5 Burst results for "U. C. Santa Cruz"

'Zombie' Urchins Are Wiping Out Kelp Forests

Environment: NPR

01:52 min | 1 year ago

'Zombie' Urchins Are Wiping Out Kelp Forests

"California francisco. has a sea urchin problem. They've exploded in numbers off the northern california coast and these purple spiky urchins are wiping out crucial kelp forests so scientists are searching for ways to slow him down. Here's npr's laura summer diving. A kelp forest is a lot like walking through a real forest. The seaweed is thirty to sixty feet tall. It's very surreal. You're kind of coming around. And then you have this large canopy over you. That's kind of filtering light. At least that's how it used to be says. Meredith mcpherson a graduate student at uc santa cruz. She and her colleagues found that ninety. Five percent of kelp forests have disappeared in counties north of san francisco. Cal provides a key habitat for all kinds of marine life. We were expecting something like that. But it doesn't really make it any easier to digest in terms of the actual loss of the coastal ecosystem because of an ecological double whammy. I came marine heat. Wave known as the blob. Water temperatures rose far above normal then came a more direct attack. Purple sea urchins. Their veracious grazers. They devour kelp. Sometimes we see dozens of them. Crawling up the stem of the kelp and kind of taking it down from there. Normally urchins are kept in check by their main predator off northern california a giant starfish sea star scientists call them known as the sunflower see star. But they've been wiped out by sea star wasting disease. Scientists think that both the disease the blob of warm water were made worse by climate change even now with most of the kelp off northern california gone the urgency

Laura Summer Meredith Mcpherson Uc Santa Cruz Northern California NPR Francisco California CAL San Francisco
Proposition 18: Youth Voting

Bay Curious

06:08 min | 2 years ago

Proposition 18: Youth Voting

"Politics reporter Guy Marzorati has been covering profit teen for K. Q. E. D. Hey? Guy. Hey. So walk us through what we're voting on here. So the very basics is that proposition eighteen would allow seventeen year olds to vote in primary and special elections if they turn eighteen by the general election. So to clarify, this would not have helped to, for example, me who was seventeen during the two, thousand, four, general election and was. Pretty disgruntled that I wasn't able to vote right right and I was in the same boat seventeen in the two thousand, eight election. This does not change that if you're seventeen when the general election is happening, you still won't be able to vote. This is really aimed at the voters who turned eighteen in the window between the primary and the general election. It would let them kind of get a headstart and voting and let them. Vote in the primary. Now, some people may think you know it's only the primary it's not a huge deal. You still get to vote in the general. Why does it even matter that you know young people would be voting in primaries? Well, proponents really make two arguments and the first is question of fairness. They say it's only fair that voters in the general election also gets a have a voice in the primary Elliott Talkie. Of San Francisco was a freshman in college. But for the past few years, she's been advocating for this change for exactly that reason I was cheated out on this election cycle and thousands of others were cheated out to not be able to vote in the twenty twenty primary such. An exciting primary I should add was really disappointing and I'm not the only one thing about all the people who are born between March and November and In the second argument is really around habit building. So supporters say that voting is a habit, the more you do it the more you're likely to do it in the future and that if you let seventeen year olds vote in the primary when they're still in high school, they're getting civics education that education could be enriched by actually participating in the electoral process it's building a habit for the future and make these young Californians. Habitual voters. Okay and there are definitely some people who are not excited about the prospect of seventeen year olds voting at all Let's hear a little bit about what they argue. Right. So when this was put on the ballot by the state legislature, mostly all Democrats supported mostly all Republicans opposed it and antitax groups are also against this measure they say seventeen year olds most of them are still in high school and their captive. Audiences in classrooms who could be swayed by teachers especially on school bonds and school taxes they say, basically, they might spend a whole day only once side of a campaign and while there's eighteen states and the district of Columbia that allowed this changes well, the opponents of prop eighteen say California's different because we directly vote on taxes, school bonds, parcel taxes, and they say that these seventeen year olds are not to be trusted in. Those votes here's Susan Shelley with the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association. So of seventeen, year, olds are seeing this in high school and then they're voting in a primary on school taxes school bonds they can be influenced to vote for these taxes without seeing the full argument or having the knowledge of the previous tax increases that may have been passed for the same purpose. Another argument that I read was because our primaries have moved so early. Some of these voters will actually be I, mean closer to sixteen than they are to eighteen when they would be voting in these primaries. Yeah and I think that's another argument made on the No side really about brain development that you know we've set this legal age eighteen and we shouldn't go any farther below it. I haven't seen a whole lot of evidence to suggest that seventeen year old or somehow less likely. To make these decisions than eighteen year olds, there are seventeen year olds who pay taxes after all but that's definitely something you're hearing from the no campaign. Now, it's not often that we actually sea propositions that benefit teenage Californians. How did this one? Make It on the ballot in the first place? This was on the ballot by the state legislature, a two thirds vote and it was largely Democrats who backed it There was only one Democrat who voted against it in the legislature only two Republicans who ended up supporting it. Okay. So even though the legislature has already passed this law because it's basically going to be an amendment to the state constitution, they have to get a public approval for it. That's right and you might be thinking wait doesn't the constitution of the United States kind of set the voting age and it? Really Only, addresses the fact that you can't deny the right to vote to citizens who are eighteen. It really doesn't speak to allowing younger citizens to cast ballots, which is why you've seen a number of states moving this direction and allow seventeen year olds to participate in the primary. At least if they turn eighteen by the general election, is there any idea on what kind of impact this will actually have a voter turnout? Well, we have some idea and that's because of a study by the Public Policy Institute of California which took a look at what they called the so-called prop eighteen voters, and there were two hundred, thousand such. Californians in this boat in the last couple elections, these voters are potentially a significant block especially for primary elections where votes can often be very close decided by a few thousand, a few hundred votes even but another key finding the study found was that the participation of these group of voters is really far from being guaranteed experts and civic engagement say that passing this measure alone is not going to be enough to boost. Turnout rates among young voters I talked with Ron Tariq has about this. She's a sociology professor at UC Santa Cruz I think that propositions eighteen if it passes will be very successful at increasing turn out if it is coupled with civics education at the secondary school level, it creates an opportunity for a secondary school educators to really concentrate more time and resources to developing the curriculum that excites people about voting. So even folks who are backing this change say it's not a panacea. A won't solve all the issues around voting rates in participation of young voters. Alright. K Q d politics, reporter Guy, Marzorati thanks for your help. Thank you.

Guy Marzorati Reporter Legislature Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Associ Elliott Talkie United States Public Policy Institute Of Cal California Columbia Twenty Twenty San Francisco Susan Shelley Professor Ron Tariq
Shedding Light on Bats and Covid-19

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

08:05 min | 2 years ago

Shedding Light on Bats and Covid-19

"Welcome to the is on conservation podcasts. I'm Gregory Haddock and I'm joined here with Kristin how you doing kristen. I'm doing great despite you know. Despite Dave forty four forty five forty six. I don't even count anymore. What's know what's the point now? It's a win Big Day. Quarantine. That's right five. Eighty to one hundred four. You know. There's just numbers that's the old world and we're on the new world down we are. We are so yeah. I'm excited to be here today to talk to you about one of my favorite subjects. Yes we definitely are looking forward to this conversation. I in particular now people who are listening to the show right now may not realize that. Kristen is actually directing and producing a feature length film called the invisible mammal all about the life of bats. And obviously right now. That's a really strange timing right. I don't know how you might define that. But I know for a lot of people at home hearing all these different things about bats and how they may or may not be responsible for the situation. Take it away like what's been your experience. You've had a obviously talked to a lot of different experts in this field. What's what's been the outcome of that. Basically I had big plans for twenty twenty. A lot of people had big plans. For Twenty twenty my big plans for this year all revolved around doing a lot of field work in filming the work of Bat Scientist Bat researchers across North America. You know here in California. I was going to go back to Michigan Upper Peninsula and I was probably also going to go back to Texas to film the Work of these amazing bat scientists who are stopping at nothing to find solutions to the bat pandemic of White Nose Syndrome. That has been just decimating populations across the continent east to West. North to south. Since two thousand six like I said I had plans I had shoots lined up and then incomes Karinna virus and I'm still hosting fundraising events and all of a sudden people at my fundraising events. Start asking me about corona virus and whereas that's not necessarily the focus of by film or had not been now it definitely is and because the scientists are no longer able to do any more about research out on the field. Do any research in the field right now no since April tenth the. Us government suspended all field research but on top of all of that the researchers themselves have decided voluntarily that because they don't want to use any additional P P that could be going to hospitals and healthcare workers that they themselves have been stopping. The field research during the pandemic is just safer for everybody at safer for the bats and safer for all of the healthcare workers who are trying to do their jobs right so as a result of not being able to do any filming out in the field and no fundraising events and no nothing. I decided the best thing to do. Would be to try to set up some interviews with the experts through online meeting and some guests here so tell us a little bit about them. What would you have for us today? Said the first interview is going to be with Dr Winifred Frick who is the chief scientist at Bat Conservation International and she's also an associate research professor in ecology and evolutionary biology at UC. Santa Cruz and Dr Frick is of the characters in my film the invisible mammal the connection between bats and current virus and couvert nineteen. I knew that she would be the right person to talk to to get the facts to clear up any misinformation and just to share the knowledge that she has about bats with Oliver Listeners. Will share it with us. What's your okay. Let's go thank you for joining us. My pleasure to be here. How has the coveted nineteen pandemic changed the focus of your work at Bat Conservation International? Like most people here in the United States and really over large parts of the world were sheltered in place. We're doing our part to prevent the spread of the novel current of Iris. And so you know for our work here at BCI by Conservation International. We do a lot of travel. We do a lot of field work. And so of course. We put a pause on that but the focus of our work stays essentially the same. Organization's mission is dedicated to protecting bat populations around the world and ensuring that no bats go extinct and of course the most fun parts of that job getting out into the field and working with bats directly and visiting the places where in their habitats where they need to be protected. But there's lots that we can do to protect bats from our home offices and so where everybody. Fbi is still working hard every day and doing like everybody around the world of working on our work. Life Integration of homeschooling our kids while working hard on data analysis report writing scientific publications and connecting with our partners to around the world. Making sure everybody safe and doing everything we can to protect bats and protect ourselves so most everybody around the globe is in the same situation. Our lives have just been completely changed by the colonel virus pandemic and everyone is also following the news and the connection between bats and current virus. Can you explain how scientists were able to make that connection? It's important to know that we don't yet know how the novel current virus spilled into the human population and the the pandemic that we're experiencing is caused from human to human transmission of this novel strain of Corona Virus. What we do know from pass work by some really excellent scientists who study zone attic disease so diseases that are caused from viruses that naturally occur in wildlife populations. Is that this group of Beta current viruses. Which is sort of the family of current viruses that the SARS covy to which is the technical name of the virus that's causing the CO vid pandemic cove. It is what we call the disease caused by the virus and SARS Cova to is the technical name of the virus itself more commonly called the novel Corona virus so SARS Kobe to the novel. Current virus is part of this. Beta Kerr virus family and what we know is that there are lots of different. Beta Corona viruses found in wild bat populations. It's presumed that the original strain of this. What was likely in a bat in China but how it then got from the bats into the human population is still a scientific mystery and something that people are working on. Oftentimes those spillover events happen through an intermediate host in the case of SARS which is closely related to this current virus it came through an intermediate host of civic cat which was harvested in in markets. And there's some evidence or there's been some work that suggests that perhaps penguins are working as the intermediate host in this case although that's still under active investigation and it's we just don't know yet. Exactly how the spillover event happened

Bat Conservation International Twenty Twenty Kristen United States Scientist Dr Winifred Frick Gregory Haddock Dave Santa Cruz Conservation International Michigan Upper Peninsula BCI Kristin FBI Cova Texas Oliver Listeners California
Lawrence Weschler: And How Are You, Dr. Sacks?: A Biographical Memoir of Oliver Sacks

Bookworm

14:19 min | 3 years ago

Lawrence Weschler: And How Are You, Dr. Sacks?: A Biographical Memoir of Oliver Sacks

"Today I have a special guest his name. He's been on the show before is Lawrence Weschler. He's writing a book about someone else who's been on the show fight a few times. That's Oliver Sacks. Oliver one of my favorite guests and I had the excitement of learning that he was one of Lawrence. Weschler 's coasts Closest Friends Godfather to Lawrence. Wash lers daughter Sara. Yes yes. Of course you're going to want to read Oliver Sexes owned autobiographical writings. But you will learn something both about friendship and the interaction of two minds that in thirty years I never really parted company. They were talking constantly and at a time when we're forgetting what it's like to have friends that you don't fight with without making up within twenty hours. Think of all the people you'd stop. Stop being able to talk to Gore Vidal or Norman Mailer Susan Santen. And they're they are Lawrence Weschler my guest and end the great neuro physician. What did he call himself? He called himself a clinical oncologists. What did we? We used to go on rounds. Rounds Ed Ed We would be dry in those days. This is back in the early eighties and by the way it's with knowing that the when I I was getting hanging out with him I'm in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine hundred eighty one. He was largely unknown. AWAKENINGS had come out but nobody had read it ten years after it had been published in Nineteen in seventy three. I interviewed the publisher in England. Colin Hay craft the first edition had been fifteen hundred copies and they had not yet sold out. I mean it's it's amazing but anyway the point is we would go on on rounds and he in those days was and pretty much through his life was mainly going institutions and poor houses and so forth you will gospels. They were status poor houses. They were you know places where people are warehouse where he specialized it you know. And and he said that's where where the jewels are. You know you have all the time in the world. Nobody's expecting anything but any case So he would be driving between them and what you know I think of myself as a clinical oncologists apologist you know analogy is the philosophy of being. You know what. Why is there something rather than nothing and so forth? And he said my I am somebody for whom the diagnostic diagnostic question of the kinds of people I see is how are you. How do you be? What is it like to be you and here we are? This is the title of the book. And how are you Dr Sour you doctors and it's an autobiographical memoir memoir and my guests. Lawrence Weschler is a specialist in the creation of what he calls writer writer Louis Nonfiction. Which I think you know we've discussed on the show in the past literary nonfiction what what I call readily nonfiction is non-fiction in which the writing matters you right if the reading matter and you read the writing mattered? That's my definition. You do classes. Yes you teams this and you see I knew Ren Weschler when he was a young man in Los Angeles Los Angeles was home. There were people like Carole Eastman who wrote five easy pieces who called US invaders. Jack Potter's she felt. We were here to to rob the natives of their do I used to see Lawrence Weschler in a bookstore called intellectuals and liars tires wonderful place who was a wonderful wonderful place once upon a time and not very long ago a bookstore was a place ice. Will you hung out. You sat around may be ready chapter of something you were considering buying where you crease the pages in the poetry books will you read it out loud. Everybody so I I met Lawrence Weschler and he'd written terrific things was it mostly for the weekly I would right. I was the only person who was awry. Loud right for both the L. A. Reader and the L. A.. Weekly the Qazir writing was so good and no Alan would turn you down and it was fascinating because he went off to New York not yet thirty years old. I had unwritten. I'd spent three or four years with Robert Irwin. The artist who was who was already then probably one of the top ten artisan America but the one who was least known because he never allowed his work to be photographed. He most of the work didn't exist anymore and and I had an occasion. Why that happened? And then I wrote a book based on the conversations nations and are manuscripts forgetting seeing is forgetting the name of the thing one sees was the title nine thousand nine hundred eighty. I had six or seven Rave Steve Rejections from all the New York publishers. All them saying they wanted my next book. But how could they be expected to publish a book on a California artist. That's that's nineteen eighty But I said at the New Yorker and it was accepted kind of over the transient which was extremely. You know lucky on I mean. I always say that he does that. They get fifty thousand manuscripts year of this type and maybe a hundred of them are worth publishing and they published two of them and going that hundreds of that too was just luck and there was the famous lunch with the top editor. The head of the shocker. Mr Shawn was at the Al Gunk Right Hotel by the way. Says you know it's Apparently I live in California. We're going to hire you but we're very live in California. Can you but I mean where were you born. I said Ben is and California Baby. Where'd you go to high school? I said I'm high and I could. College Judge Santa Cruz either. I just didn't make any sense at all but he kept on drilling until he was able to establish that all of my grandparents were released. Jews which case okay. That was okay. You mention a name name that I haven't seen her thought about in years. Maurice Natan Somehow he was Donald Barthelme. These great world was amazing about him. I used to go to classes and Santa Cruz. He has a phenomenology as a philosophy professor and he looked like Martin buber looked like God basically but that I would go go because it was like sitting in on Donald Martha Stories one after another you. It was just an entertaining. No not when I was taking the cats had just go there and years later when I saw Barthel may I asked him. What does your great influence that? When I was at the New Yorker Enescu was becker? He's I had this professor. At the University of Houston Maury Dayton said and had they abide melted was really. I'm talking to Lawrence Weschler. Who is also known by his friends as Ren Weschler and We're talking about around his book. And how are you Dr Sex. You know we were of the generation. Yes you got. Talk to be close to Robert Irwin and to our mutual friend art spiegelman on I got to be coast to Donald Barthelme. John Barth was the time with wonderful. Nobody had read awakenings as I was graduated. Maurice Natan said I'm graduating seventy four. The book had been published in seventy three mornings and thrust this book into my chest and said read this us and and I get around to reading it right away but when I did read it in seventy nine I sent a letter to Oliver. That's how how we begin the influenza right right. After World War One killed more people than all of World War One it probably affected hundred million but twenty million were killed of those who survived live particularly young people age that we were back in the days of intellectuals and liars five or six years later began suddenly in the middle of their day's Day's coming to stop you know and they were in trammelled in this statue like Situation for thirty years they were just warehoused and then Oliver came upon this population and began to realize that. Some some of these people at this institution. We're we're different than others and had the heroine notion that some of them were that these people were completely alive inside something he knew because he had these incredible experiences and so forth which is a different story but the point is that the rookie writes about their situation about giving the Mel dopey about their coming alive about the horrible tribulations afterwards. His great theme of of Fate and freedom as he used to say when he got his is bound galleys awakening in one thousand nine hundred ninety two. He sent it the first copy of Bengali. To auden and Auden who in those days Osha the days of thank you fog and so forth Is a master of adjectives and auden sends back a letter. Saying I WANNA thank you for your delightful manuscript which is the most amazing thing to say about awakenings. But it's true. There was an invasion long. Before the British invasion of the Beatles was an invasion of the Brits to America and that including W.H. On Thom Gunn and Tom Gun and Oliver Sacks ax here you have this legendarily kind. Man Who wears leather across across America period crosses American motorcycle. lives I up north in the bay area. And then then down here where this neurophysiologist. But let's say more this genius this eccentric this beautiful unaccommodating person who could only be his self. He was very close to his mother. was the first woman she was the first woman. Surgeon in England She she was formidable character and they knew they had a prodigy on by the Orthodox Jews and her husband was also Dr They knew they had a project. Didn't know what to do with him and she would do things like when he was eight years old. She would bring home Stillborn fetuses 'cause she was an OBGYN surgeon For him to dissect because that would probably be interesting for him and when he was twelve she took him along to the autopsy of a twelve year. Old Boy who committed suicide that would probably be interesting. They had a very close relationship of and then when she found out that he was gay she tore into him. She called him an abomination. I wish you had never been born. And went on like that. And that was when he was eighteen when he finishes his Medical School at Oxford he is a bat out of hell. Getting out of England. Finally when he's out of England he is in motorcycles. He is On the fringes of hells angels where. He's known as Dr Squat because he is also the California state heavyweight lifting champion. Yes he used to hang out at muscle beach and must do all the body builders. He'd come to California because of Tom Gun. Actually who was okay with US homoerotic imagery and so forth in the Patriot. Way that he oliver wasn't yet are never would be actually but But in any case for three or four years I I up there then down here in. La He was led this extravagant and especially drug-fuelled life. The reason was able to recognize those guys at the the statues. I choose as being alive with because he'd been there too and in each of the pieces that I've heard of yours. You begin with a strong subject if you are out there wanting to ride writer Lee nonfiction. Don't think you can do it with just anything. And and Oliver Sacks does not come on every day of the week and Lawrence Wessler my guest hand the the great talent of interesting the people who interested him and so all of her sacks by the time they'd spend time together wanted a profile by the young Lawrence Weschler who was this new at the New Yorker The New Yorker. Let me give you some history. Here was famous for hiring people from Harvard. When he asks Excu where you went to school when Mr Shawn asks the it's because he's expecting Harvard to crop up somewhere in the itinerary? What are you doing going coming to school at? UC Santa Cruz And so in a certain way you are as original and strange a presence as sunny about Santa Cruz and my graduating class at Santa Cruz at Calle College to under people in one thousand nine hundred four three of them became New Yorker Writers Bill Finnegan allocation has also. Oh I love Bill Finnegan. We were classmates all the way through.

Lawrence Weschler Oliver Oliver Sacks California Santa Cruz Oliver Sexes Lawrence England United States Donald Barthelme America Robert Irwin Maurice Natan Mr Shawn Writer Professor Gore Vidal Bill Finnegan
U.S. Coral Reefs Do $1.8 Billion of Work Per Year

60-Second Science

02:01 min | 3 years ago

U.S. Coral Reefs Do $1.8 Billion of Work Per Year

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Jatta. A physics lesson may be the last thing on your mind, as you relaxed the ocean. However, if you're sitting on a lovely Hawaiian Bj with your mind tie, and you're looking off shore, and you see twenty foot waves and people surfing on them. And you notice that it's only lapping up on the shoreline here with teeny little waves. That's the reef working to dissipate that energy, Mike Beck. Studies. The intersection of engineering ecology economics and finance at UC Santa Cruz. And he says reef sacked a whole lot like our human built coastal infrastructure to tame the energy of incoming waves. They essentially act just like a low crested submerged breakwater, that's an engineering term. But it means that they're really good engineering models for describing the benefits of res and those models are the key behind a new report from the US Geological Survey with Beck is one of its authors. The. Researchers modeled hypothetical storms hitting coastlines in areas with off shore reefs like Florida Hawaii and Puerto Rico they studied how reefs of various heights would dampen waves and holdback flooding, and they found that every year the country's reef save the US estimated one point eight billion dollars in direct flooding damages and other economic losses that dollar numbers important because it allows reef rebuilding projects like gluing little healthy coral nub ins, undamaged reefs to tap into billions of dollars of federal money set aside for hurricane in disaster resilience, if you can rigorously value, the benefits of any of these habitats you can unlock any of the funding mechanisms that would have typically been applied to developing a seawall or a breakwater. That's a win win for life below the water and for those of us who live on land as well. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Mike Beck Christopher Dodd Jatta United States Santa Cruz Hawaiian Bj Christopher Don Puerto Rico Florida Hawaii Sixty Seconds Eight Billion Dollars Twenty Foot