35 Burst results for "Tyler Clang"

"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:28 min | Last month

"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

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"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:41 min | 3 months ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

"<Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Today's episode <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is based on article. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Nasa moon trees <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> still stand as <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> testament apollo <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> fourteen on has <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to dot com <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> written by series cunningham <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> brings us production of iheartradio <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in partnership <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with hostile dot com. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And <SpeakerChange> it's produced <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by tyler. Clang <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for more podcasts. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Iheartradio visit <Speech_Music_Female> the iheartradio app <Speech_Music_Female> apple podcasts. <Speech_Music_Female> Or wherever you listen <Speech_Music_Female> to your favorite <SpeakerChange> shows <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> this episode is <Speech_Female> brought to you by discover <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> spending more <Speech_Female> on groceries this past <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> year. A wanting <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to orders weekday takeout. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Whether <Speech_Female> you're spending on the essentials <Speech_Female> like groceries <Speech_Female> or even splurging <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on dinner from your favorite <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> local restaurant <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> do so with <Speech_Female> your discover credit <Speech_Female> card because <Speech_Female> only discover automatically <Speech_Female> matches all <Speech_Female> the cash. Back you've earned <Speech_Female> at the end of your first <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> year <Speech_Female> and it's so easy <Speech_Female> to earn cashback since <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> discover card is accepted <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> at ninety nine percent <Speech_Female> of places in the us <Speech_Female> that take credit cards <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> when it comes <Speech_Female> to discover get used <Speech_Female> to hearing. Yes <Speech_Female> more often <Speech_Female> learn more at discover <Speech_Female> dot com slash <Speech_Female> match <Speech_Female> limitations apply <Speech_Female> <Advertisement>

"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:38 min | 4 months ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Typically <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Music> reserved for <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> specimens found at <Speech_Female> the original trinity site <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at the white sands <Speech_Music_Female> missile range. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Some scientists prefer <Speech_Music_Female> to call material found <Speech_Music_Female> in other parts <SpeakerChange> of the world <Music> adam site. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Today's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> episode is based on the article. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Genotype <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> how the first nuclear <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> bomb turned sand <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to glass <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on. How stuff works <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dot com written by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> mark manzini <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> rainstorms <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> production of iheartradio <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in partnership with has networks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dot com and is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> produced by tyler. Clang <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> or more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> podcasts. My <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> heart radio. This is the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> iheartradio app <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> apple podcasts. <Speech_Music_Female>

