35 Burst results for "U.S. Army"

Torture allegations mount in aftermath of Kherson occupation

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 15 hrs ago

Torture allegations mount in aftermath of Kherson occupation

"After 8 months of occupation, the city of Herzog is finally back in Ukrainian hands. However, reports are arising of allegations of torture in the region. The Associated Press spoke to 5 people who alleged torture took place by Russians in the key Ukrainian city, 5 alleged torture rooms have been found in the city along with at least four more in the wider house on region. It is there that people allege they were confined beaten shocked interrogated and threatened with death according to police. They alleged they were forced to give information about relatives or acquaintances with ties to the Ukrainian army, including names and locations disclosed in handwritten notes, human rights experts warned that the accusations made so far are likely only the beginning. I am Karen Chammas

Ukrainian City Herzog The Associated Press Ukrainian Army Karen Chammas
China Rocked by Protests Over "Zero-COVID" Lockdowns,

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:29 min | 1 d ago

China Rocked by Protests Over "Zero-COVID" Lockdowns,

"There is a lot of news this morning, primarily having to do with China, China is buckling under protests across the country. Shanghai rock by protesters zero COVID anger spreads, according to the Financial Times, also in the financial time, China rocked by protesters zero COVID anger spreads that got talks about Shanghai in this one after ten people died in an apartment fire in urm key where they were welded into their apartment complex because of zero COVID policy. New York Times picks up on that after a deadly blaze. A surge of defiance against China's COVID policies, the telegraph has the same thing, watch Chinese protesters call for Xi Jinping to resign as anti lockdown in March of sweep the nation. So we'll be watching on China today to see the secret police come out and remove everyone. It's the most unrest in that communist dictatorship since the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989. We know how that turned out but they were all in one place, so the country was able to mobilize that kind of army response, and they probably can do the same at a variety of places around the country, but people have had it with their zero cut. It doesn't work. And what China is worried about is that their vaccine, the homegrown China vaccine doesn't do anything. And their healthcare system will be overwhelmed like ours was two years ago because they haven't used the right vaccine. They don't want to admit that their doesn't work.

China Shanghai Rock Financial Times Xi Jinping Shanghai New York Times Tiananmen Square
 China's Xi faces threat from public anger over 'zero COVID'

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 1 d ago

China's Xi faces threat from public anger over 'zero COVID'

"Many a month after granting himself new powers, China's leader Xi Jinping is facing the kind of public anger not seen for decades due to his zero COVID strategy. Demonstrators in Chengdu chanted and locked down and free speech, as well as make China great again as they gathered in the dark around candles in Shanghai protesters assembled along the streets, many chanting and filming a stream of police officers arriving to control the protests. Widespread demonstrations like these have not been seen in China since the army crushed the 1989 student led pro democracy movement in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, John Hopkins political analyst of says, however, the protests happening now are less of a threat to the government than the chairman uprising. Students and protesting that there's clear sign that the party leadership is divided. And

Xi Jinping China Chengdu Shanghai Tiananmen Square John Hopkins Army Beijing
A Time of Mediation on Luke 21:20-18

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

02:56 min | 6 d ago

A Time of Mediation on Luke 21:20-18

"For the next few moments, surrender all the cares and concerns of the stay to the lord. Say slowly, from your heart, Jesus. I trust in you. You. Take over. Become aware that he is with you. Looking upon you with love. Wanting to be heard, deep within your heart. A reading from the holy gospel, according to Luke, chapter 21 versus 20 through 28. Jesus said to his disciples, when you see Jerusalem surrounded by armies, you must realize that she will soon be laid desolate. Than those in Judea must escape to the mountains. Those inside the city must leave it, and those in country districts must not take refuge in it. For this is the time of vengeance when all that scripture says must be fulfilled. Alas, for those with child, or with babies at the breast, when those days come. For great misery will descend on the land and the wrath on his people. They will fall by the edge of the sword and be led captive to every pagan country and Jerusalem will be trampled down by the pagans until the age of pagans is completely over. There will be signs in the sun and moon and stars on earth nations and agony, bewildered by the clamor of the ocean and its waves. Men dying of fear as they await what menaces the world. For the powers of heaven will be shaken. And then they will see the son of man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. When these things begin to take place, stand direct, hold your head sigh because your liberation is near at hand. What word made this passage come alive for you? What did you sense the lord saying to you?

Jerusalem Judea Luke Jesus
Rep. Chip Roy: The Terrible Recruitment Efforts for Our Military

The Dan Bongino Show

02:00 min | Last week

Rep. Chip Roy: The Terrible Recruitment Efforts for Our Military

"Congressman the Chinese Communist Party has to be saying to themselves gosh we are so lucky to have such a potentially incompetent enemies in this government over there I mean they're not doing any of this It's almost as if they could have intentionally infected us with this woke virus to create a substandard military I mean think about all the things you know are going on right now at our military Our nuclear triads falling apart we have a shipyard shortage So if we God forbid there was a national emergency and we needed to build more ships we barely have the capability to do it Our fighter aircraft are way behind schedule We can't figure out a way to get pilots anymore I mean these are just we can't recruit our army recruiting guidelines fell short The numbers As you said I mean the list goes on and on If I had a few minutes on the phone I could go through more and just research them These are real problems It's not as if Russia just invaded Ukraine and China is threatening across the straight either I mean this is a serious time requiring serious people And meanwhile the United States Army puts out a recruitment video that's focuses on a little girl raised with two moms who joined the military to find her inner strength and shatter some stereotypes In Pride Month the air force tweeted an image of an air man surrounded by a rainbow flag There was no American flag in the image Now compare that to the posters from World War II with Uncle Sam patriotic I want you Sacrificing Rosie the riveter All the things that this country has done and all the people have done And coming together over our differences figuring out how to make sure that we're integrating and doing the things we ought to do And not ostracizing individuals But having a culture of achievement the rallies around freedom and the American flag and isn't a woke indoctrination social engineering camp which is what it's become And I want to be very clear Republicans are just as guilty because we fund it We don't demand that they stop it and we do it because well chip what else are we going to do I'll tell you what you do Use the power to burst to tell those SOBs to stop screwing up our military so that we can defend this country

Chinese Communist Party United States Army Ukraine Russia Uncle Sam China Air Force
'It's the reflex': Veteran helped disarm gunman at gay club

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | Last week

'It's the reflex': Veteran helped disarm gunman at gay club

"A club goer at the gay bar in Colorado Springs where 5 people were killed Saturday night credits his army training for helping subdue the shooter but wish as he could have stopped the massacre sooner rich fiero did tours in Iraq and Afghanistan It was at club Q with his wife daughter and Friends He was called to action I just knew I got into mode And I needed to save my family And that family was at that time everybody in that room Police say the shooter had several guns including an AR-15 style assault rifle Fiero grabbed the shooter's body armor then pistol and beat him with it And I'm on top of him I'm a big dude man This guy was bigger And I just kept wailing on him A hero in the eyes of many but not his own There are 5 people that I could not help That includes his daughter's boyfriend Raymond green Vance fiero credits another club goer with helping subdue the suspect 22 year old Anderson Lee Aldrich who remains in the hospital I'm Julie Walker

Fiero Colorado Springs Afghanistan Iraq Raymond Green Vance Fiero Anderson Lee Aldrich Julie Walker
There Are Alternatives to Twitter

The Trish Regan Show

05:44 min | Last week

There Are Alternatives to Twitter

"So Twitter's back up and running, you can, I guess, feel free to say what you want now. And a lot of people I've seen a lot of friends who lost their accounts, they have been restored. That's all good, but will it matter? Again, there are other alternatives out there. I'm on true social as well, parlor, of course, has come about and had its own set of challenges. There's locals as well. I encourage you, by the way, you can follow me on locals at Trish Regan locals dot com, where they really are about promoting this freedom of speech within a decent way, right? I mean, we're not talking total craziness, but the ability at least to have an opinion. And in this environment, it's gotten hard. If I tell you to consecutive quarters of negative growth for our economy, means a recession, then somehow now I'm questioned by social media platforms for false information. I mean, hey, look, no recession is the same. But it used to be the definition of a recession. Now you can't say it anymore because Joe Biden doesn't want us to. I mean, that's scary stuff, folks, all right? And either side of the aisle. Remember that? Because it can just as easily be the Democrats that they're going after next. So even if Democrats are going after conservatives and all you can't say it's a recession that could so easily flip and that's the scary part about all of that. Isn't it? But lots of changes coming. I think January is going to prove to be a very interesting month. Don't you think? Don't you think I want to tell you about Kevin McCarthy? But before I do, did you see who's crawling around here? Right here on my lap. This is fluffy. If you haven't met fluffy, this is indeed him. He is the sweetest little thing and so important to me. I love this dog so much and it's the reason why I'm excited to tell you about a wonderful supplement that I found for him created by a former army veteran, an army veteran, a former army ranger named doctor Dennis black, and doctor black is naturopathic doctor, has created this supplement because he loves donks too and he's got a couple of them a little bit bigger than you fluffy, a little bit, but fluffy's just a little tiny Maltese. I encourage you if you're listening on Apple iTunes, go check out my YouTube channel or my rumble channel so you can see this guy in the flesh, but I love him. He goes a lot of places with me. And it's very important part of my life. And so I want to make sure that he is getting the proper nutrients. So this is why I have doctor Dennis black supplement for fluffy that I just add, I sprinkle onto his food every single day, because then I know he's getting the digestive enzymes. He's getting the minerals. He's getting the probiotics. All the things that he needs to have a long and healthy, happy life. Well, hopefully I will. A little bit responsible for some of that happiness, right, buddy. Anyway, I encourage you to check it out. Doctor Dennis black has a wonderful offer for free trial bag for Friends of mine, Friends of this show fans of this show. I'm going to include this link below in the show notes. But go to rough greens dot com today. Are you FF green's dot com today? Are you FF greens dot com today? Get your free trial back. It's really worth it. This is a wonderful supplement. Your dog will thank you. I promise. And your dog will love it. I mean, I'd be shocked. If it was any other way, because I know how much this guy I know how much he loves it, so I'm pretty sure your dog will as well. Anyway, back to what's happening there in Washington, D.C., as I keep him right here on my lap, I might as well, right? These little animals, they're pretty special. They're pretty special. Anyway, you've got chemical McCarthy planning some big changes. Now that he's going to be Speaker of the House. And it looks like Adam Schiff. And perhaps some of these others, like AOC, they're on the skids when it comes to the house Intel committee. As they should be, I mean, when you think about some of the things that have been done, who's the other one, the one that had the friendship with the lovely young woman. Fang fang, was it? From China, that's kind of something I wish I could forget. Anyway, we can't. I would argue rather compromise position there because she is alleged to have been a Chinese spy. Kind of strange to him to have him on the foreign affairs community here in the Intel committee. So I think that you're going to see a big revamp coming of some of these committees where there are sensitive positions and you have people that maybe don't like Israel or have had questionable relationships with people like fang thing. Are going to come into question and as they should. And that's going to result in some changes. Look, I think we need more responsibility in Washington. I really do. I think that people are shooting off their mouse in ways that are unbecoming, frankly, to themselves, and to the nation. And we've got to remember, in fact, who our allies are, one of which, of course, major ally, being Israel. So there's an important some important things that are going to be happening. And I'd say, in that sense, very good things that are going to be happening. But they're not going to go down without a fight. So gear up, be ready. In the meantime, let's all look forward to some Thanksgiving Thanksgiving which, by the way, we're going to talk about this tomorrow. Is suddenly super, super pricey. Have you seen the price said the turkey dinner this year? We'll talk about it. Great to have you here. Make sure you go to Trish Intel dot com. Trish Intel dot com to sign up for the newsletter, secure your invites to all our free and great exclusive events so you have to be, you have to be on the list as they say. I'll see you tomorrow.

Dennis Black Trish Regan Army Kevin Mccarthy Joe Biden Washington, D.C. House Intel Committee Twitter Fang Fang Adam Schiff Youtube Buddy Apple AOC Mccarthy Intel Israel China House Washington
Kyle Seraphin: See How an Agency Treats Its People

The Dan Bongino Show

01:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Kyle Seraphin: See How an Agency Treats Its People

"You and I had the same job title and I thought and I know you thought as well because your friend and a patriot that we were there in those jobs to investigate crimes and go hunt for the bad guys Not to investigate people and then hunt for a crimes and make them bad guys That kind of sounds like what's going on with the old January 6th domestic terror white supremacist threat thing which is clearly obviously a problem but clearly being exaggerated for political purposes No I agree with you I've kind of come to this realization that you can look at an agency and see how well they do by how they treat their people And a friend of mine who is a retired army 20 plus years combat veteran a 100% disabled just a good man who lives in Northern Virginia and his name is Brett He worked for the FBI for the better part of 12 years after his army career And he attended the speech on January 6th He went to the stop the steel rally And there's been no credible allegations of anything that he's done that was wrong And the FBI is suspended him without pay just like I in fact they did it before they did it to me And it just kind of tells you that they're going to go after these people And if you follow one of my social media whether it's truth or Twitter he's had domestic terror investigators from the FBI's Washington field office show up at his house more than once He's caught him on ring cam and I put the pictures out And they've been kind of hammer calling him and his wife even though he has legal representation that the FBI is required to go through So if they're not even obeying their own goal internally when it comes to this sort of January 6th excitement that they have and that's why they put so many people on it And there will even go after people inside the FBI that there's no criminal allegations They found a man They're going to investigate the man not the crime

FBI Northern Virginia Washington Field Office Brett Twitter
Ukraine celebrates regaining Kherson region

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 weeks ago

Ukraine celebrates regaining Kherson region

"The Ukrainian military has carried out what they call stabilization measures in the newly recaptured town of kirsan in southeastern Ukraine Jubilant celebrations erupted on the streets of kirsan after Russia announced its troops had withdrawn from the key city locals chanted in the streets glory to the Ukrainian forces and death to the enemy in the capital Kyiv Ukrainians chanted Kirsten is Ukraine Kyiv resident moroz Alina told the AP that the latest Russian retreat gave her hope We love Ukraine we love cursing We are all Ukraine and we are waiting for Ukrainian armed forces to take our cities back We wait for this water and by Russia's defeat The Russian put out from Kirsten has cast a further dampener on president Vladimir Putin's designs to take over large parts of Ukraine However despite the latest victory for the Ukrainian army about 70% of the Carson region still remains under Russian control I'm Karen

Ukraine Moroz Alina Kirsten Russia Kyiv AP Vladimir Putin Ukrainian Army Carson Karen
Lisa Boothe: People Like Sean Parnell Are American Heroes

The Dan Bongino Show

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Lisa Boothe: People Like Sean Parnell Are American Heroes

"The more profound conversations I've had was with Sean Parnell And if you know Sean Parnell I mean the guy is just like you want to talk about an American freaking hero in American bad ASS I think I can spell it out I don't think I can say it Hopefully I didn't get us in trouble Sorry I mean talk out a freaking American hero I mean the dude is a former U.S. Army airborne ranger He served in the tenth mountain division for 6 years he is a veteran of 485 days of fierce fighting along the Afghan Pakistan border The outlaw platoon which is one of the platoon is called that he led is known to be one of the most fierce and effective American fighting units And all of modern American history I mean get this 85% of his platoon received purple hearts for wounds incurred in battle His platoon killed over 350 enemy fighters and some of the biggest firefights of the Afghan war Sean Parnell ended up retiring as a captain received two bronze stars one for valor and a Purple Heart I mean the guy is just a freaking rockstar And I interviewed him for my podcast and I just learned so much from him because I think part of celebrating veterans and taking stock on Veterans Day and is trying to understand what veterans go through when they come home Because if you haven't been a veteran I'm not a veteran So I don't truly know how that feels to have been to war and then come home and have the world sort of pass you by and have change so significantly when you've been out fighting Sean Parnell out fighting in Afghanistan one of the most effective American fighting units in modern history facing potential death every single day of his life Willing to risk it all bravely and show bravely as I mentioned 85% of his platoon received purple hearts including shot I mean that's crazy So he's out there doing that when we're all just living our lives here

Sean Parnell U.S. Army Pakistan Afghanistan
 First lady hosts Veterans Day breakfast, supports caregivers

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 weeks ago

First lady hosts Veterans Day breakfast, supports caregivers

"President Biden paid tribute to U.S. veterans on Veterans Day from overseas The president acknowledged the sacrifices of America's veterans as he addressed a United Nations climate conference in Egypt America's veterans and their families survivors and caregivers are there a spine and soul of the United States The president's late son Beau served in Iraq as a member of the Delaware army National Guard I'm the special day on every day I honor all those of sacrifice to our nation like my son With the president in Egypt vice president Kamala Harris later wreath at the tomb of the unknowns at Arlington national cemetery She said America is a promise of security opportunity and freedom not for some but for all On Veterans Day we celebrate the generations of Americans who fought to make that promise real

President Biden Egypt America America Delaware Army National Guard United Nations Beau Kamala Harris Iraq Arlington National Cemetery Egypt
Ukraine military reclaiming strategic southern city Kherson after Russia retreat

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Ukraine military reclaiming strategic southern city Kherson after Russia retreat

"A former senior military figure is Frank about Russia's military failures General Ben Hodges former commanding general of U.S. Army forces in Europe describes the retreat from curzon as a colossal failure for Russia and says Russian military commanders should have pulled all their forces out of the city weeks ago to put the NEPA river between them and Ukraine's advancing troops Hodges speaking to The Associated Press says he expected Ukrainian commanders would work to keep the pressure on Russia's depleted forces in the weeks ahead possibly aiming for a future push next year for Crimea seized by Russia in 2014

General Ben Hodges Russia Curzon U.S. Army Frank Nepa Europe Hodges The Associated Press Crimea
John Zmirak: America Is Patty Hearst

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:30 min | 2 weeks ago

John Zmirak: America Is Patty Hearst

"Talk about the piece that you wrote behind you. People who watch this on video can see behind you the image of a young Patty Hearst, symbiote, the symbionese Liberation Army in the 70s when we were kids kidnapped her. She was of extremely wealthy heiress. And people who are younger wouldn't know this, but something happened. Her captors sort of brainwashed her into thinking the way they were thinking. So that she sided with the people who tortured and raped and kidnapped her. And it's called Stockholm syndrome. And you've written a piece that's streamed dot org that deals with that. So go ahead and tell us about that piece. Yeah, Patti Hearst was grabbed by a bunch of San Francisco radicals of the kind that formed Kamala Harris, Willie Brown was the political mentor of Kamala Harris. He was also the political mentor of Harvey Milk, the gay activist and the reverend Jim Jones, the left wing cult leader who started that compound in Guyana and got everyone to take cyanide and drink in the Kool-Aid. This ferment, this world of crazed radicalism is what gave birth to the woke movement, which currently dominates the entire Democratic Party and is being posed on the United States.

Patty Hearst Symbionese Liberation Army Kamala Harris Stockholm Willie Brown Harvey Milk Jim Jones San Francisco Guyana Democratic Party United States
Dinesh and Debbie Discuss Michigan's Prop 3

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Dinesh and Debbie Discuss Michigan's Prop 3

"The results of the midterm election were, I would say only a disaster in the sense that we should have done so much better. Biden's policies have horrific effects. People a directly experienced those effects, so it should have been a complete wipeout. It's almost like one of those early battles of the Civil War where Lincoln would say in a sense, you know, why do we finish off the confederacy? Well, yeah, we were able to hold our own yahweh were able to advance a few yards or even a few miles, but we're not even close to taking Atlanta. Why is that? We have a much bigger army. We have much greater resources. And so we need to ask some tough questions of our own side as we think about what happened this week. Debbie joins me and Debbie has some interesting thoughts about two issues that have that we haven't paid a lot of attention to in part because we have strong convictions about them were kind of dug in on them, but they can be they can pose certain election problems for us. Honey, start by telling people about we were in Michigan for an event I did with Grand Rapids right to life was a tremendous great event 1300 people, but we learned a lot about this proposal three, which was coming up on the ballot, and in fact has now been voted upon, talk a little bit about proposal three, what it does, but also kind of the deceptive way that it's framed so that people are, they don't really know what it does. Right, so prop three basically gives Michigan Michigan women. The right to have an abortion at any time in their pregnancy, including 9 months. They also have, if it's a teen pregnancy, they do not need parental consent to have the abortion. So this is, you know, this is horrible. This is something that is a strike against the right to life. But they framed it very, they were very sneaky in the way that they used the language and the proposal. For example, they said that this proposal proposal three was the constitutional right to reproductive freedom. So when you say that, you are in essence saying, listen, the right to your reproductive freedom only belongs to you and your doctor, but it's between you and your doctor. The government has no right to tell you what when you can have an abortion when you can get contraception, et cetera, et cetera.

Debbie Joins Biden Michigan Lincoln Debbie Atlanta Grand Rapids
A Missed Opportunity for the GOP

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:18 min | 2 weeks ago

A Missed Opportunity for the GOP

"I had an opportunity yesterday to talk to quite a few people about kind of their take on what's going on and their take on what's going on is that is that this was a missed opportunity for the GOP. Now, it's not as if the Republicans are in bad shape. It's almost like, you know, if we have an army and we're on the battlefield, we have advanced. We have actually taken territory. If we have the house, that alone will allow us to bootstrap to hog tie to block Biden's legislative agenda for two more years. So think of the things that Biden got through, and there wasn't a whole lot he got through, but he got through a couple of big spending bills. One was the kind of COVID relief package and the other was the so called modified build back better that Manchin in the end ended up voting for, but the Republicans were kind of powerless to block these things. Why? Because Republicans, because Democrats control the house, albeit narrowly, they control the Senate because of their ability of Kamala Harris to break a tie, and of course they have the presidency. You need all of that for a bill to become a law. So what happens now is that the Republicans will be able to say neat or no to Biden. That alone is a very good thing.

Biden Covid GOP Army Manchin Kamala Harris Senate
The Battle in the Suez Canal

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:17 min | 3 weeks ago

The Battle in the Suez Canal

"Now, throughout this, there are some harrowing moments. You almost drowned in the Suez Canal. You mentioned it centimeters. If someone doesn't extend to hand, you're dead because you jumped in the water with, I don't know how many kilometers of how many kilograms of weight on you and you were sinking like a rock. Another time you have to get a soldier off of his knees in the Golan Heights. In fact, the Golan Heights were hard on both you and your brothers, all of them. So it's a matter of interest in war. When you're making that decision to go or not go and this is going to lead me to Iran. What is the, what is the ultimate calculation, mister prime minister? I think the first thing is whether you can maintain a clear head in the midst of battle or in the midst of that enormous duress in the. Firefight. We were at the time at war with Egypt happily that's behind us, but we had a terrible war of attrition and we were being attacked by the Egyptians across the canal to our side. And raiding our people, killing them, killing them wholesale. And the army command decided to send my unit to their side of the canal. And we successfully did that one night and Egyptian military convoy and that's, by the way, not a pleasant experience to see the sea of people in agony and died something that I never and every rejoice then put it this way. But of course, there was great rejoicing on our side, so they said, okay, we'll send you another car. And 48 hours passed between the successful rate and the next one. And as we got into these zodiac rubber boats, across the canal, the as we approach close to the Egyptian side of the canal, the Egyptians dug voxels every hundred meters without our knowing it. And they opened this horrific fire at us, which killed one of my friends in the post ride in front of us. And I

Golan Heights Suez Canal Iran Egypt Army
 Ukraine warns of Russian 'brutality' in eastern region

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ukraine warns of Russian 'brutality' in eastern region

"Russian forces are stepping up their strikes in eastern Ukraine Ukrainian authorities set the region recently a target of Moscow's annexation and declaration of martial law is seeing worsening conditions for residents and its defending army governor of Donetsk oblast Pablo kirilenko says the attacks have almost completely destroyed the area's power plants and that daily shelling has destroyed the region Moscow continues to target Ukraine's energy infrastructure causing power shortages across the country key event surrounding regions are scheduled to have hourly blackouts to conserve the energy that they have as cold weather approaches According to president zelensky's office between Saturday and Sunday Russia launched four missiles and 19 air strikes impacting more than 35 villages in 7 regions

Pablo Kirilenko Russia Moscow Donetsk Army President Zelensky
Russian soldiers enter Kherson homes, dig in for urban war

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Russian soldiers enter Kherson homes, dig in for urban war

"Russian soldiers have entered homes in the key city of her son apparently digging in for urban warfare I Norman hall Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky has suggested the Russians are feigning a pullout from her son in order to allure the Ukrainian army into an entrenched battle zelensky called attempts to convince civilians to move deeper into Russian controlled territory theater Russian forces seize her son city soon after the invasion of Ukraine in late February A Ukrainian military analyst says Russian supply lines to her son have been cut off and resources including weapons and food are evaporating I Norman hall

Norman Hall Volodymyr Zelensky Ukrainian Army Zelensky Ukraine
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

04:10 min | Last month

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"And they taught me about the scouting tactics because at that point we could not fire on anybody unless they fired at us. That was a decree made by mister Johnson and to the military and the military to us and so on. And so we had to entice him and to do that he had a team of two, one flying as a decoy down low, slow, making a very desirable target in the other one up at 1500 feet out of small arms range. They said, but. If we took fire, we would identify where it was coming from, say, 2 o'clock, thousand meters. And then as the decoy you dropped down on the tree tops so that you can't see anymore. They can't shoot at you. And you go and this is where your scalp now you get down and you see what you're dealing with. Was it one farmer that just thought he finally saw his ticket out of Vietnam? Because the NVA or the Ho Chi Ben gave these guys 25,000 P now that was 250 books in American money, but to them. They made a millionaire. And they didn't have to fight anymore. But more than likely, they probably wound up dead somewhere. Before he gave it to 25,000 P and nobody ever heard from him, you know, as the way communists work, everything is so secretive. You don't know really what anybody's doing. Pete, we're going to take a quick break. We'll be right back with much more of your story. We're speaking with Pete cannon. He's a U.S. Army veteran of the Vietnam War. I'm Greg Columbus. We'll be right back. This is veterans chronicles. I'm Greg Columbus, our guest in this edition is Pete cannon. He's a U.S. Army veteran of the Vietnam War, serving as a helicopter pilot. He was just telling us about his scout missions upon his arrival in Vietnam for his tour of duty in 1967 and 68, and so as a decoy pilot, which is obviously a pretty dangerous job, what kind of weapons did you have to fire back if you were fired upon? This is what made it extremely interesting. Now the OH 23 is, as I told you earlier made for three people, but with three average sized people on board, the center of gravity of the ship is thrown so far forward. That you have a ballast bar mounted in the floor that weighs 7 pounds, take that off and you put it on the stinger and the at the very end of the tailbone. And that counters that weight allows for flight because otherwise you pull up to a hover in your like this. You go and you don't want to go. It was that sensitive to weight, huh? Oh, yeah. Wow. All right, well now, to compound things, we put two door gunners in there with body armor, all of us wear chicken plates. You got a slab of armor under the seats, weighs 70 pounds, each one of us individually has taken on about 30 pounds worth of armor. Now they have an M 60 mounted by bungee cords hanging off of the tubing. Of the doors and of course the doors are off the thing.

Pete cannon Greg Columbus mister Johnson Vietnam Ho Chi Ben U.S. Army Pete
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

03:10 min | Last month

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Welcome to veterans chronicles. I'm Greg Columbus. Our guest in this edition is Pete cannon, a U.S. Army veteran of the Vietnam War. That's where he served as a helicopter pilot during a tour of duty in 1967 and 1968. And Pete, thank you so much for being with us. You're welcome. I'm glad to be here. Where were you born and raised, sir? I was born in Germany. I was a post World War II baby. My mother was German. And she had two boys out of wedlock, trying to survive, like most people did after World War II. If you were anywhere in Europe and wound up marrying a GI and he brought it to the U.S. with along with me and my brother. Eventually, after several due to stations that my old man was at, we wound up in gordonsville, Virginia. They bought a piece property there. We called ourselves farming. Ten at that time. So I claim Jordan's real Virginia is basically my hometown, because prior to that, I didn't know where I was. Tell me about your little bit more about your stepfather's service. What you can only call a never do well. He retired as an E 5, although he had made it to east 7, but they gave him the choice of taking the reduced rank and reduced pension. Or they would boot him out. He said, I'll take the reduced trade. Not a hard choice. He was he was into alcohol and gambling and womanizing. He just told me. So when did you join the army? September 6 5 right after I got out of high school. I was walking up the street at Main Street gordonsville and I just got to the pool hall was getting ready to go in and the recruiter was across the street going the other way and he said, hey Pete, I got a question for you. How'd you like to fly helicopters? That was that. Did you already have an interest in that? I did because by a man knew a chopper pilot that used to come to the farm actually. He would illegally land there and come in for lunch or something like that and he got me interested. He was a nice guy. Had you ever flown before you joined the army? No. Where did you do your training? Well, there's 5 months at fort Walters, Texas, where we do the initial stuff, snowbird, then we go to fort Rucker and get trained and tactics and the Huey.

Greg Columbus Pete cannon gordonsville Pete U.S. Army Virginia Vietnam Germany Europe Jordan U.S. army fort Walters Texas fort Rucker
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

03:33 min | 2 months ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Welcome to veterans chronicles. I'm Greg corumba. Our guest in this edition is Cecil phipps. He's a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War, where he was also held for 33 months by the Chinese as a prisoner of war, and Cecil, thank you very much for your time today. You're welcome. Where were you born and raised, sir? Port Dodge Iowa and was there a history of military service in your family? Yes, I had three brothers and two sisters that were in the military. When did they serve? Second World War. Okay. Why did you enlist? And why did you choose the army? Well, I was at loose ends. I was out of high school. I didn't really have anything to particular I wanted to do. I didn't have any particular trade that I could work at, so I was just doing odd jobs around town. So I'd talk to a friend of mine one day and I said, let's join the army. Actually, we were headed for the marines, but I had been in jail for 30 days for vandalism and raising cane around town. So they wouldn't take me. But the army consented to sign me up, so we both joined the army and went off to basic training. Now is that fort Riley Kansas? Yes. What was that like? It was hot. In fort Wright, even in February, when we joined the army, it was hot in fort Wright. And firstly, we went down on a train, they put us on a train to fort Riley from Des Moines and we got there in the middle of the night, they let us off at the train depot and we slept there on the benches until morning and somebody come picked us up. So it wasn't a very good welcome. What did they train you to do? I was in the infantry. And it wasn't too long after that that you were sent overseas first to Okinawa, correct? Yes. I requested overseas assignment when I joined the army because I had never been out of Iowa and didn't know what the rest of the world looked like and I wanted to see it. Had the war started when you told them that? Oh no. That was later. What did you think about that? Request once the war started. I was wondering who I made it. So what was Okinawa like? We had just been at war with Japan a few years earlier. What did it look like then? Like, any other Japanese town, I guess. They had a lot of merchants in town selling everything from soup to nuts to the GIs. Then I looked around. For a boy scout knife. Because it has so many combination tools on it. They didn't have any. So I went downtown and the island heard it must have had 400 of them sitting around on the shelves to sell. They had a pretty good inventory in those shafts. Yeah. Yeah, they had a pretty good inventory about anything you wanted to buy. So you arrived in Korea on August 1st, 1950. I'm told that you arrived on a Japanese fishing boat. Yes. How did that happen?

army fort Wright Greg corumba Cecil phipps Port Dodge Iowa U.S. Army Cecil fort Riley Okinawa marines Des Moines Kansas Japan Korea
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

03:57 min | 3 months ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"<Speech_Male> And I asked <Speech_Male> him what if we <Speech_Male> run into a roadblock, <Speech_Male> what was I going <Speech_Male> to do? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And he says, oh, I <Speech_Male> understand. So <Speech_Male> from <Speech_Male> there, we picked up <Speech_Male> other people and got <Speech_Male> two inch on. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Go back, <Speech_Male> go down <Speech_Male> the Jeep with <Speech_Male> the other ones, <Speech_Male> two MPs <Speech_Male> were standing <Speech_Male> at the entrance gate. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> the one <Speech_Male> MP was looking <Speech_Male> at that <Speech_Male> car being <Speech_Male> so I <Speech_Male> just handed it to <Speech_Male> him and asked him, <Speech_Male> I don't need this <Speech_Male> anymore <SpeakerChange> and gave <Speech_Male> him the clip. <Speech_Male> Got to be a good <Speech_Male> feeling. Yes, it <Speech_Male> did that I was <Speech_Male> through. <Speech_Male> I could <Speech_Male> get out of that <Speech_Male> part of it. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Well, you did <Speech_Male> go back to Korea, and <Speech_Male> this will be our final <Speech_Male> question. You went back to Korea <Speech_Male> many years later in <Speech_Male> 2019. <Speech_Male> What stands <Speech_Male> out most to <Speech_Male> you from that trip <Speech_Male> and this <Speech_Male> could be it. But I also <Speech_Male> want to get your thoughts <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> what it was like <Speech_Male> to see how different <Speech_Male> and how much more <Speech_Male> advanced South Korea is <Speech_Male> the North <SpeakerChange> Korea. <Speech_Male> The South <Speech_Male> Korean people <Speech_Male> were very <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> appreciative <Speech_Male> of what we did <Speech_Male> and what we <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> have accomplished <Speech_Male> for them and it was <Speech_Male> beautiful to <Speech_Male> see <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> their road <Speech_Male> system <Speech_Male> and their maintenance <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> and the buildings <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> everything <Speech_Male> like this <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> courtesy that <Speech_Male> my <Speech_Male> wife and I <Speech_Male> received that <Speech_Male> they just <Speech_Male> could not <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> do more <Speech_Male> force <Speech_Male> because they <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> do appreciate <Speech_Male> our <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> sacrifices <Speech_Male> that we <Speech_Male> did go through to <Speech_Male> get there. <Speech_Male> And I <Speech_Male> was really <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> impressed <Speech_Male> by <Speech_Male> everything <Speech_Male> we went <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> while I was <Speech_Male> there. We went <Speech_Male> up to the DMZ <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and walked <Speech_Male> into the <Speech_Male> building <Speech_Male> where the <Speech_Male> negotiations <Speech_Male> had <Speech_Male> taken place. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> walked <Speech_Male> inside and there <Speech_Male> was a big desk <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> where chairs on <Speech_Male> this side <Speech_Male> and chairs on the <Speech_Male> other side of that <Speech_Male> desk. <Speech_Male> And we <Speech_Male> were told that when <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you sat <Speech_Male> in the chairs on <Speech_Male> this side, you were in <Speech_Male> South Korea <Speech_Male> when you went around <Speech_Male> the table and <Speech_Male> set <Speech_Male> chairs on the <Speech_Male> other side, you were in <Speech_Male> North Korea. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So we couldn't <Speech_Male> resist <Speech_Male> the walking around <Speech_Male> that desk <Speech_Male> and setting. <Speech_Male> On <Speech_Male> the back of the room, <Speech_Male> there <Speech_Male> was a door <Speech_Male> where the <Speech_Male> bolts on <Speech_Male> it and <Speech_Male> bars and <Speech_Male> everything <Speech_Male> that was <Speech_Male> in North Korea <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Opening <Speech_Male> of that for a Roman <Speech_Male> back. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> so that <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> very <Speech_Male> interesting, <Speech_Male> but. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They just <Speech_Male> did everything they <Speech_Male> could to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> help you, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> my wife <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> using a <Speech_Male> cane and everything <Speech_Male> and they <Speech_Male> made sure <Speech_Male> that she was <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> helped <Speech_Male> and walking and <Speech_Male> a lot of the <Speech_Male> places <Speech_Male> of interest <Speech_Male> that they <Speech_Male> taken us <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> pointed out <Speech_Male> they had people <Speech_Male> on the <Speech_Male> bus <Speech_Male> talking <Speech_Male> about points of <Speech_Male> interest and things <Speech_Male> in any questions <Speech_Male> that you <Speech_Male> had and they <Speech_Male> did everything <Speech_Male> in the world to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> help <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Well, mister sharp, it's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> been an honor to speak with <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you today, sir. We thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you deeply for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> your service and we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thank you for sharing your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> story with us today. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I think you appreciate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jim sharp <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is a U.S. Army veteran <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the Korean War <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> serving with the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> U.S. first <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cavalry division <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> within the U.S. Army. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Greg, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and this is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> veterans

Korea North Korea U.S. Army U.S.
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

05:07 min | 3 months ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Jim, let's pause right there. We'll be right back with much more of our story right here on veterans chronicles. I'm Greg corumba. Please stay with us. This is veterans chronicles. I'm Greg corumba. Our guest in this edition is Jim sharp. He's a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War, where he served in the U.S. Army cavalry. And Jim, we talked about your first experiences in combat, one thing we didn't quite specify is what weapon you were carrying. So what weapon did you have? I had a BAR every new man coming in got a BAR and then he had a choice of carrying the ammo for browning. Weapon or carrying the weapon, I chose to carry the weapon that fires 20 rounds, and when you carry it, you sling it over your shoulder and then it's got a tripod on it and you put your fingers on the tripod hair so it balances on your shoulder. If you run into a problem and I need some more firepower other than a rifle or a carving, well then it comes in to play because like SETI, you can put 20 rounds of continuing fire on an enemy and it causes a great deal of destruction of power. And then after that, new man came along so I got rid of it and then I had a M1 grand. And it has 8 rounds, and that is a wonderful weapon for the army. They only problem they had with it was on that last round that you shoot in it. The clip goes ping and it makes a noise about like that and the enemy got to know when that painting went that you were out of ammo shooting Adam at that particular time.

Greg corumba Jim sharp U.S. Army cavalry Jim U.S. Army browning SETI army Adam
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

03:15 min | 6 months ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"<Speech_Male> We had to take the <Speech_Male> ferry. So <Speech_Male> I'm up there <Speech_Male> on top of the world, <Speech_Male> man. I'm gone. <Speech_Male> God, <Speech_Male> get me off this <Speech_Male> bridge. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> thing's gonna follow. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So I came down to coronado <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> I was <Speech_Male> supposed to go to Texas. <Speech_Male> For <Speech_Male> my <Speech_Male> last <Speech_Male> duty station. <Speech_Male> Fort <Speech_Male> hood. <Speech_Male> To <Speech_Male> train <Speech_Male> guys <Speech_Male> to go to Vietnam. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So I called The <Speech_Male> Pentagon and I talked <Speech_Male> to I <Speech_Male> talked to a major <Speech_Male> can't <Speech_Male> even remember his name <Speech_Male> now. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And he was impersonal. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I gave him <Speech_Male> all the information he <Speech_Male> needed to know and I <Speech_Male> said, major, I don't <Speech_Male> not want to go <Speech_Male> to fort <Speech_Male> hood, Texas and <Speech_Male> train anybody to go <Speech_Male> die. <Speech_Male> Send <Speech_Male> me back. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'll <Speech_Male> go back. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> He goes, <Speech_Male> you know what? I think we <Speech_Male> need to talk about this <Speech_Male> first. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> he said, if I can get you <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> duty <Speech_Male> station, <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> acceptable to you. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Would you <Speech_Male> take that? <Speech_Male> I said, <Speech_Male> where <Speech_Male> are you thinking? He <Speech_Male> goes, where are you thinking? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I said, find me <Speech_Male> something in California. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Two days later, <Speech_Male> that was on a <Speech_Male> Friday. So it's <Speech_Male> Monday. <Speech_Male> He calls me. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> says, I'm sending <Speech_Male> your orders <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to this place <Speech_Male> up in <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> San Pedro. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> is you go up there, <Speech_Male> you drive up <Speech_Male> there <Speech_Male> next week. <Speech_Male> And you <Speech_Male> talk <Speech_Male> to the <Speech_Male> guy up there. If you <Speech_Male> want the job, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you got it. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And that's <Speech_Male> where I spent my last <Speech_Male> 7 <SpeakerChange> or 8 months. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> 9 months, whatever it <Speech_Male> was. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Up in <Speech_Male> San Pedro. <Speech_Male> Guess what I was doing? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What? <Speech_Male> Oh, come on, yes. <Speech_Male> You <SpeakerChange> get three <Speech_Male> guesses in the first two, <Speech_Male> don't count. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Communications. <Speech_Male> Put me <Speech_Male> in a calm center. <Speech_Male> Put <Speech_Male> me in a top secret <Speech_Male> calm center <Speech_Male> and said, <Speech_Male> so this is your <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> MOS. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Guys. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I haven't seen a <Speech_Male> crop top machine. <Speech_Male> Two years. <Speech_Male> You know, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it all worked out, <Speech_Male> believe me. It was <Speech_Male> better than fort <SpeakerChange> hood. <Speech_Male> It was better <Silence> than Fortnite <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> now that I look back <Speech_Male> on it, it <SpeakerChange> was a heck of a <Speech_Male> lot better going <Speech_Male> back to Vietnam. <Speech_Male> So <SpeakerChange> yeah, <Speech_Male> yeah. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Terry, <Speech_Male> I can't thank you enough <Speech_Male> for your <Speech_Male> service to our country. <Speech_Male> I know <Speech_Male> it hasn't been easy to tell your <Speech_Male> story today. So <Speech_Male> I want to thank you <Speech_Male> for doing that as well. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I know our <Speech_Male> viewers and our listeners <Speech_Male> will <Speech_Male> appreciate it and <Speech_Male> get a better sense <Speech_Male> of what <SpeakerChange> it was like to <Speech_Male> serve there and we thank you <Speech_Male> for that. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I just hope <Speech_Male> nobody else has to <Speech_Male> go. But <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it <Speech_Male> happens. <Speech_Male> And it's <Speech_Male> going to happen. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I appreciate <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you taking the <Speech_Male> time. <Speech_Male> This wasn't <Speech_Male> easy coming in here. I can tell. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Music_Male> It makes me <Speech_Music_Male> appreciate you even more. <Speech_Music_Male> So thank you. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Terrence buckle is <Speech_Music_Male> a U.S. Army veteran <Speech_Music_Male> of the <Speech_Music_Male> Vietnam War. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm Greg corris. <Speech_Music_Male>

San Pedro Texas Vietnam California U.S. Army Greg corris
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

05:35 min | 6 months ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Welcome to veterans chronicles. I'm Greg, honored to be joined today, aboard the USS midway in San Diego, California, by Terrence Buckley, Terry is a U.S. Army veteran of the Vietnam War, spent 20 months in country and served as a sergeant ultimately in the U.S. Army. And sir, thank you very much for your time today. Sure. Where were you born and raised, sir? I was born in Florida was raising the U.S. Air Force. So you're a military brat. I am. What is your dad doing in the service? He was a B 36 pilot. And was he in World War II or Korea? He was in World War II, Korea. When he was finally got out of the air force, he flew for the CIA. Oh, I'm not supposed to say that. Yeah. Air America. It's probably declassified by now. I'm sure it is. Hopefully. So was his service influential in, well, no, actually, I know this because you were drafted unlike others drafted. He actually told me what I really needed to do because the draft was coming down in 68 was to go and enlist in the army, didn't think the air force was a good idea. In the army and go to flight school. And I did and I didn't. Obviously, I got drafted first..

Terrence Buckley U.S. Army Korea Greg U.S. Air Force Terry San Diego Vietnam California Air America air force Florida CIA army
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

03:39 min | 8 months ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"And you <Speech_Male> also, we carried <Speech_Male> a little package <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> bird shot because <Speech_Male> if you went down the <Speech_Male> jungle or you <Speech_Male> stand better chance <Speech_Male> of shooting something with <Speech_Male> a shot in <Speech_Male> it than you would with <Silence> a slug, <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> you couldn't feed <Speech_Male> those in through the <Speech_Male> chamber. <Speech_Male> In the weapon <Speech_Male> itself, <Speech_Male> so I <Speech_Male> always slipped <Speech_Male> one of those <Speech_Male> thing <Silence> into the chamber <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> with ball <Speech_Male> ammunition, <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> would slam it in <Speech_Male> so that <Speech_Male> if I needed <Speech_Male> the ball ammunition, <Speech_Male> all I had to do was fan <Silence> that thing and throw <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> one shelled out and <Silence> a good round would <Silence> go in. <Speech_Male> Well, <Speech_Male> I'd forgotten it that <Speech_Male> round was in there <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> being out in the water <Speech_Male> all of the <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> cardboard <Speech_Male> had <Speech_Male> opened up and all the shot <Silence> had ran <SpeakerChange> out. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So when I pulled my <Speech_Male> gun out and put it <Speech_Male> on <SpeakerChange> like <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> maybe three <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> feet behind it. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Kicked <Silence> off around and it <Speech_Male> went <Speech_Male> about that <Speech_Male> loud <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and all it did <Speech_Male> was hitting <Speech_Male> the back of the head with <Speech_Male> the water paper. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> all it <Speech_Male> is pissing him off. <Speech_Male> He turned <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> around and he chopped that <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> thing outside <Silence> behind. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> said American, then <Speech_Male> I saw <Speech_Male> he was <Speech_Male> in Japanese. The <Silence> Americana Americana <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and he said in <Speech_Male> perfect English. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Why the hell <Speech_Male> did you say you were American? <Speech_Male> After <Speech_Male> flying in World War <Speech_Male> II, Dahl would <Speech_Male> return to the reserves. <Speech_Male> Only <Speech_Male> to be called back <Silence> to fly in Korea. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Years after his service, <Speech_Male> Dahl was awarded <Speech_Male> the silver star <Speech_Male> and the Purple <Speech_Male> Heart for his <Silence> service in World War <Speech_Male> II. And <Speech_Male> he describes <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> what that means to <Speech_Male> him. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> He take a picture of <Speech_Music_Male> it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I appreciate you getting <Speech_Male> the silver star. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> I didn't do <Speech_Male> anything more than anybody <Speech_Male> else. <Speech_Male> I was a young <Speech_Male> kid. I <Speech_Male> shot down my first airplane <Silence> for his old enough <Speech_Male> to buy a drink. <Speech_Male> And I just <Speech_Male> I got paid <Speech_Male> for flying airplanes. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And if I <Speech_Male> got silver tired <Silence> along something, <Speech_Male> helping <Speech_Male> my <Speech_Male> comrades in arms, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> well, I appreciate that. <Speech_Male> Just like I got <Speech_Male> the Purple Heart for <Speech_Male> taking around <Speech_Male> or I shouldn't have taken. <Speech_Male> So <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Male> appreciate that again. <Speech_Male> Looking back on <Speech_Male> his illustrious career, <Speech_Male> PJ <Speech_Male> doll is proud to <Speech_Male> be named among the Patriots <Speech_Male> who honorably <Silence> serve their <Speech_Music_Male> country. And <Speech_Male> he says <SpeakerChange> that <Silence> is what he is most <Speech_Male> proud of. <Speech_Male> I guess I'm <Speech_Male> very proud that <Speech_Male> I had the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> opportunity <Silence> to serve my <Speech_Male> country. <Speech_Music_Male> This <Speech_Music_Male> sounds a <SpeakerChange> little <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> unusual <Speech_Male> that I <Speech_Male> would say that <Speech_Male> about myself <Speech_Male> and I don't like <Speech_Male> to do that, <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> I just say <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's a privilege for me <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that I <Speech_Male> joined <Speech_Male> that category <Speech_Male> of patriots. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I became one <Speech_Male> of them <SpeakerChange> who <Speech_Male> were the greatest country in <Speech_Male> the world, and <Silence> some of <Speech_Male> us <Silence> sacrificed their lives <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and a lot <Speech_Male> of sacrifice to <Speech_Male> other things. <Speech_Male> In order to preserve <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> our <Speech_Male> country, we could <Speech_Male> maybe end up speaking <Speech_Male> Japanese or German <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> if we hadn't <Speech_Male> performed. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> I'm proud <SpeakerChange> that I'm a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> member of that <Speech_Male> patriotic group. <Speech_Music_Male> PJ doll, <Speech_Music_Male> a U.S. Army <Speech_Music_Male> air corps veteran <Speech_Music_Male> of the Pacific theater <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the Second World <Speech_Music_Male> War. He <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> eventually rose to the rank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of colonel <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the U.S. Air Force. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Greg Columbus, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and this <Music> <Advertisement> is veterans <Music> chronicles. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male>

Korea Patriots patriots U.S. Army Greg Columbus U.S. Air Force
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

05:57 min | 8 months ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"On the task at hand. It didn't change a little bit at all, really. As you moved up, you started out flying wing, flying on somebody's wing. And as we became more experienced, you moved up and became an element leader, and you had a wingman. Then you sometimes went up and became, you could lead the whole squadron. And nobody really cared if you were a lieutenant or a captain as you went up that great. So you and your responsibilities and the squadron were purely based on your experience. We will have more from World War II veteran PJ Dahl after a short break. I'm Greg Columbus, and this is veterans chronicles. Welcome back to veterans chronicles. I'm Greg corumba. Our guest in this edition is PJ doll, a U.S. Army air corps veteran of the Pacific theater in World War II. He later served many years in the U.S. Air Force, rising to the rank of colonel. When doll got into sticky situations against the Japanese zeros, his favorite move was to use the two engine design of the P38 to his advantage..

PJ Dahl Greg Columbus Greg corumba PJ doll U.S. Army air corps Pacific theater U.S. Air Force
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

05:24 min | 8 months ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Chronicles, I'm Greg corumba. Our guest in this edition is PJ doll. A U.S. Army air corps veteran of the Pacific theater in World War II. Mister Dahl served in the 475th fighter group, and later served many years in the U.S. Air Force, earning the rank of colonel. Born in Saskatchewan, Canada, Dahl moved to Seattle with his family before his second birthday, and was raised in that area. From a young age, Dahl recalls having an interest in flying. Here he remembers reading about the great red baron and other heroes of the air. My father was a diesel engineer for a tugboat company in Seattle and every summer he was executive there, but every summer he would take we would haul oil to Alaska in those days they didn't have any oil up there and now of course they're probably not like crazy, but we would haul two bars up there and I would go along with humans as Euler had to oil the engines and these lenses. And then I had a I had a magazine and I was always reading about the red bear and all those that Pope magazines and stuff. That's my only interest in aviation I wouldn't fly before that. After Dahl enlisted in the army National Guard, his unit was recalled in response to the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor. Dahl was then moved to a base in Tacoma, where he was able to earn his high school diploma. When I was in high school as a junior, a lot of us joined the National Guard there was a 41st infantry division. They got recalled to hostilities starting to get going, they called that unit into active duty. Into, I was in Seattle to go into high school there. And they went, we recalled active duty, and we were stationed at fort Lewis Washington, which is adjacent to the town of Tacoma, which is just south of Seattle. And I was able to go to night school in Tacoma to get my finish my high school education and I was able to go and graduate with my high school class in Seattle in 1939. While at the base, Dahl was informed of an opportunity to apply for aviator cadet training. He was instantly intrigued and began working toward the qualifications needed for that assignment. The reason I got into aviation cadet training was that being a member of the 41st infantry division we were at on maneuvers in fort Lewis Washington write adjacent to that is mccord Air Force Base where they had the airplanes flying of course. And we came in from a maneuver one day after being out in the field for about four or 5 days and rigging wet from The Rain and one thing and other digging foxholes and.

Dahl Greg corumba U.S. Army air corps Pacific theater Mister Dahl Seattle Tacoma U.S. Air Force Saskatchewan baron army National Guard Alaska fort Lewis Canada Pearl Harbor National Guard Washington 41st infantry division mccord Air Force Base
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

05:53 min | 10 months ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"And so then when you reconnected, they were kind of moments of flashes of anger and that sort of thing, did you think that was still part of that original personality or were you starting to kind of see at that point that this is changing a lot? In those early days, I was still dealing with my own reintegration as well. And I was dealing with a lot of flashes of anger. And so many of the other soldiers that had come home with us from the Middle East were exhibiting symptoms of post traumatic stress of some kind. So trouble sleeping and angry outbursts and hyper aware of potential threats. So since that was kind of my normal for me and for other soldiers that I had come home with, I didn't see it initially as abnormal for Brian either. Okay, we'll take a short break. Come back and continue this conversation in just a moment on veterans chronicles. Our guest this week on veterans chronicles is Kayla Williams, she's a veteran of the Iraq War, 101st airborne division in the U.S. Army, her most recent book is plenty of time when we get home, love and recovery in the aftermath of war. And Kayla obviously much of this book deals with both of you dealing with the severe traumatic brain injury that Brian dealt with, but just before the break you were talking about how it was tough to pick up on some of the problems he was having as a result of your own. Transition and reintegrating back into American society..

Kayla Williams Middle East Brian 101st airborne division U.S. Army Iraq Kayla American society
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

05:27 min | 10 months ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"I guess this week on veterans chronicles is Kayla Williams, she is a veteran of the U.S. Army, an Iraq War veteran served in the 101st airborne division. She's the author of two different books. One is, love my rifle more than you, young and female in the U.S. Army. The other is plenty of time when we get home. Love and recovery in the aftermath of war. Kayla, thank you very much for your time today. Thanks for having me. Let's start with your decision to join the army. It wasn't your original plan. I do everything backwards. So I actually went to college got my undergraduate degree, worked for a couple of years, did all the things you're supposed to do in your early 20s, had a steady boyfriend, bought a car, even bought a house. And then I lost my job and was kind of flailing around trying to figure out what to do next. I wanted money for graduate school. I wanted to challenge myself. I got my undergraduate in English literature, reading books is what I do for fun. It's my favorite thing, so it kind of felt like I cheated. They gave me a college degree for doing my hobby. And I wanted to do something outside of my comfort zone. I felt like I was digging myself a rut, just doing what I was supposed to do and not choosing any of it, just kind of rolling along. And so the military was away for me to get money for college, genuinely challenge myself and also give back to the larger community. My mom was a single mom when I was a kid and we were on food stamps a few times. So we're paying that debt to society. It was really important to me. And learning any language was important to you as well. Yeah, when I started looking at potential jobs, I found that the army would pay me to learn a foreign language instead of me having to pay somebody else to teach me one. So I thought that was a really great opportunity. And I got you some expertise in the Middle East as well. Correct. Yeah, it was just computer generated number, random chance needs the army that I ended up in Arabic as opposed to Korean or Chinese, the other two big languages when I started my training. And it was while I was learning Arabic at the defense language institute that 9 11 happened. And it became immediately clear that my military career was going to be very different than it might have been otherwise. It was no longer a question of whether or not I would ever go to war just when and where. And when were you sent to Iraq? I was part of the initial invasion of Iraq in March of 2003 as part of the 101st airborne division air assault. And a couple months later, when you met your eventual husband, correct? Yes..

Kayla Williams U.S. Army 101st airborne division army Kayla Iraq defense language institute Middle East 101st airborne division air as
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Fly back home and i remember going to general school maker who was asserting general and at the time and then also general corelli who was vice chief of staff of the army and i said even though i deployed. It was many years before i felt. Like if i was going to lead army medicine that i need it to deploy teff ghanistan. And ensure i fully understood what our service members were encountering on the battlefield after her appointment horror ho deployed to afghanistan. She traveled more than four thousand miles and visited more than two hundred forward operating bases and command posts. I learned so much I learned the importance of taking behavioral health and can custom care and integrating that together. We can cuss care centers across the theater of operation. We actually had virtual behavioral health that went out to some of the most remote sites because there were individuals that literally were coming under attack every day. And if we wait it to get them behavioral health until they redeployed back then it would be much more complicated to be able to treat them so we got virtual behavioral health out there and it was our medical team that innovated at that moment to change the way. Trauma cure is now delivered in the us. We learned so much about the ability to save alive at the point of care. Where our young soldiers were all trained on first-aid on trained on intimation. They were trained to provide blood at the point of injury which really lead to unexpected survival and we had individuals that were injured and in less than thirty six hours. They were back in the united states receiving Level for care at our premier medical centers. I think what it says is that we have highly trained highly educated highly motivated healthcare workers that are willing to on the cloth of our nation. Place themselves in harm's way and take care of our warfighters and what our warfighters are able to place themselves in harm's way because they know that they have the best military medical care that will be there. If they're injured. I think what weighed on me. The most during the years of serving as certain general was this need to have the transformation across all of our medicine as we moved away from a disease model of care to assist them for health and we changed every aspect of the way that we delivered. And i knew that if we did not improve the health of our service members and the health of our families then we would not be honoring the commitment to those that were racing. The right the right hand there was also the strategic bone ability that only twenty five percent of our youth seventeen to twenty three were eligible to serve armed forces and so we had to really ensure that we were helping to improve the health of our nation and so our vision with actually to improve the.

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"And i turned and i went back to my office and as soon as i put my foot in the doorway the whole pentagon just shook and i thought this is it and so as we started leaving i remember turning to susie and i said i'm going to go to the attack site and i wanted someone to know so they didn't think i was missing and i ran to the attack site and it was just this large gaping hole in the pentagon and there was smoke and there were Parts of the debris of the airplane all over and Specialists opole that happened to be outside saw the plane going in and so it was the two of us who kinda united and we just started triaging and taking care of patients and And and really trying to do the most we could to help others. Jojo says her trauma experience proved very valuable and treating victims at the pentagon and she marveled at how everyone of every rank immediately did whatever was necessary to help on nine eleven in looking at Triage it's kinda one. It's your training training. His trauma clinical nurse so regardless of what. Your assignment you default to your basic skill sets and i remember looking at landmarks and saying okay. This is where we're going to put. This tree will be expectant. This tree is going to be immediate. This is where we'll have our delayed Because we didn't have anything to tag them in. So we just did geographical landmarks. We had specialists k. Hill who Was a medic. Had his aid bag home with them. He was on leave and he literally saw the fireball from the pentagon and rian two miles and because he did that we had an a bag. And so we started started. Iv's i remember brigadier general webster actually came up and he said what can i do. I said you need to give me your belt now. And i used that as attorney ticket to start. Iv so everybody regardless of the rank regardless of their background everybody came together To really help the wounded and you know we had there. Were still air threats so that we had to keep relocating our sites because the fbi And others were saying air threats. We need to move. And so we relocate like three times during that time we were able to get some evacuated out than they grounded planes airlifts and so It was just being very agile. It was responding to where the need was It was utilizing everybody. That was there there. Happened to be A chaplains conference. That was ongoing that day so we had chaplains everywhere for to be able to provide psychological support we utilized individuals to teach them how to be litter bearers to go into the burning building After they stopped the burning smoke filled. We had firefighters. Ems that went in where there was gasoline and smoke filled and debris everywhere and there i thought was. How do we get as many people out of that burning building without worrying about whether or not they were putting themselves at risk horose actions on nine eleven garnered recognition from the american red cross on september fourteenth. Two thousand two. She was one of fifteen nurses selected as a nurse..

pentagon brigadier general webster susie Jojo rian Hill fbi american red cross
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Welcome to veterans chronicles. I'm greg columbus. Our guest in this edition is retired. Us army lieutenant general patricia. Hora aho she served as the forty third surgeon. General of the. Us army general hora was not only the first female but the first nurse to serve in this role in army history during her thirty three years on active duty from tending to victims of the nine eleven terrorist attacks and wounded soldiers returning from the iraq war jojo proves she was capable of leading and some of the most difficult circumstances in the military medical community. General horror who was raised in army culture literally from her first breath. She was born on base while her father served the nation in uniform and this born at fort bragg north carolina and my dad fought world war two korea vietnam served in the eighty second and special forces when they when they were first stood up so fort bragg is home and its military town a growing up in a military town in a military family in i would also say a military community Really impacted my view of service from the perspective of servant leadership of really wanting to be part of something much greater than yourself and Appreciating being born in the united states. And all the values that come with that. I was able to follow in the footsteps of my father who came into the military as a seventeen year old fought will or to battle of the bulge was honored. Actually to august ago for liberating saints zehr. They reached out to us after seventy years. And said. are you related to frank dallas. And they said if you are we want to honor him and his family because he gave us freedom and what that showed me is the impact that the american servicemember has not just on the united states but around the world and so i'm very proud to follow in his footsteps and proud to fall in the footsteps of all of our service members who have given so much of this nation after earning advanced degrees in nursing home would put her skills and knowledge to the test in two very difficult tragedies the i was known as the green ramp disaster which occurred at pope air force base north carolina on march twenty third nineteen ninety-four a mid air collision and subsequent crash on the ground killed twenty four servicemen and injured..

greg columbus Hora aho Us army fort bragg jojo patricia zehr frank dallas army iraq north carolina vietnam korea united states
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Because she's very detailed about their training and their operations and how did and so it seems there's twin purposes here one is to make sure the full history as much as you can of world war two is known and also How at that time. A lot of these women were told by the military. Now which don't have a space for you or some other excuse and they were so committed to the cause and the the idea that they could do the job if they found a way to serve whether it was in uniform or some other way or they started when they were very young and Some of them who were resistance might have been seventeen or eighteen. And perhaps they didn't quite know what all of this would mean until the at first let's sing in the club and powell around with a group of buddies and and after we all go as we all go home from the club. We're gonna steal the weapons from some nazis if they left them on their bicycles or let the air out of the tires of their truck and and that it became more serious from there and so by the time they were smuggling jewish children and whole families out of the country it was deadly serious thinking. We're gonna talk more about this In just a moment. I'm greg columbus. This is veterans chronicles. Where speaking with retired. Us army major general. Mary kay eater and the book is the girls who stepped out of line. This veterans chronicles. I'm greg columbus join today in studio by the. Us army major general. Mary kay eater. She is the author of the girls who stepped out of line. We've been talking about this book now for the past several minutes and This is probably an unfair question. But do you have a favorite of these Fifteen stories of the women who Help to save the allies and To rescue People in trouble in world war two. I have a different favorite every day. And as i was them each one that i was working on with my favorite and certainly they have all taught me things too. I had a greater appreciation for the challenges of my own career through learning about what they went through and i think seeing their persistence and their ability to handle major challenges was a real real leadership lesson for me just in reading this and i don't know you can read this book just for the the history of it and in fact i think i had a couple of reviews already. I've seen that said well. The last part of the book that talks about their legacy into today. That seemed like an agenda. Well it is because they did have a definite effect on where we are. They built the path maybe right after the war. That path wasn't followed. That's everyone tried to return to normal with nine million men coming home. We're in uniform and about half a million women. That was a big move to get all of these people out of europe in from the pacific back home and restarted in normal life so it presented its own challenges but they have had a definite effect on every generation from alice marble the tennis star. Who coached billie jean king. Who coached serena williams. Who has helped cocoa goff now. They have touched every generation going forward and that lesson realizing it kind of blew me away. The alice marble story stuck with me. It's the first one and and right out of the gate..

serena williams Fifteen stories seventeen eighteen europe nine million men Mary kay eater jewish first one greg columbus twin purposes world war two today alice marble each one one about half a million women billie jean king first couple of reviews
"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"u.s. army" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Alchemy veterans chronicles. I'm greg columbus our guest. This week is retired. Us army major. General mary kay eater. She served thirty six years in the army and while there she commanded at the company battalion brigade and division levels. She also held some of the most critical communications positions in the army and she was also the top official when it came to the us army reserves. She has now a sought after speaker and is the author of multiple books. Our latest is entitled the girls who stepped out of line untold stories of the women who changed the course of world war two and general eater. Thank you very much for being with us. It's great to be here thank you. Where were you born and raised. I was born in grove city pennsylvania which is about fifty miles north of pittsburgh. And that's where. I grew up any history of military service in your family. My brother was drafted in vietnam and he served for about two years and then left the army but a very competitive kit and if he can do it i could do it. So that was the motivation. That was a motivation. Originally i was fifteen and so you went to edinboro pennsylvania and was that an rotc opportunity there at that time it was at other universities in the area so what i did was achieve a direct commission. At that time they were commissioning people directly into the army. They are now into certain specialties. Like cyber but at that time. I was commissioned into the women's army corps yes it still existed and was there for about another year after i came in. And so you graduated. I believe was in nineteen. Seventy seven yes. He went on active duty. And so where did you go from there well. My degree was in english. I wanted to get into journalism in the army public relations public affairs. I didn't know that that was not a entry level specialty. So I was given instead was the army signal corps and put into communications electronics. So i went to the basic course as a former english major with about seventy five west point graduates with degrees in engineering so it was.

vietnam thirty six years fifteen nineteen This week pittsburgh about two years world war two Seventy seven mary kay edinboro pennsylvania west point greg columbus about fifty miles about seventy five pennsylvania english