35 Burst results for "Typhoid"

Huge Number of Healthcare Workers Still Unvaccinated

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:03 min | Last month

Huge Number of Healthcare Workers Still Unvaccinated

"I know show many people who are resistant to the vaccine. It's just a fact of life and there are people in all walks of life white people black people hispanic people members of the military. The healthcare profession. You know how many nurses and dare i say doctors. Physicians assistance unwilling to get the vaccine. It's more than a little. So what do we do with them. What do we do those people. In fact that's been one of the most unreported stories of the whole crisis of this pandemic healthcare workers who are unvaccinated. Now those you would think to people like geraldo or a public menace. They're lepers that's typhoid mary. Try to take my blood pressure. She didn't get a vaccine. She's fired to quote the forty fifth president of the united

Geraldo United
New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

UN News

00:50 sec | 7 months ago

New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

"The un world health organization. Who thursday that. There's a very high risk of the ebola virus spreading in guinea after. An outbreak was announced last sunday in an update. Whol said that its concern was based on the unknown size duration and origin of the outbreak. It has led to five deaths so far in the southern region of missouri corey which borders sierra leone liberia and cote d'ivoire the first confirmed victim was a nurse from rural health center. He was initially diagnosed with typhoid and malaria. While her known contacts include a traditional healer and their family are potentially a large number of others and limited capacity to respond cautioned the agency guinea was one of the three most affected countries in the two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen west africa ebola outbreak which was the largest since the virus was first discovered in nineteen seventy six

Whol Missouri Corey Ebola Rural Health Center Guinea UN Sierra Leone Cote Liberia Typhoid Malaria West Africa
"typhoid" Discussed on Ghost Town

Ghost Town

06:07 min | 10 months ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Ghost Town

"And that's where we get if you've seen the famous photo of typhoid mary. It's her in a bed. she's she's in her late twenty s and she looks really pissed and she's in like a row of beds. She's not happy she's like very like strong irish like anger bubbling up inside of her. And there's also a illustration of a typhoid. Mary iconic representations of her. That's like this large cook. And she's on the stove and she's cooking and she's cooking up. These little tiny skull meatballs so those are really good and again fairly accurate portrayals or what she was also what people thought her to be but again. It's it's much more complicated than that. Soper also visited mallon in quarantine. Remember him he wanted to write a book about her and share the royalties with her. She was not into that and locked herself in the bathroom until he left. She hated her nickname and wrote in a letter to lawyer. I wonder how the said. Dr william h park would like to be insulted and put in a journal and call him or his wife typhoid william park so she was really on the defensive. As you might be again being told that. You're this contagious. That you're this like angel of death figure in you know the medical world and the public world but also she was that so it was the these two competing forces of like her being a danger and her being kind of this pariah but also her being a danger and her not understanding what she had and what she was doing to the people around her in one thousand nine. Mary mallon tried to sue the new york health department for her treatment but her complaint was denied and the case closed by the new york supreme court in a letter to her lawyer. She complained that she was treated like quote a guinea pig. She was obliged to give samples for analysis three times a week again. For months she was not allowed to visit an eye doctor even though her eyelid was paralyzed and she had to bandage it at night. I'm not sure why she would have to bandage it. But it gets even though they were like all up on her for typhoid again through all this. Mary never thought she even could pass along typhoid. She didn't believe that she had it because she didn't believe she had symptoms and she didn't understand how it worked with. The help of french sent several samples to an independent new york laboratory..

Mary iconic Dr william h park william park Soper mallon Mary mallon new york health department mary new york supreme court typhoid Mary new york
"typhoid" Discussed on Ghost Town

Ghost Town

01:53 min | 10 months ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Ghost Town

"In i guess all of her households now i understand where she's coming from where like to be kinda victimized or told that she is on sick or unwell and again. This is an irish immigrant. Who's just trying to work trying to make money trying to make a living in a foreign country that would seem like really rude and offensive and she kind of has this victimized air to a lot of the stuff that i read the same time you know. She was contaminating literally everyone. She worked for so published his findings on june fifteenth nineteen o seven in the journal of american medical association. He wrote it was found that the family changed cooks on august fourth. This is about three weeks before the typhoid epidemic broke out. The new cook mallon remained in the family only a short time and left about three weeks. After the outbreak occurred mallon was described as an irish woman about forty years of age. Tall heavy single. She seemed to be in perfect health. Super notified the new york city health department realized that and this was not again very well known. Science at all that malan was typhoid carrier. Even though she didn't display any symptoms herself she was arrested as a public health threat. She was picked up at her home forced into an ambulance by policemen. Dr josephine baker. Who is a fascinating person in her own right but at this moment she had to subdue mary mallon by sitting on her to restrain her. Mom was taken to willard. Parker hospital where she was restrained again enforced to give samples for four days was not allowed to get up and use the bathroom her own. She was heavily heavily restricted but after testing her they found massive numbers of typhoid area and her stool samples indicating that the infection center was in her gallbladder under questioning. Mallon admitted that she almost never washed her hands again. This is not unusual. Nobody really knew what germs were during the turn of the century or how they might actually kill you but let's take a break for own.

mallon journal of american medical as typhoid Dr josephine baker mary mallon malan Parker hospital new york willard Mallon
"typhoid" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

05:31 min | 10 months ago

"typhoid" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Yeah yeah why. Why are the pooping in sync. Like there was nowhere else to poop. Okay dig a hole. What i mean. But all the holes got filled either with poop or with water than the rainwater would reflect the rise to the surface and spread around. That's schroeder she s. Yeah so that was from the report of the commission appointed by the president to investigate the conduct of the war department in the war with spain. Essentially the spanish american war reports from that around nineteen hundred is one news reports from all all made a few different excerpts. I thought it was more fun to do. A little smattering of salaries essentially. Yes and you'll hear why. I picked the spanish american war for the subject of today's episode Later on the first. Hi i'm erin. Welsh and i'm aaron omen uptake. And this is this podcast will kill you. And we're back with season flor- we are back and i'm very excited. I think we definitely need that break. Big time yeah. So we appreciate you guys for being patient and sticking with us and letting us get a little bit of time to take a breather yonder. Yeah we'll also get a bunch of fun new episodes lined up for so many new episodes. Yeah yeah speaking of fun new episodes. What is the topic of today's episode. Maybe our break was too long. No i actually love the. I feel like most of the time lately are firsthand completely. Give it away and now. It's like suspense has been building for like two whole minute. Yeah well i guess if no one click on the title of the. Maybe there's been auto sade day we're talking about typhoid fever typhoid fever. This fun has been a longtime coming. Oh very long time coming. I'm super excited to cover this one because typhoid fever was sort of the episode. I feel like that really changed our lives. Yes it change. Lives a thousand percent. Even though we have not yet covered it because typhoid the story of typhoid. Mary is the story that georgia heart stock told when she first gave us a shout out on my favorite murder which is like what led to like our lives changing forever. All the way back in case you're interested in listening all the way back in episode one oh five titled proclaim city. I looked it up. And i listened to it again. Research or this episode. Yeah this is definitely like a full circle moment. We've been for this episode since like twenty eight team. Twenty two thousand eighteen yeah eighteen. I'm just so excited for it. But before we get into the actual meat of the episode we do have some pieces of business starting with quarantine. Quarantine a time aaron. What are we drinking this week. Of course we could be drinking. Nothing other than a bloody. Mary bloody typhoid. Mary flood eat. Typhoid mary not just any bloody mary. Not just any. This one is titled differently But yeah other than the title. It is essentially a bloody mary who doesn't love the bloody mary. You can pick and choose whatever pickled vegetables you wanna put in there. It's tomato juice vodka. It's were sheer sauce. It's hot sauce. It's whatever you wanna put in there it lemon juice. How you like a bloody mary. Yeah an entire like hamburger on a dick. Yeah anything you want to put in there. We will post the recipe to the bloody typhoid mary as well as the non alcoholic placebo rita on our website. This podcast will kill you dot com as well as on all of our social media channels. What other business do we have to attend to erin. Well let's see let's go over the usual suspects. I mean number one. We've got merch. We've got some super cute new things. They're year things very exciting things. In fact the amazing artist holly sullivan did some new designs for us including and you can get prince of her designs right now and stickers of your siniya pestis eighties agip die of the influenza virus of girardi girardi like say it and then there's also other really cool things like one of my favorites is the quarantine time t shirt at a so soft and i also have to admit of to always wearing the hoodie around. It's like the perfect way. I drink out of the pint glasses and the socks are just too cute. I can't handle it. We also heard you guys when you ask for face masks since those are now pretty much a staple of everyone's wardrobe so we have two different face masks including when that says wash your hands you felt the animals. They both do. They both do. They are super cute. I really i love them all so yeah go check it out.

aaron omen fever war department erin Mary Welsh mary spain typhoid georgia holly sullivan aaron girardi girardi rita influenza
The Road to Bouillon

Gastropod

05:09 min | 10 months ago

The Road to Bouillon

"Today's story starts as soon as many good stories. Do with a german chemist whose family vig was one of the people who invented modern chemistry as a field and his contributions are vast in laboratory science and culture in nutrition. And once again we have the wonderful flavor historian nadia bernstein on the show and for the purposes of today's episode leagues contributions to agriculture are. Not the most important. We're interested in his nutrition. Science at the time in the eighteen hundreds scientists were hard work trying to understand. What the heck food actually was. This is kind of what chemists were up to you back then in the nineteenth century they were like. There's all of this stuff in the world what is it made of. Let's figure it out and name it. It's not just name it but decide which bits of it were essential chemists. Were trying to break food down into its elemental parts and understand exactly which parts we needed to survive in the eighteen thirties. Scientists named and identified protein and they found it particularly fascinating so why not just keep breaking things down was the trend at the time and scientists noticed that different protein-rich foods seem to be made up of slightly different building blocks. These are what we call amino acids today. If you think about proteins as molecules i mean most of us aren't thinking about perkins molecules. But if you imagine it it's sort of long molecule that's composed of a lot of different component parts of which are amino acids and what hydrolysis is basically this process of blasting that big molecule apart into these constituent pieces. This is in fact. Exactly what did hydrolysis he took hydrochloric acid and used it to break down or dissolve matt and then figure out what the different kinds of amino acids were lee bigs. Big breakthrough was identifying one particular amino acid creating which he then also found in the muscles of living animals. He found it in especially high levels in the muscles of a fox that died while it was running. And that's what led him to the conclusion that creating was the key to muscle action. People had been claiming that meat was important for health for a really long time but leagues contribution was to show at least based on his science at the time that the protein in meat was critical for muscles and so it was an essential component of a nutritious diet. League went as far as to say that the protein element of food was the only true nutrient meet. Was it said when his friend's daughter came down with typhoid league. Knew exactly what she needed me but she was too sick to digest solid foods. So league took some cook chicken. He grounded up. He soaked it in hydrochloric acid to dissolve it altogether at what he thought was critical creating. Then he added another chemical to neutralize the acid and turn it into table salt and then he gave the young girl this salty savory broth and she recovered and this led to what became one of his most popular discoveries at the time league was able to use chemistry to create a modern version of beef tea leaf. Tea had been popular with the sensitive and the sick leave for a few decades. The idea was that invalids. He were too delicate to eat. A great big steak could still get all its goodness by boiling that stake in water straining it and then drinking the resulting meat juices. Basically the idea is if your sickly. If you're wasting away with any of the numerous diseases that may have afflicted the dickensian populace mid nineteenth century. What you want to do is to get an easily and readily absorbable. Both sort of strengthening food of protein leagues was different from traditional beef t. He didn't need to boil meat for hours. To break it down. He could use hydrochloric acid to league. This meant he could keep in more of the good stuff from meat in the broth. He thought boiling. It was less effective. So liebenberg's beefed. He was kind of this. Concentrate at this sort of hydrolysed blasted part beef proteins made into a liquid broth that sickly little orphans and delicate women could sip and thus beyond the way to restoring their health lee big published his beef tea formula and a quickly became all the rage with fragile elite searching for something to pep up their delicate constitution pharmacists would make up a big batch. Evaporated and zealot under the name extract. Carney's extractive meet. It was classified as a legal drug. in germany. in fact it was considered so essential that pharmacists were required to keep it in stock. Doctors reported that league's formula for extractives. Carney's could be useful for tuberculosis. Typhus various dumped arrangements. and scruffy. One doctor said it could be a useful substitute for brandy and cases of exhaustion. Depression and despondency. I'd rather have a brandy but the point is leaving. High tech version of beef d. was a wonder drug in the eighteen fifties. It was thought of as a way to give the goodness of muscle forming meat to the week in puny

Nadia Bernstein VIG Perkins Typhoid Matt Liebenberg Carney Typhus Germany Tuberculosis Depression
How COVID-19 human challenge trials work -- and why Sophie Rose volunteered

TED Talks Daily

04:01 min | 10 months ago

How COVID-19 human challenge trials work -- and why Sophie Rose volunteered

"In april. Two thousand and twenty. I made what many perceive is a risky decision volunteered to be deliberately infected with covid nineteen. This infection would be part of what is cold. A human challenge show where young healthy people given a vaccine and then deliberately exposed to the virus that causes covid. Nineteen these trials help. Researchers figure out more quickly if a vaccine is working. I think this research is crucial. Because today i'm going to speak to you for six minutes in that time. Roughly twelve hundred and fifty people will be confirmed infected with covid nineteen twenty. One people will die and then this pot repeat hour after hour and day by day until we're able to vaccinate most of the eight billion people affected but squabble crisis. Scientists have been working around the clock to make those vaccine's reality. But what should we do when the human cost of waiting for vaccines is rising by the day. This is a human challenge shells. Come in the different from the traditional phase. Three bucks trials taking place now where people are given a vaccine or placebo. An oss to go about their everyday lives. Researchers have to wait to see how many people in each group become infected until enough of them get sick. We don't have enough data to know whether a vaccine is working. Finding effective vaccine with this method can take months sometimes years and it requires thousands of volunteers. A challenge tall works foster because research control exposure instead of waiting for people to get sick so instead of a year we could know in as little as a month whether a vaccine seems effective instead of thousands of volunteers a challenge shawl relies on just fifty to one hundred because we know if a sudden when people are exposed and develop disease. These trials also allow us together data about the early stages of infection and our response. This data is impossible together in any other way especially for people who become infected but never showed symptoms. This knowledge is important for designing policies. That limit covid nineteen transmission. The time saved translates into precious month's headstart on manufacturing getting a small working covid. Nineteen vaccines scenes foster. These trials are useful even their recent phase through results on encouraging. The arrival of the fuss vaccine is going to be a monumental breakthrough. it just isn't quite the fairy tale ending role harping full. We're going to need multiple vaccines because we just don't have the infrastructure needed to immunize eight billion people on the planet with just one kind. Each type of back seen requires its own special process and equipment to make store and deliver it if we had multiple working covid nineteen vaccines. We could make use of all of our equipment at the same time. Some of the leading candidates need to be kept extremely colds before they live limit to people. This can be really hard especially in countries where there isn't reliable electricity or a secure method to store them. Scientists have been using human challenge. Charles for hundreds of years. They've sped up the development vaccines against typhoid and cholera. And i've helped us better understand how immunity develops to things like the flu. Malaria and dengue gay with use them for other types of coronavirus. Before there's been a lot of debate about whether challenge charles a too risky. I happen to think that those risks of taking a challenge trial would recruit young and healthy participants think between the ages of twenty and twenty nine fewer than one percent of people in that age group need to be taken to hospital after becoming infected with covid nineteen likely even lower in a challenge trial because researchers check to make sure that participants have no pre existing conditions. The risk of a young healthy person dying of covid nineteen is around five thousandth of a percent

Colds Typhoid Cholera Dengue Malaria Charles FLU
If approved, UK to start controversial Covid vaccine challenge trial infecting patients

Up First

01:03 min | 11 months ago

If approved, UK to start controversial Covid vaccine challenge trial infecting patients

"Researchers are preparing for a step toward finding a corona virus vaccine a particularly terrifying step it's called a challenge trial and it means you give the vaccine to people, and then you expose them to the virus to see if the vaccine works. Channel trials are used to test vaccines for diseases like typhoid, cholera and malaria. The difference here is that if new vaccines for those. Illnesses do not work there at least ways to treat the people who've been infected for covid nineteen. Of course, there is no cure and treatments are still limited. So a challenged trial raises some real ethical concerns. Arthur Caplan is a bioethics professor at New York. University School of Medicine. We don't fully understand the Cobra virus we're going to give it to people intentionally make them sick. What if there's a death? What if there's long-term disability? What if things go really soured for the subjects? As, just GonNa look like an ethics catastrophe researchers in the United Kingdom? Still think challenge trial is worth it and they plan to try one

Arthur Caplan Typhoid University School Of Medicine United Kingdom New York Professor
U.K. Moves Toward Ethically Controversial Coronavirus Vaccine Trial

PRI's The World

06:07 min | 11 months ago

U.K. Moves Toward Ethically Controversial Coronavirus Vaccine Trial

"Vaccine Trials are happening all over the globe today. The UK government announced funding for phase. One of something called a human challenge trial for a corona virus vaccine. The process will require young healthy volunteers to be infected with the virus in an effort to speed up vaccine testing a company called H Vivo and Imperial College London. Have the contract is set up the first part of that process. Here's more from the world's caroline dealer the idea itself sounds wild intentionally infect people with the very virus returning our lives upside down to avoid. People hear about these trials. Many people's immediate reaction is, how could it be ethical but Oxford bioethicist deb Yom row gic says, it's possible if certain conditions are met one of those conditions is that the expected benefits of the research outweigh the risks. In this case, how many infections could we prevent if we developed a vaccine sooner? For example, in a typical clinical trial thousands of people are injected with a test vaccine and sent out into the world to see if they still get infected naturally that's happening now with several corona virus vaccine candidates, but Andrew Catchpole. The, chief scientific officer at H., Vivo the company launching this human challenge trial says that takes time normal traditional trials involve many thousands of subjects take many many months to complete in human challenge trials, which HP VO has been running for decades. A small number of healthy volunteers would be intentionally infected with the coronavirus after getting jabbed with a trial vaccine to see if it works. What happens is because everybody is given the disease, you're able to determine efficacy in a matter of weeks. These types of tiles have been used for centuries and in the recent past have. Sped up the development of typhoid and cholera vaccines. The agreement announced by the UK government today is just for the first step of this contract to manufacture and test Raina the virus to use in trials it still has to be approved by regulators and an ethics panel. If it is between thirty and ninety volunteers could start being injected with just the test virus, not yet any vaccine as soon as the beginning of next year so far nearly three thousand people in the UK have signed up to volunteer for a challenge trial. One of them is allaster frazier ORCA. White indefinite convinced. The Human Josh all has essential to advising Ovalles, scenes, population way more quickly lift on them on opinion the risk is small enough to travel participants that we need to take that risk frazier ORCA put off going to university for a year to work with one day sooner, a nonprofit group advocating for human challenge trials and signing up volunteers. He says the Tom Channel some of the fear of living through a pandemic into something that feels productive grandma custos. My Dodd might catch his out his risk. So kind of on a personal level the. Volunteer volunteers will be paid somewhere around five thousand dollars insurance cover healthcare costs. For any complications they will quarantine in a special nineteen dead unit at the Royal Free, hospital in London for an expected two weeks after virus exposure. Again, Andrew Catch Paul from h Vivo. A first priority was doing these studies is the safety of the volunteers. So for that reason, we go very strict criteria about those who. Will be eligible to participate. Volunteers must be between eighteen and thirty healthy with no pre existing conditions. But there's a more controversial criteria that scientists are wrestling with right now whether to exclude volunteers of color because there is data suggest that there is a potential for increased risk. The UN says Kobe nineteen is disproportionately affecting racial and ethnic minorities around the globe including in Brazil the UK and the US. K. Government figures, black men in England and Wales are more than two and a half times more likely to die of cope in nineteen than white men. Some of that is explained by socioeconomic status in pre existing conditions. But Dhillon David Kumar, a physician and professor at University College London says it's more than that. They're also other underlying causes racism discrimination for example, being an underlying cause which are not easy to count foreign. Announces such as this Dave Qamar said, he's the health impacts of racism and xenophobia. He says, well, it's important to note that raises a social construct, not biological. The effects of racism in tells in ways that can be hard to identify. So you can't hold constant the discrimination someone's face throughout their life. You can't hold constant the environment someone grownup in the levels of air pollution kinds of housing that they've lifting throughout their life. So. There are differences in outcomes amongst racial groups. David Kamar isn't familiar with this specifics of this study proposal, but he says he can understand the reason for picking volunteers who are at the lowest possible risk for getting really sick. Charles cordray chief officer for the Caribbean and African Health Network sees it differently. It's really disappointing people of Color. In clinical trials that's partly due to legacy of racist medical experiments. By white doctors and kwok-wah dray says the idea of excluding people of color from this trial would add to the distrust mistrust and the lack of trust has come about as a result of decades of sometimes how we need to respond so quickly but what is meant is that there's a whole section of people. Fair much. whose voices are not being head HBO is still making a decision about whether and how to include people of Color in the first phase of this trial when they're testing out the safest way to infect people with the actual virus the company hasn't designed protocols yet for the actual vaccine-testing in hopes quickly follows the volunteer criteria for this stage of the study will be finalized and handed over to UK regulators and an ethics panel by

UK Andrew Catchpole Imperial College London Chief Scientific Officer London Kwok-Wah Dray David Kamar Frazier Orca Typhoid Royal Free Caribbean Hp Vo Dodd University College London Tom Channel UN Dave Qamar Dhillon David Kumar
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

13:31 min | 1 year ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Ebola Congo Kinshasa Scientist Google Belgium John Jack Mugabe Fever Epidemic NPR Typhoid United States Dr John Jack Ater Kenya Mattie Dr John Africa Peralta
"typhoid" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"typhoid" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Might keep the story of typhoid Mary in the back of your mind she didn't have symptoms of typhoid but infected others and caused a huge outbreak governor Poloz says many people with corona virus are also a symptomatic there are many typhoid Marys among us unknowingly people who are contagious and have no symptoms and wouldn't even know it that's why governor poll says hand washing wearing masks social distancing are so important especially over the holiday weekend he reminds people to avoid gatherings of more than ten people and to be mindful that the coronavirus fight is far from over Jerry bell Kaylee newsradio Colorado is now among the states with cases of a corona virus related syndrome that attacks kids in the past week or two there have been just over a hundred whole case reported in multiple states throughout the U. S. but the most cases being reported in New York we have been both involved with the care of three children with suspected Amancio children's hospital Colorado Dr Sam Dominguez of children says pediatric symptoms include multiple days of fever or severe abdominal pain he says the multi system inflammatory syndrome presents after about four weeks of being exposed to corona virus boulder is cracking down on all of the people who've been out lounging around boulder creek without practicing social distancing boulder has closed the area along the creek within the city limits in the past three weeks sixty six citations have been issued their restaurants and retail stores in Connecticut are now welcoming customers that means all fifty states have now partially re opened after corona virus shut downs apple is making it easier to unlock your iPhone while wearing a facemask the tech company updated software so users can enter their passcode by swiping up if face ID is not working before the update if face ID didn't work it would try again before giving the passcode screen the new feature will start working when users update their operating system Tom Roberts NBC news radio on Wall Street the Dow was up three sixty nine nasdaq gained one hundred ninety one points S. and P. five hundred added forty nine aren't accepted at four thirty I'm Cathy Walker K. away newsradio eight fifty AM in ninety four one FM Hey it's John and I don't know about you but I'm ready to get back on the road and drive up on the E..

Cathy Walker K. NBC Tom Roberts abdominal pain Amancio Jerry bell governor Poloz typhoid John typhoid Mary apple Connecticut boulder boulder creek fever
Debate resurfaces over origins of novel coronavirus

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Debate resurfaces over origins of novel coronavirus

"The debate continues over whether the covered nineteen virus was manufactured in a lab or if it developed naturally ABC's linsey Davis spoke with an expert about where it may have actually come from to help us try to make some sense of all this we like to bring in Tom Bossert president trump's former homeland security adviser and ABC news contributor thanks so much for joining us so trump in Pompeii they suggested there is a link between the virus and will haunt lab Dr Fauci seems to knock that down entirely and is said that the science indicates involved in nature who is right and what we know yeah well it's very important be precise about this language because they could both be right they can also both be wrong at the same time and here's what I mean by that the the the virus itself has been studied by scientists including in the trump administration under the NIH and Francis Collins the director of the NIH has come out and scientifically concluded with a report that they published almost a month ago that it wasn't made by man it wasn't a man made you know genomics kind of can you know conception of humans it was naturally and if you may be brewing so to speak for maybe even years if not months so the question is did it then transmits a human beings from the market or were they looking at this naturally occurring virus in the lab and then either intentionally or through some accident release it from that lab so the question is not about origin of the virus that's not man made the question is about whether was released accidentally or whether it was you know a natural occurrence and that's the question being investigated now as we know this virus has already killed tens of thousands of Americans you envision political or social fallout from suggesting that a Chinese lab is to blame that's exactly why it's so important to be careful with that language between the president and secretary of state and and doctors out she they're all saying something similar but to be very clear the fall out from a mistake or an accidental release will be you know somewhat significant but perhaps obviously not that level of war or conflict we've we've had this problem in our country where after nine eleven we had doctors in laboratories not properly caring for the anthrax that they were working on and studying and that could have been a bio laboratory security concerns certainly we can see a buyer laboratory safety concern in China and we want international agreements to improve those standards and those practices so that negligence and and mishaps don't happen but if it were intentionally intentionally released it's not intentionally created but intentionally released that would be tantamount to the largest bio warfare we've ever seen on the planet and so we have to be very careful to make sure we don't imply that Lester is pretty strong evidence that you kind of just touched on this but I'm just curious to know if you think that we will ever definitively know the true origin of the virus and how important is that discovery yeah I think that there's a good chance that we'll know so it was both naturally occurring which it is and naturally transmitted let's say from the market down the street we may never be able to prove that there won't be a typhoid Mary he said to speak that we can zero in on and talk to but it was released from the lab many alternative intentionally or otherwise we should be able to find evidence of that I believe that's what our intelligence community is looking at now you can talk to lab officials and maybe disgruntled doctors that worked at the lab there were observing their practices one of the first key questions I'll have to ask is whether that lab was actually looking at and performing research on this virus so will determine that and then we'll determined through investigation and if there is some link to the lab will find

ABC Linsey Davis
My Panic Attack

Buddhist Boot Camp Podcast

07:24 min | 1 year ago

My Panic Attack

"Originally intended to record this episode back in March but that's when the corona virus hit the US in full force. So I put it on the back burner to host live. Qna's instead highlights. From which are uploaded as podcast episodes but once our front doors open again. The sudden stimuli of crowded stores and roadways might overwhelm us which brings me to this unlikely story. I want to share with you about a panic attack. That had earlier this year it turns out. There's a good explanation for why it occurred but it was quite unnerving when it was actually happening. What got me through? It is what can get us through. What's happening right? Now after? Six years of accumulating airline mileage points from flights and credit card charges. I finally had enough points to cover an absolutely free round trip. Flight and five week backpacking trip around the Philippines earlier this year and setting up a tenth on the beach or as I like to call it. A five billion star hotel made the trip in nature lovers paradise but quite a few shots. Vaccinations for things like typhoid and malaria were either necessary or strongly advised prior to boarding the flight. I am fortunate enough to not be on any medication. generally avoid even taking aspirin unless. I'm in severe pain but considering all the time I was about to spend sleeping outdoors in a third world country. I took the malaria pills for two weeks prior to departure as well as during the trip and for three weeks. Afterwards I didn't bother reading the possible side effects because not taking the pills wasn't an option but it didn't take long to notice that the pills made me sleepy for example so I just took them at night. I later discovered. They also cause vivid dreams and a slight fever which was no big deal. The whole point of the trip was to maximize time on quiet deserted islands for some peace and tranquility and to avoid major loud cities like Manila as much as possible. Since as far back as I can remember. I've been hyper sensitive to certain types of noise. The high pitch of CRT monitors beeping alarms the sound of someone snoring chewing the auditory assault of emergency sirens screaming children wind chimes and even certain. Birdsong would all drive me crazy. If it wasn't for two things one I can usually meditate and breathe deeply through the noise until it stops and I can return to the bliss of silence and to almost always have earplugs on me just in case. The sound is louder than my meditation consumer. Whether this miss a phony ah is a symptom of being somewhere on the spectrum or something else. Altogether avoiding noise isn't an option especially when dealing with major airports and public transportation. I can usually gear myself up prior to leaving the house in preparation for what's to come and wear noise cancelling headphones which more often than not keep my anxiety at bay anyway. The trip involved wonderfully warm ocean breeze on white sand beaches beautiful hikes and surprisingly freezing temperatures did not expect to experience in the Philippines but enjoyed immensely nonetheless on us. Sunrise hike to one of the highest peaks in the country clear blue skies and great food. Add into the mix one bad case of getting seasick on a boat between islands two cases of food poisoning which I actually think was from drinking the water. Not NECESSARILY FROM ANYTHING. I eight and you've got the complete experience which was still great in the grand scheme of things but at one point returning to the big loud and busy city of Manila after a couple of weeks of reading books in a Hammock on a quiet deserted beach. Hit Me really hard. The noise of construction traffic blaring. Tv's and radios car horns and the fast pace of everything and everyone around me shot my anxiety through the roof and sent me into the worst panic attack of ever had. I'm not going to play it down for you. I completely lost it. I truly believed it was the end of timber as we know him. That Buddhist boot camp would come to an end and that I would have to check myself into a mental hospital upon returning to the states. If I don't kill myself I that's how bad it was. Suicide was more inviting than another minute of noise from which I couldn't escape even with earplugs or noise cancelling headphones I truly wanted to die. It was my lowest point and I didn't even recognize myself. I mean this is me. We're talking about the guy who feels anger threatening to surface and starts contemplating what other feeling I'd rather choose but in this case this down to Earth Guy you've grown to know over. The years was no more. What got me through this sudden spiral of mental instability. As I was rocking back and forth was repeating to myself. This is temporary. This is temporary. This is temporary within an hour. I fell asleep probably from exhaustion. It's incredible how much energy the body uses to feel something anything so strongly. When I woke up the next day I was no longer on edge but still seriously questioning my mental health. Was this my own psychotic breakdown. His this what everyone was saying. Britney Spears went through in two thousand seven. It felt like years of meditation. Mindfulness and all the practice of had to remain calm in the midst of chaos. Meant nothing so I decided to do some research and discovered that severe panic attacks are actually a common side effect from the Malaria vaccine. I was taking and it all made sense on the one hand. I was relieved that it was merely a chemical reaction to the pills but has felt so real in the moment of panic. I couldn't access all those other parts of my brain that would have otherwise kicked in with logic and reasoning to talk me off the ledge but whether real or chemically induced the mantra. This is temporary. Helped me through it? All temporary can mean a minute or two an hour a week month year or lifetime. No matter how you look at anything. Everything is in constant flux. I guess what pleasantly surprised me. The most is how quickly I was willing to accept my mental breakdown. Prior to falling asleep I contacted a friend to recommend a therapist could see immediately upon returning to the states. I asked another friend whether the mental institutions depicted in movies resembled the real ones. He sees in his medical practice and then all reminded me of the near drowning incident that I described in my memoir and how I'm merely observed what was happening rather than reacting to it. I guess I wanted to share this story with you because perhaps all of the years of mindfulness practice didn't go out the window in the moment of panic and the gap between impulse response. I didn't react to what was happening. I reminded myself how temporary it all was. Mindfulness Meditation can really help us. Not In the moment of meditation but at some point down the road when we need it most a got me through the four hours of being seasick on the worst boat ride. You can imagine it. Got Me through the panic attack and it got me through the whirlwind of change to which I returned when I got back home for starters I found out that I had to move out from where I've been living for the past two and a half years but rather than react or dubbed the unexpected experience terrible or unfortunate. I found a new place to live. That is everything of ever dreamed of. And then this corona virus exploded and I can't think of anywhere on the world where I'd rather be quarantined right now

Manila Philippines Malaria United States QNA Fever Aspirin Typhoid Britney Spears Assault Birdsong
"typhoid" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

12:33 min | 1 year ago

"typhoid" Discussed on BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

"In one thousand nine hundred ninety six it was considered the most advanced to burke yellow sus sanatorium in the country but even then most advanced. The most advanced is what it said. Yeah because I had the highest death rates. It's crazy to think about like this isn't just some we just had they build a shitty place for criminally insane or whatever people. There was no medicine available at the time to treat the disease and so many patients were offered there. So you go there arrest. Fresh air and nutritious food sadly the main use for the hospital was to isolate those who would come down with a disease and to keep them away from those who would not families were tragically divided with parents and even children forced into the sanatorium with little or no contact with their loved. Ones now the treatments for this and this will all lead to kind of the haunting. Were sometimes as bad as disease itself. Yeah so signed. Some of these practices are considered barbaric. Here a couple of them now. I this one is like actually like Oh. The fresh air was actually thought to be a possible cure so patients were often placed in front of huge windows open porches. And you're like oh well. That sounds Nice but this was regardless of the season. There were photographs. That show patients L- like lounging chairs force their hair while literally covered in snow. So they're having to sit there and breathe while basically freezing to death. Yeah that's and other treatments or even less pleasant much bloodier they said balloons would be surgically implanted in people's lungs and filled with air to expand them. Oh yeah can you imagine that instead needs to say this often had disastrous results? As didn't operation were muscles and ribs were removed from a patient's chest to allow the lungs to expand further led more oxygen. So fuck they were combating this all the wrong ways off. Yeah Commission a balloon going into your lungs so wile patients did survive tuberculosis and they left through the front door. Many others left through what came to be known as the the body shoot. It was an enclosed tunnel for the debt that led away from the hospital and it was through railroad tracks in very very hush hush like it was very secretive and they did that so that patients wouldn't see how many people were actually dying in leaving. His horse is because the hospital that their mental health was important. And you know what if I were there? I would not want to see all the dead bodies I would be like okay. Yeah that's fine. I understand what they're doing. I mean because being a hospitals depressing enough and then then that just puts you in a panic attack anxiety because all you're thinking is I'm next. It's exactly right and it almost might even psychologically weakened you like everyone else's is dying. What chance do I have yeah? Health is just as important and I agree with that. I think like your mental state. There can do a lot some okay with that. Now there are reports. There's no nothing accurate. How about that? I'm imagining a shoot lake? Sweeney Todd like when we slits pages junior last thing they have. It's terrible so they. There's no accurate results on how many people died so people estimated that it was like in the tens of thousands or something like that like it was something stupid crazy. But there's no known answer. However is there any wonder that after all that shit that it's known as one of the most haunted places in the country because? Oh my God by two thousand one. The hospital gained a reputation for being haunted and stories began to circulate and people would see a little girl who would run up and down the third floor solarium. There's a little boy spotted with a leather ball. This is to me. That's the biggest creepiest thing. People saw hearse that appeared in the back of the building dropping off coffins. Oh can you fucking believe that? If you said there's a car pull up out of a ghost unload fucking bodies. Oh my God. There was a woman. People have seen with bleeding wrists. Who CRIED OUT FOR HELP suicide victim? Yeah Yeah visitors told of slamming doors lights and windows coming on even though there's no power Strange sounds Erie footsteps. Other people see a man in a white coat who's seen walking through a kitchen and the smell of cooking food will actually emanate from the kitchen. So yeah let's chef shop as haunting the hunting the place and like making delicious and then the greatest and most controversial legend is connected to the fifth floor of the building. It's Room five zero two on the fifth floor and basically it's a subject of many rumors and legends. That every curiosity seeker. Who's broken into waverly hills has has gone to see the fifth floor. Now this is where according to stories people have seen shapes. Moving in the windows have heard disembodied voices and then though the shadows of the ghosts go to the window and jump so they actually jumped to their deaths and it was actually said that this floor was the one used to confine or house the mentally ill. Tuberculosis patients that is the waverly hills each wars. It out again in Louisville Kentucky. I'm so crazy now you are i. It's creepy it's so creepy and just real place and they really did that stop. That's what gets me a thank God. We have vaccinations. Yeah I know right well. Hopefully we'll have a vaccine or something soon the shit that's going on now so it's crazy that were freaking out. And the thing is it's warranted like. We need to be quarantined but over. Something that has like a two percent death-ray compared to compared to these where it was. I mean sixty percent of the population in Europe. I mean we. We should be worried but absolutely so many more people. Oh my God. It's crazy to think like. Can you imagine what our economy and life would be doing right now? If a thing we're spreading list is sixty percent fatality rate. Oh Gosh okay. The next story takes place here in America by way of Ireland. I'm talking about Mary. Mellon also known as typhoid Mary. Oh Okay Oh this is a real person. Okay this peaches Yup okay. It's called the most dangerous woman in America but we will get there. Oh No okay I let me tell you what typhoid is. Typhoid fever is a bacterial infection that is caused by a semi Nilo Taffy. That has an onset between six and thirty days and can create a number of symptoms including and later state something called the typhoid state where the afflicted lies motionless and exhausted. Sometimes has hallucinations. Salmonella Typhi is shed from the body through fecal matter so if someone doesn't wash their hands after pooping it can be transmittable usually through contaminated food or drink. Oh my gosh so yeah. Typhoid is a disease that is still around today but thanks to vaccinations. It is a lot less deadly than it. Once was so now typhoid. Mary was an Irish born woman in Cookstown who migrated to the United States and worked as a private cook to several families in New York City in one thousand nine hundred six. Mary was hired by a wealthy New York banker to cook his family on. Long Island that summer between August twenty third and September. Six six of eleven people in the home suffered from typhoid fever. Remember that this was a time when the infection was still pretty deadly and at that time was a known only to affect impoverished community so that a wealthy family was afflicted. Oh it's like a big deal was surprised list. Following the incident sanitary engineer called. George Soper was hired to investigate as he had experienced a typhoid fever outbreaks suspecting Mary soper track down her previous employers only to find that some people in those residences to had caught typhoid. Oh my gosh. So per confirmed his suspicions being that Mary was the common thread. Ah she transmitting. The disease the thing is Mary was a model of good health so it was hard to put the complete blame on her soper had called her a quote healthcare yer of the disease meaning. She had the disease but did not show any science. Which of course seen as extremely dangerous. Absolutely okay just trying to see if this was something malicious or okay keep going some people say she's a murderous but I don't believe I just think okay so okay so it wasn't like I was like. She liked putting feces in the meal per accuser. Chocolate cake and eat my thought that Mary had passed on her germs by not washing her hands thoroughly before handling food. Although the high temperatures to cook food killed the bacteria soper wondered that then how the? Germs were transferred. Oh yeah the culprit was one of Mary's MOST POPULAR RECIPES. Ice Cream and rob peaches. Oh my gosh heads my peach rose. Never I don't like peaches anyway. And this is why soper had tried to obtain a feces blood a urine sample to test for the disease from Mary but she refused and instead chased him away with the carving fork Mary was adamant that she didn't have the disease and was never infected. She was so adamant that she refused to cooperate. And government officials had to intervene in order to get that sample. Oh my gosh against her will. Mary was arrested and forced into quarantine on North Border Island Mary so it's believed that she was not infected that she sued the health department a case she lost after a couple of years in quarantine she was released under the condition a couple of years. Oh my God. She has released under the condition that she no longer work as a cook. Although she agreed this was never intent since she thought she had no infection she eventually went back to cooking using different pseudonyms since typhoid. Mary was becoming common thing because of her. Oh my God cooking again of course infected more. No she did okay now. She's a whore. So she has a gun forced into quarantine where she spent the next twenty plus years for the remainder of her life. Oh my God after all is said and done as reported that Mary infected fifty three known people and caused at least three deaths. Mary was the cause of the outbreak of the area. And as such was seen as patient zero. Oh my God. Her nickname typhoid. Mary is now sometimes used as a metaphor for the fear of contamination. Or for anyone. Who has a contagious? I've even used it. Yeah North Border Island went through many transitions eventually becoming abandoned in nineteen sixty three. Today is a place of mystery and arenas that like in. My previous story is off limits to the public in June of one thousand nine. Five steam steamboat. Taking people to a picnic. On Long Island was set on fire accidentally. This resulted in the death of one thousand one hundred and forty one people following the tragic event bodies washed up on the island shore for hours leaving the beaches scattered with bodies the sometime after that people who were on the island claim to see ghosts of the steamboat. A boat victims wandering the area crying. Sins that these spirits are not the only ones there for someone who has visited the island whether legally earth illegally. We don't know they have so that there is a spirit of a woman who walks. The halls of the abandoned hospital peaches. There's one particular story told by an orderly who followed the lady down the hall after seeing her go into one of the rooms when he went into the room to see who she was. There was no one there. Each it is hard to say who this was but many seem to think it was old. Mary Mellon herself. The moral of the story is don't be typhoid Mary and always wash your fucking hands especially after taking a dump. Oh my God that's crazy. I had no idea about that. I wonder fucking taught like I hope that at the very end. Maybe she actually agreed. Oh Wow maybe I do have something going on. That is why that she's such a carrier like that that she can transmit the disease that actually having the symptoms. That's so scary thing each skis ski I heard about her on my murder. Candida Oh thing on her. Oh that's super cool. This is the shadow to thanks Karen. Thanks for the story. Had like so many thoughts and questions about that. But it's just like if you were quarantine for twenty years. What does that mean like? Was She given a nice little house? Read about her own cottage. Would what about visitors? I don't know about that okay because I I read two that eventually. She became a nurse as well in the hospital so lake. Oh God maybe she didn't have it anymore that point but oh God. I didn't actually know that that.

Mary typhoid Mary Mellon George Soper tuberculosis North Border Island Mary soper America Long Island soper Salmonella Europe Louisville Kentucky fever waverly hills Sweeney Todd Erie
"typhoid" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Murder Minute

"<Music> <Music> in quarantine. <Speech_Music_Female> She never <Speech_Music_Male> again tried to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> escape. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mary <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> was now about forty <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> eight years of age <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and a good <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> deal heavier than <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> she was when she slipped <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> through a kitchen. Full of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> servants jumped <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the back fence <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and put up a fight with <Speech_Music_Male> strong. Young policeman <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> torch <Music> sober recalled. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> She was <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as strong as ever <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> yet lost something <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at the remarkable <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> energy and activity <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> which had <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> characterized her young <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> days <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and urged her forward <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to meet undaunted <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> whatever <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> situation. The world presented <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the city provided <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mary with the cottage <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> gender steady <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> supply of food for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> free <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> now that she <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was no longer considered <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a flight risk. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mary was <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> even allowed to come and <Speech_Music_Female> go as she pleased <Speech_Music_Female> and made <Speech_Music_Female> regular visits to <Speech_Music_Female> the mainland to <Speech_Music_Male> shop. Then walk <Music> <Advertisement> around the city <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> North Brother Island <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the city of Ford <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> her a comfortable place to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> live <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a place where she could <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> cook and sleep and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> read to her heart's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> content. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Her old <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> age was provided <Speech_Music_Male> for. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> There was a good hospital <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with doctors <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nearby. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> She became <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a privileged <Speech_Music_Female> guest of the city. <Speech_Music_Female> Nobody <Speech_Music_Female> ever talked to <Speech_Music_Female> her about anything <Speech_Music_Female> she did not want to <Speech_Music_Female> talk about. <Speech_Music_Female> She announced <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that her past life <Speech_Music_Female> was a closed <Speech_Music_Female> incident <Speech_Music_Female> and nobody <Speech_Music_Male> bothered her about <Music> <Advertisement> it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> when <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a nurse wants attempted <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to ask Mary <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about her past <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> love affairs. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mary silenced <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> her with her <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> signature. Glare <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Christmas morning <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> nineteen thirty to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a man <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> came to Mary's cottage <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to something <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> found her paralyzed <Speech_Music_Female> on the floor. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> She <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> had suffered <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a stroke. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mary <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mallon spent the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> last six years <Speech_Music_Female> of her life in the hospital. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Unable to walk <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Female> died <Speech_Music_Female> on November Eleventh <Speech_Music_Female> Nineteen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thirty eight <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> George Super <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Dug into Mary. Mallon's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> personal life <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> but never found <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> any relatives <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in America <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on her <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> native. Ireland <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <SpeakerChange> Mary <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> never mentioned <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> anyone <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in her total <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of twenty six years <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the island. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> She never wants <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sent for anyone <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> when she was sick <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> or in trouble <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and no one came <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> forward after her <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> death to claim <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the small amount <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of money but she left <Music> <Advertisement> behind <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> nine. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> People attended <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mary's funeral <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at St. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Luke's Roman Catholic <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Church on one <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> hundred thirty eight th <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> street. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> She was interred <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at Saint. <Music> <Advertisement> Lehman cemetery <Music> <Advertisement> in the box. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> No one <Speech_Music_Male> was present <Speech_Music_Male> at her berry. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> This episode <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of murder minute <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was recorded <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in isolation <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in the narrators <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> apartment in <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Los Angeles <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> don't <Speech_Female> be a typhoid Mary. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Please <Speech_Female> practice social <Speech_Female> distancing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> during this corona <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> virus. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Remember <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> just <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> because you're young <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and healthy <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> doesn't mean <Speech_Male> you're not a carrier <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> for true crime <Speech_Female> anytime. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Download the murder <Speech_Female> minute APP or <Speech_Female> follow us on Instagram <Music>

"typhoid" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Murder Minute

"In March of nineteen seven after a four month search torch soper finally found Mary Mellon she was five feet six inches tall blond with clear. Blue Eyes. I- healthy color and a somewhat determined mouth and jaw. Mary had a good figure. And what have been called? Athletic. Had she not been a little too heavy George. Supermarked was so distinctive about her as her walk unless it was her mind the two had a peculiarity in common. Mary walked more like a man than a woman and her mind had a distinctly masculine character. Also Mary was working as a cook in an old fashioned high. Stoop House on Park Avenue on the west side. Two doors above a church at street the laundry had recently been taken to the Presbyterian Hospital with typhoid fever. And the only child of the family a lovely daughter was dying of it. George soper carefully explained to Mary. He had good reason to suspect that she was unwittingly spreading typhoid and asked her for specimens of her urine stool and blood test for the disease at no cost to her sober assured Mary that the city would pay for her medical treatment. If she needed it he would see to it. It did not take Mary long to react to the suggestion super cold. She sees the carving fork and advanced in my direction passed. Rapidly down the long narrow hall through the Toll Iron Gate out through the area and so to the sidewalk. I felt rather lucky to escape. Apparently Mary did not understand that I wanted to help her. But George Soper noon that Mary Mallon was the cause of the outbreaks and he didn't need to test her urine or stool to prove it. Just how she did it. I didn't know I wanted to find out. He said I felt a good deal of responsibility about the case under suitable conditions. Mary might precipitate a great epidemic. Mary Mallon was what is now. Known as an as symptomatic carrier. That is a person who has been infected with a pathogen but displays no signs or symptoms. This is different from other seemingly healthy carriers of disease an incubator carrier for example unknowingly infects others before the onset of their own symptoms convalescent carriers as was initially suspected in the Oyster Bay case spread disease following a period of illness thinking themselves to be cured but unknowingly still contagious but mary was different. Symptomatic carriers never exhibit signs or symptoms yet spread the disease sometimes as in Mary's case for years as at least dormant in their system the next day so profound Mary. Mallon again this time at a boarding house on Third Avenue that he described as a place of dirt and disorder soper learned that Mary was spending her evenings with a disreputable looking man who had a room at the top floor and to whom she was taking food super got to know the man who did his business in a saloon on the Corner. He took me to see his room so percent. I should not care to see another like it. It was not improved by the presence of a large dog of which Mary was said to be Fond George. Sopa waited one evening for Mary the top of the stairs and tried again to explain. That Ohboshi wasn't ill. Mary was carrying and spreading the Germs. That caused typhoid. Mary was angry at the unexpected sight of me and although I recited some well considered speeches committed to memory in advance to make sure she understood what I meant and then I meant her. No harm could do nothing with her. Mary angrily denied that she had ever had typhoid typhoid fever was everywhere. She argued and her employers had suffered no more cases than anyone else in the city. She was in perfect health and was outraged at the accusation. George soper would have to try again but George knew that he had to act quickly. Mary would soon be leaving her job on Park Avenue and when she did she would disappear into the city again spreading typhoid fever wherever she went until he could track her down once more he decided to enlist the help of a higher authority. George Sober brought the case to the attention of commissioner. Thomas Darlington and Dr Herman M Biggs Medical Officer of the New York City Health Department. He recommended that Mary. Mallon be taken into custody immediately. I called Mary a living culture tube and chronic typhoid germ producer. I said she was approved. Menace to the community. It was impossible to deal with her in a reasonable and peaceful way and if the department meant to examine her it must be prepared to use force and plenty of it on March nineteenth inspector. Dr S Josephine Baker paid. Mary Mallon visit. Mary slammed the door in her face. The next morning health department ambulance and a detachment of police arrived to arrest Mary..

Mary Mary Mallon George soper typhoid Mary Mellon Fond George George Sober Blue Eyes New York City Health Departmen I Ohboshi Dr S Josephine Baker Toll Iron Gate Supermarked Presbyterian Hospital Oyster Bay Biggs Medical Officer Thomas Darlington commissioner
"typhoid" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Murder Minute

"By late August. Half of the people in the house were sick with typhoid fever following the outbreak. The owner of the Summer House Mrs George Thompson Hired Sanitary Engineer and typhoid expert. George Soper to investigate what caused the outbreak. The police had been rented to a New York. Banker General William Henry Warren who had occupied it with his family of three and seven servants. For the summer months we called sober late in August and explosion of typhoid had occurred in which six of the eleven persons in the household were taken sick. The epidemic had been studied immediately after it occurred by persons who were regarded as experts and there were a number of type Britain reports about it but the cause had not been positively ascertained. It was thought by the owner that unless the mystery could be cleared up it would be impossible to find tenants for the upcoming season at first super believed that the outbreak was caused by batch of contaminated clams until he realized that some of the victims had eaten them. George soper thoroughly examined the property for contamination rechecking everything that had previously been tested hooping to find what his predecessors had overlooked he tested the Cesspool and the privy the well the overhead water tank the food supplies in the pantry. The manure used to fertilize the lawn and even the sanitary conditions at the neighbor's house but found nothing. The only other possibility was a human carrier. George Soper was aware of the possibility of seemingly recovered patients continuing to be contagious for several weeks following an illness. But had anyone in the house been recently recovered from typhoid as early as one thousand nine hundred three researchers in Germany had documented cases of seemingly healthy people carrying typhoid in their bodies and shutting it in their urine and feces spreading the contagion but new search healthy carriers had ever been documented in the United States having undertaken to see if there had been any carriers the Oyster Bay House before the outbreak occurred soper recalled. I soon came through the process of exclusion to the cook. But we're she. She had left soon. After the epidemic and that event had occurred over six months ago. I tried to find out everything I could about her? But there was not much to learn. Mrs Warren said she was Great Plain Cook. Her wages were forty five dollars a month and she had been obtained for Mrs stricker's stricker's was a well-known Employment Agency on Twenty Eighth Street. Cook had not fraternised with the other servants in the bitter about her. She was not particularly clean. Her name was Mary Mallon. The forty year old cook had come to work at the Bay House on August fourth. The first person fell ill soon. After on August twenty seventh and the last on September third George soper narrowed down the period of infection to just seven days and soon even pinpointed which meal it was that had infected the victims where there are so many servants. There is little food that a cook handles. Which is not subsequently raised to a temperature sufficient to make it homeless. George Super explained I found however that on a certain Sunday there was a desert which Mary prepared and off which everybody present was extremely fond. This was ice cream with fresh peaches. Cut Up and frozen in it. I suppose no better way could be found for cook to cleanse her hands of microbes and infect a family George soper next stop was stricker's employment agency. He explained the situation emperor. Quested Mary. Mallon's employment history but it turned out that Mary was a difficult.

George Soper Cook typhoid Mrs stricker Mary Mallon Mrs George Thompson Oyster Bay House Banker General William Henry W Summer House Hired Sanitary Engineer George Super Quested Mary New York Britain Germany United States Mary
"typhoid" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Murder Minute

"Welcome to murder minute on today's episode typhoid Mary but I your True Crime Headlines in Utah. The double murder conviction of death row inmate. Von Lester Taylor has been vacated due to ineffective counsel at his trial nearly thirty years ago three days before Christmas in Nineteen Ninety Taylor and another man Edward Deli broke into a vacant cabin in the mountains. East of Salt Lake City and terrorized a family of five killing two members of the family and injuring a third in Nineteen ninety-one Taylor accepted a plea deal under which he pled guilty to two counts of murder in exchange for eight lesser charges against him being dropped. The deal did not take the death penalty off the table and Taylor was sentenced to death. Deli. Co-conspirator did not accept a deal and chose to go to trial a jury convicted him of second degree murder and he was sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole in the thirty seven. Page decision U S District Judge. Tina Campbell wrote that Taylor's attorney. Elliot Levine offered inexcusably uninformed advice to his client which exposed him to the possibility of Execution Levin. Who's Utah State? Bar Certification is currently suspended failed to hire or consult experts for Taylor's death penalty trial resulting in what the court determined was a miscarriage of Justice. One of the two men convicted of the nineteen ninety-three murder of James Jordan senior father of NBA Legend. Michael Jordan is being considered for parole. James Jordan was shot and killed as he slept in his car at a North Carolina. Rest stop his body was dumped off a bridge and recovered eleven days later and two men were convicted of first degree murder and armed robbery for the crime. Each of them received a life sentence. One of those men Larry. Demery is now being considered for parole as part of North Carolina's Mutual Agreement Parole Program which the State's Department of Public Health describes as a scholastic and vocational program quote designed to prepare selected inmates for release through structured activities. The State's current sentencing law eliminates parole for serious crimes committed after October. First nineteen ninety four but since demery was sentenced under previous sentencing guidelines. He would still be eligible. An Austin man was found guilty of killing his nineteen year old neighbor during an argument over some fireworks on the fourth of July nineteen year old devante. Ortiz was setting off fireworks with friends at his apartment complex around one. Am His neighbor. Jason Roach came outside and told them to stop. He then returned to his apartment later when Ortiz and his friends set off more fireworks Roach and his elderly disabled father returned to confront Ortiz again. During the confrontation Ortiz pushed Rochas father to the ground and Roche immediately turned and fired one shot at his neighbor. Piercing Ortiz's rib and killing him. Roche claimed that he feared for his father's safety and fired in self defense. The jury did not agree. Finding him guilty of forties murder now as the trial moves to the sentencing phase. Jurors must further decide if Roche acted in the heat of passion which would shrink his possible sentence from five to ninety nine years down to a possible to twenty years..

Von Lester Taylor murder Piercing Ortiz first degree murder second degree murder Utah Edward Deli Roche Demery James Jordan North Carolina Michael Jordan Jason Roach Salt Lake City Tina Campbell Elliot Levine NBA
The Murder of Leslie Marie Perlov

Casefile True Crime

04:39 min | 1 year ago

The Murder of Leslie Marie Perlov

"The Californian city of Stanford laws in the northwest corner of Santa Clara County just under an hour drive from San Francisco covering any land area of two point. Eight Square Miles Stanford is adjacent to Palo Alto one of the principal cities of the affluent and progressive Silicon Valley which is served as an incubator for many prominent and influential technological enterprises. Over the years including Apple Google facebook and Tesla Stanford is home to the prestigious eight thousand Dak- Stanford University a private co educational and Non Denominational College and Research Institution. Many of the city's residents students faculty members who live on or Iran campus in a range of accommodations including Goma. Trees Co ops. Row Houses Fraternities sororities single family homes and condominiums established in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. The university was founded by railroad magnate and California Senator Leland Stanford and his wife Jane. In memory of their only child Leyland junior he died of typhoid fever. At Age Fifteen. The land began as the stock farm with OAK dotted fields and soon developed into one of the largest university campuses in the United States despite sustaining heavy damage from two separate earthquakes in nineteen. I seek since and nine hundred ninety nine. The university has managed to maintain its original California mission architecture from the light. Eighteen hundreds characterized by embellished yellow sandstone long low and wide colonnades open arches and two red terra cotta tiled roofs at the heart of the campus is the main quadrangle the university's oldest structure stretching. Iva seventeen acres. The main quad is raised Vira Mile Long Palm Tree lined road and has an inherent data section. Both of which feature sprawling lawns courtyards and interconnected buildings housing. Various departments classrooms and administration offices regarded as a national center for Research Stanford Phages More Than One hundred and twenty research. Institutes exploring a range of topics from particle physics to International Studies Given it's proximity to silicon valley and it's impressive academic and athletic performance records. It is renowned as one of the top universities of the world. Many students go on to have a lustrous careers in their field of expertise with past alumni including noble laureates Pulitzer Prize winners and Presidential Medal of freedom recipients. One hundred and fifty thousand visit as drawn to the faint grants annually to explore it too many features including apiaries shops and gardens as well as a stadium. Golf course satellite dish and church liking trials around the campus outskirts off of use of the rolling countryside and attract by more than fifty thousand visitors a year in the early nineteen seventies. Just over eleven thousand students were enrolled at Stanford University and the Kanta coach in these men that had started in the mid nineteen sixties was still a major aspect of college lawf- students fighting for social and political change would often stage protests scenes and formed community action groups for issues such as racism. Women's liberation and gay rods. Leslie Marie Po love graduated from Stanford in nineteen seventy two with a bachelors degree in history by the beginning of the following year. The twenty one year old was working as a clerk at the north. Santa Clara Canny Low Library in Palo Alto. Leslie hoped to become a lawyer and recently been accepted into law school at the University of Pennsylvania though classes had yet to begin at three. Pm on Tuesday. February. Thirteen Leslie left work. For the day driving off in her seventy-two Orange Chevrolet Nova the coworkers presumed. She was heading directly to her time in the Los. Altos hills where she lived with her widowed mother Florence. But Leslie never arrived

Dak- Stanford University Leslie Marie Po Stanford Palo Alto Senator Leland Stanford Tesla Stanford Santa Clara County California Santa Clara Canny Low Library Goma Pulitzer Prize San Francisco Row Houses Fraternities Principal Typhoid Iran Apple United States Non Denominational College Leyland
Troubled Water: What's Wrong with What We Drink