"tyler clang" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:53 min | 11 months ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"It's the day before a big calculus exam And you haven't studied for whatever reason you're short on time have too many other exams packed into the same day. Too many cat videos, you know? Around 10 PM You finally sit down to review the material. Six hours later, you catch a short nap before rushing to school. You take the exam, and it seems to go fine, Although it wasn't your best effort you pass and promise not to repeat the cycle when it's time for your next one. This is what's known as cramming. And while students, parents and educators have long known it's not ideal in desperate circumstances, it does work to some degree and fight some degree. We mean it might save your g P A. But cramming doesn't provide long term learning, according to researchers who study how we learn versus how we think we learn a spoiler alert. We're usually really wrong. In the case of cramming, you may pass the test and feel like you've got the material down. But research shows that a dramatic rate of forgetting occurs afterwards. This is especially problematic when one lesson provides foundational information for the next like in math or language class. Forgetting most of what you learned is not the only downside to cramming. Researchers have found that losing sleep while pulling an all nighter also leads to residual academic problems for days after the cramming session. You could imagine the negative effects of an ongoing cycle of procrastination and cramming. More than a century of research shows that if you study something twice, retention goes up, studying and then waiting before you study more produces even better long term memory. This is called the spacing effect rather than reviewing material right away. Students benefit from spacing out there Study sessions. There are many arguments about why spacing works better for long time retention. One relates to encoding. Students study something from a book and reviews it immediately. The student will encode the information in the same way both times that's not very helpful, Long term, the more different times and ways you could encode information, the better you'll understand it and the longer you'll know it. This means that even studying the same material in two different locations can help you encode it in different ways. Therefore, you'll learn it more successfully. Another factor it work is that research shows that the harder it is for brains recall something the more powerful the effects of that recall will be in the long term. For example, If you're at a conference and meet someone new, you might recall their name immediately, which probably won't help you remember it the next day. However, if you need to recall the person's name and our into the conference and do so you'll have a better chance of remembering it a day or a week later, because you had to put in the effort to recall it. Third reason why spacing works is that people pay less attention to the second presentation of material that they've just seen because the information is already familiar. When the material is spaced out. It's no longer is familiar, so people pay more attention. If the spacing effect sounds like a lot of waiting around to review material, and it may indeed slowed learning process because you'll be studying for more than one evening. Recent studies have shown the positive effects of another study method, mixing up different material while studying. This concept, called Inter leaving consists of working on or studying one skill for a short period of time, then switching to another one. Then maybe a third. Then back to the first. 2015 study tested Inter, leaving in nine middle school classrooms, teaching algebra and geometry. A day after the lesson for the unit was complete, the students trained with Inter leaving scored 25% better than the students received standard training. A month later, the Inter leaving group was up 76%. This is great news, studying for an exam or completing a big project doesn't need to feel so daunting and inter leaving has benefits for writing to rather than trying to block out two hours to study for a math test. Study math for 30 minutes before you move on to French and then work on an essay Go back to the math later. There's a message here for teachers as well, A student's. Instead of teaching a topic in a block and going to the next steps, Teachers can spend a short time on a topic go on to others, then return to the earlier topics. But it seems that we have a lot to learn about how we learn a 2009 study from U C L. A found that spacing was more effective than cramming for 90% of the participants. Just 6% of those who crammed learned more than those who studied using these spacing effect. In three experiments, researchers tested spacing against cramming. Yet despite the findings in favor of spacing, participants believed the cramming style was more effective. Under 2012 u C L. A study found that staying up and foregoing sleep study is actually counterproductive, no matter how much a student studies daily if they sacrificed sleep in order to study more. Are likely to have more academic problems, not less the next day. Today's episode was written by Carrie Whitney, PhD and produced by Tyler Clang. Brain Stuff is a production of.

Inter Carrie Whitney Tyler Clang
"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

"You know that every month sands? May June July and August? Has the letter are in its name? Don't look it up. Take my word for it. Did you also know there's an old wives tale that you shouldn't eat raw oysters in months without the letter are in it once again. You don't need to look it up. I'M NOT GONNA. Lie To you the logic behind this is that if you eat oysters during these months? Months you could get sick. Sounds like crazy talk right, and perhaps so perhaps not, but if you think about it, the months without an our fall during the summer in the Northern Hemisphere and the truth is that if you eat raw oysters in the summer, you do run the risk of getting violently sick. That's because and let me tell you. This does not come from an old wife. When the weather is warm, bacteria known as Vibrio, vulnificus and Vibrio Para hemolytic. Thrive and these pathogens multiply like nobody's business in warm water, especially in the Gulf of Mexico where there are a lot of voice, tres harvested so eating raw oysters during the summer theoretically could increase your chances of becoming sick, unlike chicken, pork or hamburger, all of which stink to high heaven when they go bad oysters do not so you can't tell when an oyster has turned the corner. They're also usually not rancid to the taste. However, you'll feel the effects about twenty four to forty eight hours after eating and. That's gone bad with Vibrio, chills fever, vomiting diarrhea. You know the drill in some people, high doses of Vibrio can actually be life threatening, especially, the elderly those with compromised immune systems and people who drink too much alcohol, but let's be clear. Infections caused by all Vibrio. Species are rare. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates. There are about eighty thousand vibrio illnesses of all types. Each year in the United States more than half are related to eating contaminated food, the most common strain. Vibrio Para Hema. lickochops is responsible for forty five thousand illnesses annually. Those numbers are a drop in the bucket, compared to sow Manila which the CDC says is responsible for more than one million illnesses each year. Those eating oysters harvested from the Gulf coast where the water typically is warmer than along the east and west coasts should be on guard. That's because Vibrio thrives on the water temperature near sixty eight degrees, Fahrenheit, or twenty degrees Celsius, so if you're going to saddle up to an oyster bar during the summer months, and our concern, whether these slimy suckers are contaminated well, ask the chef. Could from most chefs are reliable and only buy from reputable fisheries and purveyors they trust, or you can just stick to the cold water, east or west coast oysters until the chillier months return in the Gulf.

