that type of student. Someone's like i don't know what i wanna do in the u._s. I might be given more of a chance to figure out and still might not figure out but if i go to europe then even a more on this track and if i don't like it then what are my options well. There are a couple of choices for those kids. One is that there are liberal arts programs. I mean there are not as plentiful but but the netherlands for instance has a liberal arts program with every one of their research universities universities and with that you don't declare your major until the second year the first years more serban exploration of those so there are options for those the other thing is that a lot of the programs grams is not like you're taking <hes> just economics you know there are a lot of integrated programs that keep the programs really big which are philosophy political science economics all in one you know so so and a lot of them will start broad and even the already declared your your a program like your major then you specialize later you know a a program an example. This is a program called life science. You know that's really broad start and then you you specialize down so you're not completely pigeonholed and there are options for kids who have broad interests are just have no idea d._i._a. The program my son's doing international studies that comply combines language international relations cultural studies a political science. Hi it's i mean that's just a few of the topics that it that it involves. How does it work then for people who want to transfer credit back so let's start with someone who who goes for a year and it's just not for them and <hes> you know wash out or they are. They decided not to come back to the european university and so they say all right well. We'll that generally transfer over. Let's say you did thirty credit. Could you get thirty credits. If you came home and went went to duke after going to some european university you know it's really case by case depending on the school. You're applying to what i can say is that they're all accredited. These are all accredited in schools so these are all credited courses if you will <hes> so theoretically yes. The credit system works differently there than it does here here. Here you know credit hours are allocated based on how many hours you spend in the classroom and their credit hours are allocated based on how much time you're gonna spend on that class in an outside of the classroom so there's something east c._v._s. so in a year you're going to have sixty s._a._t. S whereas here in a year you're going to have thirty credit hours fulltime or somewhere around there so so theoretically yes but you know again u._s. Schools are run by like a they business and so right there like we don't want you to have this many credits because if you need more than you're gonna pay for pay for more okay so so it's it's. It's is not significantly harder than if you're transferring between schools in the u._s. Like yes you might have to jump through a few hoops and you might have to get stuff written about how how much is worth their but you're not gonna. You're not like out those credits. You should be able to transfer most as long as you're sticking within the same type of program rights right then what about someone who's coming from and getting a bachelor's and i don't even know is it called a bachelor's in europe the same thing okay so let's say you're going getting a bachelor's in europe and then you come back and now you wanna go and do your masters or continuing education. Maybe a p._h._d. Or something something in the u._s. Does that generally accepted as well like all right. They have a bachelors from x._y._z. college. They're here. They're in our master's program same as anyone else absolutely again. These are all accredited universities so the things you know sometimes people will say well listen. It's just three year. Bachelor's degree is that gonna affect master's degree programs here so i actually went through hon of like really prestigious graduate schools in the u._s. and pulled their verbiage for something <hes> about end they all. You know we're talking about university. So you're chicago retired about wharton school of business. We're talking about stanford really prestigious schools at say on their websites three year. Diplomas are fine because of the bologna declaration flirtation. We don't care if you got your diploma three years or four years or whatever else is that you had a bachelor's degree yeah and i would assume actually interesting way you can correct me if i'm wrong that the those types of universities as you mentioned like pan and stanford and all of them it might even be easier because they have so many international since would it be easier do that then. Let's say you went to again. I don using middleborough. Middlebury has mastered for but you're going to a small school where they're like. Oh you know they might have one or two or five. International students going for a masters were like u._p._n. It's urine with a bunch of other people coming from all over the world who are have all different types of same degree but all different types of years they spent yeah. I think more than anything else it's about. It's something that has you set out. You know the helps you stand out. You know here's here's something really different about me while everybody else you. The majority of your other applicants graduate from u._s. Schools i didn't and here's fly and here's what it did for me. You can really make it stand out for you and there have been studies done and this is more about <hes> employment than grad school all but the show that studying abroad for great amounts of time so we're not talking about you know just the couple months study abroad <hes> it has significant impact on not only job offers but career advancement. This is primarily due to the soft skills that students develop on that employers are really looking for and they're finding lacking in u._s. Students you know if you live in another country. You know this you talk you learn how to navigate unfamiliar circumstances. You know you you you learn to work with people people with different backgrounds perspectives. You know these are skills that you're gaining on on a day to day bas- yeah that was actually going to be my question. We might take it all the way right. We do like all right. You leave and don't have your bachelor's now. You have your bachelor's. Come back for a masters right now. You're coming back to get a job and my guess would be that employment. It would be if at least as easy if not easier as you mentioned because it is that story especially if you're going into a competitive field i mean i remember when i came back after interning switzerland and i was looking at teaching job again and they had like a hundred applicants for this one job i went in did my interview all they asked me it was about why i was driving baseball's around switzerland for my internship nothing about education nothing out by teaching philosophy any of that and like i laughed and like we've got you. You know fifty other interviews call. I left five minutes later. I got a phone call like hey. We're gonna can't see other interviews if you want a job and i was just like all i did was tell you stories like i didn't even this says the easiest interview of all time because they were just like who is this guy like why was he doing that. Versus you know a stock standard answer to that kind kind of stuff so i i mean i have first-hand knowledge on just being a little different and standing out in that way really really helping in the job field and i'm sure you you see that with a lot of the people who come to your program totally and he brought up another good point about internships you know in europe many of the schools rules many of the programs have a required internship as part of your graduation requirements and we're not talking about okay. It's summer. Go find yourself something. We're talking about you know day partner with with with multinational companies so people say oh will you do your internship in europe. Has i can help you here. If you're doing your internship with a multinational company that is going to help you even even if you decide to come back and that also i don't want to forget italian <unk> seguin's this. If you don't mind it reminds me of the arrests. Miss plus this program which even if your program doesn't have required internship. The arrest was plus. Program is something that was created by the e._u. In order <unk> to promote curiosity about different countries <unk> than europe and even international students can engage in this so you can either do an internship or you can do semester abroad at another school which is often part of these programs to in a in a requirement so if you do they help you get internships and it's not like shopping coffee is related to your program and there's a stipend involved as well to help you with your living expenses. Even if it's a paid paid internship and then there's a study abroad part so let's say you knows my son sam he's do. He's paying twelve thousand dollars a year and let's say he wants to go to some really expensive school for a semester abroad that that's you know twenty four thousand dollars a year. We're going to keep paying twelve thousand dollars a a year awesome for that semester yet. It's pretty awesome we actually on i did a brief series of podcast last year and did an interview with the president of the arrests student network who talked a lot about these benefits so it's a great place to check out if people are interested in that and we will link all that up in the show notes this is that study abroad option through that through their restaurants plus program. Is that able to be outside of europe as well or is that only in in europe. Could you be like oh. I'm going to go back to the u._s. For a semester and and try it like an actually basically be back during your way into a into a cheaper semester u._s. <unk> university it used to be only europe but now it's because they added the plus adding these countries outside of europe as well well so i do. I don't know what schools are but i do know that there are some in the u._s. I know there are many in asia one of our members. She's been studying in prague where a her tuition is some six thousand dollars and and she's going to be studying in malaysia semester next. <hes> is in a couple of months so you know there are a lot of options outside of europe as well. That actually brings me to a question then if you don't want to do if you're not just going to do a study abroad outside of europe and we're just gonna talk about going abroad to other to other countries and your forte's obviously you're up here but are there other options i mean i know there are option but how good what are the options. I should ask of saying all right. Maybe someone's go to south america or asia or or they want to go somewhere else. They want to go to australia. Are there similar type options for them as the stuff that we've been talking about within europe okay yeah you know the reason why because i'm kind of type eh i often think about. How should i do other countries to again. One of the beauties of my job is i go visit schools. You know twice a year and and i'd like to get back to asia <hes> but here's what i'm finding is that the reason we're sticking with continental. Europe is that across the board in continental europe europe excluding switzerland which has a high average. We have these benefits of tuition of admissions of countries that are working towards internationalization. It's it's across n._s. Also reason we don't do on the u._k. Is that price in admissions and also with brexit. We don't know what's going on there so that's one reason we haven't listed the u._k. Also anglophone. I have not yet found another country or region. I should say that across the board offers all these benefits and so that's where it gets a little iffy because <hes> i've thought about japan for instance but ah the cost isn't quite as slow as europe so yes. There are options outside of europe as well is my short answer. What are some the most popular countries that you will most popular for offering these programs so if there's three hundred and some programs which are the ones that have them the most availability body and then what are you seeing is the most popular for people wanting to go to yeah. That's a good question well first of all the netherlands has something like three hundred tiny country and that's about three times more than the highest number of of any other countries <hes> they also have a broad range of programs programs offered and so that's that's a popular choice just because there's really something for everyone they have two types of universities one which had the a._p. Requirements and and one that doesn't so people can basically meet the admissions requirements there so the popular one but what i find is that so many times people come kamei called best fit list and it's like a student fills out a questionnaire about their personality their interests their qualifications blah blah blah and then i give them a shortlist of of good options and so many times they complain. They're like i want to go to france now. I mean france is great and everything but they mostly have business programs. So if if you don't want to study business is not a good place to you for you and people say because they know it you know so i encourage students to look past france to look past spain and we have students who are now super happy in estonia for instance. Nobody's ever companies that had like a study in estonia you you know but we have a a handful of members there this year and we also have a number of members in prague and and again we have a number in the netherlands and in some scattered throughout other places in europe. What are some of those underrated countries. You mentioned estonia you <hes> <hes> you mentioned prague in the czech republic. Are there any other underrated countries. We were like oh man. There's so many opportunities here but people don't know it so they don't they don't ask for it but when the people go they come home and say like yeah this was this was a good choice for me definitely prague i have i have to tell you. I just got back from riga where i would move tomorrow. I mean i loved riga. They're not quite ms internationalized some other countries but i feel like they're on the cusp in there a couple of really good countries. I noted a couple of schools there that i noted in my most most recent blog but i do think that whole region it has all the benefits along with estonia has all benefits of scandinavia without the scandinavium price ice check which is pretty cool so we got the baltics and you mentioned estonia and latvia and also you have the baltics is kind kind of that a hidden gem there and like you mentioned pro so much cheaper than the countries around it especially if you're looking if you're looking west toured scandinavia which is i mean. Do you even have people going to scandinavia or is that yeah because tuition is still reasonable so tuition wishes in <unk>. Norway's free for international students now. The cost of living is crazy like good <unk> by bandits in norway and see how far you know no. It's not just like rent. It's it's day to day living but we so we don't have a lot of students in norway actually but copenhagen there are a number of schools can copenhagen also throughout finland. Finland used to be free for international students until just like two years ago now. International students have to hey but all schools have to offer scholarships and we're talking about like generous scholarships like pass. Your first year in your second year is free type stuff. You know so that's the type of scholarship we need in the u._s. We need lower prices and a buy one get one discount right who can resist a buy one get one <hes> but they're very generous scholarships and that offsets the living prices of those regions so what are some of the other countries that have free tuition in for international students then okay so norway germany at most the public universities however germany you just changed their admissions requirements for american students which makes it a lot harder for american students should get in without already having college credits which again head speaks of the myth of american exceptionalism because her high school diploma is not the equivalent of there's let's see those are the free ones that yak aw italy their public versus in italy determine your tuition based on family income so it's not free but it's like a sliding scale. Here's the thing though italy so like kind of like a laid back about when they're gonna give you information it would drive. Somebody like me craig c. So you don't find out what your tuition is going to be until you're already at school in in our database is listed as the highest that it would be just who you can prepare for that just in case sure you might you might get a little surprise in a good way but you're not gonna get a surprise in a bad way. It's like going to the doctors here in the u._s. You like how much is it gonna cost. We'll tell you after we're done then. I don't really have a leg to stand on here or i can't make a decision okay so off and then you talked about the competition a little bit and being harder to get in when it comes to germany so when you are applying as an international student. Are you applying the same standards like us. I'm applying to school in germany and applying the same standards that a german soon when we need or international students how to a higher standard lower standard and also then you said like people get in if they just meet these criteria but is there like a cap like. Could they say okay well. We said you would get it if you meet this criteria but we have one hundred slots and there's been two hundred hundred people apply that all these criteria so you know you're not gonna get in this year sure so enrollment caps are set before the beginning of the year. There are programs tmz. Let's let's talk about the netherlands again because this is where they use this verbiage again kind of in a lot of places but they use specific verb verb bench so they have selective enrollment for programs that have an enrollment cap so wouldn't be that university had grown again for instance has a has the enrollment cap it would be that their international business program has an enrollment cap and they tell you that ahead of time so you have to meet those requirements and then they also assess things like your motivation letter or maybe it'll be an interview. It's still not going to be what sports you play. They don't care about that but yet those those have a cap ahead of time but what they're looking at when you have these extra requirements is to make sure your high school diploma is equivalent of there's so that's you you have to have when you're applying in germany high school diploma the equivalent that the students in germany get and they're saying well guess what students unless you have an international baccalaureate laura diploma your high school diploma is not able with lavar unless you have a certain number of college credit. It used to be that they would take an s._a._t. Score now they. They don't have college credits. I think is a year or or you can do one of their foundation year programs which cost about twenty thousand dollars a year so i mean it just it just doesn't make sense to me. I mean to to go that route so there are only about three hundred programs out of the seventeen hundred said that require these sort of extras along with a high school diploma so they are not the majority and so like i know it's going to be hard right but how how competitive is that i on an average of not across the three hundred extra requirements but the other fourteen hundred programs grams is dull if you were to say like if you were to look at an average high school student in the u._s. average s._a._t. Average e._p._a. What have you would that person and be able to get into all of those programs most of his programs a third of those programs like what are we looking at needing in order the two to go abroad to go to europe and get into one of those regular programs yes. I was like a b. student. Would you say yeah we were talking about peace student right like like someone who goes to the university in in the states. They're proud. They're not going to go to an ivy league university. They're not gonna go to their worst worst state school. University are gonna go to a regular adopter buddy abby student yeah so we take out those three hundred university so we're down to fourteen hundred they would you know there are some that are even without those extra requirements that are super competitive with just base it just on s._a._t. Or or is this hard core interview process those are few and far between so data student if they applied on time and had a good motivation letter that that speaks to why why they wanna go that university why they wanna study outside their home country then they would get into the majority of the programs okay. What a bandage. I can't wrap their head around that. I tell them there. Should i applied to nine schools. I'm like do you. Do you have a top choice yeah yeah. I really wanna go. This might will apply and you're going to get in so so that is generally what you would say is apply to one or two schools. Yeah i mean it's rolling admissions. Also so you apply so oh my son's already gotten his conditional acceptance so you apply and then you get your offer and if you don't for some reason to near plenty of time to apply to your next choice choice wow that's a novel idea. That's a great little system right like hey instead of spending your time writing ten essays to get into all these schools nine of which you won't ever attend attend then you just you pick one. Go for it and if you don't get into pick another now speaking of picking though at picking a school hard enough. I remember when i did it. I ed like didn't do any essays and then did like fifteen because i was like oh my gosh i want to go here here here and then ended up not picking to go to any of them to communicate any conference message so i was a mess probably not should follow my example but school is hard enough when you just saying hey in the u._s. Here the ones that you know now we're adding like three hundred and fifty schools on top of that across multitudes of countries how other than i mean you do have your best pick area best fitness which is great. What is there's some of the things that you would tell someone to look for like. How are they going to narrow these choices down well the first thing i tell them to look well one thing i do have i mentioned that i have courses sources for our members and one course i have is about choosing a school in like really dive into in depth to the considerations i think your first choice of the quantifiable <unk> the first person to look at <hes> the tuition you pay and what you want to study so you start there and then that's going to pair the list down significantly and then through that you you make a list of what's important to you and for some it might be that the class size for some it might be a certain region for some it. Might it be on the sports in the city that they play you know there are a number of whatever those considerations are it's fine. I think i do think that people. I should look at the international student resources on the school offers <hes>. Do they have a university level office. That's going to help you with <unk> some of those logistics. Do they have a program level international student coordinator who can help you as things go on and look to some of those. Do you recommend the people take campus visits. I mean obviously it's better to do it than not. But is it something that you're like. Hey if you're going to do this and you have a number one school. I highly recommend you fly over and check it out i or or is it like if you can go for but not necessary i would say no. I'm times out of ten and said if you can before it but it's not really necessary. You know some of the more obscure places. I might suggest jessop people. Go check out just to make sure it's a good fit for them but you now one of the reasons people are looking in europe is resources are unlimited resources and so it's not always possible to to take a trip over there. I will say that it's not like here where there are tours run every single day. You can generally rain. Did i help our members arrange visits but what they do have often are they seems called experienced days. This is something my son. I did last fall at leiden where you go oh and they actually give you an assignment ahead of time and you sit with other prospective students and in an actual lecture and with the the class discussion afterwards and parents have their own little presentation that we got as well and my son like many teenagers thought that the assignment piece of it would be kinda stupid and boring and and walked out of there just so enthusiastic and so excited about the learning approach and and the class discussion and mind you he was excited sided and telling me he was excited. Even though it meant that he was wrong having to admit to me that he was wrong about this perception and still just couldn't even hide it so it's it's a pretty awesome experience all right so if they can go for but certainly not necessary to take a campus visit if it's if if it's going to mean a lot of money laid out just to just to go and issue school totally illogical have virtual tourists on their website you can also find a lot of stuff out on youtube. You know there are a lot of resources you. I even like this is kind of cheesy but you know even to feel for a city. You can watch shows like international house hunters. You know just to get the over the vibe in certain cities he had definitely finally what is the toughest part of the transition for most students that you see going over because obviously we know cost wise. It's great. We hit all kind have the staff. Your credits can transfer. You're gonna get a good education all this but there still is your life part and it's like i'm uprooting myself from where i am in the the u._s. And i'm not even going to the next state over or to another coast. I'm going to a foreign country and even i mean even for. Probably the most well traveled eighteen eighteen year old. It's going to be a bit of a shock. So what have you seen like as as issues or things that people should prepare themselves to say like this is going to <unk> happen and here's how to get past it when you when you start to run into some of the stuff. That's going to happen to you when you go abroad. I think the academic expectations are a big thing thing that students have to adjust to <hes> you're not going to be spoon fed either academically or or with resources the resources are there but you have to seek them <music> out <hes> i know of one student since i've been doing beyond the state who didn't make it past their first year and that was because he didn't seek seek out the resources i actually had dinner with him while he was still a student with him in some of his friends and he was telling me about my struggles academically and i said boys is they're not like a group that can in help you or a resource office. He said note there sure isn't an one of the students who is with us at the other it. We got an email about that. If beginning of semester you're you're not getting an email about that every single week though so you do have to seek this stuff out we'll help like will they put you with other international students. I mean like how does that work well. I guess there's no no room and board <hes> that option but will they have certain things other national students where they try to put you all together so that that you're going through it together. Well one thing is that you know if you're in an english taught program. You're gonna be with international students because it also local students but that's they're. They're appealing to people outside of the home country <hes> the student residences so there are soon residences but they're privately owned. They're owned by the squirrel. Will sometimes schools have arrangements with them where they reserve a certain block for their students and the international students are generally put together mostly because is on local students. If you know the area you're going to start out with an apartment. Already knows some friends. They are on your rent an apartment already. Student residences is our <hes> our our highly international anyway okay which makes it easier. What are the some of the cons that you would say i mean we talked a lot about the pros. Are there certain things not not reasons enough. That would make you not do it but things that that are tougher that are harder that might make someone choose not not to do it because they don't want to have to deal with the hassle yeah <hes>. You're not going to get home as much you know. There's no thanksgiving break <hes>. If if you do have a spring break you probably won't spend it. You know tooling around europe rather than coming home so you're you're not gonna get home as often more expensive to get home mm-hmm. That would be the big one. The other thing is that there are even those easier to get in their challenges between when you get that acceptance letter till the time you get to school. Will that are headaches. You know they're certainly surmountable but they're headaches getting your student residence permit. We don't have to have visas. American students. Don't have to have visas to go there but we do. You need the student residence permit. There are often just these bureaucratic nonsense rules around it. I have one school that i was working with and <hes> we did a series of of college fairs and they were signing some documents about it and i had to resubmit the document three times because it wasn't signing blue ink the first time and then because when i skimmed it they couldn't tell that it was in blue ink so those are the types of of just stupid rules rules that you're going to have to deal with when you get your doctor you know some countries require you to go to the secretary of state's office and get a certain certificate some require you to get documents translated you know yeah they're headaches and you have to talk on top of it sorta from a time management perspective too but all of those things there are probably worth forty five thousand dollars per year. I would think purser yeah when you're dealing with a headache. Just remember like okay. If i'm paying myself by our our i'm getting like three grand an hour ten grand or at this point i truly appreciate you coming on and chatting about that. Because it is for me again something i knew about i knew about it as a notion as an abstract idea and knew that i wish i could have gone back in done differently and also knew that now having a child like all right this is something i want to learn more about so. I'm super excited that you're able to come on and basically just answer every every f._a._q. That i'm sure i had is there any other questions that you could answer that. I haven't asked you're like all right. Here's a common one that people that people ask that that we you want to hit on because i feel like i was definitely curious. No i think we covered it. I guess the other thing i would say sometimes people say well. I can't go to college in europe because uh-huh <unk> really into sports now there are not collegiate sports like there are here but they're still options for sports. We have one member who who is studying specifically someplace because he's playing on the soccer league in that country that leads to being a professional soccer player you so there are options even outside of tailgating meeting and collegiate the if you are into sports we can tell that you're from down south there. You go good football and in the in the south right <hes> <hes> down there and live in the south all right all right. I'll give you a pass that one last question because you've talked a lot about information for for for travelling and studying abroad and all that stuff but i want to bring it back to your story a little bit. I want you to tell us a big travel. Mishap that you've had god doesn't have to be related to you visiting a school but if is that's totally fine <hes> but what's something that you look back on your just like yep. This was maybe funny when it happened happen. Maybe not but in hindsight it makes a good story well. I won't get into the food poisoning. I had in france which was one of the worst experiences experiences of my life but more recently we went to barcelona for my husband's fiftieth birthday and i was making the arrangements and we usually we have literally two nonstop flights to europe from where we live which is horrible so but anyway we usually just fly to paris in imply wherever going uniform they're on some cheaper airline so i bought his ticket from paris barcelona separate for my own in and didn't account for the fact that even that we were leaving raleigh on whatever the tent we were getting to paris until the eleven so his plane ticket would need to be on the eleventh and not the ten so he spent a my ticket was fine though because he was book separately i got to barcelona and we had to he he had to spend the day getting from charles de gaulle to orally and then from orly to barcelona and that is how he spent his fiftieth birthday. I have to tell you happy. I'm married to because if i remarried to myself and did that i would never hear the end of it right. You'd be freaking out on yourself and he's just well. It's okay okay. It is interesting that your ticket was okay in his. Wasn't you know done right. You should do it. You're right. That's that's right well. Thank you so much jen. What else do you guys have coming up in the pipeline with beyond the states like new stuff you rolling out what your people be aware of well well <hes> in january we have our last college fair on which is a virtual event and it has eight of the thirteen schools that were in the book that i wrote <hes> uh-huh so that's our big thing right now other than that. It's just you know making server keeping the database updated for our members and and getting all the information out there the people awesome and the site. I gotta tell you why we're still on is laid out so well like it's simple. It's easy you can find the information mation. You need like i. I went there and thought i don't yeah like i don't have any questions you know. Sometimes you go on and it's so much it for me. She don't know how to navigate them. Just like poo poo poo popping around and mike. I could learn everything i needed right here on this site so it's it's well well done and i just wanna thank you for joining me today and shining light on on this fascinating topic i think showing people that there aren't only other options which we talked about in the beginning but oftentimes deserve better or certainly way less expensive options and i say aging that fear that comes with like hey. This is out of the ordinary. I don't know anyone who's doing it. Is it safe. Is it okay. Am i going to get credits like all those questions people have when they when they don't don't have to rely on you guys do awesome awesome job at that to remind people one more time how they can come get a hold of you. It's going to be on the state's dot com and you'll find everything you need to know there. You can find the answers to your questions or check the membership page to <hes> to join us awesome. Thank you so much again. I can't now. I'm actually excited for my kid to grow up and go to school forever. I'm nervous. I like oh my gosh. What am i gonna do gonna have to start saving now now. I'm excited. It's great totally thank you. Thanks so much jen. Thank you everyone for tuning in today for your continued. Support makes us number one rated travel podcast and until next time happy free travel sir <music> <music>.

europe u._s germany european university facebook italy japan estonia prague netherlands france travis share u._s. university heather middle east vancouver leyden riga Norway
West Point Uniforms Signify Explosive Chemistry

60-Second Science

03:05 min | 2 years ago

West Point Uniforms Signify Explosive Chemistry

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm steve mirsky early years of the development of gunpowder. It was known as the devils distillate because of its seemingly sinister properties <hes> so what where do those properties come from well they come from the three principal ingredients of gunpowder outer which are sulphur charcoal and salt peter three naturally occurring materials which when combined produce something much greater the sum of their parts stephen wrestler he served thirty four years in the us army corps of engineers and retired as brigadier general he spoke at sea aboard a scientific the american crews august seventeenth off the coast of scotland. His subject was how fortifications had to evolve. Once gunpowder was widely in use wrestler wrestler revealed a little basic chemistry about the constituents of gunpowder and how they're represented in a familiar uniform sulfur mineral found in nature yellowish yellowish or golden color burns at a relatively low temperature and that made it an material intense interest in the middle ages where alchemists were constantly looking for magical properties of materials sulfur seemed to be one of those materials that had magical properties because it was a stone that burned and it burned at a relatively low temperature charcoal the product of combustion of wood typically hardwood in an oxygen starved environment environment produces pure carbon but not just any old pure carbon pure carbon with a very fine microscopic laddis like structure that actually turns out to to be absolutely essential to the functioning of gunpowder and then finally the third and really in many ways the most important ingredient in gunpowder and that salt peter the chemical compositions actually potassium nitrate and it's a waste product of decomposing organic matter. That's all it is. It's a it's a weitz material that appears on the surface of fermenting organic material and turns out to be the absolutely essential material and gunpowder okay i have to pause for a totally unrelated diversion because sulphur charcoal and salt peter have great personal significance to me above and beyond the fact that their constituent materials gunpowder and that is they form the basis for the school colors of my alma mater the u._s. military academy at west point black raincoat in goal the school colors are explicitly defined as the three materials of gunpowder black charcoal grey is salt. Peter and gold is the sulphur so the next time you see that inevitable video on the evening news of the graduation at west point and all the cadets throwing their your hats up in the air think about gunpowder because that's what the black gray and the gold are are meant to to signify for scientific kind of americans sixty seconds science. I'm steve mirsky.

steve mirsky Peter principal u._s. military academy us scotland sixty seconds thirty four years
NASA and SpaceX Rehearse Recovery of Crew

SPACE NEWS POD

04:28 min | 2 years ago

NASA and SpaceX Rehearse Recovery of Crew

"If you're listening to this you obviously like podcast and you probably like music to on spotify. You can listen to all of that and what place for free. You don't need a premium account. Spotify has a huge each catalogue of podcasts on every topic including the one. You're listening to right now. Uh spotify you can follow your favorite podcast. You never miss an episode download episodes to listen to off-line flying wherever you are easily share what you're listening to with your friends via spotify integrations was social media platforms like instagram so just search for space news pot on on the spotify app or browse podcasts in your library tab and follow me so you never miss an episode of the space news pod spotify is the world's leading music streaming dreaming service and now it can be your go to for podcasts to hello and welcome back to the space news pot daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm have your host will walden now this episode we're gonna be talking about nasa and spacex working together to extract nasa astronauts from from spacex his crew dragon capsule so this is a crucial step in the preparation for returning american can i 's crew from u._s. Soil on u._s. rocket so this is going to be happening. Hopefully november fifteenth. That's tentative time hi that they're going to be launching these people back to the i._s._s. That doesn't work out. It's going to be early next year. Maybe january sometime in february possibly possibly that's kind of what's going to be happening but these recent exercises revolved around extracting these astronauts from spacex his crew dragon spacecraft this event was composed of simulation drills in was held at florida's port canaveral in during the exercise crew members from spacex and nasa work together to remove astronauts doug hurley imbaba bankin who are selected to fly to and from the i._s._s. aboard the crew dragon and they they were the main subjects of these recovery drills so they were kind of the test pilots of these recovery drills and these two who astronauts will board the crew dragon for its first human test flight known as demo to so we haven't had an astronaut launched from in u._s. soil since the space shuttle to the us so this will be the first time in a long time that u._s. Astronauts we're not going to be launching a u._s. Made rocket from u._s. Soil so this is a very important step and as part of the simulation hurley early and bankin were medically evaluated after they were recovered by nasa and spacex his team so let's let's see here. Hurley said integrated test like today's or a crucial element in preparing human spaceflight missions. This opportunity allowed us to work with the recovery team team. It ensured the plans are solid for the demo to mission so according to ted mosser who was the recovery director of nasa asa for their crew commercial program performing this complete recovery drill prepared team for both nasa and spacex basics to work together for the upcoming flights and he said we're making sure that the team integrates together. That's a key to any successful. Mission worked on successfully doing what we need to do to take care of the crew once they return to earth so these two astronauts are going to be heroes in the u._s. when they go back to the i._s._s. This is going to be an amazing time and it's supposed to be happening in november november fifteenth tentative date passably sibley january. If all goes kinda weird in november so they have a lot of testing to do before then and once it happens i will we'll be making the trek to florida to watch this launch in person. I'll make sure that i posted here for you so you can kind of follow along long as i go through this journey so i want to say thank you to everybody who has been taking the time out of their day to spend it here with me on space news pod make sure to subscribe to the show show if you like this kind of content and my name's well wild and this has been the space news pot see you soon.

spacex nasa spotify doug hurley florida nasa Hurley instagram walden ted mosser us u._s. director
Techy Gift Ideas for Bloggers Wanting a Stress-Free Holiday Season

Success Unscrambled | Blog Traffic Tips | Business Success Stories

27:18 min | 2 years ago

Techy Gift Ideas for Bloggers Wanting a Stress-Free Holiday Season

"Hello and welcome. The success unscrambled fled cavs out run on on. I help women who wants to live life of time and freedom become wildly successful using proven organic marketing strategies so that they can finally achieve those lifelong long dreams with confidence. You're very welcome to the podcast that he and you would not believe what we looking. Okay enough enough giggling alvin. Let's do this all right so the the app. The topic for today's episode is techy gift ideas for bloggers wanting a stress free holiday season. I know what sort of a topic is that well of technical of digital marketing bleating. I'll tell you why so when it comes to <hes> the holiday season or any sort of specialty fans or <hes> <hes> any sort of celebrations <hes> oh maybe a need for gifts. I like to help us find the perfect gifts for people who have <hes> friends who are bloggers have and find the perfect gifts hence reason why episode is looking at gift thaddeus especially for bloggers and you find out why through this particular episode so are you looking for a techie gift idea. That's the kind of gifts that will make the holiday period stress-free with so many people at home or even in the house. Whether you celebrate christmas easter new year's mothers day thanksgiving or even independence day it is best to be prepared for a full house. Maybe you can relate to this but have you ever received a gif small or big that just doesn't make sense in almost like the person did not spend a lot of time thinking about you the individual and just purchased the if that's an option torch if you are like me. You probably don't like doing this it anyone whether a colleague or friend or family member left once you listened cue's all year long knowing that they would like mike for the ability you know something special special occasion anniversary or even the holidays this can be especially true for someone someone who is a blogger what a blog part time they blog full-time because they require technology to make things work autumn help them be more efficient the always stretch time so getting them something that keeps them productive or make them more efficient is a definite plus in this particular podcast. We'd be looking got nine. Gift ideas blogs will keep them and their families ready productive uneven stress free for the holiday season. Okay so the first on the list something called an eagle eat sorry eagle life <hes> unisex messenger bag one of the things we all need as bloggers is a bag act to carry all of our stuff of course mom bloggers meals aena different type of bag for their kids. I thought this messenger bag on amazon and i instantly taught hands-free. Nothing is more annoying than to have a bag of money. Purses bogs facilities have straps that constantly fall off the shoulder which or they just pinch your news which is very very annoying so this particular bug is a unisex and it comes complete pockets for your smartphone and notebook it can hold tablets laptops tablet ordeal up top that is an inch fourteen inch screen which is just music to the as beth avoid strap is adjustable and detachable on it's five feet and link is he big requirement for you to have a long strap low enough strap and the body looking for in the material it's made from canvas and leather on comes in two colors black and coffee he a his and hers okay you can head of with two might shoot shoot my podcast shoots which is success unscrambled that come forward slash jeff gift dash ideas dash for dash blogs that success unscrambled dot com forward slash gift cash ideas the dash for dash bloggers and you'd see i have images of messenger bag as well as a link where where you can actually get it available from amazon okay next up. We have the laptop desks. Stand for peace in macbook whether you fukunaga or are you just looking for a way to do your work more efficiently or he wants to laptop from the home office. This laptop desks ton is nice touched. It is much better for economics ergonomics because the reasons the laptop six point one inches over desk which means you can decide to stun why working to stretch your selects being food means that you need to stand and make recipes and <hes> take photos discreet even double as a stunt to put a pretty fruit for example <hes> but you probably need to put it inside of one of those <hes> fox's. You need to make the recipes z. y. Starting moving about or need to be you need to be basically deceptive status meat from a single piece of metal at four point four punks. It's it's not very not fancy by any stretch of modern nations. It's not a cheap option. Were you break or bend in no time at all it comes with cable organizer on its compatible mac book protein inch apple macbook macbook air and other laptops that are less than nine point four inches in depth. The visible colors are black and silver kinda. Get a link is in the show could pick it up next on the list. I have the netcom night hawk smart. Wi fi router are seven thousand. There is nothing more than experiencing wifi problems just when you have an important important blog post to publish ovidio top balloon especially during the busy holiday season depending on the design of the home that you have. Are you live in dan. We'd be different levels. You may get wifi problems incident bedrooms especially when it's very very busy where i live for example their neighbors who use the same sort of company boardman company on how companies knee so depending on the time of the congestion on london broil abundant gets very very high because everybody's ladies who either playing games or you know searching online. Everybody's off that time of the year so one clever way to handle is essential challenges to have a smart. Wi fi router is high speed. Did i mention the frogger comes with parental control. This may be the year that you're planning adding to get a smartphone tablet for your teenage. Oh which makes you very numerous. The parental control feature comes in the form of an apt. It only takes five minutes to set up you get one free trial and after that you can photos in one thousand nine hundred a month for peace of mind is it's easy to pose an access remotely as well. The added benefit is that it offers seamless wifi access up to thirty devices is yep devices and katie thinking that's a lot of devices just remember that most people have two devices connected at the same time or in some cases three they should have a teenage son for example have his lots of connected to the wifi his phone and then he also have some sort of a gaming device and probably even alexa collecting connected suit wife as well. It has a range of eighteen hundred square feet and even comes with it's very own firewall called ad fines threat protection so no need to buy more antivirus software. The good news is speaking of alexa. It works alexa so you can add voice control to this particular route up and it's such should great gift idea for others next up yup. We have on the list. The echoed through generation smarts become alexa speaking of alexa. Do you have one in every room yet who would have thought that alexa would have been such an essential part of life. You can enhance your hands free experiencing new level by having vice that can save you a whole lot of time is especially good if you dislike chiming up and down stairs because you forgot to turn on the eating or plug advice or any excuse me off the you know anything okay well well it comes and lets alexis the beauty of the ecuador speaker that the fabric design and the can fit into small spaces instantly gets wrong in your bedroom or living area by peering to ecuador speakers together and just in case you have not used alexa before it's good for orrin takeaway getting news updates finding out elitists weather forecast. You can use her for locking does ause adjusting to most. That's turning on lights and even playing music. You can easily connect every room in your house and make announcements. What were you can call it for dinna. You can secure one for every room of left. Lincoln issues again egypt coaching success unscrambled dot com forward slash rush gift ideas tash four blocks and if that's still <hes> pity remember you just go to success unscrambled dot com forward slash our dash podcast and see the list of all the podcast and he can insulation a one time gift ideas for bloggers right up next got the utech smart triple display u._s._b. Be type thing adopter. That's a whole mouthful essentially what it is is. <hes> device allows you to plug in a lot of things so let me explain if inside to alexa you come you come to realize that equity running with of sockets porch at home so we'd elect for you to plug into into laptop or something like that you might have faith laptop to plug in alexa but don't worry i have you covered with his triple display years taxi adopter from utah. Ah texmart june holidays. You come to realize that you're suddenly short on u._s._b. Port so h._d._m._i. Sockets which can be annoying. Maybe you recently got a new laptop or vice comes with the u._s._b. Type seaport into those newports and nothing else plugs into it l. It's really really annoying but now it's a good time to get ready for. These kind of technical challenges challenges before it happens this particular u._s._b. Types types of that comes with an r._j. Forty five port a four key each year my sock. It's actually not one but two forty itchy my sockets u._s._b. Reports pre point reports two of them usb two point reports two of them. You get a v._g._a. Port an s._a._t. F- <hes> smart card slot a p._d. U._s._b. sport and a micro s discards not all of these from this one adopter which means is aesthetic few instantly get. You probably have one usb port on your brand new laptop. You probably is by william and you know have four years before you can even and attached brian. You had to no wifi camera that you got for christmas or you know whatever it is. You probably h. e. m. i. poets ready ready especially if you do if you should view directly to your computer you need each year. My poets and this device actually happy with that. It has blazing fast. Uh speeds so that you can download movies quicko and even charge your phones faster. You can get ready for holidays by grabbing to again have left link in the shuttle's next <hes> you read. We've got a teepee link deco whole home mesh wifi system. So what is that well. We'll debbie a big family event at your crib. Do you need wifi for dozens ends of devices. Maybe planning a big family reunion in the next few months which means that you'll be having lots of people over dobie siblings children cousins and determine even aunts and uncles and close friends and children the the all have the tech savvy vices so you can expect that they will be showing up not only for some good food but with the latest and greatest gadgets from wifi dependent cameras top of the range smartphones and everything in between keep your family and friends happy with a wi fi system <hes> that not only covers range of five thousand five hundred square foot you might have a mock ios in abadan conservatory or you might even have have one of those sheds in the bucket and people at the dan even that can go and hang out in those five thousand five hundred square if it of space and that is if you buy three pack and you can connect up to eighty five has one hundred devices and it is as reliable has you so what he worries taken care of so just in case one was divisive wasn't sufficient feud. Here's one for two hundred devices. The teepee link deco whole-home mash wifi system does just that comes with parental controls antivirus built in a standard. The good news is that this is the also connects with alexa which means that you can have voice control and to make matters even better you can chat but everyone from some. You've landed then somebody playing outside in the conservatory in the machi. Wherever the you know everyone is absolutely connected on you can just press a button and seek. Can you please pass me the chicken. Okay so instead of spending time figuring out the tech you can now give you vitamin time catching up on family gossip and remembering the good oldies insurance. You have your family. Reunion is such last everybody we talking about it so make sure you take a pick up your tree pack of this wifi system. I've left leg again in the show. Notes headed with access unscramble but come forward slash gift dash ideas dash for dash. That's next up on the list. We've got are you ready. Beats solo three wireless on ear headphones as a blogger. You knew how important important is to not only invest in yourself but to consume your online courses so that you can get ahead a new blogging absorb absorb every word from those online videos and webinars using the latest and dependable headphones if you're like me probably take notes during your online training and you also like to stand up or structure legs of it well. A set of wireless on your headphones is just what you need to remain muya so you can caraba refill of popcorn water. Choose who's very long training sessions. The beats too slow three wireless on your headphones comes up to forty hours the battery life and is suitable for everyday use and you wanna get a good news. If you're a tight that forget to charge your headphones no problem these'll veasley headphones can be charged for five minutes to get three hours of battery life. You can take calls control music and even even actively using the multifunction on e. Controls time is precious so get the most out of your training time so you can implement what you learn. Unachieved goals quicker probably of wireless headphones. I've left link to show notes so maybe you're not not into headphones or maybe not intellectually half that you probably have a public wifi system well the thing that's nixon and this might be of interest to you. The apple watch series street g._p._s. treatment a meter when it comes to saving time one of the best gift ideas will progress is a watch that syncs thanks with all your other devices rather than having to local lug around a heavy smartphone johan just treat in the backpack back and instead of carrying the smartphone in you hunt everywhere you can know keep up to date with with what is happening a never miss invocation again using this mythic smartwatch. The apple watch series three comes with eighteen hours of battery. Life is swim proof so that you can complete your morning routine but it'd be meditation followed by swimming. Oh maybe a jug followed by swimming. Whatever it is you can do all of that. We're not missing a single beat second the suffer from a fear of missing out because you knew what is happening by just glancing accurate watch if you need to leave your heavy four at home on a the basis then make sure you take a look at the apple watch series three g._p._s. plus cellular visions of visions your phone g._p._s. or knee and you've got on a g._p._s. and you will have the ability to make and receive calls without the need for your phone to be nearby with a g._p._s. and celebration lucien. The apple watch watches over in two different sizes and finishes. You also have the change the respond to match in each occasion in show you grab the g._p._s. Only vision left lincoln if you order g._p._s. plus television of left lincoln shots. What's that one as well right sue up next. We've got the rude n._t._s._b. Was tyler u._s._b. U._s._b. condenser microphone. I e planning to start a podcast if you are or maybe maybe you're like me. You already put casta and you want to agree to a professional microphone. Well look no further because when it comes to audio recording technology to very few companies that can compete with rude. That's our d. The ruled n._t._s._b. Condense so mike comes with a standard with the premium of filter tripe desta and carry pouch. It connects the computer or laptop fight a u._s._b. Port and comes with a six minutes u._s._b. Cable sorry six meter u._s._b. Cable so annoying to have the microphone to jam the truth to your laptop computer. You would be happy to know that it is fully compatible with renewed an mkx as well as the apple ipod but you need to get a special connected if you want to connect to the ipod a u._s._b. Connection adopter would be required to connect h the ipod it is ideal hi deal if you have a dedicated space recording podcasts or if there aren't too many noisy items in your recording room as the mike is quite sensitive so i wouldn't takeda's mike if you have pets in the house wiley recording fridge in the background making noise the microphone microphone is quite sensitive and pick up that kind of song if it is you have pets in the house while recording the dog cat stuck the thing and you might want to consider using road podcast u._s._b. Dynamic microphones set the difference between the two is the end the n._t._s._b. Kibo was from the same company won't see manufacture rude. The n._t._s._b. is site address. You can talk from the side of the microphone. I have a very very wide range. It picks up song at six inches at twelve inches whereas the road podcast needs to be three the inches away and you kind of move. I moved quite a lot when i do a podcast sold that that <hes> route podcastone wouldn't suit me. I don't like to be stunning. Lug at a stiff neck or sitting still however if it is you move a lot like me and you tend to probably express yourself by moving your hands moving. You had that kind of thing then the n._t._s._b. Mike be more suitable for your particular requirement climates. It is more suitable. If you prefer to get to radio voice effect and recording a podcast you would need to be quite stationary records however if you like like me and you sort of not then you know use a n._t._s._b. Road n._t._s._b. Speak continent so mike bearing milot why the road and usb microphone comes at all the accessories standard people we would need is e tripod depending on your recording setup at home for in the office. What's it comes with a desk. Ask stan becomes the popular standard and it comes with the bag to put it into pouch cari reproach whereas the podcast it comes with a built in pop up on top of the head. You actually seat in there but <hes> and the very enti u._s._b. Content some like very careful when you're not using an e needs to be back in its case because ten pick up <music> moisture for easily put the keys with one of those sachets actually absorb moisture from the air silica gel tacit sashes so you would need to purchase ordination on accessories like the boom mom on chuck moulton pop filter disease site school for the ruled podcasts that mike whichever one you decide to go for anyway. I've got the links in the show notes the ruling road anti u._s. Microphone has risen lengthly ruled podcast. <hes> the bet best ones you by the boat of competency of color specifications passage nobody white and <hes> the root patisserie anti u._s._b. Mike <hes> is sort of a chocolate three of them a u._s._b. Connected via correct that connect directly to your laptop as standard so just when you thought that you could not find a presence for blogger at has every who has everything you know have nine options to choose from as long as there is a market they were beaten by suppliers to meet that particular demand the beauty is that many of these gift ideas for bloggers are club impli so no need to have a degree to get them up and running. You notice that the messenger bag is just the right size as it doesn't allow you to carry everyting sitting on the kitchen sink <hes>. I'm just thinking maybe if you will braga who takes you own photographs. Me want to find a space for camera and i am not sure but you can take tomlin's on is a few by. She and it doesn't quite hold cameron at you curry. You may want to return the messenger jacques but i'd say it can. It's it's not a huge bug by any stretch of the margin. I liked the fact that it's just the right size. It allows you to carry like an ipod or smaller laptops and new book pen that kind of thing but i'm not sure about for your particular size of camera and putting requirement actually fits in a messenger bag so so what is your favorite item from that list. Can you think of anyone on your list could benefit from if you of these is if yes do feel free to share the podcast which your friends okay so remember to subscribed success unscrambled podcast way. You'll be the first to hear what's happening. The enterpreneur and digital marketing will a positive review of this particular podcast is fighters keeping it alive and running for the next twelve to twenty four months so please leave a positive review for us tonight jeans spotty. Were your favorite podcasts plans. If you are hoping to have a wet ed organized holiday season where you can plan everything in advance. Why not start to plan your weeks. Are you thinking of creating your very own podcast soon. Take a look at the start a podcast resources after the initials. It's a step by step instructions and if you want want to find a way to increase your productivity logging then check out the productivity tooth again of left lincoln shorts if you are a startup small business uses and you need to hire which assistant to complete tasks such a social media marketing bragging keyword research into management then take a look at the packages that i have available again have left link initial nuts okay so that's adversity until next time enjoy the rest security and the rest of the week i.

alexa mike apple Wi cavs Lincoln ecuador amazon tyler u._s._b netcom
The One Challenge With Some 'Spiritual' People Feat. AJ

My Seven Chakras

17:15 min | 2 years ago

The One Challenge With Some 'Spiritual' People Feat. AJ

"Miso jugulars episode three twenty two the sudden chuck swirling for two seasons energy positions bureau of the base of the spine to the crown of the head for thousands of this ancient which has been installed a measure to cycle legal. What are the functions of these energy sentiments and cook these checked help you unlike your destiny and find your purpose. Welcome to my set of chocolates and now your host jay kumar what's up action dr asia here host and founder of miami seven juxtapose miso dot com the place where you receive ancient wisdom inspiring interviews and action steps that will without a doubt help you transform your life. One action edit dame. Today's episode is a conscious explanation of what it means to be spiritual. I get so many questions especially these days on this topic and i thought why not answer this question in this podcast because i want to make sure that you are aware of a potential dark side of these spiritual movement it needs to be <hes> spoken about and addressed and this is based on what i've noticed in certain spiritual facebook groups that are part of and i'm sure that you're going to find this episode it useful on your journey ahead especially when discussing this topic with friends and acquaintances and family now this might <hes> biggest dando here for the future future of action tribe and i gotta let you know what's on my mind but before we dive right in let's be homage to the person who orders are most recent. I do nhs review. This person's. Username is dp matt laws from the u._s._a. Who writes i discovered a._g. And my seven joker as when i decided need to learn more about the chuckers i have sinced listen to well over a dozen different podcasts by age and my mind is willing and expanding his choice choice of guests are quite remarkable but even more so edgy truly expresses and comes from a place of interest and caring. He's truly engaged in often asks questions that i i believe so many of us would north just accepting truly interacting and raising the bar on learning i can honestly recommend edgy and my seven chocolate us do anyone on this journey while amazing wonderfully written review. Thanks a lot for this dp met laws action if you would like me to read your review as well than dig a minute and write your heart out. I get a lot of love from people in the u._s._a. But for some reason the reviews views have reduced from my own home country would i'm living right now canada and other countries now this could mean that you don't like me or you just don't care so especially especially if you are a listener from outside of u._s._a. Now is your turn to represent. The link you need is my seven chaka's dot com forward slash review myself agendas doc dot com forward slash review so what is spirituality each of you might have a different understanding opinion right about this topic but to me spirituality is recognizing that you are off spirit and that you're you're not this physical body that comprises of your brain your balls your flesh your blood. You are more than just that you are a spiritual mutual being and because you're mid off energy you cannot be created nor can be destroyed. You are infinite and everlasting so is that one would say of course that is good that is amazing. That's great because you realize that you are more than just physical. You have the power to create your own future and that's great because you realize that you are more than just physical you have the power to create your own future and that this isn't your first all your last lifetime. It's free and empowering right. There's a challenge though as the spiritual will moment grows larger and larger there's a danger of these ideas becoming so concrete and rigid that at least due dogma water dogma well according to the cambridge dictionary it means a fixed especially religious belief or set of beliefs that people people are expected to accept vithout any doubts in the focuses without any doubt i see it happening many times especially in forums and facebook groups especially once in a while there's a heated argument between people who strongly believe in life after death and those that don't people believe even energy healing versus those that don't people that believe in as being essentially off spirit worshipers those that don't and people are expected to conform up to all the tenants of spirituality as if this were one of the ten commandments and if not well then you're not spiritual enough i mean haven't you read enough. Don't you watch documentaries. Don't you know the truth. Have you experienced an awakening yet. So you see all these memes hundred. There's some slight passive aggression beyond that you see what i mean why then are those that have genuinely good good intentions. There are some that consider themselves and you know this superior or above the rest. I mean i've heard of people who consider themselves. Spiritual who are your allies and made it did end do energy healing sessions and souza's done the mytalk behind somebody's back doc or gossip or somebody i mean i've heard of people who consider themselves spiritual worry yoga sessions and meditate and do energy healing stations and and as soon as that's done they'll talk behind someone's back or gossip about someone are they get back to their ways of manipulation and just this this feeling of. I'm better than you. I'm not saying it's you action tribe but did our folks like that and you know it. There's just this natural progression can wear a spirit of inquiry and seeking turns into dogma and a of law and as was as them it happens among historians. It happens among the scientific community. It sure happens among religious communities would as soon as <hes> someone goes against a commonly held beliefs of that group they're considered strange and they are attacked for what they believe to be true and i'm worried that it's happening in the spiritual community. Do there's a danger in this action. Try because it prevents an open honest dialogue. It's a dialogue as important and everyone's opinion must be considered because we grow through dialogue. We learn by listening to another's opinion even window. We might not agree with them. We evolve by allowing the other person to express and share what they what they believe is true so is being spiritual enough knowing that you are off spirit in my opinion not really we need to go beyond being spiritual the detroit we need to be people off the heart in you might be a person of the heart and norby spiritual which is totally fine. I'd rather spend spend an evening with a person of the heart who is not spiritual than with a quote unquote spiritual person who feels that they know the ultimate truth. I mean if you read about it. In books about sages ascended masters yogis issues is the more a person awakens the more he or she realizes how little no mainly because of how much there is to be known does that make sense you could be religious a christian buddhist or some other religion but your intentions can be seen through your actions interaction and your compassion russian in fact if you're a christian then be the best word of a christian emulating the principles of jesus the intentions fifty s if you're a buddhist then be the best person off a buddhist by recognizing the true potential of buddha hood in everyone around. You and i know that many of you have members in your family. Family who are religious not spiritual religious maybe christian or muslim or some other religion and i get this question often which is how do i convince it's them about spirituality hawkin idel about this truth hardware. Show them that there is guard inside of them in my answer is you don't have to convince them of anything. You don't have to convince anyone of anything. You don't really just go to your family. Members hugged them how conversation optima him aboard the challenges or difficulties or worries that they're having support them genuinely inexperienced that sense of oneness with them even if it's for a few few minutes or hours even because the ultimate truth is although we have multiple lifetimes we won't have any other lifetime just like this right and so this is special i repeat you don't have to convince or convert anyone because if you genuinely cared it and establish a heart to heart connection david ask you hear what does it can you can you can you. Can you teach me what you are you. Can you do some energy healing on me. I got a chest been. I've got a short opinion about new members in my extended family reaching out to me and saying you know. Can you do some energy healing for me because when you show them when you demonstrate district i'm not trying to convert or convince them but when you genuinely really care to alleviate their pain people will reach out to you because it's hard to confide in someone. It's hard to change. Someone's believes especially if that's what you've believed your entire life. It's hard to leave your friends and family knowing fully well that they in many anywhere's are your foundation your support system in your route so you gotta give some empathy right do the other people in your community who are religious religious so feel for them and support them whenever they are on their journey because think about it. We are all on our own journeys out. Each one of us has a different level of awareness of our selves and so you right so pigeon. If being spiritual is not enough then what should i aspire to be and that's a great question action tribe and i'm glad you asked here are a few things that i always keep in my number. One the heart use your heart to initiate a genuine compassionate dialogue free of judgment judgment resentment are aggression and this is a hard thing to do but you gotta practice second use your infusion and your gut which is your second brain in to really since the other person's body language emotions and intentions so that you can make better decisions about who to associated with what to say okay what to avoid and how to say something a lot of times we depend completely on language and that's a fallacy use your whole body to communicate number number three humility do know that you don't always possess the ultimate truth but spirit is always trying to send you the truth in the most uncommon places basis. That's where you'll find the truth all right just like you find the diamond in the most uncommon of places deep inside the earth right among rocks you might receive your wisdom from foyer toward your distant aren't not made in years the grocery the store cashier this evening nor even from me be humble and open to receiving number four heavy seeking a spirit so don't fall in love with what you already know always be seeking for the truth. Even if that means that you might right be bruin wrong then that might be true this mindset not just one person but if it's possible collectively will transform our energy energy as we genuinely look in new areas and new groups for that piece of wisdom and be open to be proven wrong because we are not in love with our ideas. He is our with what we believe is true but we are in love with the journey number five mutual respect over mutual ritual tolerance. What do i mean by that. I see a lot of establishments authorities. Talk about mutual respect or mutual tolerance norway mean by god. I see you lord of establishments and authorities talk about mutual tolerance but i feel that there's a slight subtle difference between mutual respect mutual torrance means. I'm gonna tolerate your beliefs your ideas and your way of life until i get an opportunity to convince and convert you into my way of thinking thinking because my way is the ultimate truth and if it's not my way then it's the highway mutual respect on the other hand is about respecting in your way of life your ideas your principles and engaging in dialogue so that we together can come to a new understanding of life in other words. I'm not trying to to convince you of my way. No no no no. You're fine perfect and special just the way you and your people are but we together in recognizing recognizing art differences can come together as a group as one tribe in dialogue and reach a new level level of understanding so they go dry by hope. You enjoyed today's explanation and you now. We'll have some ideas to explore this discussion even further in your own community whether it's energy healing community or your community or religious community or even your family emily right because this is a discussion that you can have with anyone doesn't have to be a spiritual group. It's a genuine conversation you can have and you'll be surprised by the responses and the tarts and the opinions that you get from the other side and more importantly this is an opportunity for you to really use your heart do to establish or reestablish that deep set connection that you really creative at the seoul level. I hope you enjoyed today's exploration to read the the entire block pushed for this session because i have written up the whole block post right visit my seven chocolate dot com forward slash three two two. I take a lot of time to write these blockbuster. I my seven jackass dot com far slash three to an auto action tribe. We're working on a project. That's really close to my heart. Call the action tribe inner circle that is going to be a monthly membership <hes> community for people who are listeners of my seven circle around the globe who are interested in improving their lives in every dimension and fulfilling their life's purpose on earth so if you'd like to learn more more than you can sign up for the wait list. We're still in the initial phases off for this particular project but you can learn more by going to my seven. Chaka's dot com move forward slash. Wait list my seven chuckers dot com forward slash wait list because once you go there you will be on on our email list and as soon as we have more information about the special project <hes> guard the action tribe inner circle you will be notified it and finally if you have hard comment or if you like to connect with me for some reason my email is eighty at my seven jeopardize dot com a._g. At my seven jack rogers dot com. I talk to you soon have a great day. Thank you you were listening to my son shot at my son. Chuck dot com mine s. e. v. chuck auguste dot com <music>.

facebook chaka u._s._a nhs jay kumar founder detroit miami canada souza seoul emily
Wildlife Staff Outside Denver Work To Stop The Spread Of Plague Among Prairie Dogs

Environment: NPR

03:53 min | 2 years ago

Wildlife Staff Outside Denver Work To Stop The Spread Of Plague Among Prairie Dogs

"So there is a new outbreak of plague just outside denver not among humans but rather among prairie dogs. Some parts have been partially closed was through labor day as staffers. Try to stop the spread. Dean biggins is a wildlife biologist with the u._s. Geological survey and he can explain more to us welcome. Thank you so what made my mind kind of explode when i first heard about the story was i thought the plague ended centuries ago. Is this plague now. The same mm-hmm is the black plague. It is the same disease that's caused by the same bacterium that caused the black death in medieval europe in are these outbreaks common. You've seen this before. This is fairly common in the western u._s. Play was introduced well over a hundred years ago about nineteen hundred entered in san francisco. It's been spreading throughout wildlife populations and pretty much western half. The country has it except in the most extreme environments like desert's and yeah. There's been noticed a lot in colonial squirrel species like ground squirrels prairie dogs where sometimes entire colonies will die out so when prairie dogs are infected affected with the plague. How does that affect the overall food supply chain. It's an interesting question. In the case of the prairie dogs system that of course <hes> has a dire effect on the prairie dog population in general and the most dependent species on those is the blackwood ferret which is a highly endangered. We we like animal that was much more than on the planes but it is now extremely rare. They eat prairie dogs usually and so now their food supplies being threatened they do yes. They are entirely dependent on dogs mostly for food but they also fair to use the prairie. Dog burrows has shelter so they're highly linked to the prairie dogs system the man the black footed ferrets dereck susceptible to play itself so it's not just a matter of losing its prey. It actually probably succumbs to the disease. Aziz is about as quickly as the period so what's being done now to keep this from spreading further the methods being used now are some that <hes> we've worked on for quite a few years and two of them involve controlling the fleas that transmit play and we're doing that with a couple of different products insecticides mainly. I use this flea powder deposited in borough in one case and then the another case we're feeding <hes> fipronil product to purry dogs in bates and <hes> they ingest debates and the and their system kill fleas well. That's a lot like <hes> products that you'll see us on pets so this is about fleas not to be selfish but let's just say i'm planning hiking trip around denver do need to be worried about catching the black plague. If you're hiking around prairie dog colonies in particular you should be very cautious about fleas. You definitely can contract plague from flea bites. They'll <hes> jump on you pretty readily. They don't they don't bite you as often as one might think but if you do you're at risk so what precautions should i take the normal bug spray. Keep fleas away bug spray with deep beat is a pretty good repellent and that's what we actually use quite a bit of when we're working on plague in the field one should also just be recognizing the symptoms was a plague and if you happen to have gotten a flea bite and you come down with flu like symptoms within three day period or so these should be cognizant that it might be playing probably get over to doctrine. Try to get on some antibiotics. Wow all right so people watch not only for ticks but flees after those hikes dean begins from the u._s. geological survey. Thank you very much for helping us understand all of this. Well thank you.

prairie Dean biggins denver europe u._s san francisco Aziz fipronil hundred years three day
How Capitalism Gets Off Track

Money For the Rest of Us

31:00 min | 2 years ago

How Capitalism Gets Off Track

"Walk the money for the rest of us. This is a personal finance show on money how it works how to invest it and how to live without worrying about and we host. David stein is episode to sixty seven. It's titled why capitalism goes off track back. When i was in college i worked for pulling company would ask the people we called whether they believe the u._s. Was on the right track or the wrong track. There's been discussion in this presidential presidential election as to whether capitalism still works for everyone is capitalism off track. Is there a better system. I believe i believe the free market system. Still is the best but there's some things that happen that get it off track last month. The business roundtable table announced a new statement on the purpose of a corporation. It was signed by a hundred and eighty-one c._e._o.'s who commit to lead their companies the benefit of all stakeholders. That's customers employees suppliers communities and shareholders. That's from the press release release. The business roundtable is a nonprofit association whose members are the chief executive officers of major u._s. corporations. They promised to do their part to get capitalism back on track. In this episode. We'll see what that will actually take both leaders the businesses as well as ourselves as consumers the statement on the purpose of corporation they believe it's it's the role of business to deliver value to customers invest and their employees which they say start with compensating them fairly and providing important benefits the role of business is to deal fairly and ethically with suppliers support the communities in which they work and finally generate long-term value for shareholders who provide the capital that allow the companies to invest grow and innovate then there's the gig economy amelia is straight and jonathan harris wrote a piece for the national association of counties described with the gig economy is they said it's made up of three main components independent workers paid by the gig big or a task or project as opposed to workers who receive a salary or hourly wage. That's one element to is consumers who need a specific service this for example a ride to their next destination or they might need a particular item delivered and finally you have an app based technology platform uber airbnb lift door dash that act as a medium between the independent worker and the consumer that wants. It's that temporary task this past week my daughter and i we worked in the gig economy. She was a few weeks before she she starts working potato harvests and just needed some temporary employment. She applied to uber eats door. Dash and post meets only dash asia proved her right away and so we started i was the assistant i wanted to make sure she was safe and just to see how it worked before. We share my gig economy. Experience may positives from words from one of this week sponsors policy genius september is national life insurance awareness month. Most people aren't aware that i wasn't most people aren't even aware they need life insurance at all. 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Dash is a food delivery service. They just raised another six hundred under a million dollars. They're valued at twelve billion dollars. They're not profitable in the press release where they announced that they were are raising more money. They mentioned gross merchandise value grew at two hundred eighty percent year on year. That's the value. Are you of the food that delivering. That's not their revenue. It's not their profits. It's how much food the delivering restaurant meals they. He served diners and more than four thousand cities. They're independent contractors deliver orders for more than three hundred forty thousand stores in the u._s. and canada. My daughter downloaded the door dash app on her phone. We went to our first shift in rexburg idaho. We earned nothing. It was a morning shift. We sat in our hotspot near main street in rexburg idaho waiting for that first order nothing. The neck shift started at eleven a._m. It was an two and a half hour shift. We delivered a number of orders rexburg kind of a small town gross revenue eighteen dollars for two and a half hours. We drove ten miles. Here's the thing about door dash. Most of the drivers don't factor in and the true cost. There's gasoline. There's insurance. There's wear and tear on the cars. There's repairs. Here's depreciation justify of the car falling triple a. The american automobile association does a study each year on the hidden cost of a car with regards to some of these items that i mentioned they estimate the average car costs fifty nine cents per mile onto drive that needs to be factor in so we drove ten miles. That's five dollars ninety cents in terms of wear and tear on the car which met that for the two and a half hours we netted four dollars and eighty four cents an hour the next day we took an evening shift during dinner in idaho falls for two hours and fifteen minutes we drove. It was absolutely crazy. We did some of our initial orders and then they suggest we go to buffalo wild wings to pick up an order. We go there. The system was down. The order wasn't ready so we dropped off another order that we picked up and then they started sending more orders to us even though he hadn't actually picked up the food at buffalo wild wings while my daughter waited there i drove over to you a barbecue restaurant to pick up an order there which they wouldn't give me because they said the individual hadn't paid went back to pick up my daughter. It was an absolute absolute mad house. This is not an easy job. After two hours and fifteen minutes we had driven thirty miles. We made seven dollars and twenty four cents an hour after factoring in where tear on the car but that doesn't doesn't even take into account the biggest cost that these drivers take on insurance if you go on door dashes website right. Here's a question does door dash have insurance. Yes they said jordache has a commercial auto insurance policy that covers up to one million million dollars in bodily injury and or property damage to third parties arising out of accidents while on an active delivery to qualify as an on enacted delivery. You must be in possession of the goods to be delivered in other words door. Dash only only covers your liability once. You've picked up the food if you get in an accident on the way to the restaurant to pick up the food. You're not covered robert so they say yes. You need your own insurance quote while doing a business as an independent contractor. You are required to maintain your own insurance in the amounts and types required by law which includes but is not limited to an auto insurance policy. I called my insurer for the see if we were covered. She said our policy doesn't cover food delivery. It's considered a commercial oh business. I couldn't even get an endorsement for in other words a ride or something added on to my personal policy as we were driving around. We were not insured. She said if you get in an accident call me first before you call the insurer. Commercial delivery insurance goes from nine nine hundred to twelve hundred dollars per year. I suspect the vast majority of independent contractors delivering food are completely uninsured short more importantly as we were driving. I couldn't believe why is everyone driving so slow. We have orders to deliver. I became a more aggressive driver. No wonder my personal auto insurance wouldn't cover me and this is the way these apps for set up andy newman for the new york times road for a number of apps just tried it out as a cyclist in new york newman said the apps rollout rollout ever changing and often confusing menus of bonuses and incentives borrowed from the video game and slot machine industries engineered to convince writers they may yet win as long as they keep playing but with so many writers chasing the same prizes they often fall short werner. Hanni said the whole thing is like gambling. You have to be at a spot. You have to hope that there are orders there and then you stay at that spot or go somewhere else. This is not an easy job and you're not making much money at it and you haven't huge insurance liability. The next day i decided to place an order through jordache. I've never ordered great food there but a forty dollar order from an indian restaurant door dash said regular delivery fee is three dollars and ninety nine cents but it would be free this time because i was new to the app. I wanted to see what happens. If i gave a very large tips yep so tipped fifteen dollars and then when the food came i spoke with the driver he earned sixteen dollars on the delivery jordache gave him one dollar and then gave him my fifteen dollar tip on the app and i saw the screen he was guaranteed ten dollars for delivery but because i gave a big tip essentially my tip went to him and then door dash didn't have to pay him as much and that's been somewhat controversial for dash tips essentially subsidize the driver by the tips go to the driver. They get all the tips but if you tip more than door dash pays the drivers less here's the problem with a company like door dash and some of the other gig economy companies and it's reflective active how capitalism has gone off track. There's a disconnect between what consumers are willing to pay and what it costs to deliver the food mckinsey study and they asked consumers in u._s. Germany and china what they would be willing to pay in terms of having something thing delivered right away and they found that only fifteen percent would be willing to bear a surcharge of around three euro. Only two percent would be willing to pay significantly more for delivery in instant delivery. Something delivered very very quickly. They also found in their study that a typical driver. We saw this with door dash. Generally you get two or three deliveries per hour u._p._s. That's much more centralized they they might deliver fifteen to twenty parcels for our on these gig economy deliveries doing two to three per hour the the cost of that is about seven to ten dollars mckinsey estimates plus overhead so there's a gap there. There's a gap between what consumers are willing to pay and when it actually cost in order to for one cover the insurance of the drivers now how is that gap that loss loss being covered with partly by venture capital funding. They have to keep raising money because the losses are so great so investors are essentially covering much of that loss and we talked about that a few episodes ago when we talked about blitz scaling and how the average private company before it goes public public is ten to twelve years old and still hasn't figured out how to make a profit so venture capital funding investors are covering the gap app between what it costs to deliver this food in what consumers are willing to pay restaurants cover. The cost door dash charges a commission to the restaurants. There was an article in the new york times recently about india and the restaurants there are rebelling because they're not making enough money in the article pointed out that the apps have made it easier for people order take-out meals and restaurants have gotten exposure to a larger audience diners but the platforms also charge hefty he commissions on each order and can squeeze the profit margins of culinary establishments in the united states. Some restaurants have closed unable to keep up with the cost cost of working with delivery apps so that gap between the cost and what consumer's willing to pay is covered by the restaurants and finally family is covered by the independent contractors through lower wages and through taking on this insurance liability essentially driving uninsured uninsured now. I love the free market system because i love the idea that we have companies and individuals using innovation finding finding solutions discovering new business models but it needs to be done in a way that everyone benefits. They can't be shifting cost to the workers. That was the whole point of what the roundtable was saying. We value our employees. We should value the independent contractors before we continue. Let me pause here and share some words from this week sponsors. When when was the last time you really slept great. Isn't it strange that will try just about anything to sleep better when it actually could be time for a new mattress. If you aren't getting the quality sleep you deserve. I recommend the bad. I use the sleep number bed right now at sleepnumber stores. It's the biggest sale of the year all all beds on sale and queen mattress start at only eight hundred in ninety nine dollars. Do you wish your mattress could be firmer or softer. That's what the sleep sleep. Number bed is famous for a you can adjust each side so it's right for both you my sleep number is fifty the sleep number three sixty smart beds senses is your movements and automatically adjust so your effortlessly comfortable at night come during the final days of the biggest sale of the year for a limited time save forty percent on a sleep number three sixty limited edition smart bed hurry this sale and sunday you'll only find sleepnumber knbr one of their five hundred and seventy five sleepnumber stores nationwide find the one nearest you at sleepnumber dot com slash david one of my virtual investment mentors was seth clarkson who runs the twenty seven billion dollar hedge fund the bow post group. I i used to meet with south on annual basis because he managed a large percent of one of my clients assets. He doesn't speak to the press very much but recently did an interview with the new yorker and he gave a speech at harvard about the responsibility of corporations he said. Does anyone really believe that. Shareholders are the only constituency that matters not customers not employees not the community or the country or planet earth. It's a choice to do things that maximize profits to pay people as little as you can or work them as hard as you can. It's a choice to maintain pleasant working conditions or alternatively. Particularly harsh wants offer good benefits or poultry. Ones corman also talked about how it's a choice to leverage epa company to borrow huge amounts of debt take a public company private and then pay special dividends to owners in order for the private equity funded show great returns but then then they walk away from the business because the business can't service at dad. The businesses shut down many employees. This lose their jobs. That's awes- a choice. He says when capitalism goes unchecked an unexamined and management is seduced used by a narrow and myopic perspective the pendulum can quickly swing in directions where capitalism's benefits are discounted and its flaws exaggerated capitalism works but it only works if there's not a gap between what consumers and businesses his pay for a service and what it cost to deliver it and there needs to be a prophet baked in if the cost are higher then what consumers are willing to pay. Somebody has to cover that cost in the case of the gig economy more often than not. It's it's the independent contractors they're being shorted not paid enough covering liabilities that they're not even aware of. I asked his driver and door dash that gave the tip to have you checked to see if you're even insured for this. He said no and even called is ensure month or so ago. I got an email from a listener and he was a little perturbed because they'd quoted must seem nicholas tile who have quarter before that i appreciate how he invest but there's many things about tyler that i don't agree with one was his view on regulation. This listener wrote. I i grew up in a former steel mill town birmingham alabama during the nineteen fifties and the nineteen sixties i suffered from a variety of respiratory illnesses growing up that were caused or exacerbated by the miserable cre- e._p._a. Air quality in my hometown i know from my own actual experience experienced that the e._p._a. Caused this guy in birmingham to change from brown to blue skies went away along with it pollution moreover moreover. I know from my thirty plus years of experience and lawyer that the mere threat of civil litigation has little if any deterrent effect on polluters. He realizes that sometimes you need regulation. One of the risk is that the regulation gets to be too great. Seth clements said if every business person or enough business people don't act as stewards of more than just the bottom line. Somebody's going to come along and do do it for them. And that's what regulation does it's because businesses don't self-regulate and they're passing on cost in this case poor air quality to individuals that suffer from like this listener did now this listener is the the general counsel of a retail food and beverage company that his son started and he realizes why there's some regulations sensible regulations relations. He says assuming such thing exist is generally going to be better idea than litigation for making businesses behave while litigation is sometimes necessary. It's a blunt instrument that is expensive slow and ineffective in addressing most problems if corporations nations were better stewards if they treated their workers more fairly. They're more fair to the communities that we wouldn't need so much regulation now. There's another downside to not treating workers. Fairly it can lead to financial crisis. There's a paper titled inequality leverage and crises by michael coom hof romaine ronciere and pablo when not they look at the great recession of two thousand eight and the great depression of nineteen twenty nine and they found a striking similarity between the two of them they wrote that both crisis were preceded over a period of decades by a sharp increase in income inequality and by a similarly release sharp increase in debt to income ratios among lower and middle income households when debt levels started to be perceived as unsustainable they they contributed to triggering exceptionally deep financial in real crisis they found there were two groups. There was the top five percent who were gaining getting more and more wealth and then there was the bottom that were just getting by because they weren't making enough in their jobs but they continue to spend because because they took on debt and eventually that debt gets too high and win. The debt gets too high for households. Now the debt has come down as households in in some cases defaulted and other cases chose not to spend and pay down debt but this income inequality creates uncertainty cindy for business michael pettus wrote in barron's for the past one hundred years investment has not been constrained by the cost of capital in other words. It's by the abilities of businesses to borrow money. They've been able to borrow at extremely low rates but pettus continues investment is not constrained constrained by the cost of capital but by concerns about whether there will be enough demand to justify building additional capacity businesses today have access to near unlimited it'd amounts of capital at historically low interest rates but find little reason to invest because the demand for their production is not growing quickly enough to justify justify more investment in this environment income inequality is a drag on the economy when u._s. businesses find it easy to raise money rising inequality makes it harder for them to justify additional capital spending it leads to a slower growing economy because most the participants can afford to buy stuff because of their debt levels or they're afraid to buy and then businesses are afraid to invest in new projects because they're concerned and whether there'll be demand for it so instead they buybacks knock and reward the existing shareholders because as they buy back doc and it's been huge over six hundred billion dollars of buybacks in the last year in the u._s. and it increases earnings per share because there's less shares outstanding the executives are rewarded because oftentimes the stock price goes up because earn is going up even even though aggregate earnings might not be going in the company's not investing in the future. It's just a gimmick. Pettus concludes when business investment is constrained strained only by expected future consumption rather than the cost of capital income concentration leads to both lower consumption and lower investment. Give income were more widely distributed u._s. Economy would grow faster and would be able to avoid the rising indebtedness that would otherwise be needed to sustain consumption now the u._s. In the world is not in a situation where a another great financial crisis like nine hundred twenty nine or two thousand thousand eight is imminent even if we enter into a recession debt levels have been brought down as i mentioned sometime through default a fault sometimes through just paying off the debt u._s. Households have about thirteen point five trillion dollars of debt seventy. One percent is his tied to mortgage loans. The other student loan debt student loan debt has increased over the past decade. It's more than doubled double to one point. Four trillion dollars credit card debt has stayed about the same zero point eight trillion dollars auto loans about fifty percent at one point two trillion dollars but it's not just absolute debt balance. It's the ability to service debt and so as interest rates have come down. It's been easier for households to service the debt. The federal reserve does a measure of household debt service payments as a percent of disposable disposable income income after taxes right now at about ten percent it came down from its peak in two thousand eight of over thirteen percent. The b._s. has calculated and found that this ability to service debt is a great recession indicator. They found in the last three recessions. This debt service ratio peaked right before the recession and we're far below those previous abuse peaks currently doesn't mean a recession can't come but it means that it's severity probably will not be as great as we saw in two thousand eight capitalism goes off track if it's dependent on the majority of of households taking on more and more debt because of income inequality it just isn't sustainable capitalism is off track. If the business models don't capture the entire cost in other words if households and businesses willingness to pay for giving service isn't enough to cover the cost to deliver the services so businesses pass those costs on others be independent contractors be communities in terms of the environment. Those are called extra analyses. So what can we do for you owned businesses we can pay workers and contractors fairly and consumers. We can pay a fair price. We can step back and think about what is this business model. Is this item priced so that whoever made it or delivered the service can earn a fair wage. We don't to be a business expert to figure out that we can just step back and think about it. Maybe do a little bit of research and three we can support reasonable regulation if businesses refused to regulate themselves and consist on in passing on some of these extra analyses these costs onto the community. It's nice at the business. Roundtable wants to have a broader purpose for corporation not just to enhance or grow shareholder value but be mindful of workers. The environment in their communities entities says climate in that new yorker piece said evolving is usually called flip flopping but as humans who are we if we don't evolve. I'm proud that i evolved because i think people who fail to evolve and learn are part of the problem we can be part of the solution we can change our behaviour business can get back on track. The free enterprise system works businesses trying to find solutions and and innovations but it's got to do so in a fair way that's episode to sixty seven. You can get shown. It's money for the rest of us dot com. Why are there please. We sign up for my free insider skied. I'll email those to you. Each week those links for the many articles i reference and also include an essay on money investing they konami some of the best writing i do each week just goes to the email list. It's not available on the public web. You can join that list at money for the rest of us dot dot com everything. I've shared with you in this episode for general education. I'm not considered your specific risks situation. I'm not provided investment advice. This is simply education on money. Invested economy have a great week <music> uh-huh.

u._s idaho jordache jonathan harris michael pettus David stein chief executive canada american automobile associatio
The New Normal for the Grid: Batteries

The Energy Gang

43:57 min | 2 years ago

The New Normal for the Grid: Batteries

"The energy gangs brought to you by sun gro. Son grow is the leading solar invert or supplier volume in the world and it's now a leading supplier across the americas with the world's world's most powerful two hundred and fifty kila fifteen hundred volts string converter son grow is providing disruptive technology for utility scale projects. You can find out more at sun gro power dot com while you're there cruising the internet. Don't forget to download g._t._m.'s new i._o._s. News app at apple store. It's redesigned. It's the perfect way to get your clean energy business news on your phone. The top clean energy business news that g._m. Puts out every day. The android app is coming soon so look out for that and if you prefer the old fashioned way go to green tech media dot com slash newsletters to sign up for email news in your inbox every morning from green tech media. This is the energy gang weekly debates and discussions on the fast changing world of energy. I'm stephen lacey your host in a contributing editor at g._t._m. Welcome this week. In nearly every corner of the country energy storage projects are finding their way onto the grid getting bigger cheaper more diverse and even a little bit weirder most of all. They're just becoming normal. We are gonna talk about the new normal for power operations nations and they include a lot of batteries and maybe some air tanks water pumps and cranes to we're starting with around up with the most topical projects that tell us something unique about outwear storage is headed then we'll look at one novel approach a gravity based system from energy vault that just got a major injection of japanese venture dollars and finally will look look at all the other alternatives to lithium ion that are vying for traction in the market catherine hamilton of thirty eight north is my coho. She's in the remote adirondack region in of new york this week again new mic in hand after <hes> hers broke minutes before recording last week. How are we doing catherine doing great. Thank you for getting amazon to send it to me so evidently amazon amazon truck took a look at our driveway through the stuff out the window and backed out. I would have had a fit if i'd seen that. I knew you what i did. I didn't wanna tell you jigger is an iceland this week. Filling in for him is the fabled the preeminent the unrivaled julian specter julian is a staff writer at green tech media in a periodic guest on our podcasts julian welcome. You just moved to l._a. How does it compare so far to the bay area so i always thought i was gonna be like a northern california and hurt but <hes> southern california's really <hes> going on strong. I think the sunshine is nice is the clear blue skies. The sunsets are amazing. <hes> and there's so much good food down here and a lot of you know grid decarbonisation. His asia efforts underway so that's exciting too. I saw in july that the l. a. department of water and power signed a major deal for solar with batteries for one point nine cents per kilowatt hour. Are you just packing up your belongings and following the cheapest projects around the country yep. Yes <hes> left p._g. Territory for l._a. D._w._p. and and <hes> you know haven't looked back yet. Well that <hes> that l. A. project is just one of many turning heads in the u._s. And around the world it's abundantly clear that storage storage and when we say storage were talking mostly about lithium ion batteries at this point is emerging as a viable alternative to traditional power plant development were talking mostly about replacing racing expensive peaking power plants but bulk power could be within sight and both katherine and julia following these trends so jillian to your reporting. I <hes> for the last few years we've had a handful of conversations pointing out how serious utilities and developers were starting to take storage when you think about the kind of stuff that you're reporting on now what makes twenty nineteen unique so far in your experience yeah so we've come a long way since i walked into the green tech beanie the office over three years ago and and i don't know if you remember i as you said hey we want you to report on energy storage and that kind of like doc okay. I'll see if there's any stories to rate on that and you know from the days of little pilots tiny things or a lot of forward-looking <hes> kind of policy stories of hey. Maybe one day soon. This target will lead to a thriving storage market. The last few months have just been boom time of of <hes> massive projects really all over the country <hes> so all the news i've been working on in in the recent months is really led me to believe that sturges his already competing more effectively and more places than a lot of people realize yeah i spent some time talking to the folks at fluence and they said exactly that at that the deals are getting much bigger so there three hundred or four hundred megawatt deals generally now and that utilities are really taking on more than those pilots so utilities are taking big positions on storage and really building it into the way they're thinking about their planning so i wanna talk about some of the the specific deals and again what they tell us about what's working and what's of interest for utilities and developer's what makes economic sense so let's start i with <hes> investor owned utilities any project standout to you that i owe us have procured this year that <hes> indicate where the market is headed yeah well. There's a few that have really taken the mantle of leadership on this <hes> i mean in california they had had to there is a law requiring them to buy storage <hes> but <hes> and interesting when you look at his arizona where arizona public service which is the biggest biggest i._o._u. There has essentially decided to pair all their utility scale solar with batteries and they <hes> you know talk about this solar after sunset plan to <hes> utilize the super cheap desert solar power they have but but make it available in the in the evenings and at night and <hes> that really started in two thousand eighteen when i solar <hes> won a competitive bid to deliver five hours of evening peak power in the summertime in they beat gas plants for that so that was in two thousand eighteen in any any type of research could compete but the combination the nation of really cheap solar with the lithium ion pricing that they could muster <hes> was already out competing <hes> guess peekers and since then a._p._s. has really double down and they're looking at like you know gigawatt hour scale of of storage roll out complicated a little bit by the <hes> the the fire at one of their early battery facilities in april which is still the cause of that's still being investigated but <hes> they have said that they're still really bullish on batteries is a a really effective part of the grid yen julian with <hes> envy energy right next door to arizona nevada was looking at this hulking lee a big project with twelve hundred megawatts of solar and six hundred ninety megawatts of storage that was also pretty impressive yeah and another important one to look look at his excel energy which covers eight states in the midwest and the west notably colorado and minnesota and they've they've famously committed two hundred percent clean energy of several decades out but <hes> by twenty thirty they wanna get major carbon reductions actions i think eighty percent below their benchmark and <hes> they're already shutting down or initiating the shutdowns of coal plants and replacing facing them with wind and solar batteries <hes> and they've done the math and they think it <hes> it adds value to their shareholders and it keeps spur prices affordable for their customers while making the the power supply cleaner so that's a really important one to watch as far as for for profit companies seizing on this clean energy today <hes> not not just because it's like the right thing to do or they feel good about it but they they've actually made a very very clear economic case for it. They excel case study is an interesting one because they've said we think we have got the right mix of technologies to get us to eighty percent carbon free electricity but the last twenty percent relieving open and we're trying to figure out how we get there. Maybe at some technology that we are not even thinking about today. Maybe it's a variation thereof of <hes> when you think about their plans to get from eighty two hundred percent carbon-free electricity. Where do you think storage will fit into that well. Actually i think it's helpful to understand where to stay fit in to that. I eighty percent and then do they say much about where storage might fit into that last twenty percent yes so i think <hes> <hes> as a general observation. I think they're being very honest. Inet framing they're saying a we know how to build cheap wind and solar and batteries in the next decade. There's a lot of room to just crank on that but we don't think that'll get us all the way so you know lithium ion they can do for our nation and i'm sure we'll get into longer durations in the next few years but no one's really expecting getting that to to manage say a week of of storage or even month you know few if you're trying to balance seasonal swings in a solar availability ear wind so i think they're they're being direct about that of saying we we know how to you know push the current technologies as far as we can push them and then we're going to need something else in the next ten years or beyond to <hes> take to fully cleaned grid and what i would just just observe about that. Is you know we're in a capitalist system. <hes> people do things that they think they can earn a return on and up until this point there was it's really no way to make money on super long duration storage like that that just wasn't a good place for private actors to invest their their money in in hopes of a return <hes> but now we have all these states sending sending very strong policy signals in fact requiring <hes> fossil fuels else to be eliminated from from the power grid <hes> and that's a very good reason to to start investing so i i would just say <hes>. I don't think think we should be scared about that uncertainty. I think it's <hes> <hes> making the case that hey ten years twenty years. That's a lot of time time and when you have the best minds in in the biggest companies really tackling that problem head on <hes>. We're going to find some things that have emerged so far. I think another thing that folks like fluence are looking at are all source procurement so as utilities began to define nine more what they need much more specifically based on when they need certain services at certain times of day rather than we just need x. Gigawatts all the time they're being much more sophisticated about when they need things and if they do in all sorts procurement then renewables and storage pencils out a lot of the time time and <hes> they're finding certainly renewable energy developers they're all looking at pairing storage with whatever they develop and and about fifty percent of those pencil out with no problems so part of this is a utility is being able to define better what they need and then allowing everybody to compete for it and into round out the discussion on the other end of the spectrum you've gotta utility like dominion energy in the southeast and they're trying to build pilot storage projects and then study them for a number of years so you've got a bunch of utilities who have a decade or more experience with storage have studied this stuff and are now <hes> procuring hearing <hes> you know hundreds of megawatts gigawatts of capacity <hes> why is dominion like so cautious on that end of the spectrum they're just they're trying trying to figure out if it works for them. Yeah i would say this. It's not just a dominion thing reflects. The <hes> fractured nature of our utility early regulatory system that state by state you can have utilities in one state you know really pedal to the metal going all all out <hes> on hundreds of megawatts megawatts of storage procurement today for commercial use that they're very confident and then utilities and other parts of the country not doing anything along which is still the case for many of them or saying we want to get involved in a very small way so <hes> as recently as last year a covered covered dominions <hes> integrated resource plan so their their long-term plan for the future acknowledged that battery storage was an emerging technology but didn't never any any plans on the books to do anything with it then just recently they announced that they do want to build some pilots <hes> it's it's gonna be for small ones totally eighteen megawatts and they're gonna test things like ken storage shift solar power so you can use it in <hes> in the evening or kin storage defer substation upgrades which ensure listeners will notice his has. It's been done elsewhere many times but i talked to dominion. They said you know it's one thing to know that it can work but to gain that firsthand experience agreeance is really valuable and so we want to test it out for ourselves and get familiar with it so you know i think there there is an argument therapy. It is kinda funny looking from the outside at least in seeing just how different utilities can <hes> approach the the exact axiom technology in the exact same uses of that technology. Catherine is that reflective of the broader industry. I actually think they are behind and they are slow slow. I mean you look at f- p._n._l. Which has traditionally been really dragging its feet on solar in particular and they just announced this four hundred nine megawatt awad managing energy storage center <hes> a few weeks ago and so i actually think dominion is going to quickly learn that these tiny pilots that they're proposing are going to work and then they'll be able to open up the market because they will see economic benefits by making storage edge really be part of their entire plan and i think it's worth noting that in the in the regulated utility environment <hes> you know they make a return on building stuff stuff and if they can pitch their regulators on hey we want to build this innovative thing that helps us integrate clean energy you know isn't that a win win and <hes> it it could become a real cash generator for them if they figure out how to <hes> position it the right way and i think florida power and lights probably in that bucket you know they are very good at <hes> you know making what they want happen and they decided at four hundred nine megawatt battery to display some some older guests. <hes> resources was something they wanted to do and they're just going for it. The most interesting listing story and storage in my opinion is <hes> what's happening with municipal utilities. There are a handful of cities municipal utilities that own and operate really dirty old gas peaker plants and they're they're trying to figure out what kind of resources they can use to phase those plants out because they're already retiring or they're trying to retire them early. A what is happening in that realm and wears storage being integrated yet. The municipals have really taken a leadership stance on on storage as well. I think it's important to note the governance structure here so instead of owing <hes> you know owing their loyalty to shareholders <hes> on wall street or wherever they report to the city to the community where are they operate and <hes> that i think aligns incentives in a in a really powerful way and also they have flatter hierarchies so they can if they wanted to do something they can move a lot more quickly on it <hes> so just in the last few months <hes> a municipal in glendale lyndale not far from where i live <hes> went through a very dramatic reversal where a year ago they'd been on the cusp of approving a new guest pekar for it was gonna cost five hundred million dollars and it was actually just have a it was a super backup resource so in case. It's not just one but two of their major power supplies were simultaneously interrupted. They wanted to have this this backup plan but it's going to be hugely expensive expensive <hes> and activists in the community push to stop it in this dramatic late night city council meeting the city council voted to pause and examined clean alternatives and the utility you know went and did that and came back <hes> and just a a few weeks ago announced a totally different plan where they're <hes>. They're buying large batteries. They're contracting with sun run for distributing batteries in homes <hes> as well as some energy efficiency and then a few words silla r- engines that are much smaller units that can fire up very quickly in and they scrapped the <hes> the gas plan altogether so i think that might be the fastest energy transition i've seen in a in a discreet company and it was really because the was answering the call they heard from the city's leadership and the community at large is some of that because with municipalities based on their bond rating they can get lower cost of capital investment well. I don't know if that was really a driver of this. One i mean they were. They were gonna take out a bond on the gas plant that had been proposed and then they would have been paying that off for years and years <hes> so oh i didn't say kind of financing as a as a reason for for going forward with the clean energy portfolio i think is is really a case if they'd been looking at the problem through the old lends of hey if we need capacity we need a gas plant and the planning for this started you know five years years ago and so then when they played that new lens like you were saying about going for the all source competitive solicitations they realize oh actually there's all all these other tools out there now that are commercially ready and <hes> quite competitive economically so they can really more efficiently allocate their capital all with whatever bond they take out right yeah exactly and <hes> so it's actually it's saving them. Money compared to the gas plant and then there's the benefit of it won't just be sitting idle you know waiting for not one but two major power sources to get knocked out all the batteries can be operating daily the and you know providing services and generating value for for the community so <hes> pretty pretty exciting case study of you. You know what can happen when you expand your your mindset around how to address grid <hes> needs a lot of these projects are competing with peaking gas plants and the question is when we're gonna get round the clock <hes> renewable electricity with storage that can start to knock off book power book gas delivery. What kind of projects are you seeing in this area and are we anywhere close to getting beyond the pekar. There is a very exciting exciting project out of oklahoma <hes> that <hes> knicks stare is building for the western farmers electric cooperative and this is a wind plus solar plus storage deal <hes> it'll be the largest of its kind in in the country and <hes> it it started life as they needed capacity and they realized that the solar battery combination would be cheaper than a gas plant and being cooperative. It's similar similar to the municipal structure in that. It's it's locally run and you know the the community likes cleaner air <hes> so they the decided to go with that and then through in the wind you know because it was cheap and it's integrate <hes> wind resource area <hes> and this is you know it's not <hes> <hes> baseload plant but it is a new type of resource. I think where you you're in the daytime solar production with win that is largely blowing at night and then have a very large battery in between to kind of tied tied over the the gaps between those two <hes> <hes> and so you know it's not it's not exactly the same as a fully dispatch apple baseload plant but <hes> compared to just win by itself for solar by itself it it really does feel like a new type of tool for for turning renewables into more of a round the clock resource then also speaks to this kind of system as a transmission asset which is kind of the next big play i think and would happening in germany and chile and some other places is like <hes> complementary data transmission but certainly allowing some time for transmission to be built by building these other projects totally and i talked to developers about this and they a a point to that transmission value is a huge driver for specifically for these hybrid plants because the ideas you don't wanna be shipping your wind when pricing pricings gun negative and you know or maybe there's more power to generate than you have <hes> an interconnection agreement for and so the battery lets that's you store that and parcel it out over more hours of the day and <hes> really just make better economic use of the kind of bandwidth that that you've you've contracted for on the grid so to finish up. You'll know i always say energy. Storage is the bacon of the grid but i saw recently chris shelton information. It's not just the bacon. It's the full entree now so i think that's what lance telling us the whole hog pushing those metaphors to to new heights or depths apps. We're going to take a quick. Pause here to talk about our sponsor. Son grow son grow has eighty two gigawatts converters to put across across the globe and it's now expanding rapidly in the u._s. It has more than one and a half gigawatts projects booked in two thousand nineteen zone speaking of novel projects one one of sun grows projects the twenty seven megawatt facility for the navajo tribal utility authority and that's going to double the amount of solar power that the navajo nation has in k a into. It's also going to replace a coal plant. That's closing later. This year clan to to is going to be in critical power to the navajo nation where fifteen thousand people live without regular access to power excess solar is also going to be sold back to the grid to earn money for the navajo nation. Sandro is not just focused on solar power. It is focused on storage very relevant to today's discussion. It's storage and integrated into two hundred megawatt hours worth of battery projects across the u._s. Check out more about what son grows up to at solar power are international in salt lake this september at booth to two one one or go to sun gro power dot com just a quick note before we get into the second half of the show we had a little technical glitch where both our source file and our backup file failed <hes> and that meant that catherine had to drop off at the very end of the show so you're going to hear her in the second segment but then in the third segment. You'll just hear me julian either way. It's a great conversation but just wanted to give you a heads up. That's why <hes> it's only two of us. At the end of the podcast enjoy. Let's shift our attention to a non battery technology that suddenly capturing string people's attention gravity storage no. I'm not talking about pumped hydro. I'm talking about a tower made out of concrete bricks. It relies on the the same physics and engineering as pump hydro. A company called energy vault picked up one hundred ten million dollars from the venture arm of japanese company. <hes> softbank softbank is massive conglomerate that owns or has a financial stake in sprint in yahoo japan in the robot company boston dynamics a whole host of companies. It's executive type pretty big game about becoming a renewable energy powerhouse but it hasn't delivered on that promise but now it's exploring storage so what is it about energy vault at attracted softbank and will this novel form of gravity storage work julian who is energy vault in what is this form of storage that it's trying to commercialize yes so energy full <hes> burst onto the scene last fall at energy storage north america <hes> they are the kind of company that <hes> flies in the face of pretty much everything i've i've learned covering the energy storage market in the last few years <hes> it it is time when lithium ion is accounting for more than ninety nine percent of installations in the u._s. In the first quarter this year <hes> and and <hes> there's so much momentum behind that they are doing completely unprecedented type of storage so like you said they <hes> stack large blocks with a specialized crane that has six arms and <hes> some some machine vision an algorithm so that it can operate on its own so autonomous crane about thirty five stories high <hes> that's picking up these blocks that are each which <hes> about thirty five metric tons and <hes> so when it has extra power from you know winder solar they lift the blacks up and stack them into into a tower round the crane and win. You want to discharge you grab the blocks in drop them down and it regenerates the power and <hes> so their the goal is to pair with renewables and offer twenty four seven clean energy <hes> for price. That's cheaper than in the fossil fuel equivalent as i'm hearing you describe this. I'm getting like a warning bell buzzing in my head because i've seen so many companies with these extremely extremely capital intensive materials intensive technologies that just don't have much room for cost reduction and <hes> you know you look at all the variations nations of solar that just got destroyed by p and you know. I can't see how you can squeeze a lot of costs out of this. Maybe the crane design so <hes> it. It just doesn't seem crazy to you. I would say there's very good reason to have those warning bells going off <hes> the last few years we've seen so how many startups that were taking a an unconventional approach to storage eventually fail and run out of money and <hes> you know not get to market and in particular there there have been a string of <hes> gravity based storage companies that have have not taken off <hes> even a a predecessor to this one <hes> the they both came out of the idea lab which is bill grosses incubator in pasadena <hes> there's one called energy cash that it was lifting weights up in client on kind of a ski lift and they they built a small pilot and it was largely the same pitch pitches punch hydros great but you can't build it everywhere so let's kind of make product that replicates that concept in in a in a more widely <hes> deliverable way <hes> what energy vote is doing differently is p. backing <music> on existing supply change from other industries so i pose that exact question to c._e._o. Robert coney and he said yeah you know in the past <hes> gravity companies have been trying to create their own technology <hes> wholesale and what we're doing is using cranes which there's a there's a very robust supply around the world for cranes <hes>. They've partnered with companies like g._e. For the motors that will spin and generate power so that's that's not a not technology risk for them. They've put their own i._p. Into the algorithms is to guide the crane in that's actually fairly complicated because it has to account for wind and whether interference and you're moving super heavy objects through space at high speed so not not a simple thing but the other big place where they've developed their own i._p. Is actually on the bricks themselves. They partnered with the mexican concrete <hes> conglomerates semtex and have really been working non low-cost composite materials so the ideas that you'll actually mind the soil and rocks on site where you're trying minded build the plant and then through a new process that they've created with <hes> the materials scientists at x. <hes> you use build a kiln on site and pump out bricks on sate without having to transport them so you know lithium ion is a is a mass produced mass manufactured products product. That's piggybacking on the electric vehicle supply chain but <hes> this will be constructed real power plant <hes> but their their your hope is that by using existing materials that are widely available and then <hes> producing bricks that are that are very low cost or even in using like waste rebel from <hes> other sites where they could. Maybe get paid to take that waste that they that they're going to keep the costlo slow yeah. I'm sorry to be a fuddy-duddy. It just seems complicated <hes> and it doesn't your rights. Even it doesn't seem like you could get that that much cheaper and and that there are ways where there's this company gravity trysofi which is like a clock weight using existing mineshafts where you're using in gravity but you're going down into existing holes. It seems like it would be easier to fall than it would be to construct something and then deconstructed. I dunno i watched every single video available on youtube for energy vault and i still couldn't figure out you know exactly what the value add would be if something like this <hes> but you know i'm i'm all for trying new technologies. I just this one seems a bit of a stretch well. Is it going to be cited with renewable energy or is it just taking grid electricity and hoping that the electricity system itself is cleaned up over time they talk about <hes> several different use cases <hes> a big one is citing it alongside wind and solar plants. Let's first announced project is with taipower company in india's which is a huge renewables developer birther among other forms of power that they produce <hes> but the they also talk about it as an off grid asset <hes> and powering factories industrial facilities even desalination plants <hes> so the idea is any any place that you need constant round round the clock power but you wanna get clean or or if you're off grid <hes> doing some sort of industrial process in the renewables are much much cheaper than diesel. <hes> those are those are markets. They're trying to target as well so catherine. It sounds like you and i are skeptical. Borderline cynical kohl julian your natural skeptics journalist covering this stuff. Can we compare this with pumped hydro. I think <hes> you know it's important to recognize pumped hydros the great unsung hero of the grid. It's ninety seven percent of of u._s. Crude storage that it's almost impossible to build any new <hes> it rations of a recently right about a project in montana that a a group called absa roca energy is developing <hes> <hes> they have financing from the copenhagen infrastructure partners and they have all their permits. They're looking for a customer <hes> but they've i've been working on that for ten years and when you factor in the time to construct assuming they do find a partner to the off taker <hes> maybe a fifteen ear development cycle so that's really the main hang up <hes> and i should note that one is a it's not attached to any existing river or water system. They're they're building. These contained lined reservoirs. <hes> so it's <hes> it's not influencing existing ecosystems in the way that the the the old dams would <hes> so. I think energy volts really trying to fill the gap for nearer term long-duration storage <hes> you know if you don't wanna wait ten or fifteen years <hes> they want to offer you something in the near term <hes> <hes> and i should say they <hes> told me that they're on track to complete two full size plants this year <hes> the the one for todd and then in another demonstration project in italy and they hinted that there's other projects that have not been made public yet <hes> so the the time from you know having the permits and having the land to getting all the getting all the equipment on site and building it <hes> robert robert says about six to eight months <hes> construction time so that's that's the clear benefit compared to pumped hydro. Is you know if you can get one of these up been running in less than a year <hes>. That's a that's a lot faster than a decade or more. Have they built one yet so the have if one that's a a scale model at one seventh scale model. That's <hes> been operating in switzerland since last year <hes> and then these two <hes> plants that i mentioned are going to be <hes> supposedly coming online this year. I guess the final question is one that we haven't addressed yet and probably the most most important one for many of our listeners. What does it cost. What is it gonna cost to build. These projects were kind of price. Can they deliver so the company insists that they can sell will today at two hundred dollars per kilowatt hour in the in the upfront capital expense <hes> which is really cheap for long long-duration <hes> the wood mackenzie calculations on utility scale lithium ion systems are in the range of four hundred fifty to five hundred fifty dollars per kilowatt kilowatt hour today <hes> so this is you know half of that enabled to go for many more hours than lithium ion systems do <hes> and they also stressed that over twenty five year lifetime they of course say that the system does not degrade <hes> in the way that lithium ion does <hes> pretty much every company building lithium ion alternative says they they have no degradation of course these haven't been in the field for twenty five years so flag that for for for follow up in a few decades <hes> but yeah they say that the level is cost is gonna be super cheap. <hes> you know talking about three to seven incense per kilowatt hour <hes> which would just blow out really any any other storage options out there <hes> mm-hmm now as a journalist. It's it's hard to good too good to be great yeah. It's hard for me. You know i'm not in the in the room contracting and doing the deals <hes> so so i think we'll have to wait and see if the customer uptake <hes> follows from that <hes> and with the one hundred ten million dollars behind them from softbank they'll be able to <hes> really scale their global sales operation and get going doing. I think another risk factor is they haven't built a full commercial system as far as we know <hes> and now at this money coming in they're they're looking at scaling globally while still getting the market with their their initial products in that strikes me as a as a challenge 'cause you you know often in the past companies takes years to to really to their their storage device and <hes> and then go go to market but then again you know the flow battery people have been at it for years and haven't really made it past that hurdle of the small scale tests so <hes> it could be that <hes> <hes> this is the kind of ambition. That's needed to make <hes> dispatch clean energy a reality well. That's a good place to kick off our last segment very relevant to the energy vault conversation. I want to look at the many alternatives to lithium ion batteries that companies are trying to deploy and develop l. up. Lithium ion doesn't dominate the storage market. It practically is the storage market you said ninety nine percent of systems being installed today use some variation of a lithium ion chemistry but there's an increase interest among investors and inventors in diurnal and seasonal storage and so power to gas new baddest. Ah battery chemistries pumped hydro things like gravity storage. They're getting a fresh look. Which is why the one hundred and ten million dollars from softbank does tell us something about investor interest. 'em sort of a bullishness on the need for long-term <hes> long duration storage so julian for awhile. Everyone was talking about flow batteries batteries as you said as the longer duration solution. Is that still the case so there are still flow battery companies in existence. The ranks of thinned don't considerably over the last few years and i i would say that in general the expectations have been tempered a bit there. There's a lot of big promises. <hes> you know five or ten years ago and there have been companies that have gotten units out into the field but it's it's still a very very small scale. I think <hes> the the exception to that would be avalon. <hes> is a is a flow battery company that partnered with next trekker on this solar solar plus storage <unk> tracker system or they're. They're pumping out the batteries on the the actual tracking device and that's given them some some considerable scale relative to the to the other companies that are really going small project by small project. Why do we even need alternatives to lithium ion batteries if if they're getting so much cheaper so much more dense and they can do more on the grid we'll even people who are very bullish about. Lithium ion acknowledged that in the long term berm. There's a there's a floor price baked in just from the cost of materials and <hes> that's not really an issue in your looking at shifting <hes> solar power within the day for a few hours but if we're trying to run an entire grid on clean energy you have to do weeks and and seasons <hes> when you shift from sunny season to a to a rainy season and once you push out the timeline for for that much storage ridge really i. I don't know anyone who thinks lithium is the ideal economic fit for that so what stands out to you as has the areas that are getting the most attention in long duration storage. I think there's not one clear winner. That's emerged. You know all these technologies. I really need to be vetted in the market but a change i've noticed in the last year or so is that people are actually moving forward at scale with with <hes> long-duration projects that are not lithium ion <hes> i mentioned the <hes> the pumped hydro one and in montana <hes> <hes> there's also a company called higher power which does this cryogenic storage these super cool air in tanks and they're leveraging compressors and equipment from the oil and gas industry they recently signed a memorandum of understanding with tasca aska to develop what they called four giga scale cryogenic energy storage plants in the next couple of years <hes> and we've even seed laden <hes> a small resurgence in underground compressed air <hes> with this project in utah that would be using underground in salt caverns compressed air is like pumped hydro can store huge amounts at a very <hes> favorable economics but they've only. I've been like two projects in the last few decades so it's very hard to actually deliver but if it if it can happen you know that's great <hes> and i think all this points to <hes> there's finally a critical mass of renewables on the grid such that developers actually see potential here here and they <hes> you know in in the past clearly didn't see much of a driver to to get cracking on this kind of technology but people a <hes> are are moving ahead now right so the difference may not be that we see new dramatic leaps and technologies at the market need is changing. I would say so yeah <hes> and there's certainly plenty of technological innovation happening in labs that might trickle out in the next ten years or or more. We're but <hes> a lot of these are technologies that aren't particularly groundbreaking or you know far out <hes> but but it's just a matter of making the project economics work at scale and we're calling it there julian. Thank you for taking jaeger's chair while he was out gallivanting around the world. We appreciate it. This is a lot of fun and you know. There's even more storage news that we didn't have time to touch on so <hes> you know. Thanks for having me on soon enough enough. We'll have you back. I am stephen lacey. I was with katherine hamilton and gillian specter this week we are the energy gang follows on social media hit us up with any reactions to the stories that we discussed. Give us a rating review wherever you get your podcast and send a link to your friends and colleagues. Thanks for being with us. We will catch you next week <music>.

u._s catherine hamilton country energy softbank stephen lacey new york pekar amazon developer katherine hamilton
127  Returning to Apple Mail

AppStories

39:50 min | 2 years ago

127 Returning to Apple Mail

"<music> welcome to app stories that weekly exploration of the world of apps. Today's show is brought to you by kingdom and monday dot com. I'm john voorhees with with me is my co host federico t._h._e. Hey federico hello john. How are you. I'm doing alright. I'm doing all right. I've got my <hes> sidecar all set up here so you know we talked about that last last weekend i i thought i ought to start using a little bit more while i'm recording podcast because i like that idea because there's usually so many windows that we have open when we're recording one of these shows it's it's nice just to have google docs in a nice big window on my main screen and have all the other little bits off to the side so so that was <hes> that that's been nice but today i wanted to talk to you about email because we all know well. You know it's funny because we talked about email way back and i think it was episode. Thirty seven and we talked about what we would be our ideal email client and you know here. We are are almost. I don't know here's his later with with. I don't think any better sloshes older and wiser well. I suppose when we get to the heart of this i may maybe we are wiser. Maybe we're just we're just flailing around looking for solutions. What i think is happening because i don't think that the landscape of email addresses really gotten a whole lot better since we last talked about this <hes> no it really hasn't i think we're still we're still stuck doc in these in these odd predicament of there's the traditional email client experience and there's the modern email experience and i think if anything we've seen over the past couple of years these <hes> optic of business enterprise e type of email products that tend to serve a very specific market that of a large teams on companies that collaborate on email and so we've seen things like spark or we've seen and there was actually a whole privacy debacle of superhuman which stop ema client all these features that <hes> tend to <music> address some very specific problems like i wanna be able to send a message later and so you have scheduled sent or i want to be able to track emails emails and i want to be able to see whether the recipient has opened my email message on in the case of spark and other similar collaboration services <hes> you can collaborate on messages by composing drafts together with other teammates and that sort of makes something that is it's way different from what the the actual email protocol enables it becomes something more similar to google docs mcgregor ins- and so you have those products and then you have g mail which is really become its own thing especially over the past couple of years google has been they have accustomed g mill a._p._i. Now actually you can afford developer. You can write a third party jima client that uses an a._p._i. That is completely separate from standard. I'm up in jamil itself on the web not so much on how you ask. We're gonna talk about that but on the web it now has all of these modern features like it's got snoozing. It's got scheduled. Send it's got plug ins. There's a whole marketplace to install install extensions for djamil. This was possible two years ago when we last email episode and so you can install a plugin forever no or slack or trello in g mill and those blogging they do carry over to the i._r._s. Client to the <hes> djamil app confidential mode that prevents other g email users from four warring your email to other people <hes> there's a bunch of things and of course there's a responses <hes> that google i tested with inbox but inbox has been discontinued and that feature the automatic responses created by a i have been rolled into also jima become its own thing but of course on the ipad still doesn't support split blue. I think or other modern i bet to ask features of course i tre is still not out but i'll be very sceptical well if that's going to support multi window when i thirteen launches then we have our everything else so bunch of clients on the app store apps the try to turn your email conversations into message threats than sort of resemble i message you have have <hes> something like air mail for example. That's heavy on customization and third party adding digressions. You have free clients like eddie's on male which she's very popular. Actually my girlfriend's uses it for some reason. I'm not sure why you we have outlook which is kind of popular and very nice looking. There's a lot of options since but i would you know identify four areas of the email experience. There's a b._c. Enterprise products. There's the all the other modern apps so stuff like outlook for example and these male and all these modern immer clients since with some modern features like snoozing and inbox filtering <hes> features and stuff like that then there's g mill which for me is is really a car a customer service at this point and finally for us users. There's apple meal and make users of course as well right <hes> apple male the default free by apple which for a long time was essentially unchanged and if very much still looks the same but for the first time in in a in a few years in u._s. Thirteen and i apologize thirteen apple is bringing some wouldn't say major but significant changes to mail which was surprising to me that that's right and i guess i would add a couple other facets to the mail app problem problem and that is especially on the mac side on the mac side. You also have a whole raft of apps that are basically web rappers for g mail there there are lots of these and they're all over the place and you don't you don't find them anywhere but on on the mac for the most part then there's an industry of what are effectively get a plug ins for apple mail that add functionality. That's not there already but that you know you can't do that on iowa so that's a that's also limited to the mac and then finally just to kind of elaborate a little bit on your the g mail a._p._i. Point if you wanna try an app that uses that to see what it's like. It's very basic but if you go airmail has two different email half's now. They've got traditional airmail and they've got airmails. Zero and airmails zero is just. It's just just a g mail client and that's because it's using that a._p._i. It's super fast but it's incredibly basic too. I mean it doesn't have any of these. Special features that we've talked talked about at least not yet but that's what it's using and that's what you know. It gives it a really nice clean experience. It's very jail like but you're not gonna find things like snoozing collaboration aberration and and those other things yeah and i think we've learned over the past couple of years that email and i mean we knew this before but i guess we we we we've seen more and more examples that email is just a complicated market right. It's not just about receiving and sending messages anymore anymore. There's a features the now people expect even though they're not officially part of the e mail sending and receiving technology whether it's you know tends tends to be i am app these days but features like snoozing or app integrations or <hes> intelligent filters that sort of detect what's important important and what's not in your inbox this features now most people expect and you have all of these free choices on the especially when it comes to the app store store you have outlook you have all these other apps that just search for email on the app store and you would see all of the different free clients. It's but we've also learned over the past couple of years is that that free price tag often comes at cost and in that cost for many people can be you know the concern of security and privacy and especially because apple is being. I mean you know insisting on their idea of your iphone. Your ipad in your car built to be secure and private. I've seen <hes> you know more and more of our readers and listeners girl increasingly worried and concerned about you know when i sign up for a free email client ryan where is my did actually going walk. Companies is actually has access to my conversations and so i think i think that's a good thing of of being you know more conscience more deliberate about the free services that you sign up for especially when services about email and your private communications and so maybe even more so than two years ago in the in the public arena i think there's a there's more and more of a conversation around who actually access to my email when they sent out for one of these quote unquote modern services right and there's also the fact that for for his mall team line like max stories. It is undeniable that service like spark as some practical benefits. It's that has allowed us to communicate more easily and more quickly because we can. We can share message with each other. We don't have to forward them anymore. And end up with the with the ugly scene taxing the body of the message we can comment on messages and it's really you know i i'm fully aware of the fact that i'm trusting thirty company <hes> and servers somewhere around the world with my private communications and miami eh google accounts but also it's the kind of product that allows me to communicate via using email as the foundation in a way that either email apps allow me to so it's you know at the end of the day about the trade off. Of what kind of leeming experience do you want. Yeah something like spark really does eliminate a lot of friction and i know that you know we we struggle about with that. We don't i guess we don't share a ton on of email but there are probably a few messages a week that you know maybe come into you or they come into me and ryan didn't get them or you didn't get them or whoever didn't get them and and it's just an easy way for us to make sure that everybody's seen it and then talk about. You know who's going to respond or or whatever it might be. It's not like we're having long chats at the bottom some of any of these emails but it's usually just coordinating who's going to deal with it right so that that is really handy i think the flip side of people being wary of free apps and where their data stored though is that some of these apps of move to subscription and you know airmail. I think has very notoriously done that not too long ago about a month ago and people really upset now i think there are right ways and wrong ways to move to subscription and i don't think airmail handled that particularly well when they moved to subscription but it's one of those things where i think users have to kind of evaluate email and understand. Am i gonna pay the cost austin privacy potentially of using a free client or am. I gonna be willing to pay a premium in order to get the features that i want. Those are those are two ways to do. It and i know that you and can i have for quite a while. Now use some us sane box which you know the benefit of that is compared to any of these apps. Isn't it server side. It's a service it's it's just a pure or web app web service that handles your email server side and does some of the things that we've been talking about in terms of special features without having to have a particular app which you know i mean i think more than anything just the ability for that to effectively what it's doing is surfacing emails with with of people who have communicated with before either. I replied to them or i've sent them an email myself it takes newsletters and those kinds of things and shuffles them off to their own kind of look at it later type of folder they call it saying later and then it has blocking and they call it the same black all which you know unfortunately i have to use. Is that fairly frequently these days because i get especially since i handle advertising for mac stories. I get an awful lot of junk that people are very persistent and if it's something that i'm not gonna die. I don't ever want to deal with it again. It goes into that folder and then i don't have to you know i don't have to unsubscribe anything. It just goes away so that's that to me. Has there's been a service that i've found to be probably one of the most valuable email services that i've i've added in the last. I don't know i probably start using it. Maybe three years ago four years ago something like that. This episode of app stores is brought to you by monday. Dot com the tool that simplifies the way teams teams worked together with monday dot com not only can you manage work and deadlines you could also cultivate a culture of transparency so everyone in your company company works better together. There's so many great things about monday dot com. It works for teams of any size from a couple of freelancers on up to huge teams since i began trying monday dot com. I've been really happy to find that it works great for our small team mac stories as well as big companies. It's also easy to use you can automate your workflows billboards from scratch or use their pre made templates which i really love as a great way to get up to speed quickly and you can upload files directly from your computer dropbox or google drive monday dot com helps you stay on track. You can create accountability by assigning <unk> tasks to owners and she'll never miss a deadline with their my week view a personal assistant for you and your team. There's even an iowa's apt to that'll keep you going while you're on the go. I'm new to monday to come and i've been really happy with it so far especially the ability to view projects and all sorts of different ways there's can ban style card views which are similar to things that we've used in the past for our club max stories newsletter and i really have loved using the templates because they make it really simple for me to get up to speed and try new things like visualizing our timeline for the editorial calendar at baxter's this fall you can try it out today yourself by going to monday dot com slash app stores to start a fourteen day free trial. That's monday dot com slash app stories. Go there now and try it out. I think you'll love it. Our thanks to monday dot com for their support app stories <music>. So how do you actually helped me understand. How do you actually using mill on a daily basis. Like what do you are you one of those people that files sales messages in in specific folders or do you just sort of in search. I mostly archive in search so but i but i don't archive everything. What i i with e mail what i try to do is if it's something that's truly junk. I throw trash because i as much as i want to rely on search. I want to to make sure that the results i get back from an are as good as possible so as a result of that i just if it's just junk e-mail whether it's spam or whether it's you you know i don't know some advertisement from some site that i bought something from at some point in the past. I'll delete those because who knows. Maybe there's a search term in their of something where i legitimately legitimately want to find an email from someone that that sent it to me and it'll pull up this ad. I just don't wanna pollute my search results so the first cut is is is. Is it totally junk that i'm never gonna want again whereas our potential for one and see it again. If there's a potential for wanting to see it again i archive it and then i use search and i typically use search whatever email client i happened to be using at the time but if that doesn't work i always fall back to the g mail search because really i don't think anyone anyone has figured out how to search email as well as google in terms of both the speed and accuracy so that's that's. That's always my fallback so i keep g mail on my i._o._s. Devices and i use it on the web on my mac as the last ditch which evert to find something i'm having trouble finding for whatever reason in some other app how about you. I mostly do the same. I e us sing box to categorize emailing three main buckets. There's my inbox. There's the same later folder where sort of unimportant messages go and then i can decide whether one of those messages i wanna promote to the inbox and seem box learns <hes> in the feature <hes> so we mentioned the service before it's a service side tool that integrates with your account and he creates <hes> you know as you keep using learns whether contact is important or not not and the third folder is the same news where my newsletters and sort of social communications and updates and all that kind of stuff ends up you know i try declared glared email bankruptcy few weeks ago. I deleted nardelli. The archive messages from inbox walks and sing little folder going all the way back to two thousand sixteen because i was never going to bite. This message is a anyway and there were just gonna make me feel bad and then even if you were you know even if i considered the idea of replying to a message from two thousand three hundred sixteen. What do you say to a person that emailed you three two years ago response right so i just i feel really bad about responding to people but then again responding to email is not my job. If i were to spend all my day responding to emails i not do you know the thing that people know me for in the first place which is running website and writing so i try not to upset too much over that and i've been trying to keep my cleaning box ever since your caved everything and when i'm done with something or if don respond to something i just i read. All the messages were received. I only respond to a subset of them and if i ever need something i search for it and like you if the searching my email client is not working i tend to fall back to g mail which i keep installed on my ipad iphone life on the official google app okay. I'm wondering if you use flagging and pinning at all because i know interest in all right because in spark it's called pin but you know if you pin an email and spark. I'm pretty sure that it just ends up as a flagged email in in other services and i have used that a fair paramount especially where i have ongoing conversations with someone who i'm working with and i've found that it's a very slippery slope where you'll at i'll end up with way too many pin messages because i forget to unpack them in archive them at some point and then it just becomes it just becomes another inbox at some point and that's that's one of the things that i'm trying trying to think trying to rethink how i handle those sorts of messages and one of the most important things for me. Aside from kind of the auto. Oh categorization that we've talked about with sandbox is that i have a way to get things that i need to follow up on out of email and that in a lot of email apps that's integration with a particular service whether it's something like to do is stir good tasks or reminders or whatever but i won't use an email app unless us there's a convenient way for me to get the information out of it but also be able to get back to the message in the first place so i can get the context if i need needed and so that has become probably more than anything else the most important aspect of email to me yeah so the way that i see it is m._s._n._b._c. They're important or is not and if it's important i either respond right away. If it's an emergency i need to act on it right away or save it. In my task manager. I don't believe in the idea of creating multiple inboxes in different apps apps. I don't wanna have to think about and it's really the same reason why i keep checklists for example in notes. Okay the things that i have to do going to my task. Ask manager so whether it's note or whether it's an email or if it's a safari webpage i don't like idea of okay the notes that i need to to work on our saved with a checklist in notes and i just want to have a task manager and everything going there but really again i should say i want to use email as little as possible. I don work in sales. I you know really are need to do is a few times a week. Go through support requests from cobb members because they really care about those those are important and i go through. My inbox walks especially if there's like communication from p._r. People that i need to be in touch with or developers that have sent me a beta of an app that i want to cover. I don necessarily wanted to want to respond to everyone. <hes> there's <hes> you know when you when you write a website and and i don't mean to sound like a terrible herbal person but it's just what it is when you write a public website there's y- blog about technology and i guess that it's the same about video games or musical politics or sports sports or whatever people saying you a lot of ideas a lot of feedback and a lot of comments and really most of them are bad i when i say bad i mean the either like a bad fit for my website for example right because maybe they are new readers and maybe the fan my article or my site in a google search and they don't necessarily know the kind of you know policy that i have for stories and so they suddenly suggestions like i didn't want to respond saying neither he's a with you. I just read the message kite or leave it there because i forget about it and then i go back in there and i used to be very very you know. I used to think it years ago but now i feel i feel pretty good about it like if something's important are respond right away if it's important but i can do we leader egos in reminders okay so even if it's like in the morning you wake up. You're having breakfast. You see that you got an email that you don't have to deal with it right now. But you do want to kind of deal with it. Maybe later in the day you would put that reminders even if you're going to respond the same day but not right then oh yeah because what i do and this leads us into. I guess the you know. The topic of this episode is once it saving reminders. If it's got to link back to the original message i archive it so it's gone from the inbox because in a way i've dealt with it already right a sense. What's that i've put it in my task manager. So when did you date comes up. I will respond. There's gonna be a link that takes back to the message but otherwise it's outta my sight it you know. I don't have to think about it anymore. My the task manager will think about it for me. Yeah that that makes a lot of sense. I would say that i try to do that most of the time but i have found myself kind of stuck in this pin notes world where and that's one of the things i'm trying to escape dumb being things john why i know i know and and you know i think that leads really well into what we're both really doing right now. Which is we're both have have returned to apple mail and there's reasons for that and i think sometimes these extra features like painting or flagging. I mean you can flag in apple mail you too but sometimes some of that stuff just gets in the way and there are easier ways to deal with this. I do think in one of the features that's coming in. Iowa's thirteen is the ability to link back to an email from reminders and that is really powerful once once. I saw that in the beta i knew the apple. Mail was probably something that i could do going forward. I mean that's that's been one of the big i guess speed bumps or or roadblocks blacks to me actually using it in the past but being able to link back to messages that's that's really powerful yeah so that's basically <hes> so it was the catalyst for my decision to go back to return to apple mail and see how it would go u._s. Thirteen there's a new sort of hidden feature of mail that allows you to select some text in a message sugge- hit the share button from the copy and paste my new and select the reminders extension and when you do select reminders sanction and the reminder you will create. We'll have a little male icon that serves as a dip link back to original message right. These feature used to be available only in two ways on the iphone if he used siri to say hey a seasoned remind me about this and this portion of the command would be the email message and so you would create a reminder with a link back to the the message in apple mail or on the ipad with dragon drop you could drag a message from male into reminders and it would have a diplomatic as well but there was no way to do it without voice on the iphone without siri on the iphone right now now. You just need to open select some taxed opened the share sheet. That dexter becomes the note of the reminder. There's a dip linked to the a message and the subject of the email is used as the title of the reminder the beautiful thing about these integrations that even if you're khyber message even if you move folders because of the way that message deep links work it doesn't matter what the location of the messages the the system can low the message using a unique identifier that is independent from the location of the message in your account so that allows me to create a reminder for a message surge. Give it a due date. Give it a do time and then no matter word the messages i mean as long as it's still exists in my email account tapping the male iconic hi connie reminders will take me to that message and these <hes> because i'm you've been using reminders for the past year and i'm using reminders. Were more now now that it's becoming so much more powerful than i was thirteen. These was the final aspect that the final feature that i needed to to try and go back to apple mail because i tell you john there have been missing apple mail in the sense of i just wanna have that it's not creepy that <hes> is fluid and as a native you i and looks good on i._o._s. And and he's going to support dark mode as soon as i s. thirteen launches oranges and it's going to support multi window on ipad when i s launches and mail takes all of these boxes right it of course it you know apple. It's not running any cloud based service to sort of scan your email and do weird things so your email. The mail app is limited and you. Can you know there's a bunch of the things that are wrong with it and it still doesn't have feature parity with michael. Steele cannot do smart folders still cannot do you know ruled for examples for example but it is floyd it is very elegantly is very pretty. It looks like anita u._s. Up it supports dark mode out of the box. It's white gestures. They are the most fluid and smooth of overseen an anaemic and you know when you want archive or flag a message or whatever and it supports all of the new a._p._i.'s thirteen naipoto as it's got multi window. It's dark scott context menus which are really nicely done. I believe it's got the full peach capture sure as well <hes> which by the way i gotta add to my review because i forgot to mention this so i will <hes> write a reminder right away. <hes> it is the most else native experience for an email client and for somebody like me who you know as you mentioned we only share and comment on message using spark every once in a while so i can keep spark sort of <hes> you know the backup tool for back channel communications but for my daily experience i would rather see something like mail. All that is it's clean it works well with other apps on devices and i should also mention because of how my life has changed over the past few years. I don't care about push notifications anymore. That's just not a thing that that is a priority for me anymore. At this point in my life <hes> i can open my emma client every two hours and then if i see something new i'll deal with otherwise i'd you know i used to obsess over staying on top of emo getting pushed into the kitchen for something. It's much better to leave life this way if you can afford it this absurd of app stories is brought to you by paying ingram the company that makes website performance monitoring really easy. Everyone loves a fast website and pinged them are helping to keep your favorite sites. Online sites like netflix amazon spotify twitter buzzfeed and slack. These are just a few of the companies that trust pinged them to take care of their website. Monitoring websites can be pretty complicated and you can monitor any site transaction with kingdom things like user registrations nations and loggins checkouts and a whole bunch more pinged him cares about your users having the smoothest site experience possible and if disaster strikes you'll be the first to know it super easy to get started all pingtam needs. Is your your l. and they'll take care of the rest. It's simple as that. Go oh to pinged him. Dot com slash sign up right now for a fourteen day free trial with no credit card required when you sign up use the code app stories stories at checkout to get a huge thirty percent off your first invoice again that's pinged them dot com slash sign up and the code app stores for a whopping thirty percent off our thanks to ping them for their support of the show in terms of notifications and i do like apple meals option and you can find it in that context menu to notify me so if there is an important thread that i've got going with. Someone and i'm waiting for a response. I can get a respond. It can get a notification just for that particular response in for v._i._p.'s. I will do that with just a select election number of people but for the most part yeah. I've got all the notifications shut off on email. I go in you know a few times a day and look at my email but i do not obsess <unk> over keeping up with it minute by minute at all between the notify me and v._i._p. Is that's all. I really need to keep on top of things that are absolutely it critical. Although i will also say that v._i._p.'s are totally broken for me right now in the beta. I'm not sure what's going on. I have a bunch of people in my v._i._p.'s who shouldn't be there and when i delete them they just pop back into male i don't i can't get rid of <hes> these extra v._i._p.'s and i fortunately they're not. They're not people who email me on a regular basis anyway so it's not like it's causing problems but i would like to narrow that list down because that list for me is going to be you know fewer than ten people and and and i've i'd like to be able to do that again. The other thing that i would mention to that you know apple really does make sure that their apps ups are accessible and part of accessibility is the ability to change the size of text in apps and one of the things that has driven me a little crazy about sparks. Since i've been using it is that you can't change the text size. You can change the font size of the message you're sending but you can't change the you know the size of the the message that you're you're viewing an apple. You can apple mail you can do that by going into the the settings app and the one of the reasons that this is is important in is not only is my eyesight not great but on top of that you know we're using devices at all sorts of distant different distances now. The ipad i think is a really good example because a lot of times you may be holding your ipad in your hands relatively close to your face and the smaller texas totally fine but then you might ed attach a keyboard and beholding it out quite a bit further in front of you typing and it's a lot harder to read those messages and the ability to kind of change the text size size and whatever app you're working in. I find to be you know a great feature. Use it in my text editors all the time because some days. I don't know my eyes are tired or i'm holding the ipad further away or or whatever it is i can change it and adjusted depending on the particular conditions that i'm in and you can't do that with all the email email clients that are out there something that i've been doing lately to sort of work around the lack of smart folders email i i set up a features in the djamil web app which by the way you can now access just fine in thanks to desktop class safari. I i set up filters to aggregate messages like newsletters from club max stories or newsletters from emoji pedia and that kind of stuff those filters they now show up as mailboxes boxes in in apple mail. I customize the sidebar in in males so that i can have quick access to those mailboxes and so now every time aminu club newsletter comes out it automatically and zapping my club kaba maximum mail quote unquote folder because g email is actually doing the server side processing using filters so it is a way for me to sort of add features to mail. Even though you know you you cannot of course create his mouth folder by because it's gino and everything runs in the cloud you can just create the rule using djamil and it's even better now because he night safari works expertly well <hes> actually you can make the argument that you can now use g._m._o. Safari on the ipad which i have tested and it's pretty much wouldn't say perfect perfect but it's very much usable and all almost one with a with a accessing jean from mack so i think i'm fine with apple all-male for now. I'm really enjoyed the ability to <hes> create multiple windows. You can create windows phone message composer. You can open individual messages suggest in apple calls them out celia windows which means they are. <hes> you know single purpose windows dedicated to that individual message when you're done with the message there's a button that says close or done any closes the window so <hes> i can open messages multiple windows i can pay for you can do things like an talk about this. In my view you can do things like open. A message like club maximum newsletter tied this open maximum weekly in a separate male window now and next to it put safari window like a blank safari window and all the links. The open from our club are mexico's. Weekly newsletter letter will open in that window on the right side of the screen and so you just created a klopp maxwell he's workspace max as weekly workspace to read the email on on the left side and check out all the links and all the apps and all the articles that we linked to on the right side. Which is that's exactly. The one of the benefits someone leaned on ipad and mail supports all of these by default. That's a great idea. You know i guess the one other thing i would mention about mail that i'm trying right now and i'm not really convinces is gonna stick or not is that i have physically separated my work and my personal emails into different apps okay so with my personal email account. I have moved that too. Just use the g mail app because especially when i'm looking at a unified inbox. I don't don't too much of my. I tried. I guess i try to manage my master's email more carefully to keep the junk out of my inbox but it's it's just too much to also do that with my personal g mail where i end up with all kinds of advertisements for sites that i bought things from and that sort of thing and yeah i'll go through through every now and then in all unsubscribe to a bunch of that but it's just like i don't know tons of emails from my kid's school and other stuff. That's like it's certifications from my bank whatever it is they're none of them are things that hardly ever need to be done right away and so by keeping them in a separate app i can go about once a day or every other day and it's totally fine. I don't need to be in there as much and then it's also not kind of deluding and and polluting the inboxes that i have on apple mouse so that's that's something i'm giving it a try and i don't. It's just too early to know if it will stick. I had a lot of problems especially she on i._o._s. With the betas early on with apple mail it was one of the apps that was probably the roughest for me. It seems like that has settled down to a large degree so a lot of this for me as an experiment. That's only been going on for really a few weeks and ernest lately because before that i kind of set everything up but then fell back to my old systems just because apple mail was having some troubles but yeah it's it's coming along at this point okay federico. I think we'll have more to say dan email in the future. I think we'll always have something to say about email because as much as i'm enjoying these this new system that i've set up which is awfully similar to what you're you're doing. I feel like there's always tweaks that can make it a little bit. Better and part of that is just that i think e mail is is awful in general and there's always something that can be fixed a little better. I want to thank our sponsors for this episode. That's pinged him and monday dot com you can find me and federico over at max stories dot net where we're writing all the time and you can find federico over on instagram and twitter. He's at the teacher. That's v. i. t._i. And i'm at john voorhees on both off j. o. h. N. v. w. r. h. W. s. talk to you next week federico john john.

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16 Minutes on the News #6: Health Claims, Corporate Breaches

a16z

17:13 min | 2 years ago

16 Minutes on the News #6: Health Claims, Corporate Breaches

"Hi everyone welcome today. Six z podcast i'm sonal and this is our six episode of sixteen minutes our new show where we cover recent headlines of the week the a six z way why why they're in the news why they matter from vantage point in tech and share experts views on the trends involved as well. You can catch up on past episodes at essex z dot com slash sixteen eighteen minutes or subscribe to it as a separate feed in your favorite podcast player app this week. We have two episodes since we'll be skipping next week. This episode coverage to other topics that came up recently the capital. One breach is more of the same or different. How does it fit into the seemingly endless string of corporate tax but first we dive deeper into recent news around healthcare occur claims data and insurance providers which sounds boring but his apparently not okay so the first segment is on recent news that a number of big tech companies including amazon apple google microsoft are working with insurance companies in order to help provide claims data to patients and this came about at a developer a conference hosted by a coalition call this karen alliance which is basically a bipartisan multi-sector collaborative. That's what they call themselves and it's it's includes a lot of former national health coordinators. The u._s.'s first health information technologies are the u._s. As i see tayo the former secretary of health and human services and a number of other people are working in this alliance but the key point of this and just a summary news before i introduced are a sixty expert is this the first time that healthcare providers are giving claims data to third party developers so so just to summarize also some of the stats around claims data so apparently there are four billion prescription claims and three billion medical claims processed every a year and then in terms of the cost of the healthcare industry three hundred and fifteen billion dollars is spent on health care claims of which thirty five percent is administrative straight of waste or overhead so now i'm going to introduce our as the expert julie you who is a former founder of a patient provider matching startup and and is a deal partner on the a six bio team who is focused on all things care delivery. Welcome julie great severe. I'm so excited to hear from you because honestly claims it is the most boring can't annesley and sexy you do why tell me why it matters at a higher level <hes> the notion of liquidity and healthcare and it's almost an inevitability that it will eventually occur but to say things like this is very exciting just because it's it's making it all real we think about the consumer angle oftentimes what you hear from consumers with regards to health care is it's inconvenient. It's slow and i never know what's going on and it's opaque and i never understand what things cost and transparency and i think claims data specifically. He has a role to play in making all of that better. Why is that what is it about claims data specifically because when i think of claims data i think i have so many bills outstanding and late fees he's from labs i go to the doctor's office and the lab is a separate office and they have different billing systems and then i'm like what the heck yeah exactly so in very simple terms claims claims are basically the invoices of healthcare is equivalent of if you were to go to a mechanic and get something done to your car. You'd get a list of the things that were done how much they cost etc now. There are many different types of claims data. You mentioned lab data. There's medical claims data so services rendered by a physician or a nurse like office exactly toss braise. It's there there are prescription. Pharmacy claims data so drugs that are prescribed to you those can also be a claims based payments and then there's many different elements of claims data data that <hes> that we should be aware of one is that claims because they take so long to process can be in very different states and depending on when you see a claim. You might see very very different information. What do you mean by that like specifically yeah so the average length of time that it takes to fully process a claim can be anywhere from two to three months upwards of many many months beyond that and and the reason for that is that you know the process involves first of all a provider submitting a claim to an insurance company saying here is what was done to this patient zonal for these specific line item services and here's what i think i should be paid the insurance company then receives it and by the way that process of simply receiving it could take weeks because there's lots of middlemen it could be a paper based process etc <hes> <hes> and so then the insurance company receives it and then ultimately they need to adjudicated they need to determine whether or not this was a valid service per the contracts per the benefit of the consumer and therefore how much am i actually going to pay and then how much meghan leave to be paid out of the pocket of the patient and so that process is very lengthy involves many multiple we'll players intermediaries and depending on when you see that claim in that in that entire cycle as you can imagine you might see very different information so as a pre adjudicated versus posted mutated is it <hes> sort of coming from the provider side is it <hes> on the insurance side at cetera so for instance one of the major things that insurance companies have been very edison around sharing is the full set of allowed amount data and what that means is basically when a physician <hes> submits a claim they will put their they're sort of if built amount but contractually they may have specific rates that are negotiated with the insurance companies and releasing that into the public would obviously indicate any negotiating leverage coverage that they might have with provider <unk> markets. That's so helpful. I loved the lay of the land the context for how the claims work the process so now back to the news. Why does it matter that. Developers can develop on top of this. It sounds like a very complicated system. People don't have incentives to share be transparent like there's already enough middlemen. What what does that have developers in the middle here now yeah well. I think ultimately the beneficiary will be patients because these companies will ultimately be developing apps that are consumer facing thing and i think we can probably break down the benefits into two major buckets. One benefit is simply financial transparency. You can imagine like amid dot com of healthcare finally being built. There's actually <hes> unfortunately sort of a graveyard companies that have tried to do that in the past and some of the challenges that those companies have faced are around the lack of liquidity of data. It's funny that it's the novel thing that you know all of a sudden the insurance companies are going to buy into making a._p._i.'s available to consumers because that data has existed in a b. two b. format for other companies so the consumer everything is actually the real new patients benefit to those apps. There are actually multibillion dollar businesses made on using claims data for other commercial purposes one one example that probably not so many people outside the industry know about is claims data are actually used very heavily by pharmaceutical and life sciences companies and the use case there is taking sort of the claims exhaust from insurance data exhaust right yup and using that to inform which providers <hes> see what types of patient populations and that can be informative too you everything from clinical trial recruiting who are the physicians who are most likely to have patients where they can be recommended a certain alternative therapies and so that is a very robust industry existed existed for decades and that is actually very liquid use of claims data and what's the other bucket. The other bucket is actually the health benefit. That's claims the well. This is the holy grail and i think one of the interesting thing things about this announcement. It might be nice to have information and ability to see what was done but really the holy. Grail is how how can move the needle on my health status. A lot of companies have also tried to use claims to make health claims unintended there but there's only so much you can see a claim that can then imply what actually happened from a healthcare perspective right so it's the equivalent of trying to infer you know how did the food tastes based on seeing a restaurant receipts so that's really where the need for a medical record data becomes marine necessary right the actual clinical context around a given claim can tell you a lot more about the health status and then from what you can do to move the needle on that if you compare claims to medical records claims the broad data that will give you a full much more comprehensive set of information about what happened to you whereas the medical record and the other types the data described as sort of the depth at the breadth versus the right you can be a scaffold. Let's call it of the journey that a patient has had around their health condition and as a starting point which can then inform okay. It looks like i should double click here and what happened around this particular event so bottom line for me. How should we think about this news in the broader context of healthcare and in particular where claims really fit in yeah. I think we should be very optimistic that this is yet another sign that data liquidity will be a basic piece of infrastructure within our industry that said i think this is only step one of many steps to come around really getting a holistic understanding at the consumer level about what's going on with your healthcare so of class v you wonder oh if data liquidity medical actual medical records can be to dotto but really what i'm excited about and what i think the whole industry looking towards is a three auto which would be all of the sort of non medical but health related content that actually can matter to us as consumers we can control and use to drive our health outcomes so it's things like food. What is my social status. Were now recognizing more and more that things like social isolation are huge contributors to <hes> negative effects on mental health and even things like g._i. Issues have a huge mental health component and so literally understanding. My social interactions are gonna have a huge impact on that will thank you for joining in the segment. Thank you so much. Donald okay so the last segment this week covers the capital one data breach and how corporate tax happen so quickly i summarize a news versus coppola one is the financial services company and they do lots of things including provide credit cards. They're considered one of the ten largest banks in terms of assets and they are the third largest credit card issuer and credit powers a lot out of our financial system. Today is what someone stealing date is not so good so at some did is a hacked into a server holding the personal records of over one hundred million people and here's what they stole a hundred and forty thousand social security numbers eighty thousand bank account numbers one hundred six million credit card applications from between two thousand fifteen to twenty nineteen according to the company is one of the largest data at this from from a bank ever it costs estimated cost right now is about one hundred fifty million just for context compared to the equifax credit bureau breach of two thousand seventeen that went expose the sensitive of information on over one hundred forty seven million consumers and it caused way more about six hundred fifty million and they just settled claims for that about two weeks ago so that's a quick context where the news let me introducing the expert joola garza who is our operating partner for security was a former c._f._o. Chief security officer at box. He's actually investigated a lot of breaches as he was responsible for incident response for a bank and citigroup and in his career has worked on over one hundred thousand security incidents. Welcome joel thank you. It's going to be here so so you know there's a lot of data breaches almost like why are we even doing this as a news item. It feels like it's the same old story over and over again. What is different or unusual. If anything about this one well the interesting thinking about this one is that capital one has long been kind of the most one of the most sophisticated most secure adopters of cloud technology. I think they were probably the first large financial service to actually actually moved to using cloud services. They really leaned into a lot of these technology trends and they've transformed the way that they build in their business and so for someone who is so sophisticated to have a breach of this magnitude happened to them on their new platform is actually quite quite a quite a stutter and what actually happened just in the details that apparently the hacker got in. It was a thirty-three attacker from seattle a software engineer. She got into a firewall miss configuration and they themselves are speaking of them being a leader in cloud services a._w._s. Amazon web services but apparently the underlying cloud services were not compromised. Can you give us some more details on how the heck happen well. I think that the indictments that were released by the u._s. Government were fairly detailed but they don't provide right all of their kind of relevant points and there's been a lot of speculation about what the underlying causes are. <hes> and folks are trying to make this sound similar to a lot of breaches and a lot of other kind of scenarios that impacted other companies and so i think people are filling in the blanks and be still don't really know the details but at a high level it sounds like there were some pretty sharp edges in the way at this cloud service providers configuration for product worked and the configuration was not set appropriately so that allowed for an issue where <hes> endure internal services could be exploit data could be exfiltrated <hes>. It's a fairly common occurrence. That's happened to a lot of companies this year. He said that it's actually sometimes hard to tell that the information hasn't really come out in the more the lines i used to love saying and i continue to say when we talk about taxes. That attribution is hard. It's hard to figure out who did it. Who done it well. It's hard until it isn't right. I think with this situation we've got a computer intruder that was bragging about sort of the activity that they had done and they were engaged in several very prominent hacker chat channels taking credit for their activity and <hes> they he actually had posted some capital wednesday to publicly available. Get hub repository a another security researcher was out there looking through data repos and found capital one's data and turned around and reported it to capital one well the thing that's funny to me even though it shouldn't be funding the f._b._i. Noticed her activity on meet up and she posted comments on twitter and slack of all a places. How does this fit in the overall taxonomy of corporate reaches. We keep hearing about one every year. Target equifax the list goes on and on so in the old days when things were predominantly on prem people were running there on premises mrs right on premises as opposed this offer as a service as clouds or cloud or whatever the case may be in those days breaches typically happened because software patches worn applied more someone gave away their username and password and that was kind of how we got most of the large breaches equifax was the result of a software patch that hadn't been applied that allowed the hackers to get into the network and actual trade the data as we've moved to the cloud world. We've gotten out of the need to patch a lot of this stuff right. Cloud solves a lot of these problems. The number one source of breaches. Now seems seems to be missed configuration. That's something we've been noticing for the last couple of years. It's actually one of the forecast that we made earlier this year looking at all the data that these kinds of configuration issues the things that drive breaches into the future and way this category of configuration issues. What does that mean. Justice in. This case was supposedly firewall configuration. Why wouldn't a cloud service provider just set it all universally universally for everyone and so they are in the process and amazon has made an amazon google and microsoft and made a lot of attempts to make a lot of these tools more easy intuitive live and and and and just more rapidly to be deployed but one of the challenges is when you're a large cloud service provider you're trying to hit the right balance between safety and security ease views and features right and i think what generally happens with security in the cloud world having come from box and work through a lot of these problems is that you have to find that balance between ease of use and security yeah so a high level understanding of how this breach occurred is that there was some kind of misconduct operation on a web application firewall provided by a cloud vendor now none of the products what extra specified none of the vendors are specified but there was basically amiss configuration on a web application firewall that somehow exposed internal resources right resources resources that were not supposed to be available to the public and this person found those internal resources was able to access them from the outside and then exploit them in such a way that they were able able to take more data frightened is pretty common if i recall because i covered the a._t. And t. breach back in two thousand twelve. I edited an op ed from wave of all people but isn't that what he did kinda and a hacked into the a._t. and t. thing yeah. This is a fairly common. I mean the traditional way that you would build these sorts of applications and build this infrastructure is that you have transitive trust relationship ship so it's the idea that i've got this hard perimeter this really this really solid firewall in perimeter that keeps people from getting in and inside that perimeter at tends to get software right so services are available things can talk to each other that you wouldn't want have which enable collaboration and people just ration- rapid deployment sorts of really interesting things things however the moment you breach that perimeter you expose these internal services and your data can be actual traded right and so the mood now generally in the industry people are moving towards what's called zero zero trust approach which is to remove the concept of having this perimeter removed the concept of firewall. Just assume there's no trust in any environment and build your services according according to that kind of a model that won't that be hard for people to collaborate and balance all the security usability convenience that you talked about. I mean you could argue that. Actually once you start to build security in can you actually make it a design requirement along with ease of use along with rail interoperability that you can actually make sure that all those requirements are met and if you look at really successful software companies companies now they start with security bilton until securities baked in hard. What can companies do to protect themselves. The first is obviously choosing quality vendors making sure that appropriately vet your third parties <hes> i think in this specific case right. How do you prevent these sorts of things from happening. The fact that so many people were able to infer exactly what happened happened in this specific breach means that it's been happening out in the community for some time and this is just a further supports the case that we need to have better collaboration around information security better collaboration ration- around security breaches that things like this that these attack vectors are shared throughout throughout the community and that people can take the appropriate steps to protect themselves so bottom line it from joel. How should we think about this. Capital bridge in the context of all the other beaches in the taxonomy reaches well. I think i think the unfortunate truth is is that if something like this can happen to capital one in who probably one of the best in the business it can happen to anyone and so we're going to continue to see this kind of an activity. We're going to continue to see these breaches and we're gonna have to really think hard about who we as a people you want to protect our data and wanna think about data privacy and testing will thank you for joining the segment.

developer amazon julie microsoft u._s. tayo equifax t. seattle citigroup social isolation partner
Podcast: How the Trump Administration is Affecting Women's Health Care Beyond Abortion 2019-08-21

The Takeaway

28:27 min | 2 years ago

Podcast: How the Trump Administration is Affecting Women's Health Care Beyond Abortion 2019-08-21

"This is the takeaway for august twenty. First planned parenthood is forgoing some federal funding over new rule limiting in how they can provide abortion services as the low income family. We've depended on it for feminine healthcare exam and especially when my daughter priyanka so yeah we need planned parenthood we breakdown titled ten funding and how this move by the trump administration fits into a long standing g._o._p. Apiece strategy also on the show. Some states are testing the legal limits of religion in public schools by mandating the phrase in god. We trust be displayed with when a group that has been dominant feels threatened. One of the things that it might want to do is to find markers of showing were still here. Were still the dominant option. Okay pod listeners. Let's get going uh planned. Parenthood is pulling out of a federal funding program over a trump administration rule that limits the provider's ability to refer abortion services to low compati- conservative politicians have long promised to cut off funding for planned parenthood in an effort to motivate antiabortion voters to the polls would not going to allow and we're not gonna fund as long as you have the abortion going on at planned parenthood. We will finally de-fund planned parenthood in tab. Ury the trump administration made good on its campaign promises setting into motion efforts to cut off some of planned parenthood federal funding under the title ten program of the the public health service act this week planned parenthood backed away from the fight saying they would forego the funding rather than compromise the organization's commitment to women's health the move comes on the heels of a leadership shakeup at planned parenthood where the first medical doctor to be president stepped down from her position after disagreements about the role of politics in the organization and the questions remain about what planned parenthood's decision not to accept title ten funding will mean for the women who rely most on these healthcare centers <music> joining us now our north senior reporter at vox covering gender and reproductive rights and welcome to the show hi thanks for having me and alina sal ghana cough senior vice president and director of women's health policy at the kaiser family foundation alina. Welcome thank you. It's a pleasure to join you saw anna. Let's start off with you briefly. What is titled titled ten funding and how does it work so titled ten funding is federal family planning funding and it's really intended to help underserved population so people without insurance or people who are low income to get services like sti testing contraception things like that and and what we know about the connection between what the trump administration is saying <hes> they're not allowing this this organization to provide abortion referrals and tying title tend to that. Can you help us clarify that that's right so <hes> <hes> so a while back the earlier this year the trump administration finalized a rule <hes> regarding title funding and <hes> critics call the roll the domestic gag rule <hes> <hes> and what it says is that if you cut titled ten funding you cannot also provide abortions or refer for abortions now titled ten funding itself actually could never be we used for abortions so what they're really saying. Now is not just you can't use this money for abortions but if you get this money you can't do abortions at all alina. Let's bring you in here <hes> other other than abortion referrals which is kind of what a lot of folks are focusing on here what other services does planned parenthood provide in terms of reproductive care and women's health out well. Let's just a very small part of what they do. They provide <hes> access to contraceptive services sti testing and treatment h._i._v. treatment and other prevent h._i._v. testing and other preventive services so that's just a fraction of what they do and alina you know who will this <hes> change affect the most what parts of the country will be impacted <hes> differently well. Many parts of the country are going to be a <hes> impacted and i just want to add that. This changed does not only affect planned parenthood. There's a network of four thousand sites across the country that are participating in the program. Planned parenthood is about ten percent of the sites and forty percent of the patients but there are many other sites and many states have actually actually said that they are going to withdraw from the program so we know in maine we know utah. Actually all the title ten sites are planned parenthood <unk> clinics many parts of california oregon washington vermont so many parts of the country are going to be affected did and what do we know about planned parenthood funding structure right. Now i mean how much of this money from titled ten was going to the overall planned parenthood parenthood budget and how much does planned parenthood rely on this money right so this wasn't the only federal funding stream that planned parenthood gets <hes> they also receive money through medicaid kaid <hes> and that so far has not been cut off <hes> so they will still be getting federal money they won't have to completely cease operations but <hes> they have said that certain things will stop. They've mentioned <hes> that <hes> they actually operate on mobile health unit that drives around ohio offering <hes> family planning services and other services and and <hes> that may have to stop functioning and they've mentioned also that wait times. We'll go up at clinics around the country and they are concerned. The patients might go without care but planned parenthood's entire budget does not come from federal funding. They're also private donors. I understand that are doing this. Are those private. Donors going to be able to fill the gap in funding. It's it's unclear to me whether or not planned parenthood has a plan to fill the gap <hes> right now right so they do get private donations also <hes> and they've said <hes> you know certainly they will try to make up. Some of the shortfall planned parenthood is known for a long time that this might becoming so you know. I'm sure that they've been talking to folks who could provide donations <hes> <hes> but they've also said that it's unlikely that private donations would be able to make up this full shortfall given <hes> you know. This is a long standing federal program that planned parenthood's been part of for a long time alina. You used to your point earlier about this being a nationwide problem. Are there alternatives to planned. Parenthood are smaller clinics. <hes> going to have to pick up <hes> some of the the slack here or is this only is planned parenthood the only option in in large parts of the country well in some parts of the country. It is the only option option and you know there have been studies. Actually shown that went planned parenthood goes away when it's closed the sti rates go up in texas had was an example well <hes> as well where the texas medicaid program decided to terminate its participation in planned parenthood and what they found was actually that they were fewer you were claims for a u._d.'s and other <hes> an implants which are long acting and very effective methods actually showed increases in the rate rate of medicaid births in the state <hes> in other cases in wisconsin. There were also similar cutbacks to planned parenthood through state dollars and they also saw that there there were <hes> adverse outcomes and women were finding that they were without providers alina. We asked our listeners about their experiences experiences with planned parenthood and we had a couple of calls. I wanna play one from nikki nikki from arlington texas. I relied on planned parenthood for regular checkups for about with the flu and for regular pap exams when i was young because i could not afford health insurance i specifically went there because they had a sliding scale that i could could afford and there was no judgment only now is that <hes> inexperienced that a lot of folks who who a lot of women in particular who use planned parenthood <hes> say say that they've had and if so what impact is this change going to have on that sliding scale that nikki <hes> referred to yet you actually our own survey so show that upwards of a third of women in the united states say that they have used a planned parenthood because planned parenthood gets title tan they are able to offer these sliding being scales and because the title ten funds offer the replacement of the cost so that planned parenthood is reimbursed for the services that they provide vita uninsured and low income women so i'm very sure that the experience that you're caller had is very much reflected in experiences of other women as as well particularly low income women who don't have the resources to go <hes> to a private doctor or other sites and we also mentioned at the top that planned parenthood has had its own internal struggles recently. <hes> one of them was a leadership shakeup at the very top. Can you tell us a little bit about that and whether or not that was connected to planned parenthoods response here <hes> that's right <hes> so <hes> dr liana one <hes> has left the organization was the was the president and the first as medical doctor to be president in a long time. <hes> you know that was an issue those characterized differently obviously by her and by <hes> some within planned parenthood she really said that <hes> the organization wanted her to be political about abortion and a different way than the way that she wanted to approach it. <hes> you know other sources within planned parenthood told me me and told buzzfeed that <hes> there were management issues involved to whatever the case i actually wouldn't say that that's related to planned parenthood response here. They've pretty much always said that they they will not comply with this domestic gag rule <hes> they really feel that <hes> there's no way they can offer a full range of comprehensive family planning without referring for abortion on providing abortion as part of that and so they've never been really willing to waiver they're so and it would be considered a strategic decision or one that planned parenthood had was forced into so. I think <hes> that depends a little bit on who you talk to. Antiabortion groups will say well planned parenthood should just stop providing abortions if they wanna provide family early planning services <hes> planned parenthood's response would be well. Abortion is potentially a family planning service. Even if it isn't funded by title ten they feel that they can't really provide provide health care which is a part of what they feel that they do. They feel that they can't do that in an ethical way without <hes> being able to talk about the full range of options that the patients can have alina is it a common experience where planned parenthood is not just used for women's health but also as a primary care center for a lot of women who don't <unk> have insurance or don't have other options. Well you know a lot of women during their reproductive years really heavily <unk> rely on sites. It's like planned parenthood and other family planning providers as their primary source. There's <hes> the in the past <hes> especially the uninsured short rate was higher among this group. They're generally a very healthy population so they don't need other specialty care so planned parenthood and other family planning providers fighters are able to provide the majority of services that they need have passed funding cuts led to decreases in services alina what we've seen that as i mentioned mentioned earlier the case of texas where was was a clear example where that they had far fewer visits <hes> and fewer claims for a u._d.'s contraceptive implants injectables which are the most costly and most effective methods so those are examples. There are other cases <unk> as well in wisconsin where the state legislature approved family planning cuts which were directed a planned parenthood which resulted in the closure of five planned parenthood clinics in rural areas is and they found that even though the women were referred to other clinics which were further away they had waiting lists and those clients didn't provide the full range of methods so we have examples in in the past where this has happened and where we've seen decreases and access and are we know planned parenthood contesting this in court. Where does it go from here. That's right so <hes> believe the next hearing hearing in the case is scheduled for the week of september twenty third and the ninth circuit so <hes> at the end of next month. We'll find out more and a north senior reporter at vox and alina sal ghana cough director of the women's. It's health policy at kaiser family foundation. Thanks to you both thank you and q. and we're hearing from you. Have you ever relied on planned parenthood for healthcare. Hi this is ruby marin county and as an undergraduate student at u._c. Berkeley in the eighties. I had to unwanted pregnancies both of which were taken care of safely affordably and quietly at planned parenthood. I shudder to imagine what i would have done in today's environment. Hi this is elizabeth from san diego. I use planned parenthood for health care for several years in my twenties because i've moved city you some hot. I did have a jerk position. The only healthcare i need it was pelvic exams and breast exams and birth control because i did chapman here their health issues and it was easily available and affordable. Hey james martin glendale arizona when i was in high school me and my girlfriend you got pregnant and we both decided that we weren't ready for a baby. At the time so planned parenthood was <hes> our only option option to end the pregnancy. Tell us about your experience with planned parenthood. You can give us a call at eight. Seven seven eight might take caught in the middle of the political battle over planned parenthood are millions of women who rely on government funding for basic health and reproductive care and and while the media spotlight often focuses on abortion and planned parenthood professor terry mcgovern of the columbia university mailman school of public health says there are many other ways that women's access access to medical care has dwindled over the past several years terry welcome to the takeaway. Thank you so defunding planned. Parenthood has been a rallying cry of the antiabortion abortion movement for quite some time have other republican presidents gotten as far as president trump has no he has kind of led the way in attacking <unk> access to healthcare for women so let's look back a couple years. I mean how has women's access to healthcare in the u._s. Now how does it compare now to the end of the obama obama administration for example. What sort of are the biggest changes you've seen so <hes> first of all of the administration has dedicated itself to gutting the a._c._a. Z. a. and the a._c._a. Took away all kinds of categorical kind of requirements for eligibility for medicaid so that many many more women women across the country were then going to be eligible for access to care and that's impacts cervical cancer breast cancer heart disease rates so it's been an assault on access to healthcare writ large and he has taken that fight in in many different directions first of all they went after up to the non-discrimination clause in the a._c._a. Where because they wanna be able to discriminate against l._g._b._t. Populations transgender populations nations in fact they have taken a positive approach towards discrimination. They have gone after requirements that employers offer for contraception they have expanded greatly the religious refusal possibilities and they've actually tried very hard to give states maximum flexibility to provide the minimal amount to its citizens and what's so fascinating is that you see the states. It's that have the most abortion restrictions also tend to have the lowest cervical cancer survival rates. The highest maternal mortality rates the the lowest amount of programming for children so there's a real kind of inconsistency and contradiction in this <hes> rhetoric edrich around saving children and saving women and the actual evidence of what's happening in the states where this administration has been most successful role in pushing its agenda abortion has been a really central to the at least the political fight so far <hes> there are many that suggests that these are just just steps at trying to overturn roe v wade. Do you see that professor. Yes absolutely i mean these bills that are being passed at the state level say in alabama our frontal attacks on roe v wade there is already so many restrictions in place in alabama <hes> they've made it virtually impossible all for women and girls to have easy ready choice and so this is just you know a total attack on roe v wade and again when when you really look at what's happening in alabama we're talking about <hes> women often women of color often young women who desperately need these services so instead of spending all this money and putting all this attention on abortion how about looking at programs that could reduce the cervical cancer rate aid that could reduce the breast cancer rates that could take on an obesity epidemic. That's driving up costs. Healthcare costs around the country so i find it to be puzzling that all of this emphasis from the g._o._p. On abortion when there's vast amounts that can be don to improve the health of women girls and ultimately save money because when you don't do prevention you have catastrophic outcomes that ended up costing more you. You mentioned the state of alabama. What other states can we look at in terms of examples of this latest wave of really curtailing access to women's health louisiana mississippi acidity missouri sadly. There's a lot if you look at their fourteen states that have not ex- that have not expanded medicaid and those states don't provide long-term postpone pardom care so we're talking about abortion restrictions but on in the trump administration assault were also talking about care for mothers after they give birth which is when we know many women die so it's happening in many many states <hes> <hes> and again i just wish there were this level of effort towards reducing some of these terrible health health outcomes that are completely preventable like cervical oh cancer. How could this country have. One of the lowest survival rates in the developing world that is a preventable treatable disease again you seeing the impacts worse on black women women of color <hes> so we have some serious problems that could actually be fixed if we'd focus less less on kind of taking away women's rights around abortion. Do you have a sense of where this is headed. I mean we talked a little bit about the worst case scenario for some women men who that would be really overturning roe v wade with the supreme court makeup. We know that that really is becoming part of the conversation but are there other federal programs aimed at supporting women's health that are threatened right now well so we have of course the public charged rule which is making it. If a woman who is or girl who is undocumented did actually seeks medical care this can be used to prevent her from becoming legal down the road. So that's a huge issue. That's going to create all kinds of fear and confusion. I should say that because people don't necessarily understand that alabama outlawing abortion in all cases isn't yet the law of the land. It's already created a lot of fear and confusion among elhage around eligibility where women can show up if they don't have legal status. Obviously they're not going to show up in many cases so i think you know this. Administration has devoted itself to looking for language around gender or the fetus or anything around women's human rights in any of its programming so i- sadly think that this will continue you until you know kind of all of the language around women and girls human rights is stripped from all of our programming professor terry mcgovern of the columbia university mailman school of public health. Thanks for joining us. Thank you <music> in some states around the country. Including louisiana students heading back to the classroom will be greeted with a slogan. We've all heard before in god we trust i so it's not just louisiana's eleven states across the country have mandated the national motto in god. We trust be displayed. Somehow on the walls of public quick schools. That's patrick hornbeck scholar of religion and law and chair of fordham university's theology department the louisiana bill in particular which just took took effect says well there's already sort of civics curriculum and students are supposed to be taught about the flag and national traditions but now it mandates explicitly that students be talk about the motto as you might imagine the requiring of any religious display however innocuous it's sure to cause controversy and what's supposed to be a secular space the emphasis on the national motto in god we trust and its usage elsewhere in u._s. Civic tradition pushes up against our country shifting cultural norms and the legal limits. It's a religious speech in public schools many of us. I think are accustomed to thinking about in god we trust as this long long standing historical thing whereas it's actually actually it from the nineteen fifties the u._s. Congress adopts it in the nineteen fifties around the same time that the phrase under god was added to the pledge of allegiance this time time of anti-communist panic. It's time maybe we might say of concern about atheism which was connected to communism the saying goes back to the civil war and so a union coins had the phrase in god we trust on them but it got re purposed in the middle of the twentieth century in support of what we would probably think of today's a kind kind of christian nationalism and it seems that the organizations that are behind encouraging state legislatures to pass these kinds of bills. Have maybe be something like that kind of vision in common as well. You mentioned the pledge of allegiance and i remember being <hes> a little girl and having to put my hand on my heart and pledged to allegiance and and say those words <hes> under god indivisible. Shouldn't there be i mean is there a separation of church and state here and if so how do we explain this conflict are these laws legal will you've put your finger on exactly the nub of this question and i think that whether it's about memorials in the shape of crosses or flags or school prayer. This is a debate that the u._s. and the u._s. Court system has been grappling with for decades. Many folks think that the constitution includes it's a promise of separation of church and state and that's actually not true the constitution itself only says that congress can't pass laws respecting the establishment of religion or prohibiting prohibiting. It's free exercise but it wasn't until about twelve years later that thomas jefferson wrote a very famous letter soon after taking office as president to a baptist this church up in connecticut and it's in that letter that he coined the phrase wall of separation between church and state and even then that doesn't really quite define what we mean so there's lots the people who believe that the u._s. needs especially in light of our recent history to move towards a much more secular approach. Maybe something like what western european countries half half of other folks say will the use of judeo christian language and symbolism has been part of our traditions for centuries and others want actually go one one step further and say the u._s. is was should be a christian country whatever that might happen to me when i bring it back again to the pledge of allegiance that children can and essentially opt out they can choose not to put their hand on their heart. They can choose not to recite. This doesn't really give children option to opt out. I think one of the best stories i've read. I'm comes from kentucky where one of the schools that was affected by by one of these laws <hes> decided to fulfill its requirements by posting a framed one dollar bill on the wall of the classroom and you know if you pull out your dollar bill out of your pocket it does in fact say in god we trust but i suppose the question christian i would wanna ask is in this long term conversation about how much religion is appropriate in civil secular spaces once there's a sort of toe in the door here could not a really zealous school district decide that they want ten foot graven plaques in every classroom and that would imagine it'd be a real challenge for lots of folks who don't identify with the judeo christian tradition. Is this a response potentially to the changing demographics of of the united states and i don't just mean the changing racial demographics but also the changing faith demographics in many ways. That's a great question and the fastest growing religious. This group in the u._s. are unaffiliated people so thirty percent of those under thirty five for instance. I mean that was hardly the case in the nineteen fifties when these laws were passed. I don't wanna wanna make too much of this connection but there's an analogy to be drawn in the fifties many u._s. Leaders lawmakers in particular were very concerned about shoring up the u._s. As a christian eastern country not unlike how in the late nineteenth early twentieth centuries a lot of southern states were really interested in shoring up their identity with for instance confederate war memorials which creeping talking about so much in the course of the last few years and so it seems to me that one thing that might be in common here is that when a group that has been dominant feels threatened. One of the things that it might want to do is to find markers of showing were still here. Were still the dominant option john do. I think that the eleven states concerned were deficient in providing their students with civics education. I don't know but i can't imagine that that's the case. There's something else going on with this legislation which seems to be directed by a number of special interest groups that are concerned about maintaining what they see as the u._s.'s christian identity this being the united states one thing that we enjoy doing as litigating and i can't imagine that there won't be cases taken up against these laws do you you have any sense of how judiciaries might consider challenges to the legalities of these laws. There's no single approach the justices even on the u._s. Supreme court court take in in these particular cases. There's a classic case from the nineteen seventies that said that the test for determining if government action involving religion is valid is you'll find that it doesn't have a legitimate secular purpose. Does it favor any particular religion over any other one and does it serve a compelling state interest and people defending being these particular laws would be able to say well. There is a secular purpose. This is about teaching children about the customs and the history of the country and the motto has been adopted adopted by the us congress and so students should learn about that it. It seems to me that the folks who wrote these bills did so in a way that would insulate them from challenges now. I think i think the place where challenges could come. Is you have a particularly zealous school district who wants to go well beyond what the bill requires and herons or students could bring what we would call all as applied challenges. The bill itself is probably okay but the way it's being implemented violate. Someone's rights patrick. Hornbeck is a scholar of religion and law and he's is also the chair fordham university's the allergy department at her. Thanks so much. Thank you so much and that's our show for today. And of course you can find us. It's all over the internet on facebook twitter instagram lisa comment. Give us a follow. Thanks so much for listening. I'm tansy vega and this is the takeaway yeah.

united states u._s president alina texas louisiana wisconsin reporter assault fordham university patrick hornbeck alabama roe professor Congress priyanka
663-Should Christians Participate in Tax Strikes and Tax Protest Movements?

Radical Personal Finance

1:10:32 hr | 2 years ago

663-Should Christians Participate in Tax Strikes and Tax Protest Movements?

"Walk into radical personal finance a show dedicated to providing you with the knowledge skills insight and encouragement you need to live a rich and meaningful life now while building a plan for financial freedom in ten years ears or less yesterday on the show i talked to you about why is joshua so antitax but that show was largely philosophical. I talked about a little bit of theory recent moral theories and governmental theory political theory etc and you're welcome to listen to that show but it wasn't particularly practical. I just talked about the theory but we talked about things that really. You and i have no chance to affect <hes>. It's just a theoretical discussion that i think is worth thinking about to ask ourselves if we're complicit in things that are immoral moral <hes> but i didn't go into any detail about anything practical. I thought today however it would be interesting to talk about tax protesting and tax evasion because i made the comment in yesterday's show that i don't personally support or practice any kind of tax evasion the willful intentional non on payment of taxes that are legally vote <hes> by way of reminder there are two words that we use a tax planning tax avoidance which simply choosing being to arrange your affairs in a way that you avoid a tax that is due and tax evasion which is willfully and intentionally not paying tax axe that is legally owed so an example would be tax avoidance would be if taxes you live on the line of a place where there are no state income taxes and gases five cents cheaper than you can. <hes> go over the state line and you fill up your car where the gas is five cents cheaper avoiding tax the high tax in your state tax evasion vision would be doing something like going and using nontaxed offroad fuel <hes> and putting that in your on road vehicle which then drive on the vehicle which is technically illegal illegal. It's not illegal to cross the state line by your things their tasks or lower it is illegal to use off highway diesel fuel in your on highway vehicle so with regard to income taxes tax avoidance simply means choosing to do something like put money into an i._r._a. To avoid louis the tax on a certain amount of income tax evasion means not telling the i._r._s. about five thousand dollars of income that you earned in cash from side work now. This distinction is important because when we talk about tax protesting we have a number of different techniques that you can choose from tax. Protesting means not paying tax out of protest for what it is and this is not a new subject here on radical personal finance for all the way back to episode seventeen in july of two thousand fourteen <hes> july ten two thousand fourteen. I interviewed david gross. Who is the author of the book ninety nine tactics of successful tax resistance campaigns and the title of that episode was should i stop paying taxes on moral grounds. David gross is a tax protester. <hes> specifically war tax protester after the united states invasion of iraq and afghanistan back in after the egypt eleven two thousand one terrorist attacks he stopped paying his taxes to protest the war effort and although by my assessment it seems that the current war tax resistance movement is pretty weak in the united states. I'm not aware of it being any significant political movement at the moment. There is a significant history in u._s. American culture of war tax protesters david writes extensively about his experiences. I like david. I've read his writing over the years. I think he does a good job of following these issues. If you're interested you can read his work at snuggle dot net s. g. l. e. dot net as his website that he curates on these topics challenges is that war tax protesting tax protesting in general can be an extra challenge for christians and this show is primarily targeted towards the audience radic personal finance that identifies as christian. You're of course welcome to tune in. If that's not you but tax resistance is very difficult for christians <hes> because on the one hand <hes> <hes> there's an obvious moral horror at many of the things that are done with tax money <hes> the most obvious example would be the <hes> the war machine of the united states and many other governments <hes> the behavior of the u._s. Military <hes> the unjust and immoral wars that are constantly prosecuted by the u._s. Military bringing death to millions of people all around the world are obviously immoral <hes> obviously completely antithetical to the teachings of jesus and so for christians who tried to look at this and say how do i reconcile the fact that my tax dollars are going to support this military empire. It can be very very difficult because you look at the behavior of the military empire and it turns your stomach and you don't want to be complicit blissett. You don't want to have your money. <hes> involved in it but the challenges there are a number of very clear teachings in christianity by the major prophets and founders of the faith that very clearly teach <hes> submission to government authority and the payment of taxes and if you look at the environment and the government that these men were dealing with is hard to say that they had at at tougher than we do you can begin with jesus christ himself who was executed without cause without any kind of justice was executed by the government of his his day and yet jesus taught very clearly to pay taxes to caesar what a season give to god what is god's paul also very clearly taught got to pay taxes. Paul also executed completely without cause by the roman empire. Peter you know honor the emperor our pay pay give gift all on the emperor in first peter chapter two honor. Everyone loved the brotherhood fear god honour the emperor and yet peter also executed by the government of his day now. I don't know how you get much clearer than dealing with men who were executed by the government of their day. I did nothing wrong. They did nothing other than preach a gospel message preaching the gospel of jesus christ of course preaching his own gospel paul and peter preaching gospel of jesus christ. They went about doing good. <hes> <hes> delivering people from demons healing hundreds or thousands of people we don't know exactly but at least thousands of people collectively and did nothing good. All of the accusations that were brought against them were trumped up charges. We have record record of the trials of christ and of paul and all of the accusations were false charges. They were lies that were brought against them in court. <hes> we don't know we don't have the record of paul's final trial but we had the record of of several of his trials before festus and felix i think for your committee mm-hmm it went to to caesar we have record of his defense before king agrippa in jerusalem <hes> so when you look at the in in study what these men were facing they certainly had a lot to be upset about with the government of their day we don't have of course record of peter's trial but we do know that he was executed founded by the government so it seems a little bit difficult for those of us in the modern era who are frustrated <hes> with with the immoral behavior of governments to turn an appeal to the bible as a defense and say well things were better back then <hes>. They just don't know what what we're talking about. No it's the exact opposite. <hes> you know in those days you had christians being doused and oil and used as human candle in its candles in niro's garden. It's it's hard to say that they didn't they. Had you know easier than we do. We have such an easy cushy life that it's it's. It's not even worth comparising could pick up a comparison. It's not even worth the comparison persson so but yet still you have this challenge. <hes> an a new challenge especially challenge that <hes> certainly christians in half a dozen dozen states at least are facing is how can i be complicit and involved in the abortion of children. <hes> in general dior involvement of your tax dollars in the military empire of the united states is the same no matter what state you live in reunifa live outside the country for citizen the united states your money is involved in that but then of course there's an increasing usage usage of tax monies to fund abortion. <hes> i find that issue particularly difficult particularly challenging there are a number of christian tax protesters who are <hes> not paying paying taxes because of the state's involvement in abortion and there's a very real chance that in the coming years there may be if a democratic president <hes> wins the presidency in the previous election. All of the both <hes> hillary clinton and bernie sanders pledged to repeal hyde amendment. I haven't seen or notice notice any public statements by this raft of democratic candidates but i would assume that in time they would make that pledge publicly as well <hes> and so it can be it. Maybe very difficult. We may be in a situation a couple years from now if there is a change in the political party <hes> where we face difficult choices and so i thought it'd be useful to talk about tax protesting <hes> both big picture and then a little bit theologically <hes> to give you an idea and get you thinking about the topic now. The first thing i want to point out is that there are different ways and models of tax protesting oftentimes people assume that tax protesting means that that i simply i owe the i._r._s. Fifteen thousand dollars and i don't pay it right and many people rightly have trouble with that <hes> but but in studying the issue over the years i came to the conclusion. There are a number of different ways that you can engage in tax protesting. I'll use david gross as an example. When david david gross practices to two different methods of tax protesting the first thing that he does as he keeps his earned income below level of taxation for his federal income taxes <hes> when he decided to become a tax protester that was the first strategy that he chose to employ now in the united states based upon on the way the tax code works you can use the provisions of the tax code and as long as your earned income is below a level level of <hes> below the level of federal taxation. You can avoid the <hes> you can avoid owing any income tax so david grow oh self-employed. He runs a business and so of course in a business. You have your gross income. Let's say that you are in fifty thousand dollars of gross income that funny gross income david gross folks yeah fifty thousand dollars gross income then you additionally have some level of business expenses. Let's say that you have ten thousand on dollars of business expenses that are associated with that so now you have forty thousand dollars of net income. Then of course you could do something like make a ten thousand dollar 4._0._1._k. Contribution bution which would then drop your income from forty thousand dollars to thirty thousand dollars of income and then for a single taxpayer in the united states. I don't remember exactly what the numbers are for for this year. David does a good job of calculating at each year but if you have thirty thousand dollars of annual income then you're not gonna show any federal income taxes on that waste upon the personal allowances autism exemptions etc and so you could in that situation you could effectively earn forty thousand dollars of net profit from your business. <hes> and <music> not pay any income taxes illegally using those means. You haven't broken any law. You haven't run the risk of going to prison. You haven't done anything except us. The law that exists but yet lower your earned income these are the type of strategy is the type of strategy. I think is usually the first place especially that christians sion's would go because his you're seeking to balance honoring the emperor and being a good citizen of the king while also registering your protest. You wanna be careful about breaking the law. It's hard for christians to <hes> openly be openly defied and say i'm going to be. I'm going to break the law and so that's one thing that you could consider and i think that a lot of what we talk about. Radical personal finance really could fit into those kinds of strategies for example if i wanted to become a tax protester ah but i wanted to live in the united states i could avoid most federal income taxes through putting these methods together if you understand business taxes if you are self employed if you understand the proper legal documented business <hes> the expense deductions if you understand how to live frugally you're not going to be <hes> riding around in your private airplane but you could live frugally if you understand the various tax exemptions and the activities that are not tax <hes> <hes> <hes> that are not tax intensive for example. Maybe you build your own house. <hes> that gives you a distinct monetary value which you wind up at the end of it with with a debt free house that you build yourself and you can maintain a lower income but still have a high standard of living you garden while the government doesn't tax the food that you harvest from your garden. They don't tax the rabbits that you raise your backyard so you can feed your family while needing lower level of income and as long as you keep your income below the level of taxation asian you could in effect pay no federal income taxes using that particular <hes> process <hes> if you have children you get some tax credits credits for those children and so you have a slightly more generous ability to earn income and you could always just adjust your income just simply choose not to work and you can take your time and instead of using your time to be engaged in paid activities you could take your time and you could invest it in to activities that you're not paid for and there are many productive ways for you to use your time and energy and beep and not be paid not be paid and yet still have an impact still be busy and still be productive while not paying federal income taxes and you can do that that following the law well that's perfectly reasonable and acceptable form of tax protesting now <hes> david gross stories interesting <hes> he goes he went through a phase he did that for a number of years and then he ultimately decided to stop paying his self employment taxes and this is the other wrinkle because the challenges that because house of the multifold nature of the u._s. tax system. You're going to have multiple taxes that you have to deal with. You have to deal with your federal income taxes. That's one set of tax planning but then you have to deal with your employment taxes or your self employment taxes. The employment taxes are the <hes> fifteen point three percent that you pay of your income as a self employed person that goes to fund medicare medicaid and social security <hes> and then <hes> or if your employees it's the seven point six five percent of your income. Come to you contribute from your paycheck and the seven point six five percent of your income that your employer contributes towards your medicare medicaid and social security and this again brings in another interesting ethical dilemma. Uh if you're protesting war taxes you could make a decent argument that hey i'm not funding the war effort when i'm refunding social security medicare and medicaid eight but if you have a different <hes> point of protest for example. Let's assume that you were protesting. <hes> the use of medicaid funds provide for abortion will now all of a sudden your your employment taxes are very are lot more tricky well david gross after a number of years of doing things with timber lowering income he went on and stopped paying his self employment taxes so he went all the way so his combination of tax protesting methodologies part of his practice is to not pay federal income taxes simply because he doesn't owe them but then he doesn't pay self employment taxes although technically the government says that he owes those taxes and that's where we crossed the line you cross ross into different strategies. Am i going to <hes> practice. Those techniques that are considered to be illegal that could be prosecuted could be sued for or am megan. Stay with techniques that are legal now. I don't know there's a right answer on these. Things is a matter of conscience and it is a difficult question and <hes> because there seemed to be things that are pooling and multiple ways. <hes> first thing i guess is i would say you could. There's a decent strength to the argument that <hes> it's not your fault for example. <hes> taxes are not optional title when you live somewhere and when the government that has jurisdiction over where you live tells you you have to do this you can make a very very clear and strong and compelling argument that this is not optional. This money is being stolen from me and if it's being used to do things that i think are immoral. It's being used to fund military empire. It's being used to murder babies. It's being used for medical practices that i think are immoral. Canadian christians face far more challenging for this than u._s. Christians as many european christians face bigger challenges with the medical practices that are subs that are are practiced and and and <hes> paid for by the national healthcare systems <hes> so but you could say listen the money was taken from me and so i don't have moral responsibility for that it was it was taken from me without my vote so the analogy that i would compare this to would be to simply say. Let's assume that you have a car and the car is sitting in your driveway but then one night a thief comes and takes the car and then they use the car in a terrorist attack mo- over a bunch of people at the greenmarket on saturday morning and your town and they kill a bunch of people using your car will. You're not <hes> morally complicit in the murder of those people by the terrorist because they stole your car. It's your car. You didn't do anything wrong. Your car was locked was protected. It was in your driveway. The guy stole your car and he used that car murder and a bunch of people so morally you could reasoning say i'm also no longer complicit in the murder of the people with the government's war machine. The money was taken from me. It was stolen from me without my ability to resist. I it was taken. If i'd resisted they put me in prison and take it anyway anyway. Take my stuff so it was taken from me without the ability to resist <hes> the money was then used to fund this airplane. That's dropping bombs on these people and it it was used to blow up a wedding and now there's ten people dead on the <hes>. <hes> t ten people dead here in the compound and my money funded it but it wasn't wasn't my choice. I'm not morally complicit. I think that's a strong argument. <hes> i do but for a lot of people that doesn't feel quite right because just because you're not morally complicit doesn't mean that you're not actively fighting against something and you look at the great atrocities that are committed over the years and you think <hes> shouldn't somebody have actively fought fought against this recently read. An interesting book called unbroken a world war two story of <hes> unbroken in a world war two story of survival resilience and redemption. The author is laura hillenbrand and she wrote this book about the life. Primarily of a man named louis zampa rini who among other things <hes> was an american <hes> <hes> aviator who was shot down in the south pacific during world war two and eventually became a prisoner of war in the japanese prisoner of war camps and was interesting as for those of in general enroll those of us who are exposed to a general study of history. We don't really know much about the pacific theater of operations during world war two <hes> because of the european the importance importance of the european theater with d day the concentration camps and hitler were super focused on that history and so we tend to go to concentration camps of jews in rather than thinking about the japanese this book and i would strongly recommend it to you. I really enjoyed it but this book profiles and discusses among other things what happened in the japanese prisoner war camps and it was interesting because it was of course <hes> <hes> just untold cruelty aided by the japanese soldiers who were in charge charge of the prisoner of war camps and the people who were in those prisoner of war camps and perhaps around who were trying to help the prisoners in some way there are a few people who were kind and i've often thought what if i had been japanese and i had been living there would have what i have had the moral courage to stand up for the proper treatment of people and of course there's you'd think well probably not you know they didn't and there was a reason they didn't so i probably wouldn't have either not special no different than anybody else. I probably would've gone along to get along just like just about anybody does so then you look at your own day and you you you you bring it back and you say but the fact that they didn't stand up when when people were being tortured when people were being abused the fact that they didn't stand up as a stain on the japanese culture of that day and yet. Is there something that i should be standing up for right now. That'll be a stain on say the american culture when it's reflected back on in fifty years and you know the obvious examples are the american military occupations if other places in the untold hundreds of thousands of people innocent civilians civilians have been killed in the various wars at the u._s. Government prosecutes and the murder of hundreds of sixty million people in the united states with abortion and you think how am i going to reflect back on this forty years from now and say about what i've done today. Am i going to say well. My money was taken from me and there was nothing i could do about it or is there something that i can do about it. And that's where you get into the one of the strategies some people would go to would be tax pro testing and you say well i should act. I should actively do something active active so yes the money's taken from me but at least this would be one thing that i could actively do to try to starve the beast a little bit and it seems there seems like that's a good argument seems compelling now. Let me just lay out for you. Briefly your options because i thought a lot about this a number of years ago and what's particularly difficult out is when you look at the way that tax protesters are generally treated if they don't win because if you win the victors write the history books and everything the thing is fine but if you don't win and you look the way that protesters are treated it's pretty tough and one of the things that certainly change. It has changed for me. <hes> they say that people who fight wars ores are young men with no families old men right <hes> who don't have anything to lose but i'm in the stage where it's the least <hes> i'm the least likely likely candidate to be an activist or a protester etc simply because of my family responsibilities and you think not going to get involved in that at lock me up you look at the people who have been locked up over the years and <hes> who who made well-meaning i think very sound arguments and on many things but yet doesn't matter the person you the government has all the guns wins <hes> and and if they have the guns and they had the general supported the population they win now we think of irwin shirt or when schiff locked up died in prison. He made thought pretty decent arguments but it doesn't matter it doesn't matter how decent your arguments are you still wind up locked up and dead in prison and so when you have young children you think we could do i do anybody locked up in prison. Puts things into perspective and you say it doesn't seem like a particularly good strategy so i thought a lot about it and i thought what are the options and lay them out for you and then we'll talk a little bit about the theology of tax protesting so far as i see you have two basic techniques or you have two basic choices i the first choice is do you want to stay in the legal jurisdiction of the taxing government or do you want to leave the legal jurisdiction of the taxing government because the reality is you always have a choice to stay or to leave and for much of my life. I never thought you had a choice ace and then one day i was thinking about it and i realize no you do have a choice and a peaceful solution that almost anybody has available to them. If you're involved in something that could be a potential conflict is to peacefully leave and i think the strategy and the practice of leaving of withdrawing your support is one of the most effective strategies is that in time can lead to change of an organization so if you're part of a company that is not engaging engaging in what you consider to be moral unethical behavior business practices you can leave and that company will not have your services now. You can try to change things from the inside. I and i think in general we probably have some responsibility to do that or at least it's a good thing to do that at demonstrate your care for other people and so you might sues to <hes> become an advocate for something. Try to be an outspoken person inside it might be that you can make some change from the inside but ultimately if you judge that no change is going to happen when you can leave. You can leave that company. <hes> similar thing say you're involved in an organization and the organization is not doing something or you're involved in church and the church is not doing what you believe is right to do. Well your best option often. After i think especially in church you owe a duty of of opening your mouth and and seeking to correct the thing that is wrong but you can just simply leave and leaving is particularly powerful. I leaving his obvious leaving shows that you're serious. You put your actions where your mouth were. <hes> you your your loss of your presence will be very clear. Your contributions will be on your money will be gone. Your skills are gone. Your talents gone your promotion has gone and that makes a statement are you can never be sure that your particular statement will be the one that is heard but it certainly really does make a statement and if other people don't come in and replace you in time the leaving strategy is entirely peaceful and yet it makes a difference you can see companies that are hollowed out by employees leaving you can see churches that are hollowed out by people simply leaving you look and study the religious atmosphere i follow all it closely in the united states have different denominations etc and you can see how you know the mainline liberal protestant denominations utterly hollowed out you can see so many any of the <hes> like the catholic of what's called seminaries <hes> totally hollowed out the aren't coming and that leaving <hes> has has an effect it leaves certain things now you see you're not systematically destroying something it's just leaving and so you always have this choice of course with government or you usually usually have this choice again with government where you can just simply leave you can leave the government or you can stay now. If you're gonna stay and you don't wanna pay taxes taxes you have as i consider it to basic options. You can use techniques that are so-called legal <hes> use legal techniques to reduce or eliminate your tax bill or you can conscientiously choose not to pay even though you legally owe the tax so legal techniques sneaks you could use to reduce and eliminate your tax bill first thing that you could do is you could use legal deductions and credits to lower your taxable income below the tax base that is one practical useful strategy used illegal deductions and credits that are part and parcel staples of good financial planning tax planning to lower your taxable income below the tax base you can use legal investment techniques to lower your taxable income below the tax base so you can just use investment techniques many available. I talked about a number of ways you can generate right tax free income tax free investing it can range from the simple you buy any bonds instead of taxable stocks. You buy real estate and you make sure that you have the appropriate strategy in place and never pay taxes on your real estate. <hes> it'd be very possible to do or you can work less and or earn less income to lower. Oh your taxable income below the tax base so you can instead of investing your time into activities that generate one hundred fifty thousand dollars of net income you can invest is your time and activities that generate forty thousand dollars net income and then invest the rest of your time into things that are productive but simply don't generate income so those are your legal techniques snakes to reduce or eliminate your tax bill and i think here all everything we talk about in radical personal finance <hes> lines up with those <hes> <hes> again practice techniques with frugality <hes> even extreme frugality one of the things that as i've profiled and talked about different kind of extreme frugal ists charles long jacob fisker amy decision you know and i studied there works and their commentary. What you find is that if you are committed to extreme for galaxy it has the side benefit of allowing you to live a really great life <hes> without a lot of cost which means you don't need much income and it's very very tax efficient <hes> interestingly it can also actually be very profitable because if we go in the direction where welfare programs grow go if you participate eight in those which is it its own moral quandary and do i participate or not but if you do participate in those things you wind up lowering your income is one of the best things <hes> <hes> i shelled the show decided not to do it but i the whole analysis of how to live well and yet <hes> using all the government programs <hes> by somebody who is intelligent but just simply knew how to work the numbers and chose not to invest their time into productive remunerated activities but simply to be a leech and live off off the door. I think it's bad if character which i don't really wished popularized you study it and you could do the same thing so those are legal techniques that you can use to reduce or eliminate eliminate your tax bill the challenge there is some taxes are easier to do that with another. It's a federal income. Taxes is straightforward self employment taxes or employment taxes is much. It's more difficult now. There are a few ways that you could do that ways that you could legally eliminate <hes> self employment taxes but it's much more challenging than the second thing that you could do is is you could conscientiously choose not to pay even though you legally owe and there are different ways that this has done so some people choose not to send a representative portion of their tax to the government <hes> so they calculate the taxes and they say this percentage of my. I have a ten thousand dollar tax bill <hes> this percentage here. This thousand dollars is is what would ordinarily fund <hes> the war machine so as a point of protest. I'm not going to send you this thousand dollars. I'm going to send you nine thousand dollars and instead. I'm either keeping the thousand dollars or i'm making a thousand dollar donation to an anti-war charity <hes> to try to counteract the military empire that you've established that would be one strategy where you choose not to send a representative portion of your tax to the government a second example would be you choose not to send any of your tax axe to government <hes> and instead you keep it or you give it to a charity that actively counteract the counteracts the action to oppose again. You owe ten thousand dollars. You say i'm not sending it to you but i'm going to give it to my local church or i'm gonna send it to a church. That's in iraq that needs money. That needs support. Who's trying to minister to the people your bombing and we're going to send it there instead and things like that but all of those things keep you in the legal jurisdiction of taxing government or the second option is that you could leave the legal jurisdiction of the taxing government and then again by leaving using techniques discussed on the show. You can either legally reduce adduce or eliminate the taxes that you owe when i talked about <hes> for u._s. At taxpayers talked about moving abroad. You can use used those techniques using the foreign earned income exclusion <hes> to eliminate the federal income tax on your first one hundred and five thousand dollars of income so now if you're going to tax protester it becomes a little bit simpler for you to figure out how to earn a little bit more money so you're not left destitute earning thirty thousand dollars dollars in the united states to follow the law but by living outside of the united states you avoid the income tax on your hundred five thousand dollars. It also clears up. If you work for a foreign corporation it clears up the problem of of <hes> owing those self employment taxes and so you can effectively live tax free with regard to the united states and maybe you move to to a country where the government is not involved in some of the actions that you think are wrong or you move to a tax haven and you don't owe taxes to tax haven so you live on a sailboat or whatever you do you become a p._t. Or however you you you handle it but it's very doable for you to practice those techniques a very very doable and so that may be one way that you can follow the law and i've always found that some of those things are <hes> at least i found for me that solves solves these having that as an option solves some of my moral consternation over those questions because in that way you can engage in an effective form of tax protesting by not paying the taxes but by not breaking the law you can also satisfy your conscience of not breaking the law and that to me is important so i consider that those that's just an overview of tax protesting <hes>. It's not a particularly popular subject. Most people people don't think about it. Most people don't care. Most people. Don't seem to even reason about the stuff but there are some and i really respect. I have a lot of respect for tax. Tax protesters their tax protesters for many traditions. There are <hes> somber they just tax protests. There are some that are not david gross. He's not he's not a christian. He's not religious at all <hes> but <hes> but you really appreciate. I really appreciate you know somebody who is willing to stand for their convictions it. It's really appreciate that and so <hes> i admire people who feel that conviction but as far as i can see it's a matter of dealing straight with scripture scripture and then also dealing straight with the <hes> dealing straight with scripture and didn't dealing straight with your conscience <hes> as far as i can nc there is a wide degree of individual saying conscience and then there's also significant measure of wisdom being needed <hes> again. I think it's wisdom to stay out of prison <hes> so you consider it now to the theology of <hes> tax strikes. I'm going to read you an article. That was published. <hes> almost three decades ago back in ninety one in the publication biblical economics today and the author of this publication was a popular author <hes> <hes> on these topics named james jordan and <hes> he wrote this article called the christian and tax strikes pros and cons and ev read other things on this but i thought this was a fairly fair discussion and raised good points so if you're a christian you've ever thought about tax strikes my experience in general my answer is for me in general christians shouldn't participate in tax strikes but i think there can be circumstances and you study church history and there are circumstances many times where you find a group of people that really wrestled with it and came to the conclusion no we cannot we can't do this and they tried tried to find solutions to that and so my personal opinion is that in general don't participate attack strike unwise read these discussions and arguments arguments to you in a moment but there might be exceptions and so it's not one of those very clear all the way things so here's the article called called the christian and tax strikes pros and cons the purpose of this essay is not to settle once and for all the matter to which it is addressed but rather her hopefully to set out some principles which will help the reader as he or she comes to grips with the tax rebellion of the nineteen eighties. The basic thrust of the essay is this the the bible clearly teaches that christians are to submit to the powers that be and pay whatever taxes are required of them but citizens of the united states of america including christians may properly raise the question of just precisely what is required of them and in raising this question may work for reform that is to say christians are required to work within the system as it were even as they try to change the system itself. The bulk of this essay is devoted to reasons against engaging in tax strikes by making making the strongest possible case against tax rebellion. We will be unable to see clearly on what precise grounds we might possibly join the tax revolt as is the central government of the united states becomes more and more oppressive and evil and as it takes more and more money from its citizens and use that money to promote greater and greater evils it is is natural that the christian conscience should rebel and should consider refusing to pay taxes. The present civil government of the united states takes far more from its citizens in taxes. The blueprint for christian society founded scripture allows it and the president lords and bosses of america use that money to finance gross evils such as abortion and military aggression thus it would seem at first glance that christians should refuse to pay their taxes both as a witness against these evils and as a means of avoiding complicity in their guilt there are or however strong scriptural considerations which lead to the opposite conclusion the following lines of argument need to be taken seriously by anyone considering a refusal to pay taxes one tax strikes a kingdom method are contrary to the teaching of jesus in matthew chapter twenty two versus fifteen to twenty two the pharisees sought to entrap jesus by asking him if it was lawful to give the poll tax to caesar jesus rebuked their hypocrisy and declared to them that since caesar's likeness is an inscription were on the coins they were to render to caesar the things that are caesar's and to god the things that are god's in context that which is rendered it is money so the meaning is this pay your taxes to the state and your ties to the lord caesar's coin had on it inscription which claimed that caesar was divine. Jesus says that caesar is do the tax but not any divine honors. The issue is not to be fought over money but over worship what but this passage teaches is that although god's claim and god's law cover all of life yet the proper point at which the kingdom of god is to be argued as the question of worship it was wrong for pharaoh to hold israel and slavery in egypt pharaoh was violating all kinds of divine laws by his action all the same when god challenged pharaoh he did not challenge him at the point of slavery or of oppressive taxation but at the point of worship exodus three eighteen and following ferro was smart enough to know that if he granted granted israel the right to worship their god and granted the legitimacy of that worship than he could no longer claim to be god himself ferro knew that all the cultural aspects of life life are dependent on the fundamental question of who is god thus israel's liberation from egypt was not fundamentally a political liberation it was not gained by a work strike or tax strike true lower taxes righteous government and sabbath rest were the result of the deliverance but they were not the means means the issue is the gospel both the tax strike and liberation theology obscure this fact in matthew chapter seventeen versus twenty four twenty twenty seven it is not the roman poll tax which is in view but a temple tax which grew up during the winter testing mental era of variant of the mosaic head tax and exodus thirty jesus teachings at this point is critical. He tells us that god's imposition of the head tax in the old covenant was a sign that the people were not fully sons of the kingdom but in a sense we're still strangers sons of the household do not pay taxes says jesus paul makes the same point in glaciers for in comparison to the privileges of the new covenant the members of the old covenant only the experienced a kind of slavery of course in comparison to the pagan world around them ancient israel was a nation of freemen sons of god having said that the sons of the kingdom kingdom do not pay taxes jesus goes on to say that they should be paid quote to avoid giving offense close quote the tax money is provided in a miraculous manner which teaches she's us that all money is god's and we need to worry about coming up with more if we pay taxes to avoid giving offense this passage constitutes a pledge to the sons of the kingdom that god will provide them the money to pay their taxes because the christian is freed from bondage to money he can pay taxes without worry number. Two tax strikes as a kingdom method or contrary to the teaching of paul for some well intentioned christians. Matthew seventeen and twenty two are not proved that tax strikes umbilical they argue that all these passages pertain to our poll taxes which is a far cry from the modern oppressive graduated income taxation in romans chapter thirteen verse seven however we are told to pay to all quote what is due them tax to whom taxes do custom to whom custom fear to whom fear fear honor to whom honor close quote this far more general command more clearly covers the modern tax situation the general teaching of romans chapter thirteen verses one through seven is unclear to many people and bears directly on our subjects and romans chapter twelve verse nineteen god commands us never to take our own personal revenge but in romans chapter thirteen verse four god tells us he has established the civil magistrate as his minister of vengeance. These two verses versus established the important distinction between personal ethics and civil ethics. There are some things that it is right and proper for a civil magistrate to do such as executing murderers which are not at all proper for private persons to do such as killing revenge in romans chapter thirteen versus one and two paul addresses private persons persons and tells them that it is their responsibility to submit to the powers that be even the worst rulers caesar stoller stalin hitler. Idi amin gene bukasa are ordained by god and we are commanded to submit to them in the fear of god. Those who resist rulers we are told are resisting god himself this. This is the duty of private citizens on the other hand. In verse four paul makes it plain that it is the magistrates duty to submit to god and rule according to his law notice the difference citizens are to submit to rulers and rulers are to submit to god. We are not told that each christian ought to obey god civil law willy nilly trying trying to force the hand of the magistrate rather we are told to submit to the existing order pair taxes pray for the conversion of the magistrate and proclaim the gospel to him and to all men paul does not say in verse six quote pay taxes whenever rulers are servants of god close quote but rather he says to quote pay taxes axes because rulers are servants of god close quote whether they know it or not we pay taxes for consciences sake has unto the lord not as unto men the only proper place for civil resistance is the proclamation of the gospel acts five twenty nine and this includes proclaiming the gospel gospel to our children and thus christian schools it does not include tax strikes point three tax strikes are disorderly. God is a god of order and it is sin in which is brought disorder to the ordered cosmos that god set up. God's plan of redemption is designed to reestablish order in an orderly manner. This means that covenant headship must be respected as much as possible at all times. The theology of the reformation recognized the distinction between the duties of citizens and the duties of officials as taught in scripture thus the theology of the reformation does not allow individual citizens to rebel against oppressive regimes rather it is only an ordained civil magistrate who may if all else tails lead an insurrection against the regime this is because god has commanded the lesser magistrate to obey his civil law and thus the ledger lesser magistrate has a duty to perform warm in this regard. If he is forced to declare his independence from the larger regime he does not do so in the interest of maintaining his own rights but he in the interest of fulfilling his is duties. The right of revolution close quote in reformation. Theology is distinguished from modern humanistic revolutionary ideas than at two points the question of who may revolt only magistrates or anybody and the question of the grounds of revolution duties or rights. It is not surprising that the advocates of christian tax strikes are mostly founded groups which do not adhere to the theology of the reformation american individualism has given rise to the belief that there you're in the new testament period no longer legitimate office bearers on earth to whom we are to give rear thus a large number of christians today are convinced that there are no real offices offices in the church or state but only people carrying out various special functions this thinking is anti-governmental and naturally is found in baptist circles far more readily than in reformation formation churches where the concept of covenant headship and submission for consciences sake has been better preserved the bible however is not individualistic but covenant oil and this has has implications not only for the doctrine of baptism but also for the doctrine of the right of revolution point number four tax strikes ignore the new testament principle of invisibility visibility and cooperation in the sermon on the mount jesus told his people to be pleasant and cooperative with oppressive authorities so as to remain invisible and thus thus able to work in peace. Nothing is clearer than his command quote but i say to you do not resist him. Who is evil close quote matthew five thirty nine jesus illustrates this principle of cooperation and invisibility by saying quote and if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt let him have your coat also and and whoever shall force you to go one mile go with him to chapter five verses forty to forty one was it right for the roman authorities to steal shirts from the local population was it right for the state to force men to leave their jobs and carry a soldiers weapons the first mile out of town no clearly such actions violate the eighth commandment well l. then shouldn't the citizen resist this evil shouldn't he make a witness for the truth by standing up and refusing to cooperate would not be better if everyone became a martyr rather than put up with his is gross wickedness. No says jesus it is a sin for the state to steal but it is a sin for the citizen to rebel. What is the cash cash value of cooperation well first of all pieces gained the state tends to leave people alone who cooperate with it and peace is an indispensable prerequisite was it for social progress and economic advancement the longer the kingdom is left alone the better chance it has to grow second invisibility has gained since the antichrist russian state tends to ignore people who are not in flagrant rebellion invisibility allows the christian counterculture to develop a great strength unnoticed third evangelism and is enhanced since the soldier will marvel when you carry his armor a second mile and you may get the chance to tell him why you are doing this for him here again. The kingdom of christ is advanced chanced of course ultimately the humanistic state will attack the church regardless and over the issue of who is god the issue of worship this though is the real issue and the proper point at which to draw the line by this time however the underground christians will hopefully be powerful enough to thwart such a move tax strikes in contrast go in the opposite direction shen by refusing to pay taxes. The striker calls attention to himself. He may argue that he is making a witness for christ and for god's law but in fact his witnesses questionable crisis to has told him to pay not to strike moreover few we'll take his witnessed seriously most will think he is refusing to pay because he does not want to lose the money most will assume that his refusal to pay nothing more than selfish materialism and rebellion covered hypocritically by religious excuses that is how people will look at it and so the witness is compromised and lost. Does this advance the kingdom how much better to be able to say i disapprove of these modern taxes and i i hope to help change them but i pay them for consciences sake because i am more concerned with principal than with my own money that is a witness people will hear part part of the problem for legitimate tax strikers lies at justice point. The vast majority of tax strikers are not acting out of christian principle but either out of an an arco geico libertarian philosophy or out of pure personal covetousness. This is my money. It is hard. I do not say impossible for the christian witness of a constitutional channel tax striker to be to be received in this present day social context point number five tax strikes partake of the illusion of of political power. The biblical insight that culture is an effect of religion is implicitly denied by political resistance movements. It's politics does not change things. Rather political. Change is a response to more fundamental cultural changes. What this means means is that resistance movements always fail the only resistant movements in history of the world which have had any semblance of success have been those financed and and supported by outside powers such as the french resistance during world war two the bible recognizes this and thus puts emphasis on proclamation kevin and education as the primary means of cultural transformation the not the exclusive at present christian politicians can accomplish little to to change the course of events they can however use their offices and their campaigns as opportunities to witness and educate once the consensus of opinion in the united it states has once again become christian the political order and its taxation will change in response tax strikers often argue that in the united states each citizen has some limited power of powers of rule since each citizen is a voter and each citizen may challenge bad laws in the courts. This is true and may form a rationale for refusal to pay taxes in this case the striker we'll make it plain that when push comes to shove he will pay his taxes and submit but that he is trying to get a test case before the courts. If by its actions the united states government shows that it is a pure tyranny then we must submit to it as israel had to submit to rome we are not to that point yet however point number six tax strikes resist the judgment of god as the united states states has voted itself into sin. God has increased his judgements against us. One of his primary means of judgment is to put an oppressive state over a sinful info people if we recognize that we have sinned the proper response is to be mute under the chastening hand of god and not rebel if the united states is ruled bye oppressors it is because the united states deserves to be punished for its sins. The bible recognizes that state has is the only proper condition for slaves thus joseph an agent of god helped reduce the population of egypt to slavery genesis forty seven it is a species of non-governmental anarchy arkie to assume that an evil population can be given the privileges of liberty or we'll even dot desire such privileges. What this means is that that the virtues of free enterprise and low taxes will never be apparent to people until they have. I changed their religious beliefs. If the tax revolt were successful so it would only lead to anarchy because of the immorality of the american populous. This is nothing to worry about however because most people want the benefits of big government more than they want lower taxes they are slaves and because of their lawless behavior the only kind of civil order appropriate to them is they a heavy handed. One modern americans do not want to take care of their old people. They want to check them off into old folks homes because of this irresponsibility the government steps in and that means higher taxes the only way to change this is for people to take care of their grandparents as they used to it will accomplish little to attack the matter at the point of taxation him when god brought judgment on the kingdom of judah jeremiah warned the people to submit the chasing of the lord he told them to submit to nebuchadnezzar the rebels goes in jeremiah's day however viewed him as a traitor and as an immoral man they accused him of being a false prophet who wanted to quote sell out the truth close quote to the heathen unlike jeremiah they were going to be loyal to god they would fight naked nezar they would resist the oppressor and they were wiped out over and and over they were wiped out jeremiah was right when god judges us we must submit to his judgment and preaches word if we do so in in time the situation will change point number. Seven tax strikes work against dominion. There are varieties of tax strikers and this criticism criticism does not apply to all but it applies to some some tax strikers are so concerned that the government not get any of their money that they restrict their dominion so as to avoid paying taxes axes one talented man quit a job for which he had trained for years just because the company he worked for insisted on the practice of withholding he makes much less money now as a result zolt thus his tie this proportionately proportionately lower and the work of the kingdom suffers proportionately one even here's of some who have taken vows of poverty ready to avoid taxes and others move from place to place fleeing i._r._s. agents thus thwarting the dominion mandate and disrupting family life now. This kind of thing strikes me as a great evil. The bible commands is over and over again to take dominion over the earth those faithful and small things put over larger things nothing is said about the state all this god expects us to work to expand our work to prosper and to ties whether the state good bad or indifferent we do not do our work with reference to the state but with reference to god those seeking to force the hand of the humanistic power state by limiting their work and dominion are not taking into into account the fact that the heart of the king in god's hands and god can turn it with her so ever wishes proverbs twenty one one in the film the bridge on the river kwai the captured british soldiers are forced by the japanese to build a bridge for them. Initially the soldiers do very crummy work seeking to obstruct the progress of the japanese empire the british commander however remarks that the bridge should be built to last forever since someday the japanese would be gone and by implication the british would enjoy the benefits the bridge. This is a future oriented and positive view similarly. We must work hard expand our dominion and wait for god to put us in charge. This was daniel's attitude he did not try to obstruct the workings of the babylonian empire but sought to be a servant par excellence as a result he was is trusted by nebuchadnezzar and god advanced him to a position of power in the babylonian empire. Daniel became quote ruler over the whole province of babylon and chief prefect over where the wiseman of babylon daniel two forty eight then god struck nebuchadnezzar with insanity for seven years daniel four during which time daniel was doubtless the effective active ruler of the empire after nebuchadnezzar recovered he was convened and served lord a second benefit of a work orientation as positive morale. The british commander in the bridge on the river kwai was concerned that his men find joy and pride in their work. The japanese were not his concern. He left their fate to providence. It's people's whose lives are dedicated to obstruct obstructing. The enemy are building a negative outlook on life into themselves whether they realize it or not we we are called to build. God were removed the enemy when he is ready. Alexander solzenitsyn makes the same point in one day in the life of ivan denisovich. The day's labor consists of building a wall at the end of the day ivan takes pride in having built a straight wall ivan's situation was blessed because he was permitted to engage engage in meaningful work not simply moving stones from one pile to another and back again the point however is that even in the gulag archipelago men can and find satisfaction in work even if ivan's wall is torn down the next day so that no one inherits the fruits of his labor. He is still a better man for having built got it well. The bible teaches many places that a work oriented culture will overcome an oppressive status culture. It is significant for instance that the a judge shamgar defeated the fa- listings using an implement of work and that the evil elimelech was crushed by an implement of work judges judges chapter three verse thirty one chapter nine seven fifteen and fifty three the principal is set out expressly in zachariah chapter one for eighteen to twenty one in that passage israel. L. is oppressed by four horns and delivered by four craftsmen. The horn is a universal symbol for oppressive external power and force to get the right picture. We need only think of the vikings with their horned helmets. Rating at oppressing christian civilization god does not however destroy the pagan horns with four horns of his own rather other they are overcome by four craftsmen diligent. Dominica labour overcomes oppression a culture based on work and capital. We'll overcome a culture based on kwong conquest and raping. It is no accident. Jesus christ was a carpenter. If christians will be faithful and expand their dominion pay their taxes without thinking about it for consciences sake and pay their tithes to the work of the kingdom. This country will be turned around soon enough. The the argument of the persecuted early church was this we pay our taxes to caesar and we pray for caesar in fact we are caesar's best and most law abiding citizens but we cannot and will not worship cesar thus they made the issue crystal clear and they won the day finally let us turn to some considerations iterations more positive toward tax strikes to this point we have been dealing with scriptural teachings in the abstract citizens of the united states of america must apply these teachings to their own historical and cultural situation. I need to ask a couple of questions. Do we live in a roman empire type of tyranny. If so let s. pay taxes and be as invisible as possible. Do we live in a period of judgment like jeremiah's if so let's admit to gods chastening rod and build for a future your day given the behavior of the i._r._s. I think we live in a situation somewhat close to tyranny and given the apostasy of the citizenry of the united states. I think we live in a situation rather close. Those two jeremiah's for these reasons we ought to approach tax striking with a great deal of care second. We ought to have a clear rationale. If we're going to join the the tax revolt in an open public way in general the proper rationale run something like this quote caesar for the u._s. As the constitution and the i._r._s. is engaged in unconstitutional activities i as a citizen ruler in the united states engaging in a legitimate and constitutional form of protest. I am working within the system. 'cause there are of course a variety of specific arguments used within this framework the question of what constitutes income the question of what constitutes real money the question that the fifth amendment and so on third we need to count the cost luke fourteen twenty eight to thirty two. Do we have an organization sufficiently powerful to take on the i._r._s. As more and more people joined the tax revolt openly the possibilities of rolling back the i._r._s. Increase the point is to count the troops before declaring war counting. The cost is also personal the the pioneers of the anti i._r._s. Movement will emerge as heroes in due course during the nineteen eighties not every person however is called or able to be such a pioneer to fight the i._r._s. Arrest one needs to have a pretty sharp mind a good acquaintance with the law a tough and aggressive personality a supportive family and money. There is no doubt but that the i._r._s. Functions tends to radically the question is whether the u._s. Government as a whole is now a tyranny also if you have a wife and small children who will care for them when you are in jail. If your children dr grown keep in mind that the i._r._s. will persecute them as a way of harassing you okay you're tough and your wife is tough now smarter you. How did you do in school. Do you know the law or do you have a sharp lawyer another question. How much money do you make it will take lots of money to fight one court case after another you may have to flee from state to state count count the cost fourth recognize that you are forfeiting a lot of present dominion. Your goal is to enhance future dominion for your children by rolling back oppression today also keep in mind that you are fighting negative battle. The kingdom of christ will advance through conversion and education at best your fight against the i._r._s. Passive moderately successful. We'll give a few more years for the church to do her work face it. The people of the united states want the so-called benefits of big government. Only the gospel will change that fifth recognize the right of other christians to remain uninvolved. We all have costs to count. Not everyone one can be a tax warrior sixth and finally keep your christian principles in mind and before the public don't fall into the myth of political power. Don't try to make it out that the bible requires you to do this. Make it clear that you have limited goals and that you are fighting on the basis of the principles of english common law and the the u._s. Constitution constitution which you maintain our caesar yours is not a revolutionary but a conservative movement and thus ends the essay now. It's interesting is to reflect on what has happened since that article was published in april of nineteen eighty-one. My understanding of the last forty years of history is that in essence every single one of those arguments events that were being pushed forward in the courts etc. <hes> were lost legally speaking <hes> you can if you consider yourself herself to be competent legal thinking you consider whether you think they should have lost or not <hes> from time to time get people who send me in very interesting articles discussions etc <hes> <hes> on the question of what does the law say etc. I as far as i'm concerned. It's not a matter. The law says the law doesn't say <hes>. It's just a matter of who's who's got the guns and who wants the money and <hes> and the question is what is the christian responsibility towards tyrants. What do you do <hes> so i thought not that <hes> jordan did a good job of discussing that. There are other you can find other discussions very active in the mennonite community. You can find some some some discussion about war taxes and whatnot in the mennonite community you can find other other things over over history that many people wrestled with these things <hes> but as as far as i'm concerned i think jordan's article a good job of striking to the heart of the matter <hes> i remain sympathetic and appreciate those those who who feel strongly about tax resistance but for many of the reasons outlined in that article and just simply the sheer practicality of it does not seem wise. I do not think that it is something that people should engage in. I would say that if you want to follow the legal methods that has that that avoids the risk of being imprisoned which of course incredibly important you can think about whether it's worthwhile to reduce your your income far as i'm concerned. It seems much wiser to me. If you could make four hundred thousand dollars a year. It seems much wiser to me to make four hundred thousand dollars a year and setup veigh charitable organization dedicated to whatever the specific cause are and then funded with two hundred thousand dollars per year of your income take two hundred thousand dollars per year tax seduction. Let the u._s. government. Keep the rest of it. That seems a lot more effective than lowering your taxable income to forty thousand dollars per year so that you don't pay federal income taxes <hes> when you look at it and you understand financial planning i think there are enough answers and solutions in good financial planning where you can stay on the right side of the law you can be ignored order and quiet by the i._r._s. You don't wind up being on the front page of a newspaper. You don't wind up being imprisoned. You can follow the law and yet you can make much more productive change change even if you don't make. Let's say that you have the opportunity you say i'm i have the capacity to serve people effectively enough to make a half a million dollars a year but that means. I'm gonna assume tax. We'll do it. Oh the tax but then again sat up the appropriate organizations to accomplish some uh-huh appropriate change in local community and if you much rather stroke a check for one hundred thousand dollars to the i._r._s. Let's let's say these simple example. What what is what is better served. If let's say that you can earn you live on fifteen thousand dollars tax free for round numbers and so you could become a tax protester lower of your income to fifty thousand dollars live on that so that you don't wind up owing the tax or you can work hard you can exercise the talent and the skills the knowledge and the ability that god has given you effectively and you can earn half a million dollars will earn the half a million dollars put aside the fifty live on fifty fifty thousand freeing up four hundred fifty if you have to write a check for a hundred to the government radicek for one hundred the government and put the other three hundred fifty to work doing something useful take care of the widows and the orphans that live in your community take care of the poor take care of the people who are hungry preached the gospel endow the churches and now the people who are a busy who are doing good work and that three hundred and fifty thousand dollars will go so much farther than your tiny little voice in attacks protest movement so that's how i see it. All of us have to wrestle with these things and settle them before lord but that's how i see hope. That was helpful to you interesting topic. I've never heard a personal finance. Show the talked about tax protesting in anything other than a mocking way which i don't think is a a very insulting because many millions of people have legitimate crises of conscience when it comes to these things and so i hope that i've done a good job of dealing with it seriously being careful with my language talking about the solutions oceans and the opportunities close today by telling you about my how to survive and thrive during the coming economic crisis course one component of that course is international international expatriation in one of my reasons for expatriating internationally among other things was i'd never want to be in a position and where i didn't have a chance to get out of the united states. If i came to the point that my conscience wouldn't allow me to have my tax money going lean towards things that are immoral thought about it. A lot over the years have wrestled with it. Come to the point that <hes> come the positions. I've just described but i didn't. I wouldn't want to be stuck in a position where i was forced to pay taxes to a government. That's engaged in immoral behaviour well. What do you do if you wanna stay out of prison. If you wanna follow the law if you wanna have a good witness of being a loyal citizen a good subject of the king. What do you do well. The one of the few options i see is to leave peacefully. Leave and you're not hurting anybody or not harming anybody. You're just simply exercising your right of withdrawal and that seems to me to be a healthy thing to do well interestingly. That doesn't have to be something to be done in a crisis. It's an effective way of solving planning for crisis but it's also an extremely effective way day of planning for things like increasing taxation and using the tax code as it exists. If you're a u._s. citizen you can as i described described described elsewhere on the show you can live outside the united states and you can earn one hundred five thousand dollars a year not only taxes the united states government so if you want to be in finance finance go work in the cayman islands go work into by donating taxes to those governments <hes> the income taxes to those governments and you'll take advantage of your foreigner income exclusion of the u._s. government and if you want to be a war tax processor that seems to me to be a better thing than <hes> living in the united states just seems like an effective solution and if you're a citizen of other countries as well you can always ex patriot. I spoken to people who were <hes> german. Germans germans don't allow their citizens to home school so you can can stay in germany and you can home school your children you can fight it out with the police and you can battle them out. <hes> as a christian homeschooling family did a number of years all the way to go to all louis the german supreme court or you can simply leave and you can home school. Your children in any corner of the world where <hes> such practices are legal in fact is a german. I can pretty much go anywhere and nobody bother you so it seems more effective and wise to me to avoid those conflicts and exercise your option to leave. If if you're interested in how to prepare for an economic crisis to stay i cover that too but if you're interested in how you can avoid an economic crisis by leaving and economic the crisis could be personal could be other things as well. I think you'd enjoy my course called how to survive and thrive in the coming economic crisis. You can find that at radical personal finance dot com slash store radical personal finance dot com slash store.

united states David gross u._s paul murder Jesus iraq egypt president israel joshua Peter laura hillenbrand hillary clinton
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06:07 min | 2 years ago

Cattle Current PodcastJuly 26, 2019

"Slaughtering grading data suggest feedlots continued to remain Kerr and marketing and less something happened late Thursday though oh the weeks fed cattle trade was shaping up to be an into the week showdown can calculate market update with West issue. How will this is worse Ishmael with your Kelkar Market Update for Thursday night and Friday morning the twenty six July negotiated cash bid kettle trade remained undeveloped through Thursday afternoon cattle features? I basically Hubbard and place awaiting some cash direction except for unchanged in October and a nickel higher in dis live cattle futures closed in average up thirteen cents lower fear cattle futures closed in average of twenty one cents higher in five of contracts and then an average of eleven cents lower in the other three corn futures closed one to five cents lower through September twenty and then fractionally lower soybean futures closed most before date cents lower wholesale. The values were lower on choice and steady on select with light to moderate demand and offerings according to the Agricultural Marketing Service choice box beef cut up value as a dollar three cents lower Thursday afternoon at two hundred twelve dollars and fifty seven cents in two hundred wait select was twenty four cents lower at one eighty nine eighteen cavs and feeder cattle traded mixed at the weekly Thursday auctions monitored by cal current for instance fear your steers Wayne Eight fifty two nine fifty sold five to nine dollars higher at Mitchell livestock auction South Dakota fear heifers Wayne seven and a half eight and a half sold five eight dollars higher. There are fifty one hundred seventy two head on offer at Woodward Livestock Auction Oklahoma. There are thirty nine hundred seventy nine head fear steer staffer soul to five dollars higher steer castle steady. There is no trend forever. cavs higher undertones were noted for limited comparable rebel steer offerings at winter livestock impract- Kansas while fear heifers wind seven fifty eight fifty soul two to three dollars lower. There are thirty two hundred head on offer. They're finally steers wind seven hundred fifty eight hundred pounds hold steady the four L. dollars lower at Valentine livestock from Nebraska that was compared to two weeks earlier steers way nine hundred pounds traded ten dollars higher heifers Wayne Seven hundred pounds also sold ten dollars higher there twenty two hundred eighty head. On offer major U._S. financial engines is closed lower Thursday and assortment of underwhelming quarterly earnings report was part of it. There is also chatter that investors feared the Fed might be less aggressive and cutting interest rates at next week's. F._O._M._C. Meeting based on recent positive economic news that paused of news included the U._S. Census Bureau announcing durable goods orders in June up two percent compared to the previous month that was more than traders expected also on Thursday. The European Central Bank left its lending rate unchanged hinting at a more positive economic outlook for the region. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed one hundred twenty eight points lower the S._N._p.. Five hundred closed fifteen points lower and the Nasdaq was down eighty two points feed lot marketing remains current based on the most recent U._S._D._A.. Slaughter and carcass grading data the average steer wait for the weekend in July Thirteenth was eight hundred sixty five pounds which was four pounds more than the previous week but two pounds lighter year-over-year. That's according to U._S._D._A.'s actual slaughter under federal inspection report. The average dressed heffer weight of seven hundred ninety one pounds that week was a pound lighter previous week and eight pounds less year-over-year as for grading seventy seven point seventeen percent of the carcass gray choice and prime. The week ending July twelfth according to U._S._D._A.'s national steered heffer estimated Grady report that was zero point nine one percent less than the previous week carcasses grading in the upper two-thirds of choice or zero point two two percent percent less than the previous week at thirty one point five one percent for broader monthly perspective total commercial red meat and pork production was record large for the month in June at four point three seven billion pounds which choose one percent more than the previous year that was with one less business day in the month this year however according to U._S._D._A.'s monthly livestock slaughter report beef production in June of two point two billion pounds was three percent less than the the previous year with the months two point eight zero million head of total cattle slaughter being two percent less year over year pork production on the other hand was two point one three billion pounds June which was six percent more than the previous ear with hog slaughter up four percent for January through June commercial red meat production of twenty six point eight billion pounds was two percent more than the same period last year accumulated beef production was up slightly from last year video was down one percent and pork was up four percent by the way land mutton production were also down one percent Thatcher Kelkar market update for Thursday night and Friday morning.

Woodward Livestock Auction Okl Wayne Eight U._S._D._A. Kerr cavs Mitchell livestock Fed Census Bureau Thatcher Kelkar Kansas Nebraska Agricultural Marketing Service Hubbard European Central Bank South Dakota U._S._D._A.
The immigration policies causing further uncertainty for asylum seekers

Post Reports

30:50 min | 2 years ago

The immigration policies causing further uncertainty for asylum seekers

"From the newsroom of the Washington Post I there is the Mayor Lang with the Washington Post or bring. This is post reports. I am Martine powers. It's Monday July fifteen today the changing realities for people seeking asylum in the U._S.. The latest legal threat to the affordable care act and the surprising star of a new Olympic sport. The ice rates were very successful. People came into our country illegally illegally on Monday. President trump claimed victory. He told reporters that immigration rates happened across the country over the weekend has launched what it calls the family operation that's Nick Mirror off. He covers immigration for the post targeting up to two thousand families in major cities across the United States but Knicks reporting suggests that these mass reads didn't actually happen. We had many people it was a very successful day but you didn't see a lot of it because it was done a lot. You'll speak to them and I'm not even sure they should be telling you but it was a lot. The president said that the operation was going to begin on Sunday part of his goal of deporting millions of people from the country but there was little evidence of any major agere large-scale activity on the streets. There was a lot of fear of course a lot of people stayed indoors in many immigrant neighborhoods and communities but what we did not see was large numbers of ice officers out in force force knocking on doors and picking people up doesn't mean that it won't happen and I've assured that this operation is going to go forward and technically is already underway but I think the agency out of concern for in particular regular for all the attention that this gotten I think they're trying to take it a little slower. Operate a little bit more under the radar in particular after an attempted attack on a nice facility in Tacoma Washington on Saturday in which a sixty fifty nine year old man attempted to blow up the the center and and was killed by officers to ice officials. It was an indication of just how intense emotions are running and the the potential danger that poses was further workforce so in the middle of this pretty heated environment when it comes to things happening on immigration the trump administration is also announcing new rules related to asylum-seekers. What was this announcement and what does it mean so the trump administration has announced its intentions to publish tomorrow a new what they call interim final rule in the Federal Register that is the first step toward the implementation of basically an in this case an executive action and what would do is significantly raise the bar to qualifying for asylum in the United States and what it would do is not completely foreclose the possibility of of getting asylum but it would for anybody who had crossed through another country route to the United States if they did not seek asylum in that country then that would potentially disqualify them from being able to apply in the United States so the idea is that people who are seeking asylum who are seeking dangerous situation their home country should be trying to apply for asylum anywhere that they get to rather than just seeking solely to come to the United States? That's right the argument being that you can't sort of shop around for the place that you want to apply for asylum. You should go to the first place where you're safe and and seek protection. They're potentially. How quickly would this change be put into affect well? This change is going to take effect immediately but we've also spoken to attorneys for the A._C._l._U.. WHO said they are going to challenge this in court immediately just to give you an example of how this could potentially work if somebody from El Salvador transit through Guatemala in Mexico and then came to the U._S. border and sought asylum the fact that they did not apply in Guatemala and Mexico would count against them and potentially disqualify them from <hes> receiving that protection the problem is that many countries including Mexico Guatemala are not safe at least according to the United States own State Department travel warnings so there are places for example example across U._S.? Mexico border Mexican border cities where State Department personnel have significant travel restrictions and so there are major concerns about the safety of sending back potential asylum-seekers two locations where they would be vulnerable to kidnapping extortion sexual assault and so on one of the places where there are concerns about the safety of asylum-seekers is Nuevo Laredo Mexico. Kevin Sif is the Latin America correspondent for the Post. I went to Laredo which is a city city in northern Mexico where the U._S. government has just expanded a policy known as the migrant protection protocols or remain in Mexico that program is another part of the administration strategy to slow the flow of Central American refugees to the U._S. last week the U._S. sent its first group of asylum-seekers there to wait for their hearings. Meanwhile radio is really is a really dangerous place. It's a place where drug cartels of operated with impunity for many years the U._S. Government says that asylum seekers who we in Mexico for their court hearing are supposed to be processed faster than people who in the U._S. but some people say that outsourcing are asylum process to Mexico is problematic. It's a place where the the local and state governments don't have complete control over what happens and said the idea that the U._S. would be forcing asylum-seekers to wait. There is really controversial and really worrying for a lot of human rights officials a lot of Mexican officials. Those who who wonder how asylum-seekers will will stay safe there so when you went there. What was it like I mean so he was it was strange because we knew that at some point the U._S. was going to begin implementing this policy in the city but we didn't exactly win the U._S. hadn't confirmed with Mexican officials win? The policy was going to start and so it was just the sort of strange waiting game or we didn't know win or if it was going to happen and then suddenly we got this call from a source saying they're about to send people back and so we ran to the international bridge that connects Laredo Texas in Laredo. I was really curious. How how the Mexican officials were GonNA handle this us whether they were GonNa give them armed escorts if they were going to take them directly to a special shelter and so I was waiting to see what was going to happen and then the door opens from the office and they were just sort of told to leave and I was? Really shot they were just wandering around the city. The family that I was with was Venezuelan family too young parents with two young boys six eight years old and they had no idea where to go so they were just wandering around. I was following them around and we're talking as they're walking and they like literally just didn't know what to do where to go where to find shelter where to find food. The kids were complaining that they were Hungary. It was one hundred two degrees <hes> so is it was not what I expected to see. <hes> I mean what I took away that at least at this point is that you know this really dangerous place at least on the Mexican side. There's a total lack of preparedness into to protect and offer shelter to the people who were sent back say when we own Yup who is this family and why were they seeking asylum on on the U._S.. Border Order so this is will and family in and a lot of ways. They're really a textbook asylum case the the father is named Jose Luis Romero he and the rest of his family were middle-class Venezuelan family as many as well as has has decided of chaos and has as its been harder buy groceries or medicine Ernie basic products who said Louise's family have suffered the same way that that a lot of Venezuelan families have suffered and ultimately they got to a point where they knew they just needed to leave Illinois Don don album and so in January of this year they left Venezuela and again. This is like a lot of people assume that all migrants take the same journey to the U._S.. Border but it's not true I mean they're real their differences. In the way that people get here so Jose Luis and his family they had had had means they had more money than your average Central American migrant so they took a flight from Caracas us to Cancun Mexico and then another flight from Cancun to Mexico City and then a Basra Mexico City Tsunami Laredo and for the last month and a half when they were waiting to cross the border for their asylum hearing. They stayed in an apartment yeah well we got it anymore. He went up so I mean there's no question that there are sort of gradations of privilege when we look at this this large pool of migrants not everyone is is making the same journey Ernie in the same way but the thing the thing that's really scary for St Louis and his family as you know word has gotten out within these smuggling networks within cities like mobile Laredo that the Venezuelans have more money than Guatemalans and so if you're going to kidnaps someone going to extort someone target the Venezuelans this is like a known thing in Colorado and you can tell Venezuelans are because they have different accents off nee look a little bit different they dress differently and so I mean that has just just like sent its Hodel this sense of fear throughout the Venezuelan migrant community and through wholesale Louise's family and so when they were waiting before they didn't leave the house. They didn't leave the apartment. <hes> the kids weren't allowed to open the door <hes> mister. We're talking about like months where these little kids were not allowed to leave this little room where they're awaiting and so when they got this call saying okay your name is your name has been called. You know it's your turn to begin your asylum. Hearing there was like this feeling of ecstasy like the whole family family was like finally we're out of this little one re -partment where we've been waiting for so long kids really excited and then at the end of the day they were told okay. We'll we're sending you back to Mexico and you can imagine like what that felt like for that family when they got to the U._S.. U._S. border and with the expectation or at least the hope that they would be able to enter the U._S. and wait for an asylum hearing. What was their reaction when they were told that they were part of this new program where people get immediately sent to Mexico he I mean that's another thing that surprised me? I assumed that they would have been told that relatively early on in the process like before they crossed into the U._S.. I'd but actually they weren't told that until right before they were sent back to Mexico and I asked say Louise that question <hes> you know how did it feel and she basically started crying. I mean like he was just totally shocked and I think bewildered to like why would I have to go back to that place so our Mexican officials responding to this and do they have some kind of plan in place for people like Jose Luis and his family about like how they're supposed to get through this and continue pursuing their asylum case so I think it's important to take a step back and just remind people that what happened over the last month is that president trump threatened to implement really significant tariffs on Mexico if Mexico didn't crackdown on immigration and so over the course of basically basically a week there were these frantic negotiations between Mexican officials in U._S.. Officials about how what role Mexico was going to play in stopping migration and ultimately the Mexican federal government and and the U._S. government came into an agreement part of that agreement was that this program the migrant protection protocols M._p._p.. As it's known would be expanded broadly across the border <hes> and so this was again in agreement between two central governments the subvert the problem was that the people who are sent back to Mexico under M._p._p.. Are sent back only to border states like W. bus but because they're they're big problems in Mexico but distributing funds between the central government in the state governments the state governments said okay you decide to deal with the trump administration that will inevitably lead to tens of thousands of migrants being sent back to border states but what resources are giving us to to provide shelter for them food for or them anything for them and the federal government hasn't answered that question <hes> and so that's created this huge tension between state governments in Mexico and the federal government that the leader is in border states are frustrated because they say like you've you've given us huge problem and you haven't provided any way for us to deal with this problem right exactly <hes> and that may sound kind of like it's sort of like an in the weeds domestic problem in Mexico but it has real it has real consequences forties migrants so for example in Tummy in the state where Jose Luis was just returned there now talking about shipping migrants from their state further south to the state of Noble Leon and so the idea that you know it's already difficult all to find a home in in Laredo all of a sudden you're going to be forced to get on a bus and go further south to a small town in kind of in the middle of nowhere northern Mexico. I mean that's like just makes things even more complicated but ultimately the way this is GonNa play out is that I mean the state governments in Mexico can determine what they will and won't do so they could unilaterally decide you know what we're just not going to invest in shelters or we're gonNA close all of our own shelters and then you know migrants can figure everything's offer themselves or they choose to go further south. I mean so what these states decide to do. <hes> and as of now they're basically operating unilaterally without without the assistance of the federal government. It has a real impact on asylum seekers who are looking for refuge in the US. If the original reasoning behind the conception of this of this remain in Mexico program at least on the part of the the trump administration is to deter people from. Crossing the border because they will know that they might just get back to Mexico is that having an effect on the number of people who want to calm and try to seek asylum in the U._S.. I mean we we saw this last month. that the the number of apprehensions people crossing the border went down and ultimately I mean I've done a lot of reporting in the places where asylum seekers are leaving from you know especially in Guatemala and I do think if indeed it's impossible possible for asylum seekers to cross into the U._S. within a couple of months and spend that two or three year period in the U._S. while they await their their hearings yeah I mean I think that will deter some people but lick. Let's look at Jose Louise. I mean he was GonNa Leave Venezuela Colette no matter what they're there was no U._S.. Policy that was going to change Lewis's mind and there are a lot of people like Louis. They're not all Venezuelan. Some of them are Salvador. Honduras Guatemala and some of them are Nicaraguan and those are people who you know no matter what the trump administration does. They're still gonNA come. Maybe Jose Louise would have chosen to go to Columbia instead a lot of Venezuelans doing that but we're talking about a family that has strong relatives kids waiting for them in Florida strong connections to the U._S.. I mean my sense is that they were gonNA come. No matter what Kevin Sith is the Latin America correspondent correspondent for the Washington Post Nick Mirror off covers immigration enforcement for the post <music> after multiple challenges just to this law before the Supreme Court the Affordable Care Act is here to stay the affordable care act is a law. That's been under one kind of threat or another almost sense. It was passed by Democratic Congress in two thousand ten amy gold seen as a national healthcare policy writer at the Post. This is the latest legal threat in the courts. There've been others earlier. Lawsuits made it all the way up to the Supreme Court <music> which impelled two thousand twelve and two thousand fifteen upheld most of the law because of this law and because of today's decision millions of Americans why here from every single day we'll continue to receive the tax credits that have given about eight and ten people who buy insurance on the new marketplaces the choice of a healthcare plan that cost less than one hundred dollars a month. The point is this is not an abstract thing anyway. This is not set of political talking. This is reality so you've been writing for a while about all of the different legal challenges to the affordable care act. What is is this case about? This lawsuit was filed in February of two thousand eighteen by a group of Republican attorneys general and they filed this case based on a tax law that the Republican Congress had adopted two months earlier in December twenty seventeen and that law had one big effect on the A._C._A.. It said that starting actually this past winter people would no longer face the threat of a tax penalty if they did not carry health insurance as this healthcare law requires and that had been a big part of obamacare the fact that basically almost almost forced you to get health care and if you didn't get healthcare you'd have to pay attacks the government for not having it. That's why people had a choice between either buying health insurance or paying this tax penalty and that tax penalty is important legally because of an earlier court case in which the U._S. Supreme Court in two thousand twelve had ruled that the law was constitutional because that penalty was part of Congress is legitimate taxing power <hes> so the new opponents who brought this lawsuit are arguing that without this penalty there is no more tax and they're saying the reason the Supreme Court upheld the law several years earlier is no longer applicable so after these Republican led states brought this case to basically dismantle obamacare. What's been happening next well? That case went first before a district judge in Texas. Who in December of this past year ruled that the plaintiffs in this case the Republican led states where right and he <hes> issued an opinion saying that the entire law was now unconstitutional big deal so the people on the other side of the case who are trying to preserve the law democratic attorneys general they appealed to <hes> appellate court so the latest live action took place last week in a courtroom in New Orleans where a three judge panel of the U._S. Circuit Court for the Fifth Circuit <hes> heard arguments <hes> allowed allowed from both sides of the case so you have these Republican states that are trying to argue that that Obamacare is no longer legal and then you have these democratic states they're saying no it absolutely is and they're trying to defend it? Where does the trump administration fall on this? It's normally the executive branch of the government any president and his Justice Department would defend an existing federal statute but just about a year ago the trump administration announced something that was quite unusual. The Justice Department said that it was not going to defend this law in court in this lawsuit so even though it's it is a federal law. They're just going to basically abandoned it and say like we actually don't care if this law continues to exist more than that they are arguing in court on the same side as the Republican Lid States that are trying to get rid of the law so the trump administration's do two things at once the health and Human Services Department which oversees as most of the A._C._A.. They're continuing to enforce the law while the Justice Department a few agencies over is trying to persuade this court that the law should no longer exist so we're is is the case now and what's going to be happening next sometime in the next few months. The panel of Appeals Court judges is GONNA issue. It's opinion. It was interesting to be in the courtroom in New Orleans on Tuesday because this three judge panel is made up of two judges who were appointed by Republican presidents one by a President George W Bush and one just last year by president trump. He's one of the newest members of. Of this appeals court the third judge is a longtime judge who was appointed by President Jimmy Carter. She did not say anything. During these oral arguments she was just listening and it was just the two Republican appointees on the court who were asking lots and lots of questions. The trump appointee was asking questions just of the Democratic led states and their lawyers who are trying to get this law preserved the Bush appointee appointee was a little more even handed asking a lot of questions of the democratic side trying to get the law upheld but also some questions of the Republican attorneys so what did that indicate t you about where the court or it might come down on this well a very bad prophet of any kind including illegal profit and it's dangerous practice to try to predict where any court is gonNA come out on any case but I've gotta say listening for a little more than ninety ninety minutes to these oral arguments. The questioning seemed a little more pointed when it was directed at the democratic side of those trying to uphold the law <hes> there were a lot of questions about well if this tax penalty is now gone isn't this law now unconstitutional and that of course as the argument that the Republican opponents challenging the law want this court to absorb so if this quarter Louisiana does decide to you rule that that that the affordable care act is unconstitutional what happens next well that could be the end of things but there's always the supreme court hanging out in Washington. Whoever loses at the appellate level might take like this case back to the Supreme Court for third time so if the affordable care act is struck down as unconstitutional how would that play out politically because on the one hand this is something that president trump campaigned on right wanting to bring down on obamacare but on the other hand there are many parts of of obamacare that are very popular and it's just become entrenched in American life like this is just part of how our healthcare system works is complicated? Isn't it what I've come to think. After talking with a lot of political legal experts on both sides of the partisan divide is that this actually could be a little bit tricky for the Republican Party. If they quote quote one this case they would be big winners in the sense that this law they've been trying to one way or another get to go away for nearly a decade could depending on what the higher courts ultimately do be gone but that leaves the immediate question well what happens now there are more than twenty million people in this country who have gotten health insurance <hes> through this law if you think back to 2017 Congress tried Publican led Congress within New Republican president called trump tried for most of that year to repeal and replace the affordable care act they couldn't do it they tried and they tried and they tried so you would have the Republicans Republicans who had fought to have this law overturned in the courts having succeeded legally but then they would have in their laps the question of what to do with all these people who suddenly lost health insurance what to do with people who had <hes> any kind of private health insurance who lost some of the consumer protections that are the most popular parts of this law. This would be right in the middle of a presidential election twenty twenty the congressional national elections in Twenty Twenty in which the Democrats you could imagine what gleefully say the Republicans. You're the ones who are harming healthcare for the American public. What are you going to do about it and at least up until now the Republicans Republicans have not been able to figure out legislatively an answer to what to do about it? Amy Goldstein is a national healthcare policy writer at the Washington Post <music> it and now one more thing next year skateboarding will make its debut at the Olympics and the future the sport might sound like this kind of like my happy place I it's kind of like a plague on for me to sky. Brown is a ten year old skateboarder. She's aiming to become the youngest competitor next Summer Olympics in Tokyo Rick Maces sports reporter for the post he met up with sky. WHO's hoping to land a spot on team Britain because it's the first time that skateboarding will be at the Olympics? There's no age restriction on who can compete as she was a swimmer or sprinter or volleyball player. She wouldn't be eligible to compete because she's a skateboarder. There no such restrictions so as a ten year old or I guess she'll be twelve at the time she would actually be eligible to compete in Tokyo so you don't feel like nervous or anxious. Shishir scared on when you're in their even with the crowd. It's interesting looking at sky because outside of the bowl. She looks like any other ten-year-old with a skateboard and you really don't know what to expect. Scott around the we went to the do tour stop in Long Beach California disaster on that the first Olympic qualifying event in the United States and sky was competing there for the first time and mostly against ends girls that were twice or age or much older. Can you believe on five forty plants been under coding when she gets on her board and starts going in the bowl sure right up the sides and she'll fly in the air new twists and turns just like the rest of even though she's only ten sky comes across is wise beyond her years. She doesn't want to compete at the Olympics because it's something to do. Refunded doers should be on T._v.. She kind of is competing with with the message a platform when she told us with it out to show the girls doesn't matter how big you spoil you can do anything <music> off wash game like dudas trick though think maybe they can do it too so for the past several years the Olympic organizers have made a concerted push to kind of attract a younger audience and they've been adding these these New Sports Things like surfing rock climbing in that sense competitor like Sky Brown is important to them because she can really showcase with these new sports can do and hopefully reach a younger audience that might not typically tune into the Olympics getting more little girls. It's just really bench rick. Mace is a sports reporter for the Washington Post. That's it for today. Show thanks for listening. You can learn more about the stories in this episode by heading to post reports dot com.

U._S Mexico United States president U._S. Jose Louise president trump Supreme Court Laredo Washington Post federal government Jose Luis Nick Mirror Venezuela New Orleans Nuevo Laredo Mexico Washington Tacoma Washington Guatemala
NPR News: 08-08-2019 8AM ET

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 2 years ago

NPR News: 08-08-2019 8AM ET

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like xfinity x. by get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make wifi simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply live from n._p._r. News in washington. I'm korva coleman. The immigration and customs enforcement agency says it raided seven agricultural processing plants in mississippi zippy on wednesday ice officials say six hundred eighty people were detained the agency alleges. All of them are illegally in the u._s. Associated press reporter jeff. Saami told n._p._r.'s morning edition. This is the largest such ice raid ever before eight o'clock in the morning. They surrounded these plants. They detained people who they i thought didn't have authorisation. They tied their hands behind their backs and loaded them onto buses and took them to the air national guard hangar that adjoins the jackson airport. They had a very large operation set up inside the hangar. They had seven lines one for each ray to process people with fingerprint earprint scanners and printers for document. The agency says the raids are part of an ongoing criminal investigation into several of the mississippi plans. The the united nations says agriculture must change in order to avoid the most serious effects of climate change n._p._r.'s rebecca hersher reports the warning comes from a major international panel of scientists in a new report. The u._n.'s intergovernmental panel on climate change says farming forestry and other land use generates. It's about a third of human greenhouse gas emissions that includes more than forty percent of the methane. That's pumped into the atmosphere which is a big deal because methane is particularly good at trapping heat in the atmosphere and emissions from agriculture are increasing as the global population grows the report warns that to control global warming the amount of farmland on earth must shrink in the coming decades in the amount of forested area must grow that will probably require many people to change what they eat for example eat less meat. The panel also recommends planting trees and using less water for irrigation rebecca hersher n._p._r. News china has again weakened. Its currency against the u._s. Dollar for the fourth day in a row although the exchange rate has become steady u._s. An asian stock markets have been volatile this week as trade relations continued continue to sour between the u._s. and china. N._p._r.'s windsor johnston has more u._s. Markets have been in flux and trump plans to impose ten percent tariffs on another three hundred billion dollars in chinese imports gus voce chief economist at p._n._c. Financial services says the volatility will continue for as long is the trade dispute drags on. I think if this persists the certainly has the potential to cause global economic recession. I'm hopeful that won't happen but <hes> if they're miscalculations the chinese or by the americans <hes> than that could certainly be a possible outcome foce says market uncertainty is prompting many investors to shift money from stocks to bonds ten year. Treasury yields are at their lowest level since two thousand sixteen windsor johnston n._p._r. News this is n._p._r. Police in southern california have arrested a man they allege shot and stabbed four people to death and wounded two more police in garden grove south of los angeles angeles say the mass violence appears to be random. The deceased victims included two men in the suspect's apartment complex a worker in a deli and a security regard defense secretary. Mark esperer is due in south korea to work on maintaining ties with a key asian. Ally n._p._r.'s anthony kuhn reports from seoul. It's esperance his first trip to asia since assuming office last month. Just ahead of vespers visit president trump tweeted that soul is entered into talks to increase its contribution to the cost of basing u._s. u._s. Troops in south korea south. Korea's government said those talks have in fact not begun earlier on the trip asper said the u._s. Considering putting land based intermediate range ballistic missiles in asia china sees that as a threat and says it would take counter-measures soul has signaled. It's not keen to host those missiles and says it has no plans to discuss discussed the matter with esperer north korea's recent spate of short range missile tests are likely to be on the agenda when ezra south korean counterpart on friday anthony anthony cumia n._p._r. News soul tension continues to grow between india and pakistan over the disputed territory of kashmir. Both countries claim it. Although india controls trolls it this week india revoked kashmir's autonomy in response pakistan says it's downgrading diplomatic ties with india today had cut off a key train service to india india has cut off phone and internet service in kashmir. I'm korva coleman n._p._r. News in washington.

u._s. u._s india india Ally n._p._r. south korea washington mississippi korva coleman china kashmir north korea asia anthony anthony cumia china Associated press jackson airport pakistan
#29: Louis-Vincent Gave On Staying One Step Ahead Of The Markets

Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom

55:24 min | 2 years ago

#29: Louis-Vincent Gave On Staying One Step Ahead Of The Markets

"This is super investors in the art of worldly wisdom. I'm jesse filter objected brought to you by the fellow report. I go through a ton of reading research every day and on saturday mornings i send out a free email newsletter with the five things things that i found during the week that were the most valuable to me can be a link. It can be a chart. It could be a quote. I keep it brief and it's just the stuff i found was most valuable so if this is something thing that you'd like to receive just go to the federal dot com can sign up right there in the homepage and you'll be good to go. I guess for this episode is louie gob and if you haven't even heard louis already i'm i'm really excited to share this interview with you. <hes> louise one of the most interesting thinkers in the world when it comes to global macro acro investing in fact after i read a few of his pieces over the past couple of months thought how is it that i have not already invited louis podcast. He's just a fascinating individual and very generous with his his framework and things and so in this discussion he shares his investment process process how he developed his own signature framework for thinking about the may draft classes around the world. What are some of the most important things he looks at in developing <hes> <hes> that framework we also get into several themes that he is following right now and that really form the foundation for how he's investing his own money money. I really got a ton out of this and i hope you get half as much cited so please enjoy my conversation with louis gov in one way. Fund managers can't beat the s. and p. Five hundred 'cause they're sheep. She gets slide louis. Welcome to the show. Thanks a lot great to be here. I'm really excited to have you do you this. I've been reading your stuff recently. There was several pieces that i've read recently and i thought and i really need to talk to you about this. Share these these themes with my audience because i think they're so critical to understand what's going on in the world and the markets right now but before we dive into that stuff. I really would like to understand a little bit more about about you. I was looking at your bio on the website and before you officially kind of dove into finance you went into the army for a couple of years. What was it that kind of inspired you to to do that. I come from a military family a pretty much every every meal on my dad's side of the family was normally officer her except for my dad and growing up. I just thought that that's what i do. I <hes> i went to offers a school in trance and then i <hes> joined the mountain infantry <hes> it was a terrific couple years <hes> and then the the army armie told me hey look you speak decent english. You speak chinese. I speak some spanish where we send you to brussels and you can be a nato <hes> and work in an office and i thought well that doesn't sound great and if i'm going to be in in an office <hes> doing an office job might as well get paid a decent wage for uh-huh and so yeah so i left the army and moved into finance and started getting paid a decent wage things you know the military terry is a is a family history. You know it seems like finance is probably a family history. Was it your dad that got you interested in finance in the first place. Also oh yeah yeah. We'll definitely look. I <hes> i left the army and i thought you know i don't really know how to do anything and my dad said perfect you'll be great for finance and so yeah so my dad had started his own money management firm <hes> back in the eighties in france and moved to the u._k. <hes> he <hes> <hes> it'd be quite a big success. He sold it to alliance capital. <hes> stood alliance capital for for a few years and then basically retired <hes> and so yeah there was definitely some immediate family history a finance through my dad. Although my dad's really was the only one who do done occur in finance the family and so you win and you know from the army went into a to finance he didn't necessarily work for your for your dad right away was it something was finance something you were interested in when you're younger or is it just something you said hey. I you know i want a career outside. The army finance sounds like a good opportunity. Doc look i. I grew up in the middle of it. <hes> you know my dad basically ran a macro fund <hes> and so you know i was definitely part the dinner conversations at home <hes> it was part of the friends that he brought back to the house <hes> and so no i i was very lucky <hes> in that i grew up grew up around <hes> and <hes> when i when i left that the army was <music> lucky enough to be hired at taiba before before the merger sorry before the merger sorry about that the merger with <hes> <hes> <hes> <hes> would be <hes> and they sent me on a first a singapore to hong kong and <hes> did i really kicked off my career ernest <hes> straight into think of things in asia i moved. I was very lucky because i moved to asia just a little bit before the asian crisis crisis and i got to see of ninety seven and i got basically a front row seat on how quickly things can unravel <hes> when leverage is excessive when when you got currency mismatches <hes> you know if you have an interest in macro starting off your career in something like the aging asian crisis <hes> is sir truly an exceptional experience on which to to build <hes> for later years absolutely and i've read somewhere i think anecdote only it just makes sense to that. You know. Some of the more interesting thinkers in the markets are those who went into the business shortly before for a crisis erupted almost permanently scarred by something like that for the research rear and makes you more circumspect and so you think that's kind of an impact pack on your on your <hes> philosophy today well. Maybe you know when you start very responsible for very much. If you have a big career career once you're like fifteen years in then you're responsible for that p._n._l. And a big crisis might be the end of your career when you start when you start in the midst of one yeah it's <hes> you're you're too junior to be fired and you too junior to have really messed. It mess things up so that was yeah. That was my luck. I guess to be <hes> right place right time <hes> but you know the late ninety s if you are in asia where <hes> it was a quite a few tough years ninety ninety seven ninety eight. You've got the asian crisis and you want to get back on your feet. Then you've got the tech bust which was pretty tough in certain markets like taiwan korea elsewhere you got the tech bust and then you come around on the side <hes> while you've got the sars crisis in two thousand three you come around on the other side. You're you're a little shaky and perhaps you know myself. Included your little slow to realize that hey where the start of a massive bull market here <hes> <hes> and you basically from two thousand three up to the two thousand eight two thousand nine crisis asia just retire and so so i want to try and dig into some of these themes you're writing about. I think you know like i said before. They're really important but before we kind of dive into that i'm really curious to understand channel little bit more about your investment process. How did you mean develop it. Obviously it sounds like your dad was an inspiration and then you know a lot of his colleagues the people who you know he was he was kind of working with but let's talk a little bit about the foundation of your process. How do you kind of come up with investment ideas. Where does this stuff come from to be honest. You know my my own. Processes is extremely simple. <hes> i start off with the premise that the economic cycles around the world are really driven by three key variables of course u._s. Interest rates is a key variable. <hes> the other is the u._s. Dollar n. here that it probably reflects my training in emerging markets where the value of the u._s. dollar changes in the dollar <unk> <hes> components and the third is is is all prices you get the direction on these three prices rights u._s. interest rates u._s. dollar in oil broadly. You're gonna do okay you get them wrong. <hes> <hes> and you're gonna get slapped so that's <hes> that's sort of you know. That's that's my starting points. It's not to say that <hes> other things don't matter but by largest three prices on which you need to focus a disproportionate amount of your time to <hes> to get the the broad direction right <hes> you know be beyond that <hes> what we always say is <hes> in our firm gaffe gal where we do two things we have money management arm and we have a a macro research arm we sell macro research which to <hes> a number of institutions around the world <hes> and frankly we say this because it's true <hes> eighty ninety percent of the ideas that we write about out tend to come from our clients. Were very lucky that we build a solid network of of people that you know through the questions they ask ask us through the pushback that we get when we write something dumb. <hes> you know it it keeps us on our toes and yeah so the better. Your idea is <hes> definitely come from from our clients <hes> and yet we're we're lucky to build you know the past almost the twenty years now a network that that we can trust to <hes> to be honest with us and to basically tell us you guys are full of sheds on in this excuse my french are completely wrong nats and so forth and so that's that's fascinating to me that <hes> that it comes from the clients it that makes a ton of sense because and honestly that's one of the reasons why i enjoy writing about market so much is because you kind of create this network of feedback back and it helps you better understand and be better at what you're doing so let's talk about you know in terms of just one of those three read dynamics you're talking about. Where do you start to begin with creating a an idea of where the dollar should you you know move over the next eighteen months or so. Where do you begin in that in. That thought process. That's a great question and to be honest. That's one that i've sort of gone wrong in the past eighteen months already <hes> and when i say sort of gotten wrong it's i say sort of because you know the u._s. Dollar has been stronger but it hasn't been massively stronger so <hes> i you know my view as you as always <hes> <unk> should be heading lower <hes> and it hasn't worked for the past eighteen months as a disaster but it definitely hasn't worked now today my view on on the u._s. Dollar is he's very simply driven. Well let me backtrack and say that transi markets <hes> my view on transi markets in general is that currency markets are serial monogamist in that many things can impact currency issue markets. I can be differences interest rates that can be trade balances. It can be fiscal policies. It can be a risk offerings. It's gone mentalities in the markets etc at any one time you know you have so many different things that can impact an exchange rate <hes> and but the reason when i say they're serial monogamist is that currencies tend to focus <hes> on f._x. Market tend to focus on one thing at any one time at at the expense of all others <hes> and so again. That's why i call him a serial monogamist at any one time they might focus on the difference in interest rates at the expense of anything else but they mike focus at the difference in trade balance at the expense of anything else now very clearly i think in recent years one of the reasons for the strength <unk> of the u._s. dollar was the difference in interest rates the difference in monetary policy <hes> and the fact that basically the fed was tightening while all everybody else was using and so the view was the u._s. Dollars the cleanest dirty shirt in itself. It's the only brace where you're getting <hes> an interest rates and where the central bank is actively trying to debase the currency <hes> which is why you're seeing europe what you're seeing in japan <hes> etc now my view for the really the past year <hes> was that <hes> this will change that basically the fed would need to start using an and start using <hes> soon <hes> and that basically as it became obvious to the markets that the fed would go from being hawkish to being doveish <hes> the u._s. Dollar would would basically start to roll over and <hes> so for the past year here. I think you have seen this shift from the fed <hes> but you haven't seen the shifts <hes> in the u._s. Dollar <hes>. I still think the shift in the u._s. Dollar is set to happen and that might be a story for twenty twenty now <hes> but <hes> i think there'll be other factors that will contribute to to the u._s. Dollar weakness one of them is that as has the fed starts to shift its monetary policy stance people will start to focus a little more on u._s. fiscal policy and here this the where the u._s. really stands out <hes> relative to almost anybody else in the world is in complete on willingness to do anything against a budget deficits that are just simply running away. You know you now have budget deficits in the u._s. Are over five percent of g._d._p. Ten years into an economic <music> make <hes> recovery simply unprecedented <hes> and i think for now the market is really paying attention to that <hes> partly because of the domestic politics in the u._s. but in twenty twenty as the field narrows on the democratic party side and that as it becomes less of a clown clown show of twenty guys or twenty five or whatever the number is all speaking at once and it starts to become obvious who the democratic party candidate candidate i will be i think the market will start to focus on the fact that we have a democratic party today. Promises to spend a lot of money that the government doesn't have <hes> and we have a republican party who basically promises to do the same thing <hes> the only difference between the two is really where that money will be spent <hes> you've and <hes> you know as as the market starts to focus on the fact that hold on really for the first time in the u._s. Election neither party <hes> is promising fiscal rectitude but is basically promising fiscal continents <hes> i think it will be an impact on the currency compare that to say the nineteen nineteen ninety six election between bob dole and bill clinton where the debate was who would be best at reducing the budget deficits <hes> <hes> and you know bill clinton had a solid case to make that he he was a steady pair of hands to <hes> to reduce the budget deficit because he'd been doing it for the past couple years and that he could continue to do so looking forward with welfare reform and whatever else <hes> so. I think that's a big shift. In of course this sort of ability to control once fiscal policy in the late nineties led to a very strong dollar <hes> through the late ninety s today eh <hes> my interpretation. Is that <hes> the u._s. Dollar is starting to make its structural high is it's <unk> yeah cyclical and structural highs here. I think there's increasingly signs of that. Not least of the fact that gold is really starting to break out yeah. That's interesting. You brought back memories for me. I was actually an undergraduate at the university of san diego when they held one of those dole clinton debates on on campus and it's amazing to think about how far we've come from time in terms of that psychology surrounding deficits one of the questions i wanted to ask. Can you kind of hinted at a you know. There is a lot of the things that that you're writing about like this this dollar you you know the dollar as a serial monogamist paying attention to the fact that it's maybe the less the least dirty shirt among all the currencies world but investors globally will start paying attention to what's going on the fiscal side. The markets are not right now beginning to pay attention to that but what this seems the key and a lot of the themes that you're writing about is these growing growing trends that the markets have begun to appreciate yet. What is is it that that helps you. I guess these things before the market does see them and also give you confidence that these things are going to play out so we think they are look at the end of the day the the biggest <hes> confidence yet always from our market prices writes <hes> <hes> you know any of us basically have the same tools to form an opinion you have the economic data on the one hand the problem with economic data tends to <hes> you know come out a little late it tends to be prone to revisions etc and then you have <hes> the market prices which can confirm your scenario radio or or disprove the problem with market prices of course that volatile people get emotional and i would say okay at at extremes market prices can be <hes> <hes> <unk> especially untrustworthy whether at extremes at the top were extremes <hes> at at the bottom <hes> and so i think when when you start looking through mapping through your scenario in your head and you think okay now. I believe the u._s. <unk> there's a good good odds that today everybody tends to believe that the u._s. Dollar is going to be strong and strong forever. <hes> <hes> <hes> there are signs to me that makes sense. Why shouldn't be one of them. I mentioned the deterioration in u._s. Fiscal policy <hes> another is the fact that for years and years the u._s. was the main trade in reserve currency for asia which is one of the fastest growing parts of the world and that you you are seeing very clearly <hes> china trying to attack the u._s. Dollars role as asia's trade reserve currency and try to replace it with the renminbi that doesn't mean china china will be successful but at the very least means that the u._s. is facing an attack that never had in the past so that should you know at least parts parts of your of your thought process but <hes> you know so you start to okay. I i would expect us ought to start rolling over if it did. You know what what should it mean. What will how will. I know obviously you'll know by looking at the price of the dollar caller and here the dollar is not weakening and it's not weakening partly because you have the bank of japan e._c._b. The the people's bank of china everybody i think trying their hardest to weaken their own currencies against <hes> against the u._s. dollars so that's one one factor <hes> but <hes> you know another way you can think okay. Is this going to start to happen. <hes> is to look at <hes> at other markets. I mentioned gold earlier obviously silver on our stock both starring to point towards potential dollar weakness <hes> frankly i would do you know i said there's three prices that matter interest rates gold <unk>. Sorry interest rates you dollar and an energy prices as <hes> as the u._s. Dollar weekends usually i would you would expect oil prices <hes> to to strengthen as you as weekends usually you would expect u._s. Treasuries to <hes> to underperform bond markets around the world now these two so we have a confirming signal from gold. We definitely don't have it from the bond markets. We definitely don't have it <hes> from from the energy markets so for now. This is why i said you not. I've been expecting this for the past year but so far. I've been wrong and this might still but i think this might still be a story for twenty twenty. I want to get into the deportation inflation because that seems like a really obvious theme. That's that's playing out right now. <hes> and i guess i read clash of empires a couple of weeks ago. This is fantastic fantastic. It's very easy to get through very easily readable by anybody who's not a macro economist <laughter> so i highly recommend it but the quote in here that i underlined you're talking about this and it's really has to do with the uh well. I'll just read it and then we can talk about by loosely. Pegging the renminbi to gold china could be offering the legs of russia venezuela qatar iran and anyone else waiting to bypass the the u._s. Dollar deal we will buy your energy for renminbi and on the back end you can either use these renminbi the by china by chinese bonds and if you don't like these options we'll make a marketing gold against remedy to me. The strikes me as one of the key things developments behind this de-dollarisation trend and has huge implications for the dollar serve currency etc. What do you see kind of going forward. <hes> as as the repercussions of this for for the markets in the world economy looks at you know the the theme of dedollarization. The resolution is basically the theme of this book. Clash of empires are with my dad. <hes> we wrote it over last christmas <hes> and <hes> the published published in the spring <hes> the the general theme. I think it's very important <hes> unfolding today today in asia which is a in essence you could say a structural shift in the global financial architecture and his global shift goes <unk> at innocence something like this today russia can sell oil to china get paid investment be and then used these renminbi you too bye gold <hes> and so now all of a sudden you can move oil into gold without ever going through the u._s. Dollar <hes> now. We might say oh well. This is just a cosmetic shift <hes> but in matters deeply for countries that are basically non friends of the u._s. The russia's iran's <hes> perhaps the china's tomorrow given the way the relationship asian ship deteriorating <hes> the qatar <hes> so on and so forth <hes> because i think it's it's hard to underestimate the importance on some of the u._s. Dollar for for global trade today you know if in essence it is very easy for the the u._s. To bring the venezuelan economy to its knee. It's very easy for the us to bring the iranian economy to its knees all needs to do who is cut off access to the u._s. Dollar <hes> and you saw this a a few years back <hes> when the u._s. basically told <hes> every country in the world said look we want to know who who has bank accounts in your countries and if any americans have bank counts in your countries <hes> and you know so here i am sitting in hong kong and now i have to fill out forms and i have an i'm. I'm not american. I'm trying. I'm a french citizen living in hong kong and i have to fill out forms for the u._s. Government to guarantee and verify that i- louis louis gov loans who has a bank account h._s._b._c. I'm not an american citizen so there's the ability of the u._s. To impose its rules on anybody on anybody else in the rest of the world through the u._s. Dollar i mean can you imagine if all of a sudden you had to go down to your bank in portland because the french government at asked you to guarantee to ad astra bank in portland whoever that might be <hes> to guarantee that you were not french. It's you know unthinkable writes this sort of extra territorial <unk> territoriality <hes> that the u._s. enjoys an enjoys it through the u._s. Because if hong kong wants to continue using u._s. dollars hours than it just has to use u. S. rules <hes> but of course for some countries that really grates them and so you are now seeing thing i think a shift in mentalities where you know for a lot of people a lot of countries don't feel like dealing with the tyranny of the u._s. dollar anymore in everything that that entails <hes> and countries some countries will be looking for alternatives and as they do this for now the u._s. Has this huge comparative advantage. <hes> it's an interesting you know conversation. Ask any american. What is the biggest comparative advantage manager of the united states and every american will tell you oh. It's we have the rule of law or we have the best universities in the world <hes> or we have the best tech sector in the world. <hes> in all these things are true by the way the u._s. has in fact many comparative advantages but as any foreigner what's the biggest comparative advantage of the u._s. and they'll tell you oh that's easy the u._s. as the world's reserve currency and that by far my belief is that is by far the biggest comparative advantage over any other country the fact that the u._s. has the world's reserve currency means that when a crisis comes like two thousand eight the u._s. can run massive twin deficits the u._s. can run massive a budget deficits massive of trade trade deficits and not have any defunding problems compare that to europe in europe in two thousand eleven two thousand twelve recessions come trade <unk> twin twin deficits move over five percent of g._d._p. An entire country start to go bust <hes> doing what the u._s. did. In two thousand eight running a budget deficit of nine or ten percent of g._d._p. Is unfathomable for any country except the u._s. <hes> and that's because the u._s. is the the the reserve currency <hes> but of course what's happening. Today is that it <hes> this huge comparative advantage of the u._s. <hes> is now being threatened directly by china who solely petroleos trying the chip at it and it's interesting to me that this ties directly into your your thesis dollars going to trade over the next eighteen months so you know they're they're closely interrelated. It's also closely related to another theme that you've been writing about. Which is it's not just de-dollarisation. Azazel is globalization which has also important ramifications. What what is this trend of globalization and what does it mean for for our <hes> markets and the economy well so you know the very first book i wrote was called our brave new world published in early two thousand five and the idea of that book was look. We're moving to a world of what we call back. Then a platform companies <hes> where the smart companies in essence if you look at a company companies do three things <hes> they design a good they produce good and they sell the growth and our thesis back in two thousand five was that you know the smart aren't companies would design the good and sell the good like apple does or kia does <hes> and the manufacturing bitten a middle could be taken care of by <hes> <hes> you know anybody who wants to do it in china or in poland or in mexico or wherever because a manufacturing bit in the middle is often the parts with the lowest value added. It's often often the parts with the highest volatility. It's the part that forces you to keep a high inventories. <hes> you know it's highly capital consuming etc cetera so if you can pass that bit off to somebody else you end up just like apple with a business with very high margins fairly low volatility <hes> and <hes> you know that's a good business. <hes> high returns on equity of all the characteristics that that you want in a business business <hes> and so that was a thesis of my two thousand five book and a part of the thesis of the two thousand five book was the idea that as companies move from being being vertically integrated producers to <hes> to these platform companies. You know that would free up a lot of capital and companies in the western world does see massive share buybacks because companies wouldn't know what to do with their money <hes> you'd see bigger and bigger share buybacks which would drive higher in hard valuations. <hes> and i think that's the cycle that we've had really for the past fifteen twenty years <hes> the question indeed is have we come to the now to the end of this cycle michael in essence. You know the idea that oh i can pass on my manufacturing bit to <hes> to whatever bozo wants to do it. In china or mexico etc is now directly under attack mostly for political reasons <hes> mostly because perhaps we took it too far <hes> and workers in the western world the people whose main comparative advantage was just have to strong arm and a willingness to work hard fell too far behind find <hes> and and we didn't as a society we didn't take care of them properly so now there is the backlash that we see whether it's brexit with trump <hes> whether other through <hes> you've perhaps that's also part of the demonstrations we see in hong kong today <hes> and as is political backlash unfolds what you see. I think what it is becoming clearer and clearer is that as politicians realized hold on we have to protect our workers more. We have to move more of our production at home. <hes> which is of course what president trump tries to do you end up in a situation where really the world increasingly looks like it's breaking up into three zones <hes> each with their own reserve currency. I e the dollar the euro the renminbi <hes> <hes> and perhaps much poorly each with their own supply lines so you know in essence president trump's messages. If you want to sell to to the u._s. consumer that's great as long as you produce here in north america and <hes> you know you can be yada and we're very happy you by toyota's if they're made in a plant in tennessee <hes> we're very happy to by foxconn gadgets if they're made an planting wisconsin <hes> and so so on and so forth <hes> but if that's the world that we're moving into <hes> then i think that's a brutal readjustment <hes> in <hes> in financial markets. It's because for now financial markets are very much prized for continuation of a world in which basically platform companies reap all the rewards <hes> meanwhile politically <hes>. It's becoming quite obvious that everything is moving towards <hes> or sorry is moving against the platform companies reaping the rewards whether it'd be protectionism with <unk> whether it'd be increased regulations on some of those big tech platform companies and so forth and so. I think there's a bit of a dichotomy ear. <hes> and it's you know this could be a theme for the coming years as to how how this unfold what's i've never thought of it that way that <hes> you know the globalization allow these companies to be a lot less capital intensive <hes> and the the switch to d- globalization should be the reverse but there's also the other side of it too that globalization opened up new markets to a lot of these companies so it kind caboose to growth and profitability at the same time. Does this globalization trend in its early stages if it continues does that oh put put a damper on that the top line growth side of the equation to i would think so yes. You're absolutely right. <hes> all of a sudden you know you know products that were in essence re. Regional in scope moved to be global. <hes> and globalization was a massive massive tailwind to to profitability everywhere especially for these scalable businesses for the for these microsoft's of this world. Where obviously you know printing a new software discussed nothing so despite from companies where we're huge beneficiaries of of a number of macro trans which might now might be turning around look at look at walkways efforts to now launch its own <hes> <hes> operating system now that they basically fear that they're going to be cut off enjoyed <hes> they almost have have no choice but to say all right. We were wall one option as we collapse our business. The other is we've gotta develop our own operating system <hes> and you know. Is this an anomaly or is this the start of new trend. If it's the start of a new trend is the new trend reflected in the price of financial assets today. I believe it's the start of a nutrient and i believe it is not reflected in the price of most asset prices today in one of your pieces that you recently wrote <hes> and i gotta find it really quick. I think it was you know quote from from you talking to clients and saying oh here it is. Do you believe that globalization was one of the most important metro transit. The past couple of decades gates client answers absolutely what you believe global coming to an end. It sure looks that way. What are you doing about it in your portfolio so far nothing it's is astounding that these these trends are are so they're playing is day to see them kind of unravel or or just playing out and still the markets. This is why the markets are reactives because people say well. Yeah i see that happening but i'm not changing the way i manage money in reaction to them. One other theme that you've written about the ties in really nicely with these is that globalization allowed companies to to become more profitable and reduce their expenses through offshoring of labor and what not and so it could have been one of the most powerful disinflationary trends of the past thirty plus years so it only stands to reason if we're now shifting from this globalisation disinflationary trend a ah. I'm sorry from globalization doesn't play a to d globalization that that would potentially be inflationary because it ramps up costs makes things he's more capital intensive for companies <hes> but there's a big also i think <hes> i don't wanna say misunderstanding but you have a contrarian view on inflation. You should too and related to people say well. That's fine regarding you know but demographics are not going to allow inflation into to make a comeback. It seems like exactly what the bond markets are pricing and right now is inflation will never come back to talk a little bit about your thoughts on on the relationship between wean demographics and inflation. Yeah i think like whenever you hear never in the markets hits that always kind of tingles my years right because never is a really long time so when you hear something will never happen and especially if you can take the other side for not much money than maybe there's there's. There's something interesting to do again. If only because never is a is a long time <hes>. I think thank you know today <hes> i would say the general consensus view indeed is inflation. <hes> is <hes> or sorry deflation and is here to stay and very often people points to japan as the as the precursor her to the transit will unfold everywhere else in the world and here the view is pretty simple. <hes> japan obviously had a massive financial bust <hes>. It's banking system wins. It's on the slats on its on its back at the same time japan started aging and as you age you get weaker growth and with with with japan aging you saw this unfolding of deflation and voila. This is what we're gonna get in <hes> in the western world <hes> and you know it. Doesn't there's logic to to this arguments but i would propose another one. Is you know part of the deflation story in japan was that japan really had a front row seat to the biggest deflationary force in the world which was china's arrival <hes> onto the global <hes> seen an essence china's depressing wages for the entire industrial world not least of which all the industrial industrial country <hes> companies in in asia so <hes> <hes>. That's number one now. You know the first thing i'd my first step is always is to ask okay. Undeniably china's being <unk> has been a big deflationary force for the world going forward. Do we still think china's deflationary force the world's <hes> some people you know very coaching the argue absolutely china's deflationary force for the world because the next thing china will do is devalue its currency twenty five. I've <hes> thirty fifty pick your number percents <hes> and as chinese <hes> devaluation is around the corner. They'll be another big deflationary shock to the system. <hes> i knew had a little bit of inkling of that just last week right when the renminbi broke as seven to the u._s. dollar then all of a sudden massive rally in u._s. Treasuries bond yields break down to new lows for the year and so on and so forth <hes> for the reasons we discussed before i actually don't believe leave. The renminbi will devalue massively. I'm renminbi bowl. I think over the next five years the renminbi will be higher <hes> against the u._s. Dollar <hes> mm-hmm and potentially <unk> good meaningfully higher <hes> and and that brings me to <hes> to the to to go back to where our conversation started really. Is that <hes>. I think if you're in the u._s. A lot of your deflation view should be driven again by where you think the u._s. Dollar is going to be <hes> if you think the u._s. Dollar is going to keep being super strong currency <hes> than undeniably. I believe that is deflationary for the world. <hes> you know super strong u._s. Dollar means constraint policy in emerging markets. It's a super strong u._s. Dollar means a weaker commodity prices <hes> so on and so forth i for the reasons already highlighted. I don't believe leaving the stronger dollar and in fact what i find interesting is that last week after the fed cut rates. What did you see you saw. Thailand cut rates you saw indonesia. Indonesia cut rates are not in india. You saw tun encourage you saw india cut rates you saw on new zealand rates <hes> and that that brings due to a fairly tip back to a fairly typical cycle of the fed eases which gives a lot of leeway for central banks across emerging markets <hes> to start easing as well <hes>. I'd also highlight something that's interesting. That's happening rescinded as you know the past ten days markets have been pretty crappy. You've had a number of risk off days in every one of these risk days the x. y. Went down not up in every one of the risk off days <hes> the u._s. Dollar is now weakening not not strengthening listening which is a very different a shift from what we saw before and so now even in risk of days used to see <hes> oil prices collapsed every risk off day what you're now seeing is basically oil prices now that we're sort of back to that fifty dollar floor <hes> <hes> or prices actually hold their own even risk off days <hes> and so that you know fundamentally as you look at inflation going forward forward. What i know is one of the big deflationary forces of the world was globalization. My belief is that this is coming to an end. <hes> what i know is that that one of the big deflationary forces of recent years was the strong u._s. dollar and i believe that <hes> this too is is coming to an end having settle this uh historically. It's very hard to get a pickup in inflation without rising oil prices. <hes> and <hes> rising rising oil prices tend to be one of the key drivers. It's almost as if you know you. You get pissed off. You're waiting at the pump. <hes> and you see the numbers go through <hes> and so you go into your office and you ask your boss for a raise <hes> and it's <hes> you know it's funny because energy is now much smaller all a part of our spending than it used to be but that correlation still holds <hes> the to get a meaningful big up inflation. You do need higher energy prices and so you know look. I think if you look at financial markets today they're basically priced for a continuation of deflation forever in essence what you're seeing today. I call this the dumbbell portfolio people think okay. There's there's limited growth in the world so i'm gonna go out and buy the massively overvalued tech stocks because at least i know that they'll be growth there <hes> but i am somewhat worried that because they are somewhat overpriced that jetty could fall hard so i'm gonna hedge those by buying very overvalued bonds so i've got and that's you know the portfolio. That's done very well for the past. Few years is owning overvalued. Tech tech stocks hedge buy overvalued bonds now needless to say if inflation comes into play than you get crushed on both sides of your portfolio leo <hes> so i would say that today the head you want in your portfolio and if like me you think okay mirus is inflation picks up but inflation can't pick up with that higher oil prices than perhaps one of the best hedges at this juncture for portfolio is to own the very beaten up very under own very much hated the energy stocks that actually if nothing else will hedge the rest of your portfolio against against the potential inflation shock and i think that's one of the things that really appeals. I'm a value investor at heart and you strike me as a value macro nestor which is why a lot of ideas think appealed to me. I just to come back to the inflation thing one more time and tied into demographics. There was a interesting report what the i._m._f. Put out. Maybe a year or two things the i._m._f. That tied inflation trends to the dependency ratio in the country and yeah because people have this idea that because we have an aging society that necessarily means deflation but you had a piece. I think it was back in june. We're you discuss relationship that we've gone from essentially a saving a savings type of economy since one thousand nine hundred until today to a more medicis saving type of phase and that should really be the framework to think about demographics and inflation absolutely and you know if if somebody readers are interested in some of these reports that are fairly chart heavy <hes> but <hes> you know they they can contact me at louis at a ah gaffe cal dot com but the arguments indeed is is pretty simple you know as as we move now to obviously the the baby boomers in and then some <hes> all all moving into retirement and in essence consuming the savings that they've <hes> they've called in <hes> into over the years <hes> as pension funds instead of growing start to shrink <hes> as insurance companies <hes> instead of growing start to shrink <hes> we we move into a world where in essence where we are going to start consuming and we've already started actually consuming our capital base now. There's two ways you can look at that. As we start start consuming our capital base to pay for medicine to pay for out the <unk> opera we wanna go or the restaurants or whatever else as our old people start to consume the capital base. I personally don't see why that should be deflationary. Consuming the capital edward whether it should be deflationary consuming the capital base of should be inflationary <unk> for several reasons first of course is that you'll have more money chasing not as many goods <hes> you know and so if nothing else that should push prices higher the second reason of course is as you consume your capital base <hes> you move to being less productive economy. <hes> you know there's nothing positive live about consuming a capital base <hes> and of course you know part of the the growth of deflation part of the deflation story of recent years was was one where productivity was decently strong everywhere around the world in improving. We're producing any that's what capitalism is all about right producing more one more goods with fewer and fewer inputs <hes> but now we're moving to a world where it's not about producing more and more goods with fewer and fewer inputs but it'll be increasingly about consuming more and more with pass savings and yet to me. That's that's that's inflationary now. There's another third possibility of course is that the consuming that are retirees aim to do whether you know getting hip replacements or diabetes medicine or whatever else <hes> the consuming that are retirees wanna do is actually won't there won't be enough savings for other consuming that are retirees wanna do that in essence even by consuming the capital that they saved. They'll be falling short which leaves you with to possibility the first is that our retirees adjust their consumption that they tighten their belts and they think okay well. I've got to reduce my standard of living because i haven't saved enough alternatively. The second option is that they vote in they voted politicians who promise them to give them the the <hes> the spending that they want <hes> even though they perhaps in safe for it and you know i think there's in most most western democracies. There's a distinct possibility that we go down this latter route <hes> not only because politicians left to buy votes but that because in a world where you get zero percents interest rates will be low from from central banks. You know if you're a politician. Why wouldn't you give a bunch of benefits to retirees. Even if those benefits of course are completely completely unproductive <hes> why wouldn't you do. It's every likes being a nice guy. <hes> for me. There was a sort of <hes> you know shocking moment moment <hes> a few years back when when david cameron in the u._k. was elected and the very first thing he did was basically in the same breath like the very first measures he passed as he came into to number ten. He said we're we promise that we're not gonna touch expansions and in fact we're going to re up pensions and we're going to index onto inflation etc <hes> so you know huge payouts to the retirees and at the same time he says university that used to be free will now be payable so in essence imposing a tax on young people that didn't exist before so i mean can you believe of less productive use of capital right. It's we give more money to retirees and less money to students <unk> a country that would want invest for its future would most likely be doing the reverse but that of course is where most western countries countries are going to be heading if only because of the demographics you know the demographic and democratic forces as our country's age it will be in and the very interest of petitions to cater to the desires of the retiring cohorts and that will mean of course i think higher inflation in here in the united states. There's a lot of talk about free college for all free medicare for l. increasing spending an incredible degree and potentially paying for it by just printing money i want to i know we're running short on time and i want to change it up completely here. I know you're huge rugby player rugby. What is it about rugby that really appeals to you and is there anything from plane. Lean that throughout your life that has helped you become a better investor a probably not now that you generally ninety five kilos and i never played at a greater level is is still played today and and enjoy the sport of law. It's i i enjoy the camaraderie. <hes> i enjoy the fact that when you play rugby you meet people from all sorts the backgrounds and for me it's it's actually one of the only sports <hes> where you can be playing with you know in my team team back in hong kong. There's firemen policemen a there's bankers lawyers teachers <hes> and we we we all come together. You know several times a week for training and then we we we play on the weekends and we've known each other for twenty years. You know i think in this world of ars were increasingly people live <hes> no isolated and cut off from from perhaps the way other people live <hes> for me. It's it's it's one way in essence to <hes> to meet people that i otherwise wouldn't meet <hes> in in my daily life and i think in hong kong. It's all the more important in that. It's it's very easy. In hong kong to your friends are experts they all work in finance or in lauren shipping and and you stay in fairly small circles without realizing in essence how the rest of the society that you're part of a really really evolved <hes> and so i you know i. I don't think it's made me a better investor by any stretch probably too many hits on the head for that but i do believe it it it makes me perhaps a more interesting person. I'd like to think it makes me more interesting person i i. I love the play ice hockey. I'm not good at all but i hit my head a few times and i think why the heck do i do. This is not helping me with my investing or anything but working people <hes> where's the best place for people to keep up with you and your ideas <hes> also there's lots of while not so many very few places of these of course <hes> <hes> you know we have a website of course it's gaff cow dot com j. v. e. k. l. dot com. <hes> i'm on twitter. Handle is louie gov but i'm not there that i'll tweet every now and then but but not that much <hes> we also have a private wealth management business <unk> based in bellevue washington <hes> which reproduces some of of our stuff <hes> because you know most of the gaff gal stuff is behind a paywall and must be geared towards institutional investors <hes> but some of it is reproduced on the evergreen for green gifts gal websites and they produce a free newsletter that people should definitely sign up for a great newsletter <hes> and <hes> yeah so those are really the the the the the simplest <hes> parts to to keep in touch. Maybe hopefully maybe you'll have me back so they'll be another way to keep in touch absolutely i i i read the the evergreen cal blog religiously. I don't miss a post so i highly recommend everybody. Check that out but louis. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this. I really appreciate it absolutely my pleasure. It was great to to to finally get up and that does it for another episode of super investors in the art of worldly wisdom as always you can find notes and links related needed to this episode at the federal report dot com. Thank you for listening and until next time buy low sell high. The man looks in the abyss is not them staring back at him that moment man find his character and that is what keeps him out of the abyss.

u._s Dollar china asia hong kong renminbi japan louis louis united states army fed louis gov brussels
Cattle Current PodcastJuly 15, 2019

Cattle Current Market Update with Wes Ishmael

06:47 min | 2 years ago

Cattle Current PodcastJuly 15, 2019

"Cash bid cattle traded three dollars higher in Texas on Friday. Liar carcass weights continued to moderate beef supplies allies coming up on your Kelkar market update with Wes Ishmael aw how did all this is West Ishmael with your Kelkar market update for the late weekend Monday morning. The fifteenth of July negotiated cash fit cattle prices were yet to be fully established through Friday afternoon based on reports from U._S._D._A.'s the as agricultural marketing service but the trend appeared decidedly higher the Texas Cattle feeders association reported its members trading at one hundred twelve dollars one hundred weight which was three dollars more than the previous week although too few to trend. Early dress sales were two to five dollars higher at one hundred and eighty to two hundred and eighty five dollars in Nebraska and western corn built live cattle futures close an average of thirty one cents higher on Friday helped along by recent strength and what looked to be steady lead higher cash prices for the week futures were an average of a dollar eighty cents higher week to week on Friday except for seventy seven cents higher and spot August analyst with U._S._D._A.'s Agricultural Marketing Service note that marked ready fit Kale supplies applies in the northern plains are very current and for the time being will remain that way they add that the southern plains will more than likely remain at a discount because of large numbers of cattle on feed lighter year over year carcass weights continued to underscore underscore curtness while also adding price support for the week ending June twenty ninth the average dress steer weight was eight hundred fifty four pounds which was the same as a week earlier but eleven pounds lighter than the same week a year earlier. That according to U._S._D._A.'s actual slaughter under federal inspection report the average dress heffer wait was a pound lighter than the previous week and three pounds lighter than the previous year at seven hundred and eighty nine pounds <music> finally fear cal markets gained some seasonal steam last week overall fears have traded steady the five dollars one hundred weight higher early in the week and then three to ten dollars higher according to the Agricultural Marketing Service traders quickly and aggressively moved back into the market say A._M._S. analysts especially after Tuesday's rally on the C._M._e.. On the other side of the trade the A._M._S. folks note ranchers were ready and willing to sell cattle <unk> out front with the market getting a little bounce analysts referring to heavy video trade last week including one hundred eighteen thousand head via the western video market and two hundred nine thousand head at Superiors Week Long Event Feeder cattle futures closed an average of eighty three cents lower Friday giving back some of the recent gains under pressure from higher drain futures prices but they closed an average of three dollars and eleven cents higher week to week and one hundred forty one. One dollars six cents on Thursday the C._M._e.. Fear Cattle Index was seven dollars and eighty five cents higher week to week and at the highest level since the first two days in May according to Andrew P Griffith agricultural economist at the university bursting Tennessee and his weekly market comments the surge in the index value is largely due to cal fears looking to reload pins that have been emptied recently it makes logical sense. He says that cattle feeders were looking to capitalize on a somewhat softer cattle market in May and June but the strong demand for fear cattle boosted prices wholesale beef values continued to lose seasonal stain trade on Friday was lower for unlike to monitor demand and monitored offerings according to the Agricultural Marketing Service choice box beef cut out value is four dollars and eighty seven cents lower week to week on Friday afternoon at two hundred twelve dollars and eighty cents. One hundred weight select was five dollars. Dollars and twenty cents lower at one eighty nine sixty even though the canal has turned lower A._M._S. analysts say packer margins are reading on the positive side despite having increase Biz to get cattle purchased U._S. beef exports continued. We need to underpin cattle prices as well but are getting if you're with protracted unresolved trade issues as reported earlier in the week beef exports in May were steady with the previous year for volume at one hundred seventeen thousand five hundred and forty-one metric tons and slightly higher for value at seven hundred twenty seven point six million dollars that according to data released by U._S._D._a. and compiled by the U._S.. Meat Export Federation however export volume mm for January through may was three percent less year-over-year while value was slightly lower at three point three billion dollars. Grain markets largely shrugged off the previous day's. Monthly World Agricultural Supply and demand estimates which shaved a dime off the projected season average corn price to three dollars and seventy cents a Bushel. Those estimates were based on the acreage and yield projections from the June twenty eight U._s._D._A.. Acreage report traders are betting there will be significantly less corn after a penny higher and expiring spot July on Friday corn futures closed nine to eleven sits higher through July twenty and the mostly want to two cents Higher Week week-to-week they're an average of fifteen cents higher through the front six contracts as for soybean futures. They closed mostly ten to fourteen cents higher on Friday Major U._S.. Financial ince's closed sharply the Higher Friday apparently with lighter trade and follow through rally support from expectations for a cut in interest rates. The Dow Jones Industrial Average close two hundred forty three points higher the S. and P. Five hundred closed thirteen points higher and the Nasdaq was up forty eight points Thatcher CALICO market update for the late weekend and Monday morning the fifteenth of July. You can find more at W._W._W.. Dot Calicut.

Texas Cattle feeders associati Agricultural Marketing Service U._S._D._A. Kelkar Agricultural Marketing Service Texas Wes Ishmael World Agricultural Supply Dot Calicut Nebraska Financial ince Meat Export Federation Andrew P Griffith U._S._D._A. cal analyst Thatcher