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

07:54 min | 1 year ago

Troubled Water: What's Wrong with What We Drink

"Be Wary of water. Joining joining us now is set to seek all. He has authored activist. Member of the Council of Foreign Relations guest curators interactive brokers studios. He is the author of a new book. DOC troubled water. What's wrong with what we drink? I want to talk to you about the book at about the sort of larger concept here and and you said right before we went on air. I'm not here to scare anybody at yet what I was reading through your materials. It's a little bit unnerving to think that a lot of the water that people drink it's not just flint Michigan it's contaminated that's correct almost everywhere in America there are contaminants in our drinking water and this is probably the largest unspoken of public health threat or menace in the United States. There's a large number of different chemicals that get into our systems through our drinking water that are having unknown effects on our bodies on our endocrine systems as technical phrase that affects growth attention spans sexual interest for Tilleke as well as the possibility of cancer. Some of those things are already proven scientifically and some are now in the process of being investigated but I would argue that being investigated aggressively enough by the EPA an organization that whether it's a democratic or Republican president or Congress is unfortunately inactive who've were not active enough in pursuing what we need to have pursued to get the best health profile for all Americans all right so we don't have the best water what needs to change within the US to improve the quality of our water. Well first of all there aren't nearly there. Were about one hundred thousand chemicals that are in commerce in the United States. Maybe more and you would think that seventy eighty percent of them ninety percent of them would be under some type of investigational regulation by the EPA because some significant percentage of them get into our drinking water and some percentage of those have have a act on our health but of that hundred thousand chemicals that are in commerce. The United States. It sounds hard to believe this. But it's true. Only seventy seven zero are being regulated by the EPA for drinking water purposes and is shocking as that low number is even more shocking given how much chemicals used daily life in America even more shocking is the fact that the last S. time the EPA regulated any chemical whatsoever or any contaminant whatsoever was twenty three years ago they have been inactive for generation and longer and that is putting our health at risk. Is there any map of where we can and can't drink water. We'll tell me where you live and I'll let you know. Okay I'll give you my address after this Seriously I mean it's anyone tracking or tried to do this scientifically we'll actually. There's an organization called the environmental working group. We're on their website. You Can Punch in your zip code and and they can tell you under the federally filed documents but each utility what contaminants have been found in that ZIP codes water whether or not that's particular to your. We're particular TAP LISA. I can't say for sure but invite me over for lunch and I'll bring my test okay. Great all right so water filtration plants. I I thought that was the answer you would think so the problem the problem Paul is both on the wastewater side and on the water filtration. which the way they distribute the water order to our homes from on both sides using technologies that are about one hundred or more years old and although in the interim place have been rebuilt and they're pretty nice parking lots some beautiful reception areas? The truth is that the technology is being used never grew up along with the time that America became. We'll highly medical society where now one one of where seventy percent of all Americans twelve and overtake at least one pharmaceutical product today to people to people about twenty percent of Americans twelve and overtake take five or more prescription pills day and that all gets into our water stream on the inbound side. We still do. We did one hundred. Plus years ago to get rid of cholera and dysentery and typhoid Loyd. Fever we put a dot of chlorine or chlorine like product in it to to cleanse the water. But we don't do anything to remove from that water. These pharmaceutical pharmaceutical residues and other chemicals that have found their way into our water stream such that occupy one example of many that are in my book troubled water just one they scientists independent independent scientists with no axe to grind when ahead in the Great Lakes vast amount of water so be diluted like crazy with think she tested fish and all five of the Great Lakes and an all five live with a great lakes. She founded their brains and their organs and their muscle. She found residues of all kinds of psychiatric medicines like solo often SELECTA and fourteen other medications medications. Now if that's going there that water is then being sent back to our homes for us to drink and we are getting that dosages back in micro quantities and we're getting that magnified amounts also for eating the fish. I'm just trying I'm going through these scrap extrapolation getting increasingly concerned. I'm just wondering. How normal is this with other countries says well they're just sort of this problem globally or is the US particularly bad the more the more industrialized the more industrialized society is the more likely you are to have these problems now? There are some countries particularly Israel in Singapore that have very aggressive systems for purifying the water for reasons unrelated to Necessarily health reasons but it's really for water scarcity reasons. They have a reason to do this. And there are some parts the United States and I talk about in a Chapter Orange County California which has made a decision to basically cle- ignore the EPA guidelines. Go Way above it and they demonstrate the fact that using known technologies at very reasonable prices you can have the safest drinking water. Possibly the pure water you'd think that Zoloft PROZAC or something. Everybody happy a little bit happier. Exactly so seth so private versus public water utilities. Tell us that the compare and contrast there okay so this was a piece that I wrote the other day for the Wall Street Journal and I want to. I want to highlight something that is completely unknown. Fact in American life even when I talked to members of Congress and the senators they have no idea. There's the case you would think rationally speaking fifty states. Oh maybe every state should have at least one and what are you telling maybe two maybe three so maybe there should be three hundred four hundred maybe five hundred. What are you toys United States tops? Even though you could say that when you could cover several states we have in the United States over fifty thousand. What are utilities one county Los Angeles County has two hundred separate water utilities? These are very tiny. They have no ability to have the financial wherewithal in order to get the financing that they need to make sure that they can in higher up to date Up that they can buy up-to-date technologies hire the most advanced scientists and engineers and also fix their broken infrastructure. Is Crazy Risi just real quick here. Who has the interest of keeping all of these smaller utilities open for utilities? Okay so no one of the Public Lisa. Nobody in the public should the second thing that this is a good idea. And it isn't a good idea. That's why one of the main thrust of my book talking about Public Health. Water is to say four big takeaways from my book. One of which is we must consolidate our drinking water utilities and by the way I a second point that I made in the journal Article is that it turns out that about fifteen percent of American. Utilities are in private hands which is investor owned hands whether they're public companies or private companies remarkably digging deep into EPA A health data which a couple of professors have done. You learn something remarkable. which is that although you would think that public utilities have the public's interest in mind actually we there's a much higher incidence of contaminated water in public utilities? And the reason for that is because mayors want to keep the price low and therefore the don't get the Outcomes you want set Siegel. Thanks for joining fascinating. Discussion set Siegel activist author member of the Council foreign relations author troubled water. What's wrong with with what we drink? That's coming October. I also author of let there be water. Israel solution for water start starved world. I am very interested in that Tom. Freidman near Times op-ed today on that the topic using the work of seth very

United States EPA America Great Lakes Congress Council Of Foreign Relations Seth Israel Interactive Brokers Siegel Wall Street Journal Typhoid Tilleke Michigan Public Lisa Singapore Los Angeles County Paul
Zac Efron falls ill while filming reality show Killing Zac Efron

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Zac Efron falls ill while filming reality show Killing Zac Efron

"First actor Zac Efron has survived a health scare it's life imitating art while filming a show called killing Zac Efron in Papua New Guinea Zac Efron was reportedly nearly killed by a sudden illness Efron was reportedly airlifted to Australia for treatment of a bacterial infection possibly typhoid transmitted to patients by contaminated food or water before the infection hit Efron was seen with a tour guide in Papua New Guinea the store confirming his ordeal on social media posting that he did get sick but bounced back quick thinking his well wishers many of whom fell in love with that from when he was a teen heartthrob in high school musical before taking on more dramatic

Zac Efron Australia Papua New Guinea Papua Typhoid
Actor Zac Efron is home after falling ill in Papua New Guinea

Jason and Alexis

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Actor Zac Efron is home after falling ill in Papua New Guinea

"Efron was hospitalized after contracting a bacterial infection while filming his new reality series and Papua New Guinea but the actor quickly bounced back and was able to spend the holidays at home following the health scare he announced on Twitter yesterday it's unclear what Zac Effron was stricken with with vulture sites reports that may have been typhoid a deadly bacterial disease that spreads through food and water

Efron Twitter Zac Effron Bacterial Disease Papua Typhoid
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

05:20 min | 1 year ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"Safai here with none other than NPR east. Africa correspondent eight Peralta to. Hey there ater. Hey mattie thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled but I want to open with a quick question who discovered Ebola and Google. It first of all. How dare you asked me a a question? I should definitely know the answer to and don't and yeah I already. Google bet came up was a Belgian. Microbiologist I but I think you're about to tell me there's more to the story there absolutely there always is right so I mean you cheated. Yeah what you probably saw is a bunch of White Westerners like Dr John Jack. Mugambi does not. Yeah he was not one of the people that came up yes so he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo. But back in nineteen seventy six. We we emberg he was the first doctor to collect any bola sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote. A lot of history has been written without your name. Yes but you on this Yes it is it not correct did not quite so today on the show correcting the record on a bola the story of Dr John Jock Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing its future to some in the medical community. It's a controversial move. Okay ater so we're talking talking about a Congolese Dr Jacques in his role in discovering Abullah. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa south he said we should start in nineteen seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD in microbiology at the Institute in Belgium and and he could have stayed in Europe but he decided to come back to Congo. But when I arrive here The condition of work were not I. I had no lab. I have no mice for experimentation so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah it's tough to do lab work without a lab you now. He said without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen nineteen seventy six we sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak It's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola. But no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever and he goes to this local hospital but he says he finds it completely empty was nobody there. Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and and people had died there but in the morning when they heard was sent from capitol. They thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital and we started seeing patients. So so what's he seeing. When the patients come in he was seeing people who were very weak with fever they had headaches? I started it to him to make the physical time but at that time. have no gloves you know gloves. And of course he had to draw blood but when I removed they're the city which Blood continued to spread out. It was the first time from two CDs momentum and also my fingers so with a bow. Wow Yeah so he says he he would wash his hands a lot but really really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on and he was able to not get it and at this point we MP. He was startled but then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village also got sick with a fever all the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point I was like. Oh it's probably not those things. Thanks yeah I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different. So he convinced one none to go back to Kinshasa with him so what happens next. She died at a hospital a couple of days later but he took blood samples and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end. That was Peter. Piot who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium. Aw The guy who turned up from Google Search. Yeah that's right. And so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit the CDC in the US US gets involved and they realize this is a new virus that caused hemorragic

Fever Kinshasa Dr John Jack Congo Google Blood Peralta Typhoid Dr Jacques NPR Belgium Kenya Mattie Dr John Jock Mugabe Africa Ebola Mugambi Bolla Institute For Tropical Medicin United States
Seattle City Council may add millions to mayor's budget for public toilets

News, Traffic and Weather

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Seattle City Council may add millions to mayor's budget for public toilets

"The next week the Seattle city council vote on a budget which includes money for portable public restrooms couples Charlie harder as the story there are very few public restrooms in this city and so far this year downtown Seattle association cleaners have responded to more than six thousand reports of human feces on the streets or sidewalks in the downtown retail core Seattle Times reports these five public restrooms would be similar to those in use in San Francisco on wheels with hand washing stations needle disposal in attendance on duty who's jobs would be to make sure people are sleeping or doing drugs inside he comes at a cost one point three million dollars is being framed as a public health issue cholera and typhoid spread through

Charlie Seattle Times San Francisco Cholera Seattle Typhoid Three Million Dollars
Jessica Biel denies she's anti-vaccination

John and Ken

03:25 min | 2 years ago

Jessica Biel denies she's anti-vaccination

"Digestive bills, and actress movies, and TV, Justin timberlake's, or husband and for some reason, I don't know what these these dopey actresses. She decided to get into the vaccination debate. She appeared with opponents of the new vaccination legislation. Now the new legislation. Is really simple and necessary. If you get a doctor's note, to exempt your child from vaccine, it goes to an agency in, in, Sacramento to make sure it's for real, because a lot of doctors are getting bullied by the crazy anti vaccine, mommies, and the writing out fake exemption forms. So the state's onto it in fact, the, the author of the Bill is a doctor. We've had him on the show state Senator Richard Penn from Sacramento. He says unscrupulous doctors are granting exemptions. For profit, and because they're under pressure. From individual parents, especially influential ones. Other words, rich people rich people, a pitcher, they're offering bribes to the doctors. And a bit to the doctors are charging extra for the exemption, so the doctors are corrupt and Jessica Biel decided to jump into this. She's she appeared with Robert F Kennedy jR, who is completely out of his mind. I mean chest up public. Lunatic. And. So she was supporting she was against this legislation. She joined a lobbying campaign against it. And people jumped all over her on social media and now her feelings are hurt. It's just trying to explain herself. She goes that she was not an anti vaccine that she's not against vaccinations. She supports children getting vaccinations. But families have the right to make educated medical decisions for their children alongside their physicians. Well except they're not making educated medical decisions. But they're, they're bullying the doctors and that doctors are saying, okay, pay me extra. What I see the phrase under pressure from influential individuals was that sound like that says, like, rich people pay it off the doctor, doesn't it? I mean. These anti vaccine people. Usually, people would do anything to keep children from getting sick suffering, and dying, but not anymore. It's like it used to be that we would do anything to keep a typhoid fever, or typhus or appetites are Mercer outbreak from happening not anymore. There were nine hundred eighty one cases of the measles, so far this year. Largest number in twenty seven years. And. Everyone's trying to say I'll, but you have to trust the doctors and you have to understand. It's a sacred bond between the doctors and the parents. Now it's corrupt doctors take money that Mike everybody else. What do you think they prescribe all the all the nutty drugs that everybody's on? After doctors get rewarded for prescribing. You those pills. That's why they push them

Jessica Biel Senator Richard Penn Sacramento TV Justin Timberlake Robert F Kennedy Jr Mike Typhoid Typhus Fever Twenty Seven Years
LAPD officer has typhoid fever, 5 others show symptoms, union says

Bill Handel

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

LAPD officer has typhoid fever, 5 others show symptoms, union says

"News and LAPD officers, recovering from typhoid fever LA police protective leagues. Robert Harris says the union is calling for more professional sanitation, what procedures can we do? What protocols can we put in place to ensure that this does not become the new norm? Given the deplorable working conditions that exist outside central station. The LAPD central division station is being cited by seat. Inspectors for unsanitary conditions. There isn't a definitive link between the officers, typhoid fever, and the homeless population. But officers have recently come down with various infectious

Typhoid Fever Lapd Robert Harris LA
What's the History (and Future) of Toilets?

BrainStuff

05:00 min | 2 years ago

What's the History (and Future) of Toilets?

"Consider the flush toilet. It's the fascinating device. If you think about it. This giant porcelain chairs installed into every modern American bathroom using gallons of precious drinking water everyday to whisk your urine feces into oblivion better known as the municipal wastewater treatment plant nearest you every time you flush, but have you ever considered? What else we could be doing with our poop in pee? You probably don't really want to think about it. And neither does pretty much anybody else, which is why the flush toilet we twenty-first-century century. Humans us hasn't changed much since it was first patented in seventeen seventy five by Scottish watchmaker named Alexander coming Cummings. Toilet was a slightly altered version of the commode designed for Queen. Elizabeth the first by her godson, sir. John Harrington in fifteen ninety two Cummings had an s shaped pipe to trap, bad odors, while Harrington's had not, of course, self flushing. Toilets heated seats in those vacuum potties like you see on airplanes in tour buses came later. But. Our one and done attitude towards commode innovation probably comes from the fact that we simply don't want to think about poop that much. We spoke with DNA. Mcdonagh a professor of industrial design in the Beckman institute of advanced science and technology at the university of Illinois at our banish campaign. She said within the American culture, there's still resistance and reluctance to discuss body waste the toilet has remained relatively unexplored. I think because we're failing to realize that to quote, a British saying where there is muck. There's brass we are failing to see the potential opportunity are modest toilet is offering us because the notion of immersing yourself in such a product because all feel so uncomfortable. But going to the bathroom isn't something. We've always been squeamish about long ago. It was just another experience and opportunity for relaxation. And hanging out the ancient Romans used toilet time as a time to catch up with their friends in the year three hundred and fifteen BC Rome had one hundred and forty four bustling public toilets lined with stone benches with keyhole shaped cutouts situated, all along them where people would sit together and do their business, and maybe some gossiping to later in medieval England, you could be walking down the street and someone might throw the contents of their chamber pot out the window onto you. They might say sorry about it. But it would kind of be on you for walking too close to their house. Fancier medieval, people used Garda robe a little closet. Stuck onto the side of a castle with a hole in the floor that emptied into a moat or cesspit clothes were also kept in the Garda row. But because it was thought stench of human waste would keep the fleas moths out of the garments public Garda roads in London empty directly into the Thames, which was an unbelievably poor public health. With move as the population of Europe grew over the course of the eighteen hundreds up to one hundred people would share the same public garter robe and the waste just washed into the rivers tainting, the drinking water supply, which explains why so many outbreaks of cholera typhoid and other waterborne diseases bedeviled nineteenth century Europeans, resulting in more than half the working class population dying for the age of five it was a mess. As a result of a particularly hot summer in London in eighteen Fifty-eight when these smell of rotting sewage bay living in the city completely unbearable Parliament Commission to the construction of the London sewer, which was finished in eighteen sixty five deaths resulting from waterborne diseases plummeted and cities all over the world. Followed suit and constructed their own sanitary sewers the toilet patented by coming eventually became standard in houses and wealthy countries. All over the world along with slight variations patented by others like Thomas, crapper. Yes, that's his real name whose contributions to the overall design of the toilet were minimal. But whose legacy endures because he made sure his name was visible on. All of his products. And hey, it's great that fewer people are dying due to poor sanitation in these places anymore. But the toilet is due for an upgrade. So what do we need? Our new toilets to do. Mcdonagh said toilets offer a relatively unexplored territory that offers significant potential in respect to healthy living and healthy aging as individuals are taking more responsibility for their health. Eating habits and wellbeing. The bathroom offers a somewhat blank canvas for us to integrate intuitive technology to support the individual imagine a toilet that could tell you. How hydrated you were whether you are deficient in particular vitamins or new of blood in your stools and changes in your hormones. We literally flush all that information away each day in the form of waste matter. So we could find out a lot about our own health from our toilets, but according to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which launched their reinvent the toilet challenge. Back in twenty eleven the next generation of toilets will also be able to kill pathogens compost human waste and keep up with the fast urbanization of the twenty first century. And all that without sewer, infrastructure electricity or a water source. They might even be able to minor waste for valuable elements like phosphorus nitrogen and potassium and separate solid and liquid waste in order to use them to make things like building supplies. But we'll the new toilets. Look very much different from the one in your bathroom now or the one, sir. John Harrington made for Queen Elizabeth in the sixteenth century, probably not much unless you've got any bright

John Harrington Queen Elizabeth Mcdonagh Garda Waterborne Diseases London Garda Row Cummings Europe Alexander England University Of Illinois Rome Melinda Gates Foundation Professor Of Industrial Design Beckman Institute Thomas
"typhoid" Discussed on The Polygon Show

The Polygon Show

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"typhoid" Discussed on The Polygon Show

"But the thing is like are you surprisingly, one of my favorite open road games is horizon zeroed on I think they did it the best out of everything I have played. And I think that's because the way that you can unclouded the map is still like sectioned off. They're still a specific region. And like I feel like it was tight enough where sure you could sorta fast travel, but there were they were just like also things going on. But it wasn't like breath of the wild large. You know, like there was definitely a limit to what I could do where it could go. And then I think like it also was very it became very clear and apparent to me when I was in an area that was to powerful enemies, you know, whereas like with Skyros him I'd like wander into thing. Holy shit. Just get decimated. Fuck just I don't know what just happened. It was clearly this is too much. And then yet like the first time I played breath of the wild. It was like, wow. Oh, look at me. I'm running in the field. Maybe this is a great turn turnaround. There's that giant like stone. Monster chasing me around. Body is just flailing around. But the thing about birth of the wild is that those are everywhere. Great. I do actually think that what I mean. Like Nintendo does a better job of setting the expectations. What like the great plateau is Jim easing thing. Because it's like, okay. Signed from the rock monster in the couple of guardian bomb thing is there's not really that much. They can hurt you up there. You know? But it's always just my luck to run into like the one monster on the map. Oh, yeah. And will your experience sounds like the one I had playing fallout three where I was like, oh freak of course. These giant mutants chasing may like I just went like 'cause I went off the path a little bit. Yeah. I definitely felt that a lot with fallout for which as you all know, I hate that game with all my life so bad that that game really embodied the type of open world that was just not for me. So like, you said you straight off the path a little bit to explore punished by huge mutants. And then sometimes like I feel like I would aimlessly wander around from like town to town. To area to try to find like a side quest. Like what's going on? What should I be at like a lot of the time? I felt like I was just traversing a lot of empty space with like nothing to really do or. No, real great return. Besides like doing the same kinda missions. Oh, you looted this cave. Okay. That's how I felt about skyro- too. Yeah. Typhoid west into it was I played about thirty hours. I sinned feel like there was a it was huge. And sometimes I'd be totally surprised like, oh, I have a dog for that's so cool. And then sometimes we be like, I'm up here. And I haven't seen anything for a long time. That's one thing. That odyssey does really well is just quest saturation. But Allegra you're also in the you were in the anxious camp. Yeah. Open world player. What happened yet? Definitely like a lot of what both of you guys were saying, I'm like. Yep. Like fallout. Can't do that breath of the wild was like the one that I still think is one of my favorite games ever. So that really stuck with me but verse open world. Game that I super obsessed with I think it really touched that lake all similar light completion, est feeling I guess just as quick background. Like, I have always been the kind of person who intentionally plays games wrong. Like, I always try to look for things that don't matter like, where's the bathroom? Can you use? Yeah. Right toilet. You don't say blacks into block sizes metal? I've never seen him. But. I'm always like how can I play this a really stupid way? So I my sister. And I would do this a lot like in kingdom hearts, we spent hours and hours and hours and hours in the first world destiny islands..

Nintendo Typhoid thirty hours
"typhoid" Discussed on Guys We F****d

Guys We F****d

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Guys We F****d

"And he was like just a comedian like, you know. Yeah. Yeah. Couple of you know, you guys is. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I gotta hands up your skirt. You know, I've never gotten that. But not gonna rip the guy k deck off say that kicking people. Yeah. I don't know. I wanna buy Mace. What people right in the face. I people about doing a lot of paperwork and higher and lawyers. You know, what works also just hitting someone right in the face when they need something to you. Because I'll be thinking like seven years later now just directed. I come with the comeback seven years later. You know? Yeah. That's that's gotta start hitting people. What do you want to promote? Where can we find you? The name of your band. Yeah. Tied. Rosie. How do we? Yeah. To you play. Like, do you have a website or social media for it yet? Of course, I have a land scrim, which Karen, do you still follow me? Yeah. I follow everything. Because you have you have you it rosy? Right. Yeah. Your Facebook you have to so well, my comedy is rosy rebel. But my ban which I kind of have been focusing more on three records. So we have Instagram typhoid Rosie music, and then typhoid Rosie bans on Facebook. And I've type Rosie dot com. Varna play type owed Rosie songs. You're on this episode. Yeah. So all the music you here, you know, that Rosie you sent them to me. Yeah. Well, I mean, I could adapted me. Withhold it from. I'm not narcissistic father. Tell my dad out tire Ford Rosie outweighs the rebel. Thank you so much. I s you're one of the live Rosie is this has been fucked the anti.

Rosie Facebook typhoid Karen Instagram Ford seven years
"typhoid" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

05:36 min | 3 years ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Citation Needed

"All right mary not by the way a small woman by any stretch she had run out the back door and jumped on neighbor's fence police in the doctor's searched for five hours looking for this area's irishwoman and when they found her this is what happens fucking phone i know hitting right she came out fighting and swearing both of which she could do with appalling efficiency and fishing i made i made another effort to talk to her sensibly and a gas through again to let me have the specimens but it was no use by that time she was convinced that the law was wantonly persecuting her when she had done nothing wrong she knew she had never had typhoid fever she was maniacal in her integrity there was nothing i could do take her with us the policeman lifted her into the ambulance and i literally set on her all it was like being in a cage with an angry life hundred did she say i can't breathe eleven times before where am i thinking of a different story from new york i can't ever different story but funny shatter self out of anger and then the guy was like fine scoop some of this up shit out of i'm just curious in your opinion what other emotions caused people to shit the cried envy loss like what else a lot of attention you're like hey so you just remember the and it's like oh shit themselves is it contagious it's a fun thing all right so tom did they did they literally beat the shit out of her or what no she was irish not black visit apples from mary and after they did they confirm that she booking obviously harbor typhoid big buck in shock right and the media seized upon her and dubbed typhoid mary because probably the typhoid america's still obviously not only to hurt belief that she didn't have the disease because she wasn't sick but she also continued to defend her poor hygiene she defended keeping her hands filthy she cited her own lack of illness and i'm guessing desire for like impromptu poof fingerpainted modern arts important that's good she also refused to voluntarily stop working as a cook even after the thirties explain to her that she harper typhoid and spread it everywhere she went she sounds like a bob ross of feces cookery visit crappy little tree sorry that's shit follow up interviews for her next job those had to be rough right and just like okay i see applied for this job but aren't you literally typhoid mary are you gonna try my fucking super i mean yeah i'm gonna try to answer the question i exasperated public health officials had no choice but to corinthian mary on north brother island where she was held at a clinic for three years he says and after three years the health commissioner finally took pity on marion decided that they couldn't really confined just for having a disease and they made mary totally promise to stop working as a cook and start washing your hands after taking a hit she signed an actual affidavit thing she would try to be less gross stop making people food and she was released she would go on to invent the subway pole and bowls of loose dinner eating it he lies apartment all right so america out and she worked for a few years as a laundry but again that doesn't pay very well let's face it like nobody likes doing the laundry so she changed her name to mary brown colors you could go all right color you could be any last name she picked brown awesome she picks brown and she begins working again as a cook okay anybody care to guess what happens next she switched it up and started giving malaria too they tried to make the whole country immune to typhoid fever by giving everyone fecal microbiology transplants from mary polls show one universe close but note is unsurprisingly everywhere she went people again got fucking typhoid fever for five more years she changed jobs frequently and for five more years typhoid followed her in nineteen fifteen another giant outbreak occurred this time at a maternity hospital where she worked as a cook five people's thinking simas syringe engineered she doesn't give a shit except for shit she gives five people got sick and two of them died so guess what mary does she quits she just quits and nobody can find her she was only caught by bring by the police after bringing food to a friend on long island who she also got sick a certain point you have a getting people sick thing right.

three years five hours
"typhoid" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Of work to keep pursuing and located her using the unsurprising method of just like looking for people with typhoid using the extremely visible trail of shit and blood a lot like what we do when he lie gets lost at the mall thanks for leash backpacks for him i don't know who has right but i would work my shit works as a backpack is just it's ropy and it stretches oh oh dr a lot of gum as a kid go chew it comes out of the end of guys dick this time too sick maids and one dead kid part of the body count so you protest mary and i love this because this is direct from his report i had my first talk with mary in the kitchen of the house that was his diplomatic is possible but i had to say i suspected her of making people sick and that i wanted specimens over urine feces and blood not take mary long to react to this gestion she sees the carving fork in advance in my direction passed rapidly done the long narrow hall through the toll iron gate and so to the sidewalk felt rather lucky to escape she's screaming bc's when you pry it from my cold dead heinous he's a great porn hub channel everybody check it out yeah anus is pretty good circling back the detective said he was diplomatic when he right curious how you ask for that stuff diplomatically like like a pickup that you're in feces and see him i saw please lady would you the honor of copper show ask i just wanted to end like this strikes me as a reasonable reaction on mary's right right i'm not sure i think the moral of his tail at this point is don't ask irishwoman for their poo just like eight their food and they'll give it to you morals though i admit that amac good i have both been to ireland and had irish food time those are contradictory instruction that is enough our listeners tolerate lots of racism on the show but this is too much this how do you think how do you think the corn beef got the corn it's a beautiful they soak oats in pigs blood and call it pudding that's not a beauty no because it's okay so ever yeah he looked at a menu you know what i'm gonna try says you guys could tell mary was and this is probably being charitable somewhat disinclined to shit and silver hand or whatever soper is not easily deterred just good if you're into shit like you got really heard back that up right.

mary bc soper typhoid ireland
"typhoid" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

05:30 min | 3 years ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Extensive experience with nettles and pete fire cookery oh you're high it right away just start today he can't sharp all right so beginning in nineteen hundred mary began to cook for affluent families in new york and she was reportedly good at the cooking part of her job but she was not good at basic hygiene and she was sick actually she wasn't sick and that's kind of the problem that turns out it's kind of the problem is the mary malone was infected with salmonella typhi which is the bacterium that causes typhoid fever except that mary malone was an as symptomatic carrier a term which here means basically that her entire body was a trojan horse typhoid factory okay so kind of like my dna like well if i wasn't bald overweight and lumpy with melanoma moves so actually the opposite of mike as advertised yeah you are a seller's disclosure in human sorry disclosure way better joke how can a man be a flood zone that's disputing walking away from me with their earnings money fuck that you're going to have to replace the basement that's just how do you test positive for radio he's got a little someone's installing event behind down there for a long time down there i mean his nobody tom for those of us who didn't grow up in the nineteenth century or a guatemalan village how bad is typhoid fever well typhoid fever sucks okay got it specifically badly in the early nineteen hundreds because like most diseases other than a common cold ca fucking kill you and it often did about twenty percent of people who came down with typhoid fever died from it as starting in the gut and spread from eating food contaminated with feces from an infected person typhoid fever is basically it's that it's a fever shitty miserable fever causes confusion and death in about one in five people because a lot of medical science at the time was basically just a bunch of dip shits grasping at straws in guessing typhoid fever was often thought of as miasma disease was spreading the slums among poor people who made the air gross by not having money some people still believe that being poor is contagious tom that's why i always wear a tasteful kerchief to reason doesn't work everyone around getting sick and it's like man i can't figure out why it's a huge mystery can you pass the salt and pooper malone at this point probably didn't even know she had typhoid fever but in one thousand nine hundred within a few weeks of securing a job as a cook the people around her started to get sick with typhoid fever and this might have also been when she contracted the disease it's not clear since you never developed any symptoms from it what is clear is that she got the fuck out of there and she moved to manhattan and in nineteen o one she against secured work as a cook shortly after her arrival there seven out of the eight members of the household she worked at became ill with e vers and diarrhea and the fucking laundry up and died so just bad luck all around okay so how much are your own shit can get into food by acciari right i i'd like to think small amount i'm sure i'll get corrected in core the fact that she carried typhoid bacteria isn't the most distressing part here bility to cook without getting her own shit in the food all right so it's not clear specifically where she goes from their nineteen ninety one until nineteen oh six mary fines work with the warrant it shows a wealthy family who rented a house on always her bay for their summer vacation the first to become ill was a young daughter of charles warren then mrs warren became ill then two maids developed typhoid fever then the gardener and then another of the warren daughters soon six of the eleven people in the house were sick broadly all just a coincidence jump to conclusions okay just to review so the people she cooked for got sick a woman who did her laundry got sick also the maids clean the house where she also worked and also the fucking gardner did dooby noticed this woman walking around smearing generous amounts of her own shit on literally inside and outside that's gonna catch the i it's see people do knows gartner the gartner didn't even try her food he's just out there quality taste testing each new batch of fertilizer still do good that's nice work all right so.

pete twenty percent
"typhoid" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Citation Needed

"I keep our clitoris on herself what were you saying about talking to speaking of with segue classic guys we're all right so yeah we're going to talking about mary mallon now commonly referred to as typhoid mary oh good and you seem to infect those around with a certain amount of general misery are you ready to bring a one of your heroes to light here i've been coughing up all this blood for nothing i gotta get prepared essayist thing i really we have something in common so tell us right typhoid mary was the rather mean spirited and ultimately quite accurate nickname for mary mallon malone an irish american immigrant originally born in eighteen sixty nine in northern ireland in the poorest county of what was at the time the poorest country in europe google alert to set to see if that changes has hasn't gone off quickly orphaned and often starving young mary moloney much of our early life scrounging for basic survival subsisting on nettles and potato cakes often cook outside over a peat phone yeah scotch moore's are the best irish kids read the hunger games and going like what the hell are they talking about this novel is just playing topiary all right this is obviously being irish in ireland is a bit worse than being irish in america mary set off to discover america's riches and possibly take stock of it's beautiful child shaped cages and option it really jr cages push shan't and we like shape remind me not to pick another irish top often say along about irish if a lot of worst topics that could neela accent so it's just be responsible with it so mary arrived on the lower east side of new york in eighteen eighty three and began many young impoverished immigrants working as a washerwoman but like being a washroom and sucked and the pay was total nightmare so married to the most american thing possible she lied on her resume mary created a host of employers on a resume that didn't exist at addresses that weren't real and since people are both fundamentally trusting and lazy mary secured work with this resume and the scullery and she later worked her way up to cook mary story had all the hallmarks for the beginning of the typical american rags to maybe slightly nicer rags says here mary you attended the northern ireland school of rustic cuisine.

mary mallon ireland mary moloney scotch moore america new york northern ireland school typhoid europe google mary
"typhoid" Discussed on Lore

Lore

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Lore

"After that it was more and more of the same mary bounced from house to house cooking for a while and then leaving out of fear in nineteen oh four while she was working in a house at sands point four of the servants she worked with on a daily basis became sick i have to think mary it was beginning to panic there was an outbreak of typhoid fever happening the evidence was all around her it seemed and i can't blame her for running away it's also important to point out new york city did seem to be experiencing a sharp uptick in cases of typhoid fever in eighteen ninety nine there had been only two thousand confirmed cases of the disease but by nineteen o five that number had doubled to over four thousand ultimately claiming more than six hundred lives that year the risk was real and mary like a lot of other people in new york city felt threatened and unsafe so she continued to run everything mary experienced reinforced this too there was an outbreak taking place around her and i mean that literally everywhere she went people would get sick maybe she noticed enforced herself to ignore it or perhaps she was honestly clueless and unaware that's it matter though because others were about to catch on and once they did they wouldn't allow mary to run any longer passed it seems was catching up with her.

mary new york city typhoid
"typhoid" Discussed on Lore

Lore

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"typhoid" Discussed on Lore

"But science has away of conquering things over time and in eighteen eighty they managed to identify the bacteria that caused the illness 1896 just four years before the house guest became sick the first ever typhoid fever vaccine was introduced but it was rolled out slowly too slowly in fact in nineteen hundred over thirty five thousand americans died from the disease which meant that while people were hopeful they also still very nervous so when this guest became ill mary packed up and left before she herself could do the same nets okay though because there were lots of other big families around in equally big houses in many of them would need to cook mary managed to escape the illness and find a new job so life went on in nineteen o one while working for another family one of the housekeepers became ill again it was typhoid fever and again fearing for her own safety mary left after that she caught wind of job in maine and traveled north in nineteen oh two to cook for the drayton family there two weeks after her arrival though one of the children became sick within a month seven of nine family members were in bed or ably ill the culprit typhoid fever of course but mary was helpful brave she stayed on longer than she would have liked risking her own health to help the family out the father mister drayton was so glad for her help that he gave her a large bonus as she was leaving.

mary fever maine mister drayton typhoid four years two weeks