Gulf Christian Sager CDC apple Christian Sagar vomiting Gulf coast Alex Iona Northern Hemisphere Manila United States John Perr Tano Berlanti Tyler Clang Dylan fagin
"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Bees are not doing well. Since the mid two thousand colony collapse disorder has been taking out the world's most famous plant pollinator all over the world, these pont, one third of the plant's we eat from oranges, almonds a service worth some one hundred sixty eight billion dollars a year by the way, and their rapid disappearance is worrying farmers worldwide. But what if there a secret army of pollinators? Sneaking around the plants we rely on most it could be good news for food security, or it could be a neutral factor if these insects are susceptible to the same or similar pressures as BS. A study published in May of Twenty Twenty and the journal Biology letters has found moths playing much bigger part in pollinating plants than anybody imagined possibly visiting a bigger variety of plant species than bees, and doing it under the cover of darkness. Scientists didn't just realize overnight that moths pollinate plants. The problem was much of the research was limited to a few specific types of moths the. Spend a lot of time rooting around in flowers like hawk. Moths which have extraordinarily long tongues like fourteen inches thirty six centimeters long used for getting it hard to reach nectar reserves within a flower. However over the last decade investigations into how moths as a group contribute to the process of pollination found that your average moth tongue can be a effective tool for moving pollen from plant to plant. This knowledge led the study's authors to turn an eye to the rarely studied settling moths, which sit low and close to flowers and hide out in sheltered spots during the day. We spoke by email with these studies lead author Richard Walton of the University College London Department of Geography. He said our research has for the first time compared moth pollination networks with those of day flying pollinators such as bees hover flies to help us understand illustrate the wide ranging plant preferences. We discovered moths to have in an agricultural setting. We also found that malls were carrying most pollen from the flowers they visited on their furry bodies, which means the means of pollen transport from flower to flower by moths is very similar to bees, hover flies, which also transport most of the pollen on their bodies. Many social bees like bumblebees and honeybees visit lots of different types of flowers, but they also tend to target certain favourite plants that they know will provide plenty of their favorite kinds of pollen and nectar. As a result, some plant species get less attention than others. Walton said solitary bees often be more specialized visiting one type of plant while hover flies often visit flowers with a certain shape. We found that moths visit many different species of plant with a few different types of flower shape. If daytime pollinators do not visit a particular plant species often, but motte species do, and this results in pollination. This increases the chance that this plant would survive for another generation. So because malls are a bit less picky than daytime pollinators, but still get the pollination job done. Plants not preferred by bees persist, maintaining a diverse population of plants is essential to maintaining A. Resilient ecosystem that can weather threats like climate change organization. Conversely with plenty of plants to feed on moths, themselves can continue being an important food source for birds, bats and other insects. The research team observed and collected daytime pollinators as well as nocturnal moths around farm ponds the United. Kingdom and found moth food webs were often comparable to those of daytime pollinators in complexity, and in some instances had greater complexity. Walton said moths are likely providing a kind of resilience or backup to the food webs of daytime pollinators, if a certain species or number of species of bee or butterfly disappears from the landscape, moths potentially fill in that pollination gap. Taking this step further, it's also significant because moth populations are facing severe declines across the globe, as we realize that they're important contributors to the pollination process becomes even more important to protect moth populations because we might be placed ourselves at risk. The researchers found mauled were visiting plants belonging to families that are important to humans as a source of foods like apples, strawberries, pears, peaches, beans, and peas. Walton said this has exciting implications for mall. Being involved in crop pollination, it would help us to move past seeing moths as merely pests, but as important contributors to our own livelihoods.

Richard Walton Twenty Twenty Biology letters Las Vegas University College London Depa Golf apple Tyler Clang West Reynolds Review Brady
"tyler clang" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

Next Question with Katie Couric

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

"Now back to the final part of my conversation with California Governor Gavin newsom. You have four kids how you guys doing with. Stay at homes. That is what now you have the real answer. That last question for kids getting this. We need to reopen the schools immediately. Please desperate right away. Look it saves. It saves everything my my good days. My more challenging days it is. I'll tell you one thing. He does so. Boyd sharpens my appreciation for women For Mothers for caregivers for the disproportionate amount of work women do in the household that is now even made more visible. And I think this mother's Day but it'd be the biggest mother's Day in history of mankind. How old are your kids now? The youngest just just turned four and still reminds me of the twos. You know what I mean. And we have the oldest is just tag and Homeschool A. Oh my gosh. The teachers talk about American Heroes Nurses doctors and teachers it's hard the kids just have remarkable inability to wanna be taught by their parents but remarkable capacity top teachers. And so that's why I say let's safely and responsibly reopen these schools. And I know that's something you're thinking about but there's a lot that will go into that and a lot of folks are debating whether schools should open this summer because they have to make up for lost time and that's something you're looking into as well as learning losses real. It's real every summer. Know that summer blade particularly from a socio economic disproportionately impacts black and brown communities. And we've never addressed in a meaningful way by the way all of this has been exposed With distance learning and wi fi capacity the ability for a family with many kids to have more than just even one tablet or have one tablet own alone and all of that of course is made more Problematic as we move through this pandemic and so we're talking about opening. Potentially I know summer schools upon US quickly but we are considering opening up the school year. A little bit earlier late. July early August to see if we could make up for a little that gives us a little more time on the summer school to more safely plan physical and environmental planning but then would provide us the opportunity to maybe make up for some of that learning loss. So we're we're having deep conversations. That's a big scale operation. Six million kids in California so we can do it. I think others can as well. But it's it's a big Herculean effort. Avenue Gavin NEWSOM governor. Thanks for talking to me really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me that was California. Governor Gavin newsom speaking with me for the video series time reports with Katie couric. You can check out those videos on time dot com and I'm posting them on my social media channels. You can keep up with everything I'm doing by subscribing to my morning newsletter wakeup call at Katie couric dot com. And if you haven't already make sure you subscribe to this podcast netspend on apple podcasts. The iheartradio APP or wherever you listen. There's new episodes every Thursday until next time and my next question. I'm Katie couric. Thanks for listening everyone. Next question. With Katie. Couric is the production of iheartradio. Katie couric media the executive producers are Katie couric. Co-ordinates Tyler. Clang the supervising producer is Lauren Hanson. Our show producer is Beth and Macaluso the associate producers are Emily Pinto and Derek clements editing by Derek Clements Dylan Fagin and low Berlanti mixing by Dylan Fagin R. Researcher is Gabriel Loser for more information on today's episode go to Katie couric Dot Com and follow us on twitter and Instagram at Katie..

Katie couric Governor Gavin newsom California US Dylan Fagin supervising producer Boyd apple Derek clements Lauren Hanson producer Gabriel Loser twitter Emily Pinto Instagram Researcher Beth Macaluso
"tyler clang" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

Next Question with Katie Couric

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

"We started reporting the story long before cove in nineteen infected hundreds of thousands of people across the country not to mention millions globally. It's a public health crisis of historic scale and one that frankly. This country was not prepared. For what the corona virus pandemic will mean for the maternal health crisis. We may not know for a very long time but the fact is right now. Tens of thousands of women are giving birth in unprecedented circumstances sometimes alone and often without the support networks and in-person care. They need to stay healthy. Before during an after birth meanwhile cove nineteen is only underscoring already existing racial disparities that put black and underserved Americans at greater risk while it's terrifying to think of the damage this pandemic could do to the maternal mortality crisis. There are still so many people healthcare professionals and advocates who are working tirelessly on behalf of pregnant women to that end we've compiled a resources. Section around the maternal mortality crisis including people information and organizations mentioned in these episodes. You can find that in my morning. Newsletter wakeup call and I'll link to it on my social media channels. If you'd like to get wakeup call. Every morning in your inbox you can subscribe at Katie. Couric DOT COM to share this important series or to subscribe to next question. Find US ON APPLE PODCASTS? The iheartradio APP or wherever you listen until next time and my next question. I'm Katie couric next question. With Katie couric is the production of I heart radio and Katie couric media the executive producers are Katie couric. Courtney limits and Tyler Clang. The supervising producer is Lauren Hanson. Our show producer is Beth. Anne Macaluso the associate producers are Emily Pinto and Derek clements editing by Derek Clements Dylan Fagin and low Berlanti mixing by Dylan Fagin. A researcher is Gabriel loser for more information on today's episode go to Katie couric Dot Com and follow us on twitter and Instagram at Katie couric. For more podcast from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Here's something good is a new show from the Seneca Women podcast network and iheartradio each day. We aspire to bring you the good news the silver lining the glass half full because there is good happening the world everywhere every day. We just need to look for and share it. Here's something good short. Daily show that offers positive stories helpful suggestions and shared experiences to inform and inspire you every day. Listen to hear something. Good on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows subscribe now. Hey Miles yes. It's Jack from work. Yes Hi did you know that. We hosted Daily News and culture. Podcast where people go to get caught sitting. Are You yes? Are you confused about that? You're talking about the daily show to make sure you knew and that everybody knew that you could listen to us every day twice a day talk about what is happening and they could learn everything without feeling. The life drained from their soul. Yeah I think at the daily Zeitgeist. We like to give people a balance of justice enough news that they feel informed and just enough laughs that they're not overwhelmed. I can have a decent day after listening to guys. Listen to the daily on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever fine podcasts or given away for free..

Katie couric apple iheartradio Dylan Fagin Daily News supervising producer Derek clements Anne Macaluso producer Lauren Hanson twitter Courtney Beth Jack researcher Tyler Clang Emily Pinto
"tyler clang" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

Next Question with Katie Couric

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> next question. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> With Katie couric is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the production of iheartradio. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Katie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> couric media <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the executive producer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Katie couric <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> courtney leads and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Tyler. Clang <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> supervising producer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is Lauren Hanson. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producer is Beth. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Anne Macaluso <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the associate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producers are Emily <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Pinto and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Derek clements <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> editing by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Derek Clements <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Dylan Fagin at <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> low Berlanti <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mixing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by Dylan Fagan. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our researcher <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is Gabriel <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> loser <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for more information <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on today's episode <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> go to Katie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> couric Dot Com <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and follow us on twitter <Speech_Music_Male> and <SpeakerChange> Instagram <Music>

"tyler clang" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

Next Question with Katie Couric

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

"Sing. Happy Birthday twice until next time and my next question. I'm Katie couric. Thanks so much for listening next question with Katie couric production of iheartradio Katie couric media the executive producers are Katie couric Courtney Litz and Tyler. Clang the supervising producer. Lauren Hanson. Our show producer is Beth. Anne Macaluso the associate producers. Are Emily Pinto Derek editing by Derek Clements Dylan Fagin Berlanti mixing by Dylan fake. Our researcher is Gabriel looser. For more information on today's episode go to Katie COURIC DOT COM and follow us on twitter and Instagram at Katie. Couric for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hey I'm Joe Levy and on the latest episode of inside the studio. I sat down with one of the all-time Great Singer. Songwriters James Taylor. We talked about his new album. Where is music comes from? And how telling his life story through his songs has helped music saved my life but I was lucky also to survive. I did some very stupid. Some some years at were were just really high risk unnecessarily so a lot of people around us died. So join me. Joe Levy editor large billboard for this and other in-depth conversations with the biggest artists in music music. Listen on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get gassed Hugh Jackson. I'm a chef restaurant tour a traveler. And now I'm the host of the passenger people. Ask me all the time you know. What's that list of places to go in this city in that city and this show is dedicated to that idea mercer yourself in that culture and finding out what's intriguing and what resound and what we think about the future of that place as a visitor as a passenger subscribe? Now on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you date your podcasts..

Katie couric apple Joe Levy James Taylor Emily Pinto Derek supervising producer Anne Macaluso Lauren Hanson Courtney Litz Dylan Fagin Berlanti producer Dylan fake Gabriel looser Derek Clements twitter researcher Hugh Jackson executive Beth Instagram
"tyler clang" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"By Tyler clang I hurt media at howstuffworks for more on this and lots of other common topics visit our home planet how stuff works dot com or something new from true crime to curiosity history to science and technology now over two hundred fifty thousand podcasts available to you all free by downloading the I heart radio out number one for podcast I found a physicist and a cartoonist and brought them together to discuss some simple but profound questions of the people have been wondering about for thousands of years no one understood Daniel Jorge fun jargon free way this is Daniel Jorge explain the universe have you ever wanted to travel to a distant star to a planet orbiting another son all the time however I've heard that it's impossible yeah the problem is that the universe is so big and it comes with a built in so that means it will never build the space ship that will get us to another star within the span of a human last time that's true it's almost hard and fast rule turns out there's one or two exceptions to that immortality being frozen.

"tyler clang" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Or town has the ability to count pollen and polling stations are operated in a variety of ways some are run by the city or county public health departments others by allergist simple in metro Atlanta a city with a lot of green space and ended Tories Lee high pollen count certified counters from Atlanta allergy and asthma get up early and physically count the number of pollen particles on the last flight from a hearse type instrument that's been outside for the prior twenty four hours that number is one Atlanta residents may hear reported by various news outlets unlimited explained a few stations are run by academics like me who study airborne pollen as a research topic it takes training to learn the morphology of pollen and it takes time to analyze their samples certification in pollen counting is available through a few organizations the process requires pollen counters to take an approved pollen and for identification course pass the written exam and passed a pollen grain and fungal spore identification test which means that the counters have to learn the microscopic morphology individual pollen grains the training component identification is critical because just counting pollen isn't enough after all not everyone is allergic to the same thing one can also include data on what types of pollen our heaviest in the air that is what types of trees weeds and grasses are pollinating that day people can undergo allergy testing to determine which plans Apollinaire takes them and use the specific information from morning counts to learn how they might be impacted during the day one may be to blame for months of discomfort but remember it also has an important job it gives us our daily bread by way of fruits grains and seeds and it has a lot of other neat applications to Levin says the pollen is used in forensic science because it can help determine where an object originated archaeologists also examine fossil pollen to study which plants early human societies use and he'll just use that to determine the composition of ancient plant community exploration geologist even use fossil pollen to help locate oil path today's episode was written by Carey Whitney PhD and produced by Tyler clang bring stuff is.

Atlanta Levin geologist Tyler clang Apollinaire Carey Whitney
"tyler clang" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"First ever independent television production company does he live in preparation for the show the contest's CBS to give them full ownership of their episodes when I later sold them back to CBS he reportedly made millions and the show continues to live on thanks to his business savvy but does he live productions wasn't just responsible for I Love Lucy the company also produced major projects like the untouchables mission impossible and Star Trek although Arnesen ball eventually divorced in nineteen sixty they remained close friends for the remainder of their lives I just passed away from cancer in nineteen eighty six at the age of sixty nine but its legend indoors thanks the immeasurable impact he had on the entertainment industry has loved ones and the communities to continue to draw inspiration from his immense contribution today's episode was written by Michelle constant he introduced by Tyler clang I hurt media and howstuffworks for more on this and lots of topics producing plane and visit our home planet posted works dot com on one channel this is the I heart podcast channel discover your next favorite podcast from over two hundred fifty thousand available to you free just by downloading the I heart radio app right now I found a physicist and a cartoonist and brought them together to discuss some simple but profound questions of the people have been wondering about for thousands of years no one understood Daniel Jorge fine jargon free way this is Daniel Jorge explain the universe Hey Daniel what keeps you up at night I worry about a lot of things angel crises my kids growing up to be just like me for.

A Brief History Of The Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

BrainStuff

06:35 min | 2 years ago

A Brief History Of The Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

"Rain stuff lauren. Boko bomb here on the fourth Thursday of the month the same day that most Americans gather around the dining table to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday. The macy's Thanksgiving Day parade marches through the streets of New York City city elaborate floats giant helium balloons marching bands acrobats and celebrities create a carnival atmosphere for more than eighty years. The parade has has drawn spectators who lined the streets cheer on the participants covering two and a half miles. A three hour spectacle runs from nine. AM to noon. The holiday event has grown and grown over time from a small parade of floats and live animals organized by macy's employees into large-scale annual tradition to this day though apart from performing coming talent all other parade participants such as balloon handlers are macy's employees and their family and friends. The parade showcases more than eight thousand participants pence and crowds of more than three point. Five million spectators crammed Manhattan streets for close up view. Another fifty million watch the prayed on TV. So how did we you get here. macy's department store celebrates its one hundred and sixty first anniversary in two thousand nineteen store staged. Its first Thanksgiving Day parade in nineteen twenty twenty four that year it was called the macy's Christmas parade and it featured three floats pulled by horses. Four bands and zoo animals from the central park zoo including camels donkeys elephants and goats. Santa Claus was last in the lineup. A tradition that continues to this day it was all staged by end at the request. Request of macy's employees many of whom had just emigrated to America from Europe along to celebrate their new home in nineteen twenty seven the gigantic balloons. That are now. The signature element of the parade made their first appearance with the help of helium. The balloon replaced the zoo animals. That were frightening to some children and the first balloons included cartoon tune characters like Felix the cat at the conclusion of the parade. The giant balloons were released into the air in nineteen twenty eight. macy's began offering the one hundred dollar reward for any returned balloons which were fixed with the return address label in nineteen thirty one pilot. Colonel Clarence e chamberlain snagged a balloon with his airplanes wings leading to a ban on retrieval by airplanes the following year and after the nineteen thirty two parade another pilot attempted to capture a balloon in nearly crashed leading macy's to discontinue releasing the balloon loons at the parade's end in nineteen thirty four celebrities became an important element of the parade but senior actor. Eddie Cantor joining the event that year. The the Mickey Mouse Helium Balloon was also introduced that you're parade goers from nineteen forty two to nineteen forty four. The prey was cancelled because of the shortage of helium and rubber during world world. War Two those three years. The only time that the celebration has ever been called off when the prey returned nineteen forty five. It was broadcast on television for the first time time and was bigger than earlier versions. But the floats didn't achieve their current spectacle status until nineteen sixty nine when Manfred Bass began creating them best asked designed to them so that they could be flattened their trip through the Holland tunnel they were then reassembled during the predawn hours of the parade. Today macy's begins planning planning for the parade at least a year in advance and includes float and balloon creation celebrity booking volunteer coordination and training for clowns and balloon handlers. As the prayed it grows closer. The preparations get more intense in two thousand. Nineteen macy's celebrating. Its Ninety Third Parade with twenty six floats sixteen giant helium character balloons and forty heritage and novelty balloons and eleven marching bands. But let's talk about those balloons a former tootsie roll factory in Hoboken New Jersey just across the river from New York City. The balloons are created by the macy's parade studio. It all starts with a pencil sketch. Aerodynamic and engineering consultants assist calculations to make sure the balloon will fly properly exact scale replicas. One made out of clay and one painted model are fashioned before the actual balloon is cut out fabric. Each balloon. has several chambers and includes a zipper and inflation device and a high pressure valve flight. Inflation and deflation tests are run and cosmetic adjustments are made. Finally finally the balloon can appear in the parade up to a year after the process began balloons. These days are constructed of polyurethane though they used to be made of rubber since the switch from air to helium these behemoth balloons have coasted along with a big dose of help from Volunteer Balloon Wrangler. But it hasn't always been that easy to keep the balloons afloat. In nineteen fifty-eight the balloons were filled with air and hoisted by cranes onto trucks. Due to a helium shortage and poor weather conditions kept the balloon from being inflated at all in nineteen seventy one the balloons dimensions vary but most are about five six stories high and somewhere around sixty feet long and thirty feet wide. Each balloon needs around Ninety D.. Handlers in all their around two three thousand balloon handlers for the prayed these handlers must weigh at least one hundred and twenty pounds and be in good health of those only a few hundred team leaders are required to attend training though all are invited. Training includes lessons on dynamics geometry and physics then Blantyre's practice handling one of the big balloons on a field. The team leaders include an overall leader pilot captain and two drivers a police officer marches with each balloon own handlers. Hold the ropes to guide the balloon and each balloon is also tethered to two eight hundred pound. Utility vehicles instruments that measure the speed of wind. called called a Momma's I think are mounted on Poles at key points along the route and each one is monitored with a portable computer by a police officer in a New York City office of Emergency Management Representative. Well before the prayed begins objects that could obstruct balloons including arms of lamp posts traffic signal. Polls streetlights and trