17 Burst results for "U._S. U._S"

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on The Green Light

The Green Light

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on The Green Light

"He's into it no no. He's just got to talk about the scenario women about talk about the subject and you already got it okay well. Let's discuss this woman going viral every the other week where we're talking to you about some crazy as white woman. Who's doing some crazy ass white woman ship. Are we yes this week. A mississippi zippy venue allegedly canceled a couple's wedding plans after discovering that the couples a black man in a white woman she and i quote we don't do gay weddings or mix raced because of our christian race. I mean our christian belief shutout marina leaving at they're already. This is what religion causes. I'll say this religion is caused more deaths in this world then all things by the way marine is not a christian minus mosquitoes correct video. Watch it with this guy's with way in the bible tells you that well i know one argument saying no yeah yeah we just we just don't participate. That's christian belief rice pause no. He said it was a pause when it showed that transplant she backs readings. I can't read from as far away in two thousand sixteen. The mississippi legislature passed a religious <unk>. Just freedom law allowing businesses to refuse service to l._g._b._t. People on the basis of their religious beliefs about marriage or gender republican republican governor phil bryant signed that bill h._p. One five to three into law after being initially struck down in federal court the conservative u._s. u._s. Fifth circuit court of appeals allowed a lot of stand the u._s. Supreme court did not take the case thought fuck it. I'll say she's say. She is well within her right to say that she can say whatever she wants right. She is well within her right to say. I don't want a mixed to refuse service. Yeah okay wedding one a happy couple of their. That's it to refuse service yeah. She has service. I feel like everyone should be right. Remember when the one thousand nine hundred sensitive. That's what i'm telling you. Remember what i said stay. Will the opposite did what we needed to remember what i said about two episodes ago. I wish there was a way to know what a business business or company thinks. Yeah i get it bonzo but to be honest look at this. Let me talk to you angry angry angry angriest bottles weenie we boundaries verse if it's your personal if a private business do whatever the fuck you want with it but let me know you feel this way before i even waste time trying to attempt to do business with you the same way that i don't know eight weeks ago we saw the landscaping company pull up to that lady's house with the confederate flag on the back of his truck and and then exactly let them know taylor shout detailer take out the taylor taylor.

phil bryant mississippi Supreme court u._s. u._s taylor legislature eight weeks
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

Pro Business Channel

14:25 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Pro Business Channel

"This is <hes> a sheep podcast and they're. I think they're based out of the carolinas. At least one of the hosts coz is right and they're coming coming to atlanta for their first ever live event as kind of unique in the podcast space <hes> so they're gathering all of the ladies <hes> female podcasters and unique perspectives actives <hes> and doing a live event <hes>. It's it's a weekend event. I believe going <hes> friday. <hes> through sunday <hes> october eleventh to thirteenth i <hes> i don't remember the days off the top of my head but a good calendar will pull that i think yeah the <hes> standby for our team's gonna shows yet area so it's <hes> they're gonna do like a i guess a thursday october twelfth kind of reception kickoff but the main events are friday all the way through sunday and they're doing a full day on sunday. This is not like a half day. They go all the way up until like a mid afternoon. Things and it's it's <hes> multi-track so at any time there's multiple sessions going on which is always always was nice to have in a good multiday conference multi-track of course you want to lean on the virtual ticket when you can because you can't attend everything and and as you said rich this is a conference a created by women for women podcasters or really anyone that doesn't matter invited apparently to but the sure sure sure yeah but they're very clear that we're not creating the content for everybody. We're creating the content specifically for women and the women's perspective and women's perspective back to three and their unique challenges or unique opportunities and it's going to be a great. I'm going to be there. I know a handful of guys will be there. I've invited our thousand and plus members of podcasts atlanta to check it out and i'm excited because this is atlanta's first major podcast conference this much like podcast movement started as a as a kickstarter right they did they they they over his goal. They doubled their. I remember seeing some and right now. I think they've got about four hundred and fifty maybe closer to five hundred tickets sold which is already approaching the very first podcast movement and this is not going to be eh their first conference. They're already planning out their second one. But of course they want their first win to succeed as you can tell from their website they're really they're really call out all the stops on this so i mean just kinda stumbled across this <hes> online a while back i reached out to <hes> the the co founders jessica coming up yeah online and and we're connected on linked in then i met him in orlando at the conference but what what do you know about <hes>. This group and i know a lot because i run podcast. I'm the godfather that's author podcasting in atlanta. You need to get domain name. I love of course just reached out to me and said hey. You know we're gonna she. Podcasts in atlanta we would love <hes> for for you guys to to be guys and gals yeah to be a part and an average like jess. Come on you know me yeah. We met a we've known each other for years the very first podcast move back in two thousand fourteen. She was there as well yeah. Of course where was i. How did i not hear about this. Justice has me. It's deal. You know. Let let's talk. Let's talk and i've got my own personal only like to promote one conference at a time a as although i really couldn't help much kickstarter not that they needed it their goal during the day after podcast movement is done. We're going to turn on the faucet and the flow for she podcasts live <hes>. I'm going to be there. I've inviting our thousand thousand plus members of podcast. How great is that for the podcast. Atlanta group the pot atlanta group because <hes> it's right around the corner from where they're at right yeah so many times every year here for all these conferences that we talked about. We talked about pod fest. They're outside of atlanta. Yeah people tell me i would love to go but now there's no butts now but is they can't travel now here. We have something on a weekend in atlanta. Show up one hundred percent okay so <hes> before we move on next topic so again you can check them out at she podcast dot live. There's not a dot com in there. Just go to she. Podcast dot live. You can register you. You can check the schedule of what about sponsors. I mean they have a they have a ton of speakers lined up <hes> very impressive do and can i share some inside baseball on this show and preserve. I see this is right so i said <hes> there's about four hundred fifty five hundred tickets sold if they hit the six hundred ticket mark and go beyond that they're going to open up another track. Oh my gosh means more speakers more sessions and i think we can definitely do it yeah so i it's. It's going to be a great that what you see right now on. The website is just the minimum of what they're planning right now. I know other sponsor in fact. I've talked to some sponsors at podcasts movement. They were hoping that they could get in there. Still some slots is there available but it's it's going to be a tremendous show builds off the success of a podcast and of course podcast. The one of the founders of this chris christie. Yes is is helping jessica with she. Podcast live so sure this may sound a little incestuous all these event organizers want each other to succeed a hundred percent and they're helping each other <hes> yeah because <hes> katie katie chris's wife yeah so so they are related. The last name sounds familiar. Yeah that's just one of the keynote speakers yeah and you you hit on something that i've discovered early on in the podcasting space. The podcasting casting world is that i i think i don't know if you would subscribe to this but i found that that environment is different than a lot of other business industries that there's there's lot more collaboration <hes> and partnership and synergy. I mean you know in some cases. You are kind of competing for mind share and you know advertising dollars and so forth but it's not as cut throat right but not really here's the thing podcasting is growing five years ago. The domestic adspend and the podcasting space was less awesome. One hundred million. I think is about ninety million two thousand fourteen last year two thousand eighteen. It was over a quarter of a billion. It's been growing over fifty percent year over year. The last few years the truth is rich. The pie is growing larger than we can. All cut our piece yeah so the best way to serve as many people as possible is through collaboration collaboration oftentimes. You've probably heard this rich. I know i've said it many times. Podcasts atlanta is i don't do that but i know someone who does. Let me introduce you all right so we're all like focusing in our areas of expertise while helping others and and that's what i love about the podcast industry. It's been growing faster <music> than you'd really those of us that are serving the industry can keep up with and that's why so many more people come in. We've got more conferences. We have more podcast us. It's just it's growing and growing. We still have lots of room to grow. There's many ways to make money off a podcast as just one again. We looked last year. There was a a little over a quarter of a billion spent in domestic podcast advertising terrestrial radio rich. You probably know this i was i was in that space yeah. We we can tell we can tell this is chris. Casinos gives it away. Just a casa repeats. You know for those just tuning in sorry little. Let's start over again. That's a little inside baseball here but that's twelve billion a year so there's still lots of room for podcasting just in the u._s. and it's growing even faster outside the u._s. u._s._o. Yeah everyone works together to serve as many people as possible okay so <hes> in our final remaining minutes here. What's interesting again with the she podcast live event happening here is that the advertisers sponsors that they've lined up. I mean some of the well known ones obviously lipson <hes> bus out and so forth himalayas but have you heard of pot it. That's you know i have actually i know a brass right. I forget forget. The godfather part it is a is a new you company and we'll be launching soon. They're based here in atlanta and <hes> yeah. I've got something working with them on the side so it's nice to see that the they're exhibiting here. I think they're gonna do their launch at yet another podcasting conference not she podcast live. There's so much stuff going on. There's going to be a conference right before she podcast live up in the the the northeast region of <hes> of the united states but yeah potted <hes> they're producing service to help guests connect with host and of course i show people out to find the best shows and how lower the exactly right and how to deliver the best interview possible so it was just a natural collaboration and of course bbb the godfather atlanta they reached out to me. Don't upset the godfather <hes> okay so last topic <hes>. Let's let's talk about <hes> <hes> outlets of <hes> publication about the industry so let's hit it three real quick so these are services is that are some have been around for a while some renewed in the marketplace <hes> that are offering. You know what's what's happening. What's new in the podcast world so <hes> what do you know about these brands so oh pod news on it. Yeah i love these guys. They came out a couple of years ago. I probably the longest original standards. <hes> james kremlin probably pronouncing announcing his last name incorrectly forgive me. You're in new zealand. You're probably not james but <hes> it's an awesome newsletter. You can subscribe you get get the email every day around. I think it's around seven thirty because i'm usually walking my daughter to the bus. Stop all right. L. comes in and takes three minutes read serie but they really keep their pulse on the industry of podcasting and they do some investigative journalism. Yeah here's trust me people their scandals happening all the time i he goes in looks in and and really cut uncovers the truth of what's happened. We've put in a word can create some scandal or some purposes channel the bucket atlanta so pod news. That's news dot net podcast business journal <hes>. That's a really cool publication like that a lot yeah. I'm less familiar with that. Tell us is what you think of. I <hes> i think is the editor they were there in just as an attendee and promoting their <hes> their journal but <hes> they didn't necessarily have <hes> i see it an exhibitor booth there but they're one of the newer players not the newest but probably i'm thinking about a year give or take they launched and <hes> we were proud and honored to be a <hes> <unk> a press release on their platform for a new initiative that we will talk off air but or newly another podcast but it's called actually the <hes> podcast world a tour so <hes> we were pretty honored to be <hes> in that publication when they when we announced our tour and <hes> so that was featured but what i like about podcasts is a the daily <hes> edition comes out and kind of you know. What's the the movers the shakers what's happening. The new trends <hes> in podcasting. They have some editorial writers. There's and so forth some great content and it's fairly brief like you mentioned with pod <hes> news you can kind of get the gist of it and if you want to do a deeper dive you can certainly <hes> you know <hes> <hes> jump into that <hes> let's finish with the <hes> more recent entry into the space <hes> so the podcast movement guys have gotten into the space search of <hes> a publication which they've released now on a regular basis called <hes> pod pod mo m. o. v. yeah the the pod manav pod movement abbreviation yeah <hes> so have you subscribe to that or if you check that out yet or <hes> there early into the space they kind of just announce it gives me they just release it. I think like a week or so before the before their event <hes> yeah yeah they did. They did and honestly anyone the one who wants to be top of mind <hes> it's good to have a podcast but it's also good to get people's inbox in a way that people open it and read it and that's what's great about these these new these things yeah 'cause up something else. Podcast movement is they've got a brand new conference coming in l._a. Podcast mubin evolutions yeah. Are you going to that around. I i am not i am <hes>. There's not a lot about it on the website. Let's jared has shared some things with me about the direction they're going with it and that's going to be interesting to see how the plays out and <hes> so pretty much <hes> on that topic from there <hes> daily publication to their annual event to their new event. It's just just <hes> just go to podcast movement dot com so speaking of movement. Let's move onto our last segment here. Say talk to us all things. The podcast against academy dot dot com..

atlanta baseball chris christie united states orlando jessica l._a jared lipson editor james u._s. u._s._o one hundred percent hundred percent fifty percent three minutes five years
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"It's very conspiritors if you don't have to be outdoors that's the bahamas foreign minister darren. Hen field saying power lines down. Lamp posts are down. It's dangerous to be outdoors so brian. Mcnulty is the bahamas going to get a break from dorian. <hes> unfortunately not real soon <hes> it's just been an unimaginable thing to have happened there to have a category five his hurricane to come in and start all over the the grand bahama basically for twenty four four hours <hes> so things will gradually improve at the storm starts to drift north but as of now it's just literally adrift one mile per hour so it's not in any hurry to leave those places who ecorse wanted to move away as quickly as possible things start to see what has happened and how the start trying to get people <hes> found in <hes> so that stalling of dorian over the bahamas means that they've been suffering from one hundred twenty mile an hour winds if not more and ceaseless rain lashing a grand bahama especially. Why did it stall for so long. Yeah there. There was a bit you've uh it was always forecast to come to a gradual stall and then turn north near the florida coast but the length length that stalin was not really foreseen to well <hes> and so what happened is the ridge to north which is what would help steer it <hes> west a little bit and a trough to its north as well. That's coming across the eastern u._s. u._s. <hes> that that is what was kinda slowing down the trough moving in to.

bahamas dorian u._s. u._s Mcnulty florida stalin twenty four four hours
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"To the perfect solution but utilizing our best practices and you know our our knowledge from other systems relate to then apply what we've learned about the diversity of the population in when we're augmenting or you know our best case judgment for being able to augment population where to pick exactly where we want to put at them while yeah and that's really good to hear because i think oftentimes the connection between a crap. This is endangered in we have to do something is blurred because no one really knows how multifaceted some of this can be in. I mean i'm looking at what the atlanta botanical garden is doing and then just the southeastern center for conservation. I mean mean there's database development modeling. There's the like you said the monitoring process nur's restoration. There's propagation. There's reintroduction. I mean this is a multifaceted asserted approach involving a lot of different people in a lot of different stakeholders and that's you know like you said you don't even by the land just using all these different things as a means of saying look. You don't need to know everything about this system to note needs protection yep exactly and that's what's really important you know is is is trying to find out as much as you can and then moving forward in a really concerted effort with everybody together on board and again just this idea of collaboration elaborations the atlanta botanical garden or emily coffey acting alone hate. He has a whole team of people and again. I think a lot of people get frustrated because is it can move so slowly <unk>. It's one thing to say yeah. We need to protect the land but again thinking of all the aspects that go into making these like you said informed decisions. I mean gene then that can be kind of labor some times and often like the democratic process happening snail's pace right yes but i mean our our conservation philosophy. Sophy here are really is fundamentally around that collaboration and partnership that no one can conserve alone that we can only do this as a team and together and that is without everyone coming together. You know we really can't actually move the dial and so it is one hundred percent about that collaboration like like you said yeah. One of the big moves really is this focus on sort of the southeast. Obviously atlanta is in the southeast but in terms of biodiversity hotspot here north america that i mean that's a big one way. This is larger coastal plain ecosystem exactly so we are considered <hes> the southeastern u._s. u._s. In this region we are considered by adversity hotspot so we're tremendously fortunate to have the coastal plain the piedmont all the way down into florida panhandle and you know with our work we go all the way down to south florida and the caribbean so really the number of ecosystems that we are trans versing and working on artist so tremendously diverse with wetlands seepage slopes to true mountain bogs and fens all the way down to new coastal dune lakes swamps longleaf pine ecosystems and even with our georgia oak quercus georgina work. You know that that's that's actually on glade systems that are in arabia mountain and stone mountain so you know we have really an amazing righty of of ecosystems here in the southeast that allow for this extensive biodiversity yeah in it is something i'm starting to truly appreciate and it's something i can see. It's one are those places. I'm like oh. I need to come back year after year and even then i really feel like i'll ever scratched the surface but in thinking about what motivates conservation are what gets <music> the action to the point where you know your team's undertaking something to be done here. You know you talk about communities implant communities being hyper for diverse and that's what defines a biodiversity hotspot but then you also hear about these sort of single species conservation efforts in i'm curious. Do you wait one or the other usually find species that are in particular need and then scale it from there or does it say hey these coastal plain. Depression communities are super important. Let's focus on community you level or how does that sort of plan out hers at different every time so we actually have multiple sets the priorities because there are so many plants in need that we do have to focus our efforts so we can actually make really meaningful impacts and so what we tend to prioritize on are carnivorous plants orchids g one and g two so globally ranked under nature serves global ranking g one g two and or critically endangered endangered or vulnerable and then we reprioritise within those also looking at wetland systems boggs..

atlanta atlanta botanical garden arabia mountain Sophy emily coffey Depression u._s. u._s florida stone mountain south florida georgia one hundred percent one g
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"It's it's google and facebook now. It's no secret that the dominance of digital giants had an almost apocalyptic effect on print media and with it journalism is struggling to u._s. Presidential candidate bernie sanders says he's got a plan that will help correct the dramatic imbalance that seeing the kind of journalism him that's crucial to democracy fade away awhile prophets for some continued soul now he's promising an immediate freeze on big media mergers such as the recent c._b._s. Viacom deal until there's a better understanding of what such concentration of ownership is doing to democracy. What do we make aac this idea all of the ideas that he puts forward and some of the analysis you. There's lots of problems that we know of that. I have to say i personally feel deeply uncomfortable with some of the stuff that he's saying which is kind of defect journalism and media more generally and which are often difficult space at the moment. I'm one of the striking things to be honest about u._s. Journalism at the moment is actually how large chunks of have stood up really well. We have a president who seems to have no respect for freedom of media at all who talks from his enemies the people and and so on and yet they're standing up pretty robustly hasn't even different ways. The judiciary has stood up for its own independence so for me. It's a slightly auden uncomfortable. Well you almost end up in different ways. On the side of the trump he of course isn't but it's a slightly odd moment seems to me all of those ownership shit things are absolutely there but he also strings in with his analysis kind of slightly undertone of you know all this establishment media they kind of failed to speak truth to power which okay may sometimes be true but frankly if you look at the kind of arguments the organizations like the times or washington post or c._n._n. Having with the u._s. u._s. president in a very public way. That's kinda complicated argument to make this moment. It is the whole the whole argument is very complicated. Too much of what sanders has set out here seems to be about maintaining the corporate structure that helps make journalism a viable income will business model. I suppose but joy a lot of the a lot of the journalists at the moment have been saying the journalism old to be considered much more like a public service now. That's something that i didn't really see get brought into santa's plan here. What are your thoughts on that always focusing too much. Perhaps on the business model side in zander's plan here and not enough on whether the journalism is actually crucial and eve so perhaps the problem america's facing at the moment is the absence of such something such as the bbc all a._b._c. for example when it has got an actual broadcaster which is which does not have the same heft as the b._b._c. Certainly he doesn't play the anywhere near the same role in democracy. Though does it eat doesn't buy. I take issue with a number of points. Festival sunday's attacks <hes> the current media for being click bait gossip and punditry which he called. He was quite interesting actually the joy because he did call more of what he called. Real news calls the rest of it fake fake. No history of newspapers is there's always been click beetle. They used is be able to click on it. <hes> gossip and punditry is how newspapers rose off the back of that. You get serious news. A modern example of that is buzzfeed aid that started in fact now quite a well respected news site paid for by the cap means and the jokes and the quizzes and so forth so you need in commercial terms the fun stuff that in fact people do go and look at on mass in order to generate the whole news on this idea of a ah publicly funded journalism..

bernie sanders Viacom google facebook buzzfeed judiciary president u._s. u._s. president auden washington zander america bbc
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

11:17 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Data to financial institutions and intex. She's also a financial educator through linked and learning. She joins me here in studio along with google panda who is editor in chief and executive director of knowledge at wharton nice to meet you. Jane came to be dan. Thanks for having me. Thank you recall great to talk to you. Thanks to increase to be here. Thank you <hes> so give us a sense of what this data as currency really means so there is a cliche that says data is the new oil and there is absolute value you in data and even if you just go back ten years and look at the market caps of the top ten companies globally ten years ago those top ten companies made products and services us today fifty percent of those companies a database platforms google facebook alibaba tencent like it is a absolutely fundamental fundamental shift in terms of the way even the market views the value of data now when you think about traditional currency transactions it assumes that people exchange cash for goods and services of equal value but when you talk about data being currency do think the trade is on equal terms always or was it more one-sided. What do you think so it is still very much early days in this data as currency weld but it is absolutely a one sided trade the buyers at this point or the they're not even buying they're basically amassing assessing consolidating data and then using it they are the ones that can put that data to work in the economic model and the generators of that data basically getting nothing so if you think about you know let's just say a social media. Via platform says how user is worth one hundred and twenty dollars to us in the course of a year right and to you that might actually sounds okay. That's no they give me my photos and keep in touch with my family and you know that actually sounds like a decent trade except for when you realize that is aggregate across the world right so if you're looking at you know a new york walk city-based person who is earning half a million dollars a year of course they're worth more from an advertising model monetization model than someone you know in a <hes> village in an emerging market you spoke recently at <hes> fearless and fintech conference in san francisco and san francisco where you you presented a paper on on data's currency and i i found a very intriguing term that you used in the paper which is data exhaust. What exactly is that aten. Worship consumers care about that so data exhaust is not that different to actual lengthy environmental exhaust generated by by calls so if you think of everything you do in the online world every site you visit everything you click on your being tracked and that as being you know again captured in the database somewhere and made up into the sovereign view of who you are it's now going into the offline world through tracking through your phone for example and location tracking so so there is this massive amount of data that you are generating on a daily basis just across all industries that is being captured and sold and resold old and then you know targeted right back at you to sell you more things but that that's the expectation. I think that a lot of people have now. It's almost become the norm rather than the exception. It's i think the it is absolutely the norm that you know that you're throwing off data everywhere you go but do you know what's actually happening to do. You know how it's being monitored who it's being sold to you know. Did you know that there is a social map of you and your family and your friends and the places you go and i did hear of one amazing story of a certain social platform that could tell just from locations with the people were having an affair right because the phones would technically too close to each other right and they know that the phones are usually close to this other person ninety percent of the time so there is a lot of data. That's being thrown off in this idea of data exhaust that may actually people truly knew the value view of it and be the implications that they'd be. Maybe a little more careful. One of the things that you wrote in your paper is if someone's data can no longer be optimized my st- to just sell them more stuff. The shift to data driven innovation is now a strategic imperative for companies everywhere now. What kind of data driven innovation did you have in mind and what sends says it becomes strategic imperative so at the moment the differential is still and i say this with love i came. I'm from the marketing and data world actually started my career in data marketing and this idea of we will take your data and we will segment you right and so now we know what products and services to serve up to you how much we can charge. You and you know how we can retain you as a customer but the differentiation is all in like service. Let's just say <hes> right now. Both like the across multiple industries and we will talk about financial services but i'll use an example say from travel <hes>. I fly my family of five a mistrial in if you couldn't tell from the u._s. u._s. to australia every christmas usually within a couple of days and yet every time usually around this time of year i start to panic even book tickets as yet and i've digitally put my hand adop- i'm flying a family of five to australia so guess who gets paid priceline gets paid google gets paid facebook and everyone who says she visited my side in terms of her search but i still i'll have to do all the heavy lifting why i have like. I have loyalty programs. Why not airline saying hey based on her history you no these are the sort of seats she gets. This is how much she's paid. Why not like i will pay you today for that. If you reserved seats for me but i'll pay you twenty percent less because because you shouldn't be paying facebook and google and everybody else on that path and so that sort of i mean that's a very simple version of it but optimizing a product service experience without having to go and like spray and pray which is still the technical marketing approach. <hes> is like that is what the the data driven innovations should look like so then. Is it a situation where the companies are are not taking advantage of this opportunity or the they haven't ramped up their operations to the point to get to be able to do that so i mean it's such a great question down because data literacy is still something that's not really really talked about like every digital literate digitally literate which twenty years ago was a challenge and now we're seeing this whole wave of people needing to be exciting of their careers date illiterate and at the moment that literacy sits within the marketing department so guess what gets us for to sell you most of that's why a lot of people at times tmz the term big data. They still get scared yeah when you have these huge opportunities for much much better engagement and service but it's been used again just to targeting getting sell you. What does it mean to be illiterate so i think i mean how to at the very least how to extract incites and act on them right because at the moment so much of the infrastructure and investment goes into getting the data written and now companies have data lakes great. We have data lake. It's full of exhaust to we. We don't really know that much. What are we going to do with it so taking it from that infrastructural data lake being able to structure data sets to truly drive what a business does versus what a business sells and those insights they should be from the board level down and if you don't have board directors who are data literate and how then can the executive team and all the way down so what does it mean for a company to <hes> what are the implications for for a data so driven innovation for companies in the financial services industry and and do think the fintech industry is taking the lead in disregard. I think the implications locations for financial institutions especially are actually very positive like financial institutions all the trusted stewards of our money. What we wake up every day and go the you know globally still there is infrastructure in place from a fiduciary perspective and from from safety and soundness perspective to make sure that your money is protected each country approaches at me differently but for the most part we've managed to avoid runs on banks for really longtime so from implications for institutions is that can they go from being a steward or a fishery of your money to being a steward of the free of your data as well and you know the the racist wide open anyone any company could step up clearly the big tech companies are endeavouring to do that right now <hes> <hes> but at the same time the financial institutions are making moves within open banking especially to start to control that flow of data. I'll take a a little step back so traditionally when you wanted to share your banking data say with a financial technology company. I'm going to set a budget. I'm going to apply for loan through one of these startup lenders it. It was you would m._t._o. Username and password right and it's called screen scraping so everything that you saw on your screen then your whoever you share the data with could also also see it and they could continue to see it until you change your password. They could continue to say that so that created an enormous amount of data exhaust out there in the world around your specific financial data which tells you a lot about who you are <hes> with open banking the move is to go from username and passwords to token based exchanges so no longer. Would you be sharing what is incredibly confidential information out with the ecosystem. It would just be a token exchange back and forth so that does start to to reduce the amount of data exhaust from the financial services industry globally. They seem to be the first industry to really be doing this at scale. So to your question mccall there is as you know very positive implications on this. What are some of the relationships you see between open banking and data's currency so it step up one i would say if we truly get to this idea where i can take my financial or any data and actually exchanged aged full value at my terms at a fair market value with transparency and insight like open open banking this idea of making more secure secure and private exchange of data is step one reducing the amount of data exhaust out. There is step two. It's very hard to monetize data win this so much out there but if you can start to reduce that flow then that's the logical next. Does this have the opportunity to have the ability to take this if it's able to work in the banking sector and be able to take it into other areas and be able to take away some of the angst around data that we see just in general <hes> with with people at the hospital or the retail sector as well and we've seen this in other countries so australia's one where <hes> consumer data right was passed hostages singular riot which is a person's data and should be able to access it securely and safely so they've starting with financial services but then very quickly moving into energy energy and telecommunications so it's not just oh i made these calls..

google australia facebook wharton Jane san francisco editor in chief mccall executive director new york fiduciary priceline executive u._s. u._s.
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

Uncommon Knowledge

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

"Socialism works well in two places in heaven where you don't need it in hell. Were they already have it. You just talked about the data listen to this. Since deng xiaoping opened china to free markets in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine china has lifted some seven hundred hundred and fifty million people out of poverty while remaining under the control of the communist party communism and economic growth can hand go hand in hand. It didn't work in the soviet union but it certainly seems to be working in china and young americans are smart enough to see that lee working in china not better than one thousand nine hundred seventy nine but not nearly as good as the world they could live in so in nineteen seventy nine per capita income in china was three hundred and forty nine dollars per year about one hundredth of u._s. u._s. Per capita income and just this age before dan came in china nineteen seventies was not so different than the china the late fifty s and sixty s under mao wen land just a horrendous experiment of trying to use government planning for markets resulted in a famine that killed sixty million chinese people <hes> the level of income in a society is proportionate to the extent and quality of democratic governance governance and the extent to which they're protected property rights and economic freedom and under deng china expanded economic freedom substantially so now there's private businesses operating china today chinese per capita income is no longer one one hundred of the u._s. s- about seventeen percent of the us is increased because one component of what society needs to do to grow expand expand economic freedom china did some of that but teaching at u._c._l._a. For the last twenty years i've had a number of chinese students and interestingly all of of them want to stay here. None of them want to go back to china and what they often talk about the sharp restrictions on civil liberties and personal freedoms they face the fact that they can't use the internet freely the fact that they're afraid to complain the fact that they're afraid to criticize the government <hes> chinese to grow at twelve percent per year compared to our three percent per year that was twelve years ago today to the best of our knowledge china's growing talking about four percent per year compared to our three percent per year there at seventeen percent of where we are now unless they improve the quality and extent of the democratic socratic governance. They'll never come close to catch up to the u._s. Not even close george as the cold war was drawing to a close you you knew it. Most of us did not know it that the cold war was drawing to a close you have. I've heard you tell the story that you have you gave me. He called gorbachev of tourelles in free market economics. Would you explain what was going on there well. I got him aside. He's a break guy. Let me tell you how bright ideas he came here to san francisco. After i left office he was still in the office more or less to see me and he came down to stanford shot like to have a meeting with some of the leading intellectual lights at stanford and an interchange with them so i arranged it and you practically had to be nobel laureate to make the cut and we had chemists and chemical engineers and physicists mathematicians mathematicians and military was economics and so on a rather <hes> so these were really first class people and i had to being the day before with him and i said you've got to figure out how to say in about four minutes something significant in your field. That's real meaning into it. Otherwise we'll get around the room so we went around the room and he responded with information and candor to each statement that was made it was a breathtaking display of his intellectual capacity so one time we were meeting in the kremlin and we had a break and i said let me show you something and i had some information and i said we are moving moving into a new era. It's called the information age and if you have a society that's closed <unk>. You're gonna miss out. You're gonna leave you behind.

china gorbachev deng china deng xiaoping soviet union communist party u._s. u._s kremlin stanford us san francisco george lee dan seventeen percent three percent
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Mueller, She Wrote

Mueller, She Wrote

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Mueller, She Wrote

"Attends the mayflower speech in april of two thousand sixteen he spends twenty fifteen doing is visiting four countries <hes> russia saudi arabia israel and egypt put that were central to this plan he was working on with acu to effectively nuclearized the middle east by bringing nuclear power more than thirty new nuclear power plants to countries across the middle east and doing so and this is important in a way that would violate violate what had conventionally been what's called the gold standard or the one-two-three agreement that governed any transition of nuclear technology from the united states to other countries which is that those countries would agree not to use that nuclear technology to <hes> build and design nuclear weapons and so the a. c. You flynn plan not only would have brought nuclear power to the middle east <hes> a number of nations in the middle east particularly saudi arabia egypt and the united arab emirates but it would have led to an nuclear the arms race between iran and those countries that could have gotten extremely dangerous and frankly if it still happens could well be very dangerous for the entire world in the next ten and yours this side before we talk about the flynn emails with <hes> barrack and all maleek <hes> trying to sort of formulate this plan <hes> <hes> or at least i to me it seemed like they were lobbying <hes> trump to adjust his policy and the r._n._c. platform but what what does this have to do with that i mean when we start bringing in how you have to relieve russian sanctions to have this plan go forward and then we take look at things like the seychelles meeting with prince and nater. These are all tied together aren't. They said they are and one thing. That's things that's been frustrating about. <hes> i mean i just wrote a book on this. Essentially on this middle east deal that flynn was working on called proof of conspiracy and one of the things that that was frustrating in talking on social media about the fact that i was writing this book and giving a sort of preview of some of its major events and characters and topics is that people would immediately they say wow you know everyone is now switching from russia to focus on other things they're switching from discussing collusion with the russians over the topic of sanctions actions to talk about completely different unrelated countries and unrelated events and in fact as you just said that's not at all the case so so let me break down in a simple a terms as i can deal that michael flynn was working on with acu in two thousand fifteen. The idea that michael landon acu had was that the u._s. u._s. u._s. Companies and the u._s. government could work with the russians to build nuclear reactors across the middle east particularly in saudi arabia egypt and the united united arab emirates and the idea they had is that they could get the u._s. Ally the chief u._s. Ally in the middle east israel to come on board with that plan even if if it meant the possibility of new nuclear powers arising in the arab world if the saudis on the emirati promised to help israel number one counter iran on and number to get its way in the ongoing palestinian dispute okay that was what the railways felt they would get out of the deal and and that has a lot to do with <hes> one of if those two <hes> issues that muller brought up in his report with flynn where they were lobbying the u._n. Security council to either delay or lobbying other countries is to vote against the resolution banning the <hes> west bank occupations by israel. Is that also part of this absolutely. It's a great example all of how this plan that flynn and acu created and took around the world pitching to leaders was in fact adopted by the trump campaign by the time time you get to the presidential transition you have donald trump calling the egyptian leader el-sisi directly and telling him he needs to withdraw a resolution in the united nations that the israelis are strongly against regarding the building of new settlements in israel and immediately the egyptians withdraw it because what you have by december of twenty sixteen is this as i have turned it a grand bargain or what you might also determine we can talk about why i called the red sea conspiracy.

michael flynn middle east saudi arabia israel russia acu egypt united arab emirates united nations michael landon acu u._s. u._s. u._s iran united states donald trump seychelles barrack
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

12:56 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Time <hes> yeah alabama now but but <hes> <hes> <hes> bush senior he's my favorite republican rosa rosa so when clinton was running as this snake i mean this guy is a complete snake is he might he. I can't tell you he's telling you what you wanna hear and when he got into office he's doing things that you know he's breaking promises like like i expect him to say yeah. He had like that like that. I like that. I like that too so he different form of a democrat is there's some differences. I don't know if you appreciate if you say beckmann but but he's almost like a little bit more more reportedly pests nafta he passed after <hes>. That's a very anti democratic thing. I mean nowadays i made it thing they turn around from that but but back then the republicans are the ones that came up nafta and he passed him and a lotta people their union members can stuff that just completely hated that yeah. I want an apple legal to x._m. Bob free trade. There's cheap labor down mexico or china given the cheap jobs. Give us a high techjobs given the cheap stuff like dumped money into education so we can have all the smart people here and the laborers. There's always gonna be cheap. Labor on the world young on may be mexico now but then some other countries poor now all the u._s. Jobs belong here in the u._s. That's what i believe but oh well yeah but but why would you buy okay so so beguin. <hes> background is time period. <hes> thing was like a <hes>. The american automakers acres were getting beat up right because of like the the japanese carmakers had cheap labor so they can build a career cheaper. Good quality car really cheap it whereas we had high high labor costs here right. We can compete right. Do you really want those shops here whereas expensive where we can't compete bergen just this great reverse on cars to each other in can't we don't allow foreign cars in here all right but us like hello. There is allowed to play on the world and if there's cheap labor you're out there. You can get them working and we have jobs. You can tell jobs. We have a very developed system. We educate our people people now. We have a good as well and i'll get it as but but we should have a good educational system these other countries don't have good education -cational system yet right so so why not let them do what they they're an energy uneducated person gonna do labor and they have us do the hiring tip stuff that they can't do but that's not all of u._s. u._s. Right so there's a lot of people that can do cheap labor. That's still u._s. That need to feed their family we but but so why give it to a foreign info country to do that. There's always going to be cheap labor. I mean you always yeah in the u._s. Silica cheap labor houses houses. You always have to build a house right right so i mean you can't outsource it. You can't send that to mexico now now now. There's there's always a clean house. There's always cheap labor jobs. There's the market out out there but to me. I want america to educate the hell of our people so they're also smart. Rudinov reliant stuff ensure that some people that don't go to college demonte monday study fan. Let them deliver job but i want to. I want to push our people to be the smart people there be the scientists they're developing the so you know the best smartphone whatever it is the best will for sure but not everybody in the u._s. is gonna have that privilege to be have that career and and and you know and and be able to have that so there are still people that are you know those jobs that are overseas would be planning awful for them to feed their family but instead. They're they're doing whatever they're out of work and because u s i mean any country you've got your around. I don't i'm sitting right now. We have three percent unemployment. No yeah because there's because there's so many more jobs bob came back to the u._s. But we we like we always had like under f- round anything under five percents good we were in like when the market market crash except situation there but it lasted for a long time but guess what remember driving down woodward and all those automobile parking lots they were empty they used to be filled with ford and chrysler all gone all empty when we have recessions russian visit right right but what where do they go swimming. Where where did all of our plants go there on overseas don't sell they went overseas to yeah. Maybe a few but they went overseas. So now you know some guy in china china or mexico who didn't have an education or whatever you wanna call it now. He gets a job because of the u._s. And some looks at picking picking up marvin. I gotta call marvin every week you but but it's it's a <hes> what nafta passed beckon nineteen ninety three. I think was <hes> <hes> <hes>. It's been a long time. We had <hes> most of the time we had low unemployment yeah so we don't have a shortage of jobs yeah. No i mean we now. We don't the high pay jobs but you're still one of the issues is the pay so we don't have the high page now g care. Do i care that we don't have the high paying jobs. No i mean the okay well good. I mean i care that we're thriving <music> as like a state. I care about my state. I care about you know the u._s. We're thriving want high paying jobs but <hes> but i want to let me let me rephrase this. Do you want to pay the high wages. Do i want to bomb out a boss. Why i know yes your house cleaner but or lawn person some of those working on your house he idea yeah do pay money. I mean i pay them money. Money like twenty dollars to cut my lawn. You know one hundred bucks to clean my three story house. I mean do you want them to have the nice hyping job <hes> i would love everybody to be as best in as much as they want but he know what if somebody comes matter of fact my house cleaner the other day i'm sitting there working and she sues is like thanked me. She's like because they kind of made me upset because they weren't playing my house that well and they switched over this new girl and she's like. She thanked me. She's like thank you you. <unk> are giving me a job and i'm gonna kick ads around your house and make sure that it's done right and not up. Thank you and i appreciate you for that so happy where where she's at and she has a job so you're younger than me so you probably don't just like three years. He's blue youthful. Well wait a minute. I forgot five. Maybe maybe pay attention so much like forty seven so when i was like <hes> back in the eighty timeframe or it may cause them by an open the big things are anti union because is very anti union because we got this guy. That's doing this shit. Bunch of engineers are but but but a bunch of the conserve you know england can put like a tire care share. Why should that person get paid now of fifty thousand dollars a year or a hundred thousand a year <hes>. Why should they personally get paid that much money money right so we know people got really bitter at the for doing that kind of stuff and then like the japanese companies they had all cheap labor or so they have some skin paid half the price right and their cars are lot cheaper and guess what people bought the the support the i own a japanese the japanese car actually hypocrite but not nothing's a little bit more balanced says nafta things a little bit more balanced down so nafta we know now are we shipped love her stuff. Yeah we do ship our stuff down to to mexico. We ship down there now. We got the cheap labor in and <hes> we can compete had had labor costs which was a big thing <hes> so the bad side it is is that now you've got these guys that were making a lot of money not making that much money so now they get these jobs. There are now getting paid. Ten bucks an hour bizarre cheaper whatever the u._s. yeah yeah so if you bring the jobs back here. We're going to start paying those guys i mean. Do you want to pay ten thousand dollars more for your car so i understand where you're japanese car referred. We're going to need it. I don't know i i just i don't know it's my first foreign car. I'm afford girl but but i kind of had this thing where i was like dating foreign guys and drive american cars like hey. Let's flop and see what happens so i bought a foreign car now american guys but so flop but i do think i do my car. I don't it's a it's a it's. It's a <hes> what are they called a infinity infinity. It's a japanese car but i mean that's not even the point is that i rather paid american more money to have a bunch of people working not on making ten dollars. There's an hour and i would pay more for my car eighties. That's that's. That's why actually we didn't want her now because like like right now we tried break-up wake-up unions. Why do we unions why why did abused no but i so i know but but you still don't want to people. Do you say it now because it sounds cool but it's like okay back then we lifted back then it's like so our cultural too expensive in our own makers were going down and i am so i got it and we were also children. We're like teenagers gers young adults and that time eighties right so <hes> and i get in times are completely different. Wages were completely different in also oh <hes> also i think just people were just more like vietnam. Everyone's come back from vietnam and everybody's well no but still i it it. You know a trickle down to like the you know my i mean my dad was in vietnam so it just trickled down even like the eighties and it's just different and i think at that time you know everybody was just about saving money and you know i remember you know your mom would fried chicken chicken and keep that fat and fry bacon and keep that fat i mean i grew up in proposed them for you. Know butter on toast. I mean it was just like like people were just report. You know everybody did that see my world but but at times were for different so but i think right now the economy is and in people are wanting like okay. I'll pay more. I'll pay more money for my car car. I'll pay more money for my house cleaner. I'll pay more money if i if i can yeah i i i would love for anybody. That's listened to take a vote. Oh would you pay a little bit more to keep americans getting having jobs and having you know <hes> <hes> having to take really bad jobs or just ten dollars an hour to support their family because their job got taken away from them to give to a <hes> <hes> a foreign country. I would pay more money to keep those jobs in the u._s. App lutely absolutely th they before so but the eighties and we're now like coming up to the dino twenty twenty i mean that's a lot and we're and we're in charge now. Not arp parents yup. If you look at what happened since the eighties in particular <hes> days was a very big dividing line. If you look loud like the deadlines <hes> income income and income inequality is a really big thing right now <hes> <hes> and they merged up is called the guinean coefficient and this goes back to met..

mexico china vietnam u._s. u._s beckmann alabama apple bergen bob rosa rosa bush america marvin clinton england ford chrysler ten dollars fifty thousand dollars
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"He looks up at me says larry. I just played the best set. I've ever played from the back court. I said yeah what's that telling you rocket scientists. What do you do the cia. That's all i said he served and volleyed the next two sets one three three and won the tournament so he was smart enough to make an adjustment okay but but you know if you look if you look at these guys going on the court and because i mean i think it's i think it's really really bad for the game. They think you're taking a major part of the game away from figuring things out while you're playing and that's just maybe i'm old school. Maybe then i'm old school but i think it's not entertainment. He's an athlete figure it out. Get on the bus and then in the practice sessions okay and when you play sets at the time to stop play which i still do juniors. What do you think in here. Why would you keep making that same play. When you're oh and seventeen doing it and you keep doing it so that's where you have to make headway than the practice sessions not while it's going going on in the heat of the battle so that's just my opinion david on that on that subject. That's fair enough fair. My question is here larry and and it is obviously you've coached. Now against federal you mentioned the dow you've coached against jackovitch. They are now within two grand slams of ovation the federal twenty eighteen sixteen yes. Who do you regard as the greatest. Where do you think they will finish in terms of grand slam in total one other thing. I want to jump back a little bit. <hes> roddick beat djokovic five times in row when i was with him before <hes> <hes> joke of it's one on his run so andy had a very very good record against djokovic defaulted a few times in that he just you know every time it got down to where he would like like get into a dog fight 'cause andy wants to bring it to a dogfight mckay and and so he had a very very good <hes> record against joker <hes> until it kind of blew apart <hes> you actually when he lost to him in the quarterfinals of u._s. u._s. Open then heating five times in a row after that there was there was there was something kind of clicked with andy in do very well with joker but i'm gonna make a prediction right now. Jokers gonna have the most slams with endgame. If you're asking me who's gonna be the one. I think rafa can still a win on the clay. I think he can win. <hes> that tournament a couple more times believe it or not but i think he's going to struggle when it gets best to five on a hard surface and on the grass <hes> roger <hes> you know he's you know he's still so he's still kicking in and and playing at the top three level so there's no reason why he can't win one or two more as well but jokers a lot younger. What is job thirty two yeah i mean it must be pretty extraordinary fee you having seen and coached against judge and seen andy roddick outlasted asked him and grind him and yet round. He's to see what he's become. I mean yeah he's in the thing they hold on joker back. If anything is between his ears i mean i'm not getting i think he's he seems to hold him back. Is maybe that thing that you have that belief factor or board or or you know. I mean there's no. I'm just gonna run this guy into the ground and i'm not what we saw. He sometimes press the panic button when there's no need to be present the panic button when he's got eighteen slam. How many slam sixteen sixteen okay got sixteen to eighteen and twenty. Is that how it goes at twenty to twenty yeah so i mean so and he's so much younger than these guys if he if he doesn't let his mind get in the way and that's how we took that hi it's for a year and a half otherwise he would. He took like vacation okay now. He's back but he's still let me tell you when you have that ability..

andy roddick larry cia dow rafa djokovic david u._s. u._s mckay
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Why some other consumables that this would show flexibility ability on the u._s. Side the american farm bureau's dave salmon's and says he hopes chinese react to that in a positive way that they changed their announcement a a little while ago that they're not going to buy you as act products and start buying them again. There was a call earlier in the week between the two sides that seem to be positive with and at that point. We'd heard that a meeting in september with still on you know it's really <hes> comments come. Can you just don't know how services gonna turn out but we do know that. Agriculture and other sectors are desperate for some resolution of this dispute because <hes> has folks in farm country. No this is costing billions of dollars in lost sales of soybeans pork corn ethanol. You name it speaking <music> of some hope u._s. M._c._a. and the clock is ticking as we get towards september yeah. This is important <hes> trade agreement. It's one that farmers are looking toward with some hopefulness. There have been positive signs <hes> in the negotiations between the white house the the u._s. trade ambassador robert lighthizer and a team of negotiators put together by house speaker nancy pelosi. There is certainly italy support on the democratic side in fact. We just ran the story this week that senator chuck grassley who chairs the senate finance committee that which has trade jurisdiction is pointing to tom vilsek former governor of iowa caucus face in the presidential race and and <hes> a former u._s._d._a. Secretary and now the head of the u._s. dairy export council as <hes> making several positive statements about the u._s. m._c._a. Ville sack recently testified before senator graphics committee said i have a simple message for the committee exports member and the american food and again just thirty percent of all ag production twenty percent of all income is directly related to exports parts and then when you look at mexico and canada twenty eight percent of all food and agriculture exports go to those two countries. We're talking about forty forty to forty five billion dollars in trade. That's five times what it was when nafta was first enacted and this new deal a u._s. u._s. m._c._a. If speaker nancy pelosi allows it to come to the house floor with being another two point two billion in added added into the didn't come a very big appeal and <hes> the pushes on during this <hes> summer recess month of august to <hes> get the support from democrats to allow us to you come up and to pass it has been tougher exports and for domestic use corn ethanol and more small market refinery waivers <hes> disappointment <hes> thirty one additional <hes> waiver is the word from senator grassley of in the top lobbyist for us and all on the hill is that the the president has given all these gonna give and probably not going to get any more concessions from the white house they got fifteen that was about it it and now grassley says it's time to go to <hes> perhaps the securities and exchange commission in that how many of these companies really deserve a a break from having to purchase credits in order to satisfy the legal requirement under the renewable fuel standard all right man ed. Thanks so much. Thanks man jane d._c. On our f._d._a. gets old baby right now. How all jeans are on sale up to fifty percent off from fifteen bucks for adults ten bucks for kids. Try on a pair in store and save even more with five bucks off your purchase the fifty dollars or more during old navy's great denham triathlon hurry in now to find your perfect fit and save big with up to fifty percent off all jeans now at old navy valid he twelve eight twenty one excludes in store clearance gift cards register lane items jewelry five dollar discount valid with jeans purchase an ad from dad all right save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive guys like what is this wow. Where did you get this. I'm talking to you with the hair yeah. Where did you get this good stuff solid. That's not the near that solid stuff. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto progressive casualty insurance company affiliates in other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations <music>. You're going to need <music>..

senator chuck grassley nancy pelosi white house american farm bureau dave salmon nafta senator senate finance committee denham Ville sack iowa Secretary u._s. u._s. m._c._a jane d._c italy robert lighthizer tom vilsek
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Be scaled up to keep global temperatures from rising more than one point five degrees celsius. I'm andrea sears reporting. This is pianist international trade pfizer having having an unexpected upside for indiana programs that focus on feeding the hungry more from dan hyman to make up impart for the lost overseas markets the u._s. u._s. Department of agriculture is buying much more food from producers which ends up at food banks and pantries. Josh trionnaire with the indiana pork producers association says the government bought ten times as much pork this year than in the past so much in fact it was a challenge at first but he says it's the kind of problem feeding feeding programs like to have it was such a great opportunity to get this much protein at once. They have families to make it work. The trade situation situation remains in flux but trionnaire says the mitigation program looks likely to continue for at least one more year. Dan hyman reporting roberts estimated summating all those programs receive an extra one point three million pounds of extra food in two hundred nineteen due to trade mitigation finally are eric eric allowed us reports. He deadline for public comments on pacific corpse plans to mitigate toxic leaks from their coal. Ash ponds power plants wyoming is august twenty six. If i've are group's urging people to put their opinion away record coal ash is the byproduct of coal burned for generating electricity and his primarily stored in open air pits ponds the dave johnson naughton and jim bridger power plants along with based electric power co ops laramie river station all i'll have reported groundwater contaminants above federal limits connie wilbert with the sierra club says because the toxins are dangerous. It's important to do whatever is necessary to clean them up. They really need to take appropriate measures to deal with these problems not just stopgap and they'd kind of measures. This has to be the recent data showed selenium and lithium levels at the gym bridgier and not in plants were one hundred times over federal levels for safe drinking water pacific core says has it's up for the task of cleaning up the contaminated sites and maintains the sites have never post danger to wyoming drinking water each year the nation's coal fire power plants produce about one hundred forty million tons.

dan hyman Josh trionnaire indiana wyoming andrea sears eric eric u._s. u._s laramie river Department of agriculture dave johnson naughton connie wilbert jim bridger sierra club roberts one hundred forty million tons five degrees celsius three million pounds
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"While the nation was still in shock doc in mourning over these senseless deaths this weekend <hes> <hes> and the shootings one of them explicitly targeting mexican immigrants in el paso u._s. u._s. Immigration officials carried out a massive raid on mississippi food processing plants. They arrested six hundred eighty mostly latino workers i in what is now the largest workplace sting and more than a decade so let's get this arrested. Workers filled three buses add a coke foods plant in morton mississippi forty miles east of jackson so think about this six hundred and eighty workers were arrested but no mention of the coke brothers whose company hired all these people who weren't legally allowed to work in the united states something just just doesn't add up there and they deployed six hundred ice agents to do this to arrest six hundred and eighty people but you know what they didn't think about. They didn't think about what would happen to the children of all those workers who were arrested. These children holdren came home from school to nobody there but our government of course didn't think about what would happen to the kids of these these workers or make any provision to deal with them. Here's a news report from local mississippi television station these children some who are just toddlers we're relying hang on neighbors and even strangers to pick them up outside their homes after school and drive into a community fitness center where people tried to keep them calm but many kids kept crying for mom and dad fighting back tears eleven-year-old magda lena gomez 'gorio expressed to us her devastation being alone without her dad. Go thomas pleased. Let my the what everybody else. Please don't leave the joes with greatness the era this came after agents raided several food plants across mississippi arresting six hundred and eighty people believed to be in the country illegally while we ordination of immigrants more than that we are first and foremost a nation of laws but those children left behind and and families impacted by each raid stress. Their parents and friends are good. People muhdad me that in the the the children now live right now and their mom being here for fifteen years. He has no record nothing. A lot of people here has no record. I've been here twelve well year ten years fifteen years for christina per solta who's the godmother of two children whose mom was arrested. She felt helpless watching all day as the boys wonder when they'll see their mother again his mom's gone that he's upset with trump is a he just wants him home back and they're both crying crying boom crime but get home school but with the help of clear creek bootcamp owner jordan barnes and other community leaders.

mississippi el paso u._s. u._s trump thomas coke brothers magda lena gomez 'gorio holdren united states jordan barnes jackson fifteen years eleven-year ten years
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"Capital. You have to borrow money or inflate your currency so that you can depreciate the value of of any one dollar so there are a lot of different ways to create the illusion of growth in an economy <hes> you can have the governor the federal reserve zor print money which is what creates that inflation but the only way to truly enrich a nation enriching economy is to have a store of excess assessed capital that can be used to generate more capital with and what we did instead was we financed the expansion post nine one thousand nine hundred seventy in effect the u._s. Go ahead. I was going to say the way that that was done. Then largely was win. The bretton woods system collapsed the u._s. arranged with saudi arabia to effectively effectively to make the dollar the reserve currency so that anybody who wanted to buy oil now from the largest oil exporters would be required to buy dollars domes which then which artificially inflates the demand for dollars internationally which is how then you get the the dollar being the u._s.'s largest export yeah so so weakened now essentially the important a piece of this is we were sending dollars out and we orchestrated a way in which people would have to use those dollars or or take those dollars in exchange for whatever good or service they wanted to purchase k now what that does is it allows us to infinitely devalues. Oh you our own currency and manipulate our own currency and nobody can really do much about it because they have to use it game so let me read on here <hes> the rest of us <hes>. This accomplished several yeah yeah. I'm i'm trying to. I'm paraphrasing here because i don't we don't need to read all of this. <hes> <hes> so this accomplished several things one it create it created pacified working and middle class and client states it created had pacified working and middle classes in client states so the people we were sending money to so yeah so we send the money out it goes into the hands of working and middle class people in the u._k. And europe and this pacifies those people because they're they feel like they're getting more because we're they're. They're selling more goods to us. It exported u._s. Credit inflation which we just talked about it gave the controllers of the monetary system vast wealth and power and it impoverished wish the u._s. middle-class and made them dependent and the problem with this is that you can only strip mine a legacy resource <hes> for so long before it's exhausted the one hundred fifty years of accumulated capital from the continent continental nation is a gigantic resource but it is also finite our collective seed. The corn was a entirely spent by the end of the nineteen nineties so he's making this is he. No he really knows this because it's it's economically economically. It's too much of a mess but essentially what he's saying is going into the nineteen nineties. We were realizing now that we had a bit of an economic problem. This was about the time that china was coming onto the scene and we needed someplace to dump dollars china needed to increase its industrial real output and it needed somebody to buy the goods that it was selling the problem was it was not part of the <hes> what was called the ch- which <hes> trying to look for the actual thing the actual group that it was basically it couldn't it couldn't do business internationally the way it wanted to and so what we decided to do as we cut a deal with china to take their goods <hes> they they call it here pax americana u._s. u._s. u._s. The u._s._d._a. is the dollars only backed by two things number one a willingness of people to use them as a medium of exchange and the collective might of the u._s..

u._s. u._s china bretton woods europe saudi arabia u._s. one hundred fifty years one dollar
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"To our story on anxiety at the border. Here are some other top stories. We're following today china one of the biggest importers of u._s. agricultural commodities now all says it will suspend all imports of u._s. Agricultural products the wall street journal's kirk maltese says the latest blow in the u. S. china trade dispute compounds owns. What has already been a difficult time for the u._s. Farm belt this year is unprecedented just in terms of the string of unfortunate events that farmers of had when you have the spring the planning conditions excessive wet weather now summertime and now it successfully dry they just just can't catch a break in that front so their plans are suffering as a result and then you kneel on top of that prices have been ebbing and flowing with you know each each piece of news about china about the negotiations other going and now that we have this news out that china's halting their purchases of u._s. u._s._a._a. Exports prices reacted to that and farmers it. This is just one more problem. The farmers have to deal with did something where you don't farmers that we spoke to do. They wonder how they're going to survive and it's the there's no clear answer to chinese buyers imported nineteen and a half billion dollars in farm goods in two thousand seventeen the u._s. department of agriculture says china canada and mexico were among the biggest export destinations for u._s. Agriculture commodities from two thousand nine to two thousand seventeen u._s. stocks stabilized on tuesday after china said it wouldn't let you on fall much farther it fell below. Oh the seven to the dollar level on monday sending global stock sliding the dow fell seven hundred sixty seven points on monday and the u._s. labeled china a currency manipulator manipulator jon huntsman the u._s. ambassador to russia will resigned from his post in early october. The salt lake tribune published a letter huntsmen sent to president trump and speculated that huntsman may be considering a run to become utah's governor for a second time huntsman ran for president in two thousand twelve and was selected as is u. S. ambassador to russia by president trump in two thousand seventeen public pension plans fell short of their projected returns this year according to data released.

china jon huntsman u. S. china china canada president u._s. ambassador to russia u. S. ambassador to russia salt lake tribune wall street journal department of agriculture kirk maltese trump utah mexico u._s. u._s._a._a billion dollars
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on 1A

"Of this escalates anytime soon laura again looking at the broader picture this this is not just about hong kong this is about china and the greater <hes> dispute with the u._s. and with the rest of the world <hes> which goes into trade it goes into militarization of the south china sea so china china it really does not want to be seen as backing down from its core values and this is sort of can could be seen as sort of the culmination of this an example of this and what happens next will really i think have an impact on the talks with the u._s. u._s. and china lever increasingly dimitri the world needs china china's too big a player it's asserting too much of its influence across the south china sea parts of africa like it's not like some small country that we can say now now now now china's a player that the world can't really push around china is essentially on its way to becoming the second superpower on with respect to hong kong <hes> notwithstanding what's happening there and how we've arrived at this place it's also important to point out that hong kong was originally parts of china <hes> the british came in and colonized it so you can understand why the chinese feel very strongly about hong kong i just wanted to make one point about the protests while it's true that there are some very prominent violent incidents the vast majority of those have been incredibly peaceful oh to the point that back in two thousand fourteen i was living in hong kong i took my two year old son and four year old daughter down to what was called democracy square because it was so peaceful it was like going to a kind of berkeley compass on a sunny day when everyone was at reading their books in the sun so to two million people protesting actually the amount of violence compared to what it could be was really minimal but it gets played up obviously i used to teach berkeley.

laura hong kong china berkeley u._s. u._s. and china africa four year two year
"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

12:05 min | 1 year ago

"u._s. u._s" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Fifth in hong kong monday june twenty-fourth in new york coming up this hour and fiscal in asia following a similar finish for equities in the u._s. u._s. and chinese trade negotiators scrambled to make arrangements for a trump she summit this week shanghai based i only international said to deal for russia's g._v. gold join his biggest new startups ditching intel and oracle for a domestic upstart number shot salama th by the story u._s. sanctions on iran this time surround the supreme leader more hong kong protests in the week leading up to the g twenty bernie sanders proposes forgiving student debt by taxing wall street i'm ed baxter global news the u._s. women's world cup team moving onto the quarterfinals while stefan marberry is taken a head coaching position in china i'm dan schwartzman i'll have those stories and more coming up in bloomberg sports that's all straight ahead on bloomberg daybreak asia on bloomberg eleven three new york bloomberg ninety nine one washington d._c. bloomberg one zero six one boston bloomberg nine sixty san francisco sirius x._m. one nineteen and around the world on bloombergradio dot com and via the bloomberg business app okay it's the fourth hour of the show at the bottom of this hour trading will begin on the mainland in the chinese equity markets along with hong kong if you're joining us from the region good morning i'm doug krizner at bloomberg interactive brokers studio in new york and i'm juliet folly in singapore well as saying muqata attending a little bit more grain let's get all the latest with bloomberg's bryan curtis in hong kong brian julia thanks very much yes we're pushing higher this morning in an interesting sense in that we were quite defensive in europe and also in the united states and stocks kind of moved sideways there but here in the asia pacific starting to edge up a little bit the asia pacific index of three tenths of one percent we just got the footsie china fifties trading in singapore trading up about two tenths of one percent we'll get hong kong or hang seng index futures in the next twelve to thirteen minutes in the cash markets the nikkei is tenth of one percent asx up two tenths of one percent new zealand is pushed hires well and and the coffee's up about three tenths have one percent so the havens not getting quite the bid that they did earlier although we still see gold higher pushing fourteen hundred thirty dollars an ounce for look at august futures fourteen twenty eight fifty here at the moment bitcoins up over eleven thousand not quite sure if you're ready to embrace bitcoin as a as a safe haven some also look at china capital flight and also some sympathy with what facebook is doing so there has been a pretty solid rally for bitcoin dalian one oh seven thirty that's a little bit stronger and years been hanging around donner fourteen just on the strong side now one fourteen four doug overview so we've got a few geopolitical trigger points for markets these days we've got u._s. iran sanctions and of course the u._s. china trade war now speaking of trade negotiators are discussing arrangements for meeting this week between president trump and she at the g. twenty treasury secretary steven mnuchin in u._s. robert lighthizer spoke earlier with chinese vice premier lia they exchanged views and agreed to keep communicating president trump's trade advisor this is peter navarro told us earlier there are huge economic differences between the u._s. and china they devalue their currency to take the bite out of the terrorists they've lowered their prices we've seen them bearing the burden editor to lower exports lower profits so we got some comments from the chinese side as well i'm speaking about vice commerce minister one show win who said compromise will be on both sides and it will be a two way street an interesting twist in the u._s. china trade foot five fedex is now suing the komo's department in federal court as bloomberg's denise pellegrini reports it's an effort to block enforcement of tougher restrictions on exports and imports the package delivery giant says the export control reform act of two thousand eighteen is forcing it to police the contents of millions of packages and it says it's making it try to choose between operating under the threat of u._s. punishment or facing legal trouble from customers and foreign governments fedex has come under scrutiny from china's government after at least two incidents where parcels involving the chinese telecom equipment giant while we were returned because of confusion over the restrictions denise pellegrini bloomberg daybreak asia we've been looking at the winners and losers in the trade war you know many of china's biggest startups are now dropping american suppliers like i._b._m. and oracle and going with a chinese software provider instead we have more from bloomberg's rishaad salamat being cap already counts more than three hundred chinese customers some very big fish like show me and meet you on developing for years supplies like i._b._m. and oracle of invested heavily to build markets in china that may now be fraying china has long wanted to develop its own technology but it was difficult the trade wool seems to have changed that as a result a number of database providers such as pasta s._q._l. and it's you light of pumped up and grabbing business term thing cap wants to venture outside of china but at least for now the trade will is putting a block on that in hong kong i'm rishaad salamat bloomberg daybreak asia well we're hearing that hong kong based if w._d. group is in advanced talks to buy metlife's hong kong insurance unit more from bloomberg's yvonne man sources say to companies could reach agreement in the next few weeks the deal would how f- w._d. boost his presence in the former british colony it would value metlife hong kong and under four hundred million dollars that's less than the value of the company's insurance products china has working hard to limit demand for hong kong's insurance products because they are popular with mainland and customers who see the offshore investment as a way of hedging against u. n. volatility even so some bidders are betting on further growth in the industry and would be the latest in a string of deals and also the latest in a series of acquisitions by f. w._d. backed by billionaire richard lee in hong kong i'm yvonne man bloomberg daybreak asia let's get global news now where it's six minutes past the hour we've been talking through the program about the u._s. placing new sanctions on iran at baxter has the latest from the bloomberg nine sixty newsroom in san francisco eddie and of course the question is are these symbolic are they really do anything do they hurt their aimed at the supreme leader in those closely tied to him well deny the supreme leader in the supreme leader's office and those closely affiliated with him and the office access to keep an angel resources and support our president trump says a leader has agreed he doesn't really need nuclear weapons to go so mr trump says something can be done quickly he hopes bloomberg's rob levinson you know i think that's the idea here is to get a dialogue going but again tensions are still very high and another incident at sea or in the air could start spiraling out of control hundreds of hong kong protesters have staged a sit in at the city tax offices the latest in a wave of protests in the city china's announced it will not allow any discussion meanwhile the protests in hong kong at the g. twenty u._s. presidential candidate bernie sanders wants to cancel one point six trillion dollars in student debt and make public colleges free how leading attacks on wall street trades this wall street tax will have the added benefit of controlling wall street recklessness and reducing the likelihood of another major economic crash of wall street economists say would make markets more volatile and costs would be born by american households but not all agree josh bevan's director of transition economy policy into this one i'm pretty confident that this is either going to raise money or squeeze out largely socially unusual transactions but again industry groups for the most part of saying we'll fall on the shoulders of main street investors jeremy hunt accusing boris johnson of being incredibly disrespectful to current -servative party members by voiding tomorrow's debate he says he needs to come out of hiding this is an addition to the prime minister of the united kingdom and burst needs to show that he's prepared to answer difficult questions in the wake of reported altercation with his girlfriend in san francisco i'm ed baxter this is bloomberg douglas all right our guest for the half hour is ben look he is senior multi-asset strategist at state street ben always a pleasure we can talk more about kind of u._s. china trade but it seems like one of the primary drivers and a lot of the price action that we've been seeing the fed with that dovish pivot dollar weakness and now expectations at least in the markets that we could get as many as three rate cuts this year is that's something that you're betting on well i think the the magnitude of the rate cut is is still overly price in my opinion right now but to your point doug i think what what has changed as this policy normalization story where we started out the year where everybody still at a tightening mode to now we're activating easing mode and and the indirect effect of this as a continuation of a weakening of the dollar that we're seeing in the last one month which is why i think asian markets have actually been rallying much quicker and much faster irrespective of the g. twenty relative to the european counterparts or the u._s. equity market as well and weakening of dolo also massive weakening of yields how much further can they go yeah i mean to to the point that i think we don't at a team think that that the fed needs actually cut rates by actually three times by by the end of this year i think we are expecting possible cut i think by by by the second half of this year one is something that i think makes sense i think it really depends on how g. twenty unfolds and whether or not we'll see for the curation on that trade deal or to see whether or not there's going to be a second but i think given that we are only expecting around one rate cut by the end of the year we do expect that the u._s. treasury yields to rally back a bit i think i'm more towards the two to two and a half area as opposed to really below the two percent that we're seeing in the last couple of days so in the u._s. session on monday we had an essay written by the president of the dallas fed bank rob- kaplan and he was kind of sounding a little cautionary when it came to cutting rates he said that at this point in time you add more stimulus the risk is of build up of excess and imbalances in the economy and he went on to say that it's that that may ultimately prove to be more difficult and painful to manage down the road does he have a point well i do think obviously with how the u._s. economy has been over the last i mean i would say last ten years relative to the rest of the world they are at a much stronger position comparing to to to the likes of other e d. m but what we are seeing is that this trade tensions is going to have a very profound impact and a lasting impact on the global trade cycle and what that means is that i think what the fed is trying to do is trying to stay ahead of the curve this time as opposed to always being allegra where they need to really see the the numbers to really be reacting me negative actually start to do something so so i do see it as really trying to move ahead of the curve and being actually a supportive of possible given the risk that we're seeing on the trade side then we'll talk trade when we continue then luck there of state street here on daybreak asia this is bloomberg it's a great time of year to be outdoors.

hong kong new york asia u._s. u._s. russia intel oracle one percent fourteen hundred thirty dollar four hundred million dollars six trillion dollars thirteen minutes six minutes two percent one month ten years