17 Burst results for "U. S Fish And Wildlife Service"

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"I'm okay so i got a couple of beers archery but that's about it. Cool okay jimmy. That's great fantastic to to. Obviously you've got a lot of experience in the hunting community. You've you've done a lot of hunting over the years So touch a little bit on about being kind of the only brown face in the crowd. When you're out chasing critters around. So i'd i'd like to jump into hunters of color and i know it's a registered not for profit five. Oh one c. Three and you guys got started last. I guess last summer so and and you've done a fantastic job or promoting the work. You guys are doing our tell our listeners. A little bit about what hundreds of color stands for and i'd love to hear a little bit about your founders about lydia and thomas too so you know just opened up and we'll probably have some questions based on that. Yeah so. Hundreds of color is a nonprofit in breaking down barriers to entry into hunting for people of color And we incorporated in august of twenty tony and became an official non-profit by one c three with our s This last april so pretty recently And we've we've had a pretty solid up social media presence our growing every day And we are rapidly growing so we have Events that are going to be taking place this year In new york oregon minnesota california washington Were looking at montana in also new mexico And then beyond that next year will be expanding to more states And basically so. I mean there's a million barriers to entry into hunting regardless of your skin color regardless of your ethnic background But we are focused on breaking down any barriers that may exist for people getting into hunting the really sparked are I guess this is dr in mission to to accomplish. This was in two thousand sixteen. There was a study that came out. I think i mentioned earlier. I was by the. Us fish wildlife service. That did the demographics of huntin as a whole and It showed that ninety six percent of all hunters or white and That doesn't reflect. What the us or north america's demographics Look like so.

thomas new york ninety six percent august new mexico last april next year last summer north america this year lydia jimmy minnesota hundreds two thousand sixteen montana color california Hundreds washington
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

"Active Particularly the i mean and they make the point in they surgical i The other our trusses suffer significantly from Longline fishing where the fish get caught on the the The long lawn columba's long fishing lawn with multiple hooks on it And then the fish need the surface the albatross dog grabbing get hooked themselves and so significant number of Albatross die cheap like em up. In some small populations. It's quite possible that this will lead to extinction And so for wisdom to chat her way through sydney of the stuff in contribute. Thirty thirty five buds to the next generation at some. it is. Exciting stuff brendan. I was hoping it was a little secret of mind that you would try and pronounce with teams long term current might likely fouled jake of Back i can try and get that. I think it's it's certainly I think you've got to take into account that it some It's the north pacific midway atoll and so the majority of the us fish wildlife service offices who work in that area come from hawaii is a k. k. Come on he's Era was trump. Set you up for be pronunciation out of the park. So what have we have. We got a good news story. I have i do. We'll do yes but don't know what to make of this story britain to be honest with you. I'm i liked the story because it. It does contain some of my favorite topics in the world and that includes boyd's forest dragons the butte spectacular gomez from the rainforests of north queensland It does include sakes. I'm always one of my favorite topics and And some controversy. I was begging for us to have a little bit of conflict earlier in the show. And and maybe this is the place so the story is that Doris a ported leaf. Female boyd's forest dragon at melbourne aquarium Stop laying eggs and on more detailed inspection namely the application. Aww an ultrasound probe By an unnamed member of our profession. it was suggested that this was in fact now not a female but a male and they had been some well Clown fish like change in six to explain the prisons of laid eggs now now transposed into transformed into a mile. Is it And i said to you before when discussing this case that tom. A one of the researchers who was who's published widely on sexual development of comedy Wantonly She said that such an unusual occurrence would require very convincing data And she reminds us skeptical but intrigued. And look i think. That's how i feel exactly like sarah. Skeptical trade deals skeptical button. Trade look can. I could imagine a whole bunch of scenarios that Three lizards in the enclosure sees and So one of them was mile in two of them. Were believed to be female. I could easily you imagine They bring some confusion about who was laying the eggs in that circumstance. old might dodd. And the two females were moved into a new exhibit and doris binged like a mile dragon when she was offered food in the new enclosure and his secondary six characteristics The the thickness of the crowd size of the capella scales. And on general braddock cala took off her white shut up from hundred which is always. She would have been very worried about that hundred programs. Two hundred and fifty nine I don i i. I have my doubts that tom that we've had a genuine female to male sex change but i could easily say a finger on the pulse for this one mac and maybe we should contact mr fair. Yes capability there are more questions than answers he says there are. There are fair comment. Fake come okay. Chomping toil mind story. And it's a bit of a quickie. We did covers a broad range of this topic in episode one hundred and seven and that For those of you haven't listened to episode one hundred seven not Com and type in the search and yourself to get tight site side by topic is a little bit more specific that was a bad environmental enrichment for reptiles in jan role. And we go to summarize subsection of that this way. Count me rack. Environmental enrichment for snakes So snakes in captivity. Why do we do this mike. What is environmental enrichment ample of it and what causative o-negative does result in. Jump into it. Back what is environmental enrichment for those of us who aren't particularly fight with the term. I love using the example of of The traditional zoo cage. You know the pit that was used to house to house Big cats In decades gone past and and It's interesting because that sonny's z. Way to maintain them in captivity by Eat and it might even help. Cape his control parasites and other health diseases but it has bad psychological effects the cats who knows enclosures. The begets in those enclosures developed pounds. Psychological problems by up stereotypical pricing behaviors. They will often develop serious health problems as a consequence and leave the normal behavior behind and fail to reproduce so maybe act aggressively to colts so environmental enrichment is the process of trying to in some ways emulate aspects of the natural environment that these animals would come into contact with stimulating the senses challenging. They thity levels so that.

two females sydney Wantonly six fair Thirty thirty five buds Three lizards two north queensland Doris hawaii six characteristics hundred trump melbourne Two hundred one hundred programs north pacific midway atoll tom
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:17 min | 1 year ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Center for Health Security. Thomas Boy Ki, director of global health at the Council on Foreign Relations. Once again Thank you both for taking time to be with us today. Thanks So much for having us. Thank you for having me. It's been nearly 50 years since the passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973, designed to protect species threatened by development or other consequences of economic growth. But how Well is it working As we stared down the world's sixth great mass extinction. Investigative reporter Jimmy Tobias looked at the Endangered Species Act through the lens of one struggling big cat. Endangered Florida Panther. He's a contributing writer for the Nation and the Guardian. He's also a 2021 Alicia Patterson fellow and his reporting on the Florida Panther appears in the intercept this week. Welcome, Jimmy. Thanks for having me. You're quite welcome. Tell us more about the Florida Panther first. How endangered are they? Sure. Yeah, The Florida Panther is a subspecies of the once abundant cougar. It Z, now the last of its kind along the Eastern Seaboard, and it's facing all sorts of threats, a zbig cat and needs. Large landscapes to survive, but its habitat is getting gobbled up by development. Panthers air regularly run over on the roads in South Florida faces competition from invasive species and a number of genetic maladies. One of the sources. I spoke to my story whose renowned National Park Service biologist told me there's about 150 left in the world. That's it in the whole world 150. Now developers are after some of their last habitat. What's going on there? Well. Florida has a booming population and lots of development. And it's constantly encroaching on Florida Panther habitat and right now the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, which is our country's most important Wildlife Conservation Agency. It enforces the Endangered Species Act. It is considering a plan from a group of landowners in South Florida. Ah plan that would, if approved, allow them to build a string of new residential and commercial developments. In Panther habitat. In South Florida. And how big of a piece of real estate are we talking about here? Well, the plans approved, is currently written, it would allow for development in roughly 45,000 acres of Panther habitat. And you know the plan does have some conservation benefits. It would set aside lands for preservation. But opponents of this plan are very concerned that the development will push the panther towards extinction that it could jeopardize. Survival and recovery of this of this endangered subspecies. Because they would be eating like what? Hundreds of thousands of people in that area Yeah, an analysis by the conservationists. Opponents of the plan found that it could bring hundreds of thousands of new people to the areas well, his cars and and road kill is a leading cause of death for Panthers. So that's a major concern the impact of new cars in the area the impact into people and just the loss of habitat from development. Recent paper in the journal Plus one by scientists in Florida found that you know, the Panther is restricted to something like 5% of its historic range and one Population on and that it can't afford to lose any more of its core habitat if it's going to survive and thrive in the future on so that's the real concern. There's just this species. Is really struggling, and it can't afford habitat loss. That's what the science says, and that's what conservationists are saying. Started out talking about the Endangered Species Act. Let's get into that a bit. What does that act require in a case like this? Sure, Well, the day's be exact, is one of our most powerful environmental laws was passed overwhelmingly by Congress. And then it gives the United States a great deal of authority to block developments that harm endangered species. Basically The message of that law is that no one has the right to send a species to the brink of extinction or towards extinction. And so under the law, the Fish and Wildlife Service has the authority to block a great deal of development from infrastructure projects to any kind of development has any sort of federal permit. But it almost never does. The agency almost never blocks projects, and that's been an ongoing trend of bipartisan trend for many years now, so that is, but Species like the Panther in a pretty tough bind. We think this might be different in this case with the Panthers their hopes that it might actually block it. You know, most of the sources I talked to former Fish and Wildlife Service officials in Florida conservations. Very few of them are optimistic that the agency is going to block this plan, and in fact, the fishermen live service has permitted the destruction of Tens of thousands of acres of panther habitat in Florida over the last couple decades, so its track record on this issue is not great. Does this mean that the Endangered Species Act really? Isn't being enforced right now. Or are there other rules through which it could still have teeth? Many of people feel who closely observed. The official answer is that it is not adequately enforcing this law that it Too often bends to pressure from political interests from corporate interests. You know that it doesn't have the resource is that needs or the political support? It needs toe aggressively enforce this law, and this lot is immensely popular with the American public. Pole in 2018 found that something like 80% of the American public support the essay, so there's a great deal of support among the people is just that the government doesn't have the gumption or the resource is On suffers from pressures that undermine the enforcement of this very popular law. So I would thief, Fish and Wildlife Service not be stepping in to protect endangered species to the degree that Science says they needed. Is that what you're saying? They don't have the will. But you know the rank and file of official Alex. Service by and large is Very committed to the conservation of species on wants to do the right thing in many cases, But what I've been told by the source I've talked. I've talked to many fish and Wildlife service retirees, especially Is that the upper management too often is willing to bend the political pressures you know, out of careerist intentions or out of just none willingness to engage in conflict or toe. To take that tough stand on. So that's part of the problem. There's a cultural problem, I think within the upper echelons of the agency on D yes. Also, the agency is underfunded that many, many people believe that And it just doesn't have the political air cover from Congress and the White House that it needs to really enforce this this law toe to the full extent I can understand that because there's a lot of money involved here, especially when developers come in and want to build for hundreds of thousands of people. That's right. And there's also you know a lot of pressure from kind of conservative pressure groups industry groups that are constantly suing the agency to block a stronger protections and things along those lines. It's a very complicated situation. But you know the bottom line messages that this law that so many people love is not really being allowed to fulfill its true potential. This is science Friday from W. N. Y C studios. Let's talk about how many other species might this trend of inaction be putting in danger? The science says that we're living through this sixth great extinction. Ah, U N backed panel two years ago found that as many as one million species face the threat of extinction in the coming decades or beyond. On DATs happening right here at home. You know, there are many, many species in the United States from Panthers, too. Right whales to stage grabs two salmon that Face a very bleak future, and unless this agency can really get its act together, you know there's not a lot of hope right now. And so, you know, it's definitely imperative upon the public to put pressure on this agency. I think to do the right thing in this new administration. Speaking of administration, Can you recall an administration thinking back that really believes strongly in enforcing these rules? You know, when I speak to a fishing wildlife service people they often look back on the era of the Clinton era when Mollie Beattie was the director of the Fish Wildlife Service, as as a really high point for the agency. But since then there seems to be a trend where it has become ever weaker. And so people I think are clamoring and hoping for new leadership that can really revitalize on agency that is full of great scientists and great people who wanna, you know, conserve. The floor in the fun of this this country. Well, we hear that Joe Biden and his administration is, you know, the new environmental president. I guess we'll have to wait and see how this moves through his administration. Yes, the jury's definitely out and you know, I think We will see how this administration.

United States Fish and Wildlif Florida Panthers South Florida Florida Panther Jimmy Tobias United States Congress director Wildlife Conservation Agency Council on Foreign Relations National Park Service Fish Wildlife Service Alicia Patterson Center for Health Security Eastern Seaboard Thomas Boy Ki writer
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Of September. And Indiana season again in September, 12th to September 27th so I would love to hear from folks, perhaps that have been out there participating in that season. I would love to hear What this weather changes done because it's been a pretty drastic weather change here. In the last several days. I've talked to some of my partners and they've lost birds. The doves migrated with thee. The onset of this cooler north winds that we've been having the last couple days. Others are saying they still got him. So I would love to hear from either side of that fence of anyone's Been out there. But I I would love to hear from some of the doctors that early season is a very, very special thing. Goes all but gosh. I don't know how many years ago was now the job, Bruna. Who was the Wildlife director at the town of Appointed Me is an ambassador to the Mississippi Flyway Council meeting. Because we have been trying and trying to get an early would duck season for years and a day that times T. Longley And I was able to compound data. From a study that was done. That showed conclusively that the Northern Wood duck's did not start migrating into Kentucky until in October. And so our argument to the fiery counseling to the United States Fish Wildlife Service was we wanted an opportunity to harvest our own. Wood Ducks ducks. They were raised in Kentucky, and luckily that argument prevailed front keener 00 Ruled with us, and that season went into effect that next year we've had it ever since, and I lost a lot of fun for folks who like to get in. Early work with their dogs or take kids duck hunting. This is one of the best possible terms to take the Children and get them involved in water found because obviously it's not so cold in the Better conditions as we tend to have in the winter season. So, um, and they were passed along. Finney, You have access to Some local waterfowl and have youngster this showing the interest. There's a great town to get him out there. So I want to pass that along now, yet we're doing open lands tonight. The numbers 571. 84 84 a 1 804 for 4 84 84. This break is presented by Paul Thomas and Moscow Properties Heart Realty. Paul is And a 100 fishermen himself. He knows exactly what kind of pram please you're looking for. He has numerous listings, including Farm's Wildlife management properties end Vacation cabins on lakes and rivers. And he would be very, very glad to list your abdel properties for sale. Check him out at M O P. H a. R t realty dot com for a W. A.

Paul Thomas Kentucky Moscow Properties Heart Realty Indiana United States Fish Wildlife Se Bruna Finney Mississippi Flyway Council T. Longley director
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Mayko had 6 55 on the ring Central News line. The state appeals court rules in the case of a couple from Wellesley, who apparently violated the town's conservation restrictions by cutting down a couple dozen trees to build a sports court. Five years ago, Robert and Sherry Pereira purchased a nearly three acre plot. Of land right next to their home and Wellesley Land had a conservation restriction, which they were aware of, but they ignored it. Cut down more than 23 mature red oak and white pine trees, tore out a bunch of vegetation, grated the land and installed a huge sports court with fencing and lighting. Well, the Wellesley conservation counsel sued them and asked the judge for monetary damages. The judge said they weren't entitled any money. But the state appeals court disagrees In this ruling. They say the right to enforce the restriction encompasses a right to recover money damages. How much money will likely be the subject of another court hearing in the future. Carl Stephen Stub, BBC Boston's news radio and a piping clover chick that was taken from a nest in Western westerly Rhode Island has died was apparently taken by tourists from Massachusetts who thought it was showing signs of poor health. It took the bird to a wildlife rehab center, but the bird did not survive. U. S Fish Wildlife Service wants everyone to know do not interfere with piping clovers, even if you think they might be orphaned as that's not usually the case. Clovers, of course, are protected birds, and there's only a few breeding pairs in Rhode Island. And some good news tonight out of stone and fire fighters getting a call about a convertible that was just shipped up from Georgia. The caller said he couldn't close the roof. He heard noises coming from the car. Inside the convertible roof storage. They found a litter of newborn kittens. All of the kittens were rescued safely and survived. Unharmed. 6 57 Just ahead. We've got the latest debate between Ed Markey and Joe Kennedy. Keep it here. For.

Wellesley Land Wellesley Rhode Island Ed Markey Sherry Pereira U. S Fish Wildlife Service Mayko Carl Stephen Stub Robert BBC Boston Massachusetts Georgia Joe Kennedy
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Open tonight, folks. So if you have questions or comments about anything pertaining to pitch to our life The number's 57 more, 84 84. 1 804 44 84 84 right before break with talking to my friend Judy Roberts to observe a So here's attack on a vulture. That wass Concerned to the dough. She thought it was. Approximate the over attacking or all of it. Judy's understand there was a dead raccoon at the field. That vulture was attracted to you. Is that right? Yes, Yes, There was several out there. But this one was a little bit further, where her baby Wass, and that's why she was coming to protect protect her baby. Cassidy. Did you were you able to observe her on the initial attack? Oh, well, like I said that it took me a few minutes to realize what was happening because I thought it was her baby in her, you know, running around, and then I saw the black underneath of her and then the wings. You know, spread out. And like I said, they were all over the field and this went on for 5 to 10 minutes. At least. In her, you know? Get in the vulture and killing it eventually. But that's a amazing observation really appreciate what it points to Samy is Another indicator that these vultures are preying on forms. Oh, that's either an instinctive response from that dough. Or it's learned behavior, Perhaps She's in jail for trying to run a mile from her fallen Jesus. She's a new mom. And so she's been fun to watch because she she won't get too far away from her. Well, I'm just suspicious vultures may have tried to bother her phone before. That's what I'm referring to you. Tell them Or settle in the city. Certainly. Course to the fact that those are take protecting their young. I've watched him fend off couch. On several occasions. Riches pretty amazing, but it can only be effective if the does Holtz enough to intervene before the couch grabs on because once the damage is usually does Well, it's a great story. I appreciate you sharing it with. Well, I didn't realize itwas my like your was excited over you. All right. Well, keep on keeping on. We appreciate all you folks to wildlife for the sportsmen out here. You take care, okay? June You know, folks, one of things that I wanted Interject here because I think bee on the radar screen if you will. That fish wrong, Lars and our courage A fellow sportsman observing these occurrences to share What we're seeing. Tremendous numbers of these black vultures. Stay here year round now. I'm sure interviews that air out about noticed They become a Really problem for cattle farmers. They're attracted to the smell the afterbirth and or the visual aspect of the cow. Giving birth. And the coming of Bob I am. Kill the hands. And it's pretty brutal scenario because they usually start with the eyes. Evasions. Hardly the more pitiful than seeing the results of that. And I'm not trying to put emotion into being The need to control him. But Us doing this while our U. S. Fish Wildlife Service are providing permits to farmers, they're having problems with these Vultures. And They allow you to shoot him and eliminate him. I'm very, very suspicious. That there's more predation on phones. Occurring that we know. So I put that out there for you folks to take a bear once for Afghan Have observed a strange Have is something That after he cares a lot of study at the U. S Department of Agriculture's doing We're really close to return you this Through the permit application process. That they've got the farmer so Be great for that information be shared back and forth from fish wildlife to us today for obvious reasons. Another problem hard that's out there right now. There. We need a bar very, very closely. Are the cormorant. Ah, the acquired order birds that prey on fish in the huge numbers up. We have data Kentucky Lake and Barkley like right now. There's a lot of folks myself included. That are very concerned the back to station That those corn words they're exerted for game fish in the shallow bays at both of those legs. There are estimates that there sounds a little birds spread out Queen Barkley to be late. They have tremendous rulers nesting sites. And they eat all the carrots pounded to fish. £1.2 pounds of fish pervade Let's just our recent run the math. You're talking about thousands of pounds of fish a day. That these corporate or eating And I've watched him bluegill betting areas. Shell cracked the bids. Preying upon the tools. You have bass there back in the very picture. Be a real study of how that's impractical. Those game fish in addition to the problems that we've got with the issues card I'm of the opinion. It's a serious one, too, arch. Our game fish populations. Very ugly picture. If I'd love to see Studies done out of battles in Paris, and I'm not talking about 3 to 5 year studies I'm talking about You know, Let's look into this immediately. I know that. Day in case the first district director for the league, Kentucky Sports were Has been raising these concerns for some time. Virtually every Syrian president. That I don't There's Baptiste birds, the guides the Jazz bass Certain there of all expressed their served about this so I'm kind of opening this door will for Some study. Ideas about what to do Some of the I suggest one of them has been a to allow folks to shoot up. Which.

Judy Roberts Queen Barkley U. S. Fish Wildlife Service Wass Kentucky Lake Samy Cassidy Holtz Paris Lars Kentucky president Bob I director Afghan U. S Department of Agriculture
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WTVN

"Back now to professor ward welcome back professor thank you mark I just there are so many questions but I'm going to try and stick with the phones in this last segment if we can ease for the Rockies you're on the air with professor ward hello yes thank you thank you much more I can barely hear you Sir yeah thanks for taking my call has been a good morning professor good morning I was wondering if you generated maybe any data or statistical facts they would have to do with methane ice and I'm proud form on banisters and floors in the world and the release of such gas within the last twenty years but probably a writer eleven to twelve percent and what affect that may have on our ozone layer yeah that's a very good question that the stuff you're talking about is called a clathrate funny word clathrates are frozen methane ice one of the aspects that we worry about of course is if we had drops in sea level it exposes methane ice which can there by mail I I'm not an expert on it I know people who worry about it a lot it looks as if that particular stuff has been more involved in past global warming than what is going on now once again I just I know about it I know that this is of a concern but industrial release is far more dangerous and problematic open the classrooms are professor you know so much about what may well happen what's happened in the past and will happen again that I'm surprised I wonder if you've considered doing in essence what Preston did and that is taking your knowledge of science and applying it to a scenario in writing a sort of a of a pseudo science or maybe that's a bad phrase of a science fiction novel based on based in reality well or how bout this I'll come down to your trailer will spend a month together have a cooperative advertisement in time with it I would I would love I'd absolutely love to do that and so again I thought your I am and I'm happy to anytime you want okay all actually consider that I've tried I've been swearing off writing another book I've got four under my belt three more than anybody supposed to have been noted you knows that swearing off is impossible you and I are these it once is there you can't stop I know then the pressure to keep going is really intense if you love it though too I am that's right west of the Rockies you're on the air with professor ward hello Warren this how are you Sir and my brother was trying to get started with your own university he spent forty years coming on Newfoundland Peru yeah going on but and it was pretty calm here yes and he said that that he believed that there was more than the ones in all the Middle East did he tell you believe that they're not the only reinforced before the moon was blown into orbit well that that's probably not true you may I I don't think it's true that there's more oil there than the middle east of the Saudi Arabian oil field searches so stupendous but unless there is a hell of a lot of oil in the north slope but those who took the moon effect happened long before their forests the workforce before the Samarian which is four hundred million years ago and that moon was because as we know now by the impact of a Mars sized object with the earth four point six billion years ago now that a fact you know a lot of us are wondering if there were no move what will be happening to the earth right it really looks as if the moon is our fly wheel that keeps us from flopping around other planets change their obliquity which is the angle of the spin that by calculations by number French people of scientists it looks as if without a moon we would be changing the book with the soul of the equator becomes the North Pole and vice versa over time spans of hundreds of thousands of years or less Vasko strophic indeed all right it is for the moon a wildcard line you're on the air with professor ward good morning good morning hello gentlemen another great show this is a little Madison Wisconsin listening to W. IBA ten AM thank you will ten years ago I was with the department of geology university Helsinki and Finland when I was young in the sixties I work with Nobel Prize winning geneticist Dr Joshua Lederberg like point of term mutator raised for creating while hyper mutation the binding sites in Abadi also coined the term fish and wildlife but a federal fish Wildlife Service well to put in the speech user when the I'm a I'm just honored that art will allow me to speak with a great scientist like you'll the sixties seventies and farm people having to survive living under your they gathered leaves and grass and made soup in the winter time just to survive it was hideous over there will you have a question now you know what you are talking about and art I don't know why you use the term it's fantastic well I have that in my book how to know our origins and hidden history to save our future willing can wait but here's my question to get through icepower early human may have been semi aquatic an aquatic ape now my question is are you a professor ward we're all gonna be loyal Stepanovich Estrada Graphis I have a search them look at them in the Heidi H. E. R. and that they've been gathering from a wind blown dust out for over two point four million years and that these lawyers predict that we will.

professor
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

KSCO Pet Radio

16:27 min | 2 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

"This is a remake of a segment that we did on a really windy and bad traffic day and interestingly they're having that up in Ohio which is why Laura Hakeas is with us. Amanda is Wildlife Protection Manager at the Humane Society of the United States. Those are my dogs getting into a downstairs. Probably because somebody is at the front door I will close the studio door that are. They found a cat who will run from them. Yeah isn't that it's not. It's not the fight and then it stops the fight that it sounds like anything. Good guard dogs though. Well well this is the front door and you have. We have four dogs here and there. I usually have one in the studio during the program now and now they're quiet now. I saw first of all. There's a lot more like on the. Us blog that we now have linked on our home page that talks about hunting related issues. One of the reasons the humane society of the United States is different from say the ASPCA and why Morris Animal Foundation is different from. I don't know who else does what they do. Which is handed out grant? Money is because they are focused not just on companion animals but on wildlife and trophy hunting and all of that so I that was Amazon. Making a delivery so now. I have my studio headphones sort of things that are here. Okay continuing we had there. Where do you want to pick this up? Amanda what am I like you? I have lots of questions for you. But why don't I let you introduce yourself and your the way you'd like to come at it and then Josh Stevens deny who's being co host today and I will dance with you in terms of going down those roads? I want to talk about this new appointment of some someone who's from the industry. You know lobbyists kind of thing. I want to talk about. Why Trophy hunting is evil. I WanNa talk about winners hunting good when his hunting? Not so good and we did all of that last time. So let's imagine we're starting cold right now because this is where the podcast will start and Amanda. Welcome to the program tell me about the HSA US and trophy hunting. Yes hi I'm Amanda White So I think last time it seemed like there might have been a little confusion about the differences between trophy hunting which is what we focused on. as opposed to just you know your average run in the middle hunting practices and so at the humane society we define trophy hunting as a hunt where the primary motivation is to obtain animal. Parts for example head pieds clause or even whole stuffed bodies for display and for bragging right but not for subsistence and so- trophy hunters often pose the dead animal for a portrait Such as for social media And again they're they're not motivated by putting food on the table So I think he needs to society. We actively worked to eliminate the most inhumane an unfair sport hunting practices Including TROPHY HUNTING. Which often uses very cool agreed just methods such as body gripping traps and snares a bear baiting The use of towns to hunt bears Bob Cats Mountain. Lions and wolves Contest killing events and cap depending on fence properties To those are sort of the the practices that we target with our work And what a lot of people don't realize is that trophy. Hunting happens right here in the US as well Each year thousands of our native carnivores There's Mountain Lions Bob. Cats will are killed to obtain a trophy or bragging rights So it's not just sort of you know a problem that happens elsewhere. It also happens right here. And that's what we focus on On nineteen is that domestic trophy hunting that happens in the United States on our native carnivores and here in California. We have recently. I don't know all the details like you would banned the trophy hunting of Bob. Cats for five years for example exactly so it was the bill Last year that we supported that put a moratorium on trophy hunting. Bob Cats in the state it does that measure does allow the lethal movable of an individual animal that poses a danger to humans endangered or threatened species or livestock But basically it makes it unlawful to trophy hunt Bob. Cats until twenty twenty-five after which California could Reopen peace and if certain conditions are met in those conditions would include the development of an updated management plan It directs the Department fish and wildlife to really just adequately study Bob Cats in California including getting a population count Before they could allow the trophy of them to continue. Bob Cats are an amazing creature. I've had a couple of encounters with them while driving a rural roads and stop and watch and it was really interesting and Bob. Cats are cool. I mean I would probably have been afraid if it had been Cougar Mountain Lion but the the Bob cats you know are these giant there in any case they they're very interesting do we have H. S. I say we do. We have any opinion on rattlesnake hunts. Yes those I think would fall under those sort of contest kills where Agadir. Now the the primary purpose is to just kill these animals for sport And Yeah a lot of times. Those rattled rattlesnake roundup. As they're often called are tied in with contest I grew up in Texas. Okay now I don't know if we want to get into this. But his fishing any part of this sport fishing for example. Is You know for taxidermy significantly. We have lots of fishing contest. Now I think they throw the fish back. In most cases do we have any opinion on fishing. Yes so I think not in terms of our trophy hunting mark. We don't focus on fishing We did In Maryland a couple years ago there was a bill that bans killing contests on counters. Raise Which were particularly because yeah yeah counts. Raise would come into the Chesapeake Bay To have young And so often there were contests to see who could kill the most or the heaviest Oftentimes the heaviest ones were pregnant wines and so it was just a very agree just practice and luckily we're able to ban that. Maryland and I think that's probably The only marine species that we've on with our trophy hunting word. That's not that we don't work on marine species outside of that As part of our additional wildlife were mostly focused on protecting marine mammals. Okay I understand now again. There is no problem. Well there is no policy on subsistence hunting. Which is you go out and you kill something you take it home and you eat it or you do something with it. Correct correct yes. We're really focused on behind those really. Just egregious and cruel practices say even most assistant centers Disagree with do we have any opinions on well. Is there anything we haven't talked about so far that we should and then I'll let josh ask a couple of questions if he'd like to but it seems like we've we've pretty much? Yes if it's a Oh one other question. Do we do anything about taxidermy? Would one approach to this not be? Hey taxidermist you can't work on this species for example. Is that something we would ever do? Not An approach. We've taken I think we're remorse focused on policies and again targeting sort of the the cruelty aspects of it and the trophy hunting itself. Well and okay now before I go to Josh. Tell me about what's happened lately in the international trophy hunting business. One of the things is they've got one of their own as their regulator. Now which is the kind of thing that happens in Washington and is yeah. Yeah draining the swamp sure. It is Can we talk about that? Real quick yeah so that was In a Siedman She was a litigator for the party. Club International Recently appointed to head a key office within the US Fish Life Service And so she the club international to think as you know folks haven't heard of that it's one of the world's largest trophy hunting industry groups And their members kill hundreds of animals that are really disappearing from Earth There's a lot of focused on killing those sorts of rare species Around the globe Again for prestige and providing rights So in a statement she led humorous lawsuits against Pushing Wildlife Service and other federal agencies. that prohibited. You know different Predator control tactics and She's really an advocate for trophy hunting for us. The Party Club International And now as assistant director of the fish wildlife services international affairs groups She'll be leading a team responsible for implementing international conservation treaties and protecting at risk wildlife populations and their habitats around the globe. You know at the agency where Whose policies she previously opposed a sued and worked against So it's really one of those instances of you know the Fox guarding the Hen House. The trump administration is not a good friend of. I'm never mind anti trophy hunting. Is that true? Yeah you know There have been a lot of policies to under the trump administration that seeks to expand trophy hunting Just recently The International Wildlife Conservation Council which was a committee That was made up almost entirely of trophy hunters gun industry lobbyists from groups like the Safari Club International and the NRA Recently that group was disbanded Following a lawsuit filed by a coalition that included The the United States as well as humane society international And Yeah it was another instance of appointing this committee made up of Trivia Hunters and industry groups That was looking to guide. You know policy on how the US looks at trophy hunting And so again. It's sort of that Fox in the Hen House idiom repeating itself where Sort of the very groups that are looking to expand trophy. Hunting are the ones in charge of the policies. You know looking to expand trophy hunting Josh Stevens. It's your turn to ask. Amanda questions excellent. I have one. It's a little elaborate. So with regards to hunting for non trophy purposes is there a guideline as to what is considered using enough of an animal that is hunted for example take venison such as dear? Let's say a hunter and I'm not one personally utilizes they're gathering of a deer to only make a coat that is only a small portion of the used that was hunted so is there a policy or guideline on how much of enough of one hundred animal is utilized. That is Is there such a policy? You know we don't have anything Sort of defines like that As the policy with us And again I think important thing to remember is that you know motivations aside. We're also looking at these very cool and egregious methods which are usually use two hundred native carnivores And not so much use to the year in other Typically hunted species Here's a another thing that comes to mind is when it comes to animals that are hunted. I've noticed there is concern for those and this might even be beyond your scope. But would you happen to be aware of anything regarding regulation on types of bullets us? Because I've heard some use lead in that can poison in ecosystem having those sorts of bullets on grounds. I believe we had a phone call about Lead versus what is a copper or steel and California law? Is that something you get into Amanda? It's not something that I personally work on but I know They mean save. The United States is very much opposed to use of of lead amunition. It something We time previously. And it's just because you know. Less toxic alternatives are very workable and very readily available in the marketplace. And and. So it's definitely something that we worked on as well and Hunters though will tell you. It's very very expensive to use the alternative ammo and then the people who are the supporters and this includes. I think almost all of us people who care about say California condors who are being led poisoned because of shots and I think in any case there have been concerns about the amount of lead that is introduced into the environment by hunting activities particularly anything that uses a shotgun for example. So excellent yeah. Let's definitely very widespread drought. The you'll like. We are circling this issue. From about and not really getting into I mean I just feel like this is not the best interview I've ever done because I have a hard time trophy hunting trophy. Hunting is often cruel trophy. Hunting often targets animals that we care about Giraffes Lions Tigers of which there are very few left in the world trophy. Hunting is often very very big business. Actually your question now since that your monologue just prompted a really great q. And that's what is the What are some of the top speed animals of concern that your organization is following? Yeah so on the domestic side. Which is what I work on. We also were crying. You know international trophy hunting through our international affiliate but on the domestic side the species that were focused on our Black Bracing Grizzly Bears Mountain.

United States Amanda White Josh Stevens California Bob Cats Maryland Ohio Wildlife Protection Manager Humane Society of Amazon Chesapeake Bay Laura Hakeas Giraffes Lions Tigers Hen House International Wildlife Conserv ASPCA Fox Party Club International
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Below the poverty line. This is P.. Ns Kentucky Kentucky lawmakers considering a bill that would prevent seriously mentally ill defendants receiving the death penalty a handful of other states including Ohio. Virginia and in Indiana recently have pushed similar legislation. Patrick Dante of the Kentucky Coalition to abolish the death penalty says the bill does not exclude everyone with some form of mental illness from capital punishment. Only those with severe disorders such as schizophrenia. And so it doesn't seem fair. In a system of justice that seeks is to punish someone and also show people the difference between good and bad he says the bill is similar to a Kentucky law passed in the early nineteen nineties that bars people bill deemed to be mentally disabled from being executed. I'm not from Lagaan. The National Alliance on mental illness and other groups have publicly stated their opposition into executing people with serious mental health issues. The Pine Ridge Indian reservation in southwestern South Dakota will be the site of one hundred million dollars. Our Solar Energy Generation Project Roz Brown reports for pianists. The State's public utilities commission approved a lookout solar park this week for property about eighty miles from rapid city to build the state's first large-scale solar facility. A German company will lease the land from the rap family. Lynn rap is a member of the Oglala Sioux tribe who was represented the family and hopes the historic project will be an example for other reservations. And then we know that win. A- dollars spent it turns over over seven times in communities where disease and our reservation talents are desperate for care. The lease agreement is the first of its kind for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and finally our gladys tells us a coalition of conservation. Groups are taking the US Fishing Wildlife Service to court over its proposal to postpone phasing out winter winter feeding at the Jackson Hole. National Elk refuge recent winners of more than eight thousand elk crowded on refuge feed lines for Alfalfa pellets provided headed by the agency Connie Wilbur with Sierra Clubs Wyoming chapter one of the groups joining the lawsuit says the time for fishing wildlife to take steps to prevent the potentially catastrophic at a straw fix spread of disease is now this service needs to start saving out feeding on the refuge now before the refuge kids becomes infected with chronically wildlife officials detected chronic wasting disease in Jackson hole in two thousand eighteen. And Biologists say it's just a matter of time before it reaches elk drawn to easy winter food supplies Wyoming livestock producers and hunters have urged fish and wildlife to keep the winner program in place to keep elk elk.

Kentucky US Fishing Wildlife Service Jackson Hole National Elk Lynn rap Kentucky Coalition chronic wasting disease Bureau of Indian Affairs Sierra Clubs Wyoming Wyoming Patrick Dante South Dakota Lagaan National Alliance Ohio Virginia Roz Brown Connie Wilbur
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:03 min | 2 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Twenty. I Mike Clifford White House hopeful. Joe Biden uncalled his poor performance in the Democrats. I twenty twenty leadership. Vote in Iowa caucuses a gut punch that from the BBC. Their report Biden's Haddens coming forth. According to incomplete results Biden said quote. I'm not going to sugar coat it. This isn't the first time in my life. I've been locked down the BBC ads ads with most of the results declared it in. Monday's glitch. Play Caucuses Pete. Buddha judge Birdie centers are neck and neck. New Hampshire is the next day to vote on February eleventh. Eleventh Meantime Are Mike Bowen reports. I was prominent role in the essential. Nominating process is now being questioned. After this week's delays and technical issues issues Iowa has long held one of the most closely watched events in the election cycle with its caucuses as the first votes taken every four years. But with this this year's delayed results those who want I would've switched to a primary election and later on the calendar amplified their calls for Article Fowler with the Aclu of Iowa Iowa says her organization would at least like to see more improvements for people who can't take part we have concerns about the current format because it's very difficult occult for a wide variety of marginalized people and and many others to actually participate. Father says there access issues issues for people with disabilities older people who can't travel and for anyone who works in the evening I wa Democratic Party said it did take steps this year to make the event easier easier for people with disabilities including an online forum for voters to make accommodation requests an effort to increase minimum wage. For all how workers is a step closer to truth enough ever ballot. Here's Mary Sherman on Wednesday. The Ohio Ballot Board Certified Language for the proposed amendment brought forth by Ohioans for raising the wage James Hayes with that coalition says the Measure Mirror. See Two thousand six initiative that indexed wage increases to inflation would be voting to raise wages. She's thirteen dollars. By twenty twenty five that rate would be connected to inflation so wages would continue to rise with the cost of living year after year as it has been the slower but we would have the higher floor to begin with the current. Minimum wage is eight dollars seventy cents an hour. The coalition needs to collect about four hundred fifty thousand certified signatures by July first to to put the measure before voters in November. This story was produced in association with media and the public interest and funded in part by George Foundation currently at Ohio. Hi on working fulltime for minimal. Wages paid just over eighteen thousand dollars a year. According to research from Policy Matters Ohio that would leave leave a full-time worker with a family. Three about three thousand dollars. Below the poverty line. This is P. S. Kentucky Chucky lawmakers considering a bill that would prevent seriously mentally ill defendants from receiving the death penalty a handful of other states including Ohio. Virginia and Indiana Indiana recently have pushed similar legislation. Patric Della Handy of the Kentucky Coalition to abolish the death penalty says the bill does not exclude everyone with some mm form of mental illness from capital punishment. Only those with severe disorders such as schizophrenia. And so it doesn't seem fair and a system of justice that seeks to to punish someone and also show people the difference between good and bad he says the bill is similar to a Kentucky law passed in the early nineteen nineties that bars people deemed to be mentally disabled from being executed. I'm Nadia Ramleh Gun. The National Alliance on mental illness and other groups have publicly stated their opposition to executing executing people with serious mental health issues. The Pine Ridge Indian reservation in southwestern South Dakota will be the site of one hundred million dollars. Our Solar Energy Generation Project Roz Brown reports for pianists. The State's public utilities commission approved a lookout solar park this week for property about eighty miles from rapid city to build the state's first large-scale solar facility a German company Will Lisa land from the rap family. Lynn rap is a member of the Oglala Sioux tribe who has represented the family and hopes the historic project will be an example for other reservations. And then we know that win dollars spent turns over seven times in communities where disease and our reservation talents are desperate for cash. The lease agreement is the first of its kind for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and finally our gladys tells us a coalition of conservation groups are taking the US Fishing Wildlife Service to court over its proposal to postpone phasing out which interfering at the Jackson hole national elk refuge. Recent winners have seen more than eight thousand. Elk crowded on refuge feed lines for alfalfa pellets provided by by the agency Connie Wilbur with Sierra Clubs Wyoming chapter one of the groups joining the lawsuit says the time for fishing wildlife to take steps to prevent the potentially catastrophic straffic spread of disease is now fishing wildlife. Service needs to start phasing out feeding on the elk refuge now before the refuge which becomes infected with chronic disease wildlife officials detected chronic wasting disease in Jackson hole in two thousand eighteen. And Biologists say it's just a matter of time before it reaches elk drawn to easy winter food supplies Wyoming livestock producers. An hunters have urged fish and wildlife to keep the winter program in place to keep elk away from livestock grazing on public lands data collected by state agencies and NGOs show there is enough natural food to sustain the regents Elkin of a big game over the winter. I might cliff public news service. We are member or listener supported Ron Line at public service DOT. Org Mickey Rickety in the his office is not thank you for that I It's funny. How the backlash has already begun? People texting me and contacting me some of my friends and they all hate this trade now. The thing to remember is deal though is a very likable guy. You Know He. I don't know he's just. He's an attractive player like he's a a young all-star Guy Who can light it up on a terrible team. You know our best offensive player on terrible team. I know it sucks trade. That guy I know it does but the thing is is is that next year when it's not about this year they're the worst team in basketball. They've won ten fricken games..

Ohio Iowa Joe Biden BBC Mike Clifford White chronic wasting disease New Hampshire basketball Kentucky Mike Bowen twenty twenty Bureau of Indian Affairs National Alliance Buddha Pete US Fishing Wildlife Service South Dakota Kentucky Coalition Democratic Party Mary Sherman
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WGN Radio

"We are on track to have the wettest year and and all in all I in recorded history and throughout much of the Midwest but as I spoke about frequently we have exacerbated it where all this high feeling that is taking place across the heartland of America tiling to make it easier to farm and also exacerbated the course with lots of parking lots every time we put a party line of course instrument you've altered the drainage so we really are restricting as I think many of us now or restrict restricting where the water will go with that said it is very interesting that's that's coming out and it's to do with technology which could be a real eye opener for frankly for for all of us and that is a mapping system all the hi all in the Midwest our state by state county by county basis I have a sense that if this can be done it will shock everyone you know literally millions of miles hi we have quite in our underground scene across Ohio in the air Eleanor in Wisconsin Minnesota Iowa under South Dakota in particular most state and that's underground tunneling system has created a never before this thing river of water goes underground on scene and then ends up in our rivers and this is why the fourteen I think going forward you're going to only get worse even if we don't have record years of rainfall we have created the most modern highly interested we've ever had the clay tiles are gone placed by plastic style which is larger change the water faster so it's a little bit like filling repair with all and having an old trainer watching a trickle out we're still in your path Martin grain watching it poor that's what's happening what will range now we're snows in South Dakota that water is going into a tiling system that carries an underground to the nearest road track it's for Kerry the underground into another farmers hi all and the whole system from South Dakota works its way south east from Hyrule works I mean come on works its way south west and it's coming underground rivers so we can't see it but one of the things that I think science is going to be able to do is we're going to be able to we can't see above the air when you're above ground router we care man underground and one that man is done it will explain first of all why the nitrogen runoff is so horrible hearing our fertilizers in this essay is not a case about dumping on for me that's not what I'm doing at all because that I am an agriculture capital all my life it's simply that we have done these things and now we're facing the consequences in the amount of water coming is is this year was a store and I don't think it's going to be the only time we face this in the coming years I think we're gonna continue to see massive flooding coming our way which also then combined with the drainage system is taking place in our the southern part of United States know channelization of our rivers we we we turn the page here and what I'm really saying is that the spring summer and fall of twenty nineteen I think it's going to look a lot more like the coming years then say we did twenty years ago before we replace all these tiles trials for second I want to quickly start and then I will talk about the price on that is taking over southern Florida the efforts of the state of Florida and also now the US fish Wildlife Service others to try to get a handle invasive species which are absolutely changing the face of America and have been for some time but we seem to see it all of a sudden and a much in a much faster way so I'll come back with a story about hi starts what's happening in southern Florida and if I have time I also want to just talk for a moment about the apelo abalone in California to bring them back back in just a moment for the great outdoors this is Charlie Parker most of the outdoor voice of Chicago in America great outdoor show on WGN radio first message from our long term sponsors northwest Indiana Chicago land Chevrolet dealer I was living a healthy life when it all changed I'm Christina twenty six I was rushed to northwestern Memorial Hospital due to an arteriovenous malformation the cost of rain how much after.

Midwest twenty years
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Have a situation where there was a lot of food in traditional areas we did not contemplate that we would have two of the most significant cold fronts in a long time to come through this early moving though from from the situation of birds migrating let's talk about this morning something that doesn't migrate all apple products and I'm sure many of you have heard about aquaponics and it's growing interest across the country particularly in schools this is a program that could really change the way we interviews not only ourselves but our kids to and there's a new video out which I think is probably the best that's been done on this subject and it's called aquaponics look wrong way and if you go to the website at the next withdrawal wildlife foundation you will see a scientifically based how to video which really will give you the ages we are setting up aquaponics either in whole or in the classroom and the purpose of this educational video was to work with classes in school teachers so the aquaponics will become a staple of of classrooms across the country it occurred to me when I was actually looking at this video why not apple products in the home and we could have a situation where what truly unlimited number of households and for you I guess had I had a coupon exist in every house but you could have assistance to Asian where apple products could be come a home grown vegetable garden while at the same time also providing game fish to to fishing game agencies her restocking lakes and all kinds of positive conservation an axe of course if you're gonna restocking version the like you need to work with your state the and are but I have a feeling they would be overjoyed to have to be receiving applications from individual who while are quick fish back into the eco systems Bakul products in the holder akel products in the classroom I think it's going to be a sweeping trend across this country and then maybe even the world as individuals find out that for very little money they can have a sustainable system where they are growing their own vegetables let us in particular through an aquaponics system right in their own house at the same time they are really helping helping the environment so you know if you would and go to the McGraw Mexico wildlife foundation website and look up apple products in the classroom and it can be transferred aquaponics and hold very easily need a how to video describes that only for about fifty dollars you can put together a system that can be your family on an ongoing basis throughout the year with healthy fresh organic produce and it takes up an area about the size of a coffee table plus it's fun to do so I think that we're going to see aquaponics in the classroom take off across the country and there are a number of individuals led by McGraw and others here in the Chicago area dancing that's it's just one of the ways that we can help our requirements and we can help provide food and we can do so in a way that also attach is our kids for the land I think if you took an informal study and ask most kids any school age the words let us come from you might be surprised or appalled at the answers and in this case they could actually say well as comes from from my own round kitchen we grow and we grow it to aquaponics and helping the profession work so anyway it's a it's a project that I think you're gonna see I just take cold across the country or I should say I I hope we see a cold across the country because it really could be a way that we are improving environment and and also really connector cells if you will route ourselves pardon the pun rid ourselves to soil so the second thing that I will talk about this morning is is what is happening in Minnesota this year and Dennis Anderson who is a longtime friend of mine who was writing for the pioneer press when I first met him out of Minneapolis many years ago great article entitled where the doctor will spend about thirty seconds on this because of the tongue in cheek article and he once again said the fish Wildlife Service has reported that we are going to see a record migration of of DOCSIS fall or near record migration of ducks and he asked rhetorically the question well where are they Minnesota hunters or have gone out and they been out in the March for over a month and and they're all saying where are they well it turns out that there was this report out of northern Minnesota where some nine hundred thousand bring next will reported to be located on one National Wildlife Refuge and it's quite the radars that show will credible number bird when they got up from this lake in and fool around they literally was historic concentration of of water column one place at one species ring next Dennis Anderson went on to say listen Markel because according to the official Wildlife Service they're probably only about nine hundred thousand rednecks in all of North America and am once every single ring necked in North America really on this one National Wildlife Refuge in northern Minnesota so he he does look a tongue in cheek article as to who really have a clue what's going on with water from a population actually bird populations in general if you extrapolate it further so if you have a chance Dennis Anderson we're on the dock door you don't even have interested docks to want to read it because it does point out how we how we have left the game officiating season states change regulations and and hunting seasons in a way that they perceive to be the best and worst of all the resource but but hunters don't perceive to be in the best interest of the resource show Dennis Anderson as usual is is a very work while reducing very talented writer and for many years he he has been on the cusp of raising issues in the conservation world weather out water quality Minnesota has one of the best now conservation pieces of legislation to provide revenue addressing the state water quality that comes from Dennis Anderson we could learn something in Illinois from what Minnesota's done any also just has a unique way of looking at things are asking the question do we really do it really now in this case were of the docks I think it's pretty clear if you read Dennis financial story we don't have a clue so Alexanderson has written another fine piece which if you have a moment pretty chilly week I think you would enjoy reading when I come back in a moment I'm gonna talk about those something that is really serious and that is chronic wasting disease and what is taking place and why all of us all of us really should be paying attention thanks to his family back in just a moment this is Charlie potter on the outdoor voice Chicago in America seven twenty WGN it hurts the message from our long time sponsors Chicago land in northwest Indiana Chevrolet dealers this.

thirty seconds fifty dollars
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"He'll be back on monday you want to call in the number is two four four one seven seven seven and while we were on break we had a question right here in the studio and the question from a fisherman was to dave what about the cormorants on lake champlain seen too many of them well. It's an interesting puzzle. The you know <hes> it's as as our bird populations recovering rebound <hes> sometimes they get out of balance and the cormorant sarah bird species that you may have seen the long their long black cenex they're diving birds and they eat fish <hes> and one of the and they're unimportant and and a lovely part of our ecosystem and they can have some significant impacts on habitat they the the waste that they produce actually has the result assault of kind of causing all the vegetation to die so there really are actually one of the threats to comment turns and as their populations have really grown. There's been questions about whether they they may be impacting. Fish populations having other impacts on other bird species so there are actually efforts underway by the fremont department of fish and wildlife the u._s. fish fish wildlife service and others to figure out. How do we keep that population cormorants imbalance. That's great problem that is we have enough trouble with the blue algae and everything else so the list. I read the a little while ago about <hes> bluewater. They're called what you call. Priority birds <hes> <hes> could you talk about what that means. What does it mean to be a priority bird sure the black throated blue warbler leg it. It's it's full full. Name is a fascinating canadian example of this. It is a bird that is in terms of its national or international habitat is threatened. It has some it faces a number of risks that are causing it to be a burr that has declining populations vermont turns out to be one of its its <hes> places that it really loves to be and it's doing very well here so you might look at the black throated blue warbler and think well. It's doing fine for mind but in fact it it means all the more. It's all the more important for us to protect it here. Because it is a bird that's going to thrive in vermont and if we can protect it here we're contributing to the global population of this important species david. We have a call from pete from berry pete. Yes good morning good morning. <hes> i you mention cormorants a moment ago and i'm and just curious when i was a child in vermont <hes>. I don't remember cormorants being around here. <hes> i usually thought of them in warmer waters now. They're coming into vermont or arrived in vermont. Is that a consequence of global warming and if so are there are other birds are coming farther north because of global warming. We're gonna pitch that one right to our guest. I have no clue by thank u. P. that's a great question and i honestly don't know the answer to it but a i do know that there has been a trend in the growth in the number of cormorants there. I'm i'm pretty sure that cormorants have been common throughout vermont in the past but just not the level of the population were seen now and it could be a connected to climate climate change. There are definitely bird species that we're seeing shifts there birds that we didn't ever used to seeing vermont. They're more southern that have begun to shift their range into vermont. There's other species that are at the southern end of their range in vermont who are which are becoming less frequent. You know one of the birds will worried about for instance is the bicknell's thrush so there's no question that we're seeing changes in <hes> in wind snow melt happens when vegetation happens when there's insects <hes> <hes> <hes> blooms and all these things are connected to birds birds have thousands and tens of thousands of years of evolution that have caused them to to arrive on a specific time in a specific location and if because of climate change there are the food that they're expecting to be there isn't they have to keep going they have or they won't come as far so it depends on the species and the nature of their habitat needs but there's no question we're seeing impacts from global the global climate crisis crisis..

vermont lake champlain assault fremont dave pete bicknell u. P.
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:01 min | 3 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And now these Bloomberg sports update the Yankees have got some frustration after being swept in Oakland they had dropped four in a row hitting five home runs smash the Dodgers tended to Didi Gregorius went deep twice including a grand slam of hung jury you Erin judge Gary Sanchez and labor Taurus also went deep James packed to the beneficiary going to for six and two thirds giving up two runs five it's no walks and eleven strikeouts the Yankees a club fifty seven homers in the month of August Morigi news claiming right handed pitcher Corey Geren off waivers in Seattle and to make some room they released pitcher dimming go Acevedo guerriers thirty three appearing in forty eight games a Seattle three point nineteen ERA giving up eighteen and runs in forty one and a third innings the mass struck out twenty six Atlanta Braves became just the second team in history to strike out that many and loose follow that latitude one in fourteen innings Billy held on the go ahead RBI single Jacob Agron struck out thirteen and hit a home run he's done that twice this year Braves rolling they've won six in a row they just take on the season alive stadium Major League Soccer New York City FC against the New York red bulls that when he stadium starting at seven o'clock to buy the devils is engaged to former Olympic ski champion Lindsey Vonn who made the announcement on her Instagram account the two been dating for at least a year the US patent trademark office is rejected Tom Brady's application to take control of that name Tom terrific ruling that points uniquely and and mistakenly to miss pitching great Tom Seaver course the office concluded that giving Brady the trademark might lead to confusion about which athlete was endorsing a product a chance of redemption for free just added what Howard the son a non guaranteed contract with the Lakers with the understanding these disruptive I'll be gone how is that twenty five pounds since last season the B. with is sixteen in five years that's lumber exports I'm David Lewis you're listening to Bloomberg long I'm Jim also the reason you can still see a bald eagle a humpback whale or the California condor is the Endangered Species Act the landmark law that has protected fish plants and wildlife since it was signed into law by president Richard Nixon but now the trump administration has announced changes that will profoundly weak in the act polar bears and seals whooping cranes and beluga whales are some of the animals that are at risk joining me is Pat parental environmental law professor at Vermont law school so that how would this trump overall change the act well probably the most significant changes that ministration is saying that they will now take economics into account at this stage it which you decide whether a species should be listed the statue clearly prohibits that the case law over the last forty five years is reinforce that so the idea that you would include in your consideration the economic costs of course which are very speculative at the earliest stages it just flatly legal the trump administration is claiming that they don't intend to actually rely on the economic data when they make the decision but nevertheless they're going to consider it and disclose it and the law says that agencies cannot consider irrelevant or improper factors when they're making decisions and I would say that the consideration of economic cost has nothing to do with whether or not a species is in danger that's a purely scientific questions so I don't have any doubt that the courts are going to strike that particular aspect of the rule down what about the impact of climate change is that also being taken out of consideration yes there are narrowing the definition of what's reasonably foreseeable and they're requiring a higher level of proof that climate change will in fact jeopardize species such as the polar bear the ring seal the bearded seal the penguins the Wolverine these are all species that are at the very much at risk from the changes the climate changes is creating within their habitats whether they're in the arctic or in the hi elevation habitat of species like the Wolverine we know beyond doubt the climate changes altering their habitats to the point where if it continues they will go extinct it's just a matter of time and that time maybe decades not not centuries so the idea that you were going to raise the bar of proof of land and how climate change is going to drive these species to extinction again it flies in the face of the policy and the language of the Endangered Species Act the Supreme Court in the famous Tellico dam case said the statute is the institutionalization of caution and so the idea is that you act while there's still time to avoid extinction not wait until the sciences conclusive by which time it's too late so what groups are going to benefit from this oil and gas industry fossil fuel industry to some extent users of public lands people that graze livestock timber companies mining companies mostly extractive industries the real damage to endangered species habitat comes from these really large industrial scale extractive industries urban sprawl certainly contributes a significant amount of habitat loss as well pollution invasive species but the really big hit on species habitat is coming from the consumption of natural resources that are way beyond the capacity of ecosystems to recover in time to save the species from extinction Massachusetts and California have said that they are going to file a lawsuit against this revision by the trump administration it is that an up hill battle well it's going to depend on each issue like I said on the economic question I I think there's a ninety percent certainty that the courts will strike that down that at best it's an irrelevant factor and at worst it's poisoning the decision making process and course rivaling up all kinds of political opposition to listing some of the other changes they made one and in particular where there are no longer going to automatically protect species that are listed as threat as opposed to endangered that's probably frankly within their discretion so that's going to be a hard one to challenge legally but practically what that means is species that are listed as threatened and that's the way most of the species are currently being listed will not have the same protections that they have had historically on laughs and until the fish and Wildlife Service adopt a rule that defined what constitutes harm to the species problem with that is that the fish Wildlife Service doesn't have the budget to even keep up with the current workload that they have the way behind they have been for years in listing species and designating critical habitat and protecting them so this is just another layer of bureaucratic workload for which they don't have the resources or the budget and the trump administration has proposed to cut the fish and Wildlife Service budget for twenty twenty by fifty percent and haven't there been some species that have not been saved despite the Endangered Species Act yes the word like terrible sadly has now disappeared from the United States territory they formally occupied in Montana there's still a small herd of woodland caribou in Canada and there's been about eight species that have gone extinct waiting to be listed so anything that you do to further complicate and delay the listing process increases the likelihood that these species are going to go extinct by the time they do get listed the scientists call it an extinction vortex when the species begin to decline in the drop below a critical population mass they're pretty much garner's no matter what we tried to do you mention the condor the only reason we save the condors we collected all the ones that were in the wild to come into captivity and Brad captive condors and then release them that's the only way the save that population that's Brenda the Vermont law school coming up on Bloomberg law the biggest environmental clash in the trump administration I'm Jim call so and this is Bloomberg of course the.

Yankees Oakland Dodgers Didi Gregorius Bloomberg twenty five pounds forty five years ninety percent fifty percent five years
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

13:35 min | 3 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"I'm Mark miracle. Police in Brazil have again, arrested a farmer convicted of ordering the two thousand five percents the nation of American missionary Dorthy staying register Volvo Dow was detained this week after Brazil supreme court overruled a may two thousand eighteen injunction that had blocked him from serving his sentence in the killing. He was taken to prison yesterday. Back and forth rulings in the judiciary of mostly kept out of prison. Ten was convicted in two thousand ten of hiring to win Chan's to kill staying. She worked as an environmental activists throughout Brazil often in opposition to powerful agricultural and ranching interests, the two men shot staying to death as she was walking to a community meeting to discuss the protections for the Amazon prosecutors alleged gov. Oh, ordered the killings because of stings activism. There are troubling signs that killings of environmental and indigenous activists in Brazil are on the increase since the election of alt-right wing president John Deere Bolsonaro three recent massacres late March and early April in Amazon states resulted in at least nine deaths over the period of just two weeks. The violence was exactly what indigenous groups and environmentalists had worried would take place under Bolsonaro regime. Sue Bradford is the author of Amazon besieged contributor to manga bay. Don, Tom and the former correspondent for BBC Branford told Sonali hot car host of the rising up with Somali show that they're still not sure of the actual death toll in the recent killings. We do know is thoughts that was some people on a an squashes camp. This was the one in in the west of the base in zone us right on the border was Danica. Who had occupied this Eric quite legally Brazil's Lewis onto a hoping to turn into appropriate land settlements that there. The landowners who Orion up this lines, and they decided with the present climate Lois nece onto the sonata government that it was a good moment to go in and try and get these people. So they went in they cut some resistance. But they they we think they quite a lot of people off the line, and the government appears to have done nothing. I we think at least three people were killed on this moment missing. And I think this is what is really worrying in the almost. Now, this climb Loris nece since both Tanada Kate power in January. The Landau is in the lumpy field. They got an on. I two of government, and they can get away with these kinds of acts previously. Would it been combated by that by the government? So seeing a lot of on inside was in Brazil in the Ahmanson only this shit, and you could feel the change that people will very castle before they spoke to you. Environmentalist activists will feeling that it preserves moving into a very dangerous phase. So when we've had these three messages did get reported in the press is interesting, they all in areas, which are right on the edge of the Amazon frontier way, the the the land thieves, and the landowners trying to move in very remote areas. So it's very difficult to get your information is exactly what is happening you right in manga dot com. Where you report it on these massacres that the areas where the violence has taken place our areas of heavy deforestation where the building large dams has brought a capital infusion center land. Prices soaring and invited land speculation by von glut, grabbers loggers and ranchers how much of this has been unleashed by Wilson auto. It was full. A. Whenever you get your new beak development project. Young prices tend to go up, and you tend to get comfort. What is you is is that the land thieves in the on the Landau near the locus feel? They thought this window of opportunity. They're not even really sure if Olsen our will manage to the government, very long. I mean, he's he's getting on top priority uneasy, easy extremely right wing. I think many Brazilians during the electric campaign that all this talk on being an ally of the military dictatorship that will resume nineteen seventy s this was all big toke rhetoric. But now he's in power. He is being extremely repressive going. It's not just the miniature ideology that's his body enough. He's actually going back, and he is embrace the metro views over development. I mean the ministry in the nineteen seventies was that she was my first job. I was reporting the in the nineteen sixties onto the minute. They had this idea which was common in time. That Nate you was an enemy that you had to go and build roads have big projects and homeless the resources of the Amazon for the good of good of Brazil. It was seen as a battle between nature and progress. Over the last forty years on the world, these views of feet challenged. And they change people realize that you've got to what with night that. We have we have destroyed too much too much Forrest and doing sin which damage to the system that we have beginning En-ching phase of extreme warring climate change and reduction the number in the bond of us die of all over the world. So these views have changed radically over this period. And it seems that this happened in Brazil in meaning the nineteen eighty eight Brazil, the new constitution off to the military stepped on which embraced lot of. These progressive news, particularly respect to the Indians. Until Ben the official policy of the Brazilian government. Had been to instigate the engines to make them like other Brazilians simulate they? Lost in business identity. And this constitution was the first time that the presenting the song Keith recognize the festival the agents where the original since I had the right to then on. And Secondly that the have the right to continue with their old way of life with their culture with Glen ridge. It was an enormous step forward and to that of things gained a lot more and more control over their traditional areas. A now. Trying to turn the cook is trying to be Indians of land. So that you can on group business mining using the line profitably. And so what's at stake in the mantle over the future of the Amazon rainforest? During two thousand five to two thousand fifteen had money to bring down quite radically the rights at which down. Listen florist was being cut down. I'm now, it's all increasing again undiminished Santisima wounding that already owns twenty percent of the Amazon forest has been cells. And they're saying that if the percentage of fell far as goes to twenty five percent. That it's very like the Amazon forest will not be big enough to be sustainable. I'm whoa. Quite quick to probably taunted will flip over to being to some kind of savannah. And this would have a huge impact on the wolves climate because the forest the Bussan is funny at the more. They ran the place a key role in stabilizing the woke climate of the greenhouse gases that Negage to be released in the I mean, John of greenhouse gases if the Amazon forest stop freaking until interests. So it's not just a problem of of Brazil going through a bad period. She's a -ffective very seriously Brazil. It's now kind of global crisis, which is going to to Seoul. Former BBC correspondent sue Bradford is a contributor to manga bay dot com and author of the book, Amazon besieged conservation groups are asking state agencies in Wyoming, and I'd Aho to require hunters to carry bear spray in grizzly bear habitat. Eric Gladys reports between two thousand fifteen in two thousand seventeen one hundred forty six grizzlies were killed in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem. The vast majority were encounters with hunters Kristen combs with Wyoming wildlife advocate says while grizzly populations have been slowly improving over the past twenty years bears are still struggling to expand their range and connect with populations in the mountain west. However, if we keep having these high numbers of mortalities year after year after year. We are not going to see recovery. We're not gonna see Janetta connect tippety between populations encounters with grizzlies are rare. But comb says more conflicts happen during hunting season in part because bears are drawn to gut piles left by hunters after field stripping game. Skeptics of the proposal say hunters are not about to drop their guns and reached for spray if they encounter a grizzly in the wild. According to the US fish and Wildlife Service and studies published in the journal of wildlife management bear spray has been ninety eight percent effective at preventing human injuries. During bearing counters firearms are only fifty percent effective combs believes the proposal is similar to requiring seatbelts in cars or a life jacket when rafting people tend to be kind of bad shot when they're they're charging them in a high adrenaline situation. If they have that they're spray on their person that we give them a chance to have some sort of secondary method of protection for themselves and for the Barry combs notes that Yellowstone and glacier, national parks. Already require staff to carry bear spray when working in the field and Wyoming OSHA encourages guides and other workers in Christly territory to carry and be trained in the use of bear spray as a matter of workplace safety. The Wyoming fish and game department has sixty days to respond to the petition submitted by conservation groups for public news service. I'm Eric Gladys. Mexican gray wolves are slowly returning to historic territories in these south west United States, but they are still being killed at rates that worry biologist tracking their recovery. More from reporter Ross Brown. The recent US fish Wildlife Service report says the Mexican gray wolf population showed one hundred thirty one individual wools and thirty two packs of two or more animals in the wilderness of era Zona and New Mexico that twelve percent increase over the previous year next biologist Brian bird defenders of wildlife cautiously optimistic but also concerned because Twenty-one wolves died from various. Causes in twenty eighteen to get a handle on mortalities illegal killings Pollution's. And we need to get more wolves genetically viable chill out the wild. Because the great news. The population grew that necessarily mean that their genetics are healthy following a six month study, the National Academy of sciences recently determined the Mexican gray wolf is a separate subspecies from other gray walls, meaning they will retain their endangered status for the foreseeable future. Reintroduction of the gray wolf to the southwest ecosystem began in nineteen ninety eight after they were nearly driven to extinction in the nineteen seventies. Last year more than eighty pups were born with a projected survival rate of sixty percent bird would like to see the southwest ecosystem benefit from the introduction of wolves much like Wyoming's Yellowstone National Park has since grey wolves were introduced there in nineteen ninety five. He says the predatory pressure from wolves in the park. Has increased beaver populations created healthier hurts elk and improved. Vegetation. We meeting. The European were exterminating baiters the left had any idea that they would have found back on our ecosystems science suggests a recovery of the Mexican gray wolf in south west would require at least three connected populations totalling approximately seven.

Brazil Amazon Wyoming Eric Gladys Sue Bradford United States BBC John Deere Mark miracle Chan Landau National Academy of sciences Volvo Dow Lois nece Loris nece wolves Yellowstone and glacier
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

09:13 min | 3 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Section leader with wildlife inherited service department of natural resources and Josh homeopathic. Did I say that correctly? Josh allen. All right waterfowl program manager who gets to deal with the public. From also wildlife inherited service department of natural resources. Welcome gentlemen. High Bill bill's kind of sitting out this round. He's sitting here in the studio in the background. And we'll be here in a little bit more from Bill later right now, we're gonna talk Paul and we're going to talk to Josh. And we're gonna talk about the symbiotic relationship between the US fish and Wildlife Service and the Maryland department natural resources federal government regulate migratory game birds as they have for over a century. That's right. And, but we share responsibility for those migratory birds with with the states the government of Canada and the person of the Canadian Wildlife Service and the provinces in Canada. So my my job title, indicates what part of what that relationship is as the flyway. Representative for the Atlantic flyway. I'm the fish and Wildlife Services liaison between the service and the states and provinces in the Atlantic flyway for managing migratory birds, and since we share those responsibilities. It's important that we work closely together, the the Atlantic flyway council is a coalition of state agencies provincial agencies and the territory of Puerto Rico. There are seventeen states in the Atlantic flyway in the Atlantic flyway council six provinces, and again, the territory of Puerto Rico, and my I'm the liaison between that group and the fish and Wildlife Service and Josh can tell you more about what the Atlantic flyway council is about we'll get to that. In just a second. What is a flyway somebody tell us what a fly way is. Well in the in the couple of several decades, right after the migratory bird treaty act was signed migratory bird hunting regulations were set along latitude, no gradients. So the south had one set of regulations on the north and middle latitude states heats had their different regulations in a twenty years after so that now that was nineteen thousand nine hundred thousand eight hundred eighteen hours anniversary earlier this year, a great one hundred ten of the act so twenty years or so later, Frederick Lincoln did an analysis of banding information banding data on waterfall that indicated that there were pathways specific pathways that ducks took from Canada down to the US and points south of for some species on their annual microphone migration route. And he he developed the term fly ways to characterize the major migration pathways the four major pathways. The birds take going north to south on migration in one thousand nine hundred forty eight the fish and Wildlife Service decided hey, that would be a pretty good way to manage harvest regulations for these game bird species. And so the service at that time switched over from latitude, no gradients to flyway management and just shortly thereafter, the four flyways. The the states and provinces in those fly develop those flyweight councils and the the Atlantic flyway. I think was nineteen fifty two was when the flyweight council came into existence but shortly after forty eight when we changed our system of managing regulations and management is based on the fluctuating population great levels of each of the waterfowl species. Yeah. Level wonder why we have you know, why are we allowed to bluebills one year and three the next or one canvasback or whatever it might be. And I mean, you know, you gotta stay up on it because all based I guess on population levels right population levels into some extent. Habitat conditions got to influence those population levels. Yes. Win flyway system of regulations was first established there are differences in hunting regulation season length. For example, is your it's longer in the Pacific flyway short- shorter in the Mississippi and Atlantic flyways that was all based on two two main things one is how many ducks there were in the flyway second. How many hunters there were in the flyway? So in the Pacific flyway, they have they had and they still have lots of docs, not very many hunters. Right. So they have a long season and a slightly more liberal bag lemon in the Atlantic. Flyway? We have quite a few hunters not not a whole lot quite a few hundred not all that many ducks. So we have a much shorter season. Mississippi flyway has lots of docs. But also lots of hunters fifty percent of the duck hunters in the country. Flyway? So they typically have regulations that are similar to the flyways in the central flyway is somewhere in between. They've got a lot of docs, not all that many hundreds. But quite a few there in between. And that's that's historically been the way we've managed ever since. And you have to believe he said seventeen states six provinces and Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico, Tori, and that's in the Atlantic a lot of management territory, and it is Josh we have the epicenter of Canada goose wintering right here in the Delmarva peninsula. Correct. Yeah. That's that's absolutely true. There are we have the epicenter of the wintering ground. But it is it is certainly shared resources as birds travel south from the from the nesting grounds in Canada. And that's what makes the flyway council and interacting with the other states and our peers council so important. So the question gets asked, and I've been asking I'm sure you guys hear it all the time. How can they kill so many more states north of us and how can they kill more in Canada than we're allowed to kill right here in Maryland. And you guys have FAQ frequently asked question. Site on the Maryland department natural resources, which I find to be very good at answers. A lot of those types of questions. But it's basically there's a difference between a state like New York compensatory where the geese passed through as opposed to where they spend the most of their winter where they're most susceptible is that answer that question kind. Yeah. That's that's very close to the answer. So we we monitor harvest a course through the banning program that we offer and also through the ports collection survey, most waterfowl, hunters, maybe sometime in their career have received wing envelopes from the fish and Wildlife Service were were diary survey. And so those are the things that. Both the states and the fish Wildlife Service used the monitor harvest, so we know kind of the proportion of the harvest that occurs in each state and Maryland, of course, has of the the goose harvest we have the we and most of them, you know, of that harvest. I think were because this is where this is where they stay for the longest period of time, the hunting season overlaps that stay and they're very susceptible. Plus the fact that Maryland hunters are very good at killing Maryland, hundreds of very good at killing gays have absolutely not necessarily everybody's good at shooting them. But we're good at kill it. Well, that's right. You know, there are those days. You know, you you wish you'd spend a little more time on on the sporting clays ranger to skeet range. Sure. That's that's for sure. But yeah, we have experienced goose hunters we have well developed outfitting business. And and you know, this is basically the. The southern terminus for this this population against now. There's a few that still go to Virginia and North Carolina. But as we know that's changed a lot over the years. It used to be used to be North Carolina and points south back in the day. And it's switched to Delmarva. And and probably still changing a little bit. But but for right now, we're we're still the the center of the wintering ground for sure got it. Here. We are in the first segment we'll be switching up here in a minute or two, but it is time for me to tell the.

Atlantic flyway Atlantic flyway council Josh allen Wildlife Service Canada fish and Wildlife Services Bill bill Atlantic Maryland Puerto Rico Canadian Wildlife Service US fish Wildlife Service Mississippi North Carolina program manager Section leader Delmarva
"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:00 min | 3 years ago

"u. s fish wildlife service" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Liaison between the service and the states and provinces in the Atlantic flyway for managing migratory birds, and since we share those responsibilities. It's important that we work closely together, the the Atlantic flyway council is a coalition of state agencies provincial agencies and the territory of Puerto Rico. There are seventeen states in the Atlantic flyway in the Atlantic flyway council six provinces, and again, the the territory of Puerto Rico, and my I'm the liaison between that group and the fish and Wildlife Service and Josh can tell you more about what the Atlantic flyway council is about we'll get to that. In just a second. What is a flyway somebody tell us what a flyway is. Well in the in a couple of several decades, right after the migratory bird treaty act was signed migratory bird hunting regulations were set along latitude, no gradients. So the south had one set of regulations on the north and middle latitude states had their different regulations in. Twenty years after so that now that was nineteen thousand nine hundred thousand eight hundred eighteen stores anniversary this year, a great one hundred ten versus the act so twenty years or so later, Frederick Lincoln did an analysis of banding information banding data on waterfall that indicated that there were pathways specific pathways that ducks talk from Canada down to the US and points south of for some species. On their annual microphone migration route, and he he developed the term flyways to characterize the major migration pathways the four major pathways that birds take going north to south on migration in one thousand nine hundred forty eight the fish and Wildlife Service decided hey, that would be a pretty good way to manage harvest regulations for these game bird species. And so the service at that time switched over from latitude, no gradients to flyway management in just shortly thereafter, the four flyways. The the states and provinces in those fly develop those flyweight councils. And. The the Atlantic flyway. I think was nineteen fifty two is when the flyweight council came into existence but shortly after forty eight when we changed our system of managing regulations and management is based on the fluctuating population great levels of each of the waterfowl species. Yeah. Level wonder why we have you know, why are we allowed to bluebills one year and three the next or one canvasback or whatever it might be it. You know, you gotta stay up on it because all based I guess on population levels, right population levels, and to some extent. Habitat conditions got the influence those population levels. Yes. When the flyway system of regulations was first established there are differences in putting regulation season length, for example, is your it's longer in the Pacific flyway short- shorter. And the Mississippi in Atlantic flyways that was all based on two two main things one is how many ducks there were in the flyway second. How many hunters there were in the flyway? So in the Pacific flyway, they have they had and they still have lots of docs, not very many hunters. Right. So they have a long season and slightly more liberal bag woman in the Atlantic. Flyway? We have quite a few hunters not not a whole lot quite a few hunters, not all that many ducks. So we have a much shorter season. Mississippi flyway has lots of docs. But also lots of hunters fifty percent of the duck hunters in the country are a mess acidity flyway. So they typically have regulations that are similar to the. Atlantic flyways and the central flyway or somewhere in between. They've got a lot of ducks. Not all that many hunters. But quite a few, sir. They're in between. And that's that's historically been the way we've managed ever since. And you have said seventeen states six provinces and Puerto Rico Puerto Rico. Territory, and that's in the Atlantic flat a lot of management territory, and it is Josh we have the epicenter of Canada goose wintering right here in the dumb peninsula. Correct. Yeah. That's that's absolutely true. There are we have the epicenter of the wintering ground. But it is it is certainly a shared resources as birds travel south from the from the nesting grounds in Canada. And that's what makes the flyway council and interacting with the other states and our peers council so important. So the question gets asked, and I've been asking I'm sure you guys hear it all the time. How can they kill so many more states north of us and how can they kill more in Canada than we're allowed to kill right here in Maryland. And you guys have FAQ frequently asked question. Site on Maryland department, natural resources, which I find to be very good at a lot of those types of questions. But it's basically there's a difference between a state like New York and Pennsylvania where the geese pass through as opposed to where they spend the most of their winter where they're most susceptible is that answer that question kinda. Yeah. That's that's very close to the answer is so we we monitor harvest a course through. The banning program that we operate and also through the ports collection survey, most waterfowl, hunters, maybe sometime in their career have received wing envelopes from the fish and Wildlife Service or diary survey. And so those are the things that. Both the states and the and the fish Wildlife Service used the monitor harvest, we know kind of the proportion of the harvest that occurs in each state and Maryland, of course, has the AP goose harvest. We have the we harvest the most of them, you know, of that harvest. I think were because this is. This is where they stay for the longest period of time, the hunting season overlaps that stay and they're very susceptible. Plus the fact that Maryland hunters are very good at killing geese, Maryland, hundreds of very good at killing gays have absolutely not necessarily everybody's good at shooting them. But we're gonna kill it. Well, that's right. You know, there are those days. You know, you you wish you'd spend a little more time on the sporting clays ranger skeet range. Sure. That's that's for sure. But yeah, we have experienced goose hunters. We have a well developed outfitting business. And then, you know, this is basically the the southern terminus for this this population against now, there's a few, you know, that's still good Virginia and North Carolina. But as we know that's changed a lot over the years. It used to be used to be North Carolina and point south back in the day. And it's switched to Delmarva. And and probably still changing a little bit. But but for right now, we're we're still the the center of the wintering ground for sure got it. Here. We are in the first segment we'll be switching up here in a minute or two that it is time for.

Atlantic flyway Atlantic flyway council Maryland Wildlife Service Canada Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Mississippi Josh Atlantic North Carolina fish Wildlife Service Frederick Lincoln Delmarva Pacific US Virginia New York Pennsylvania fifty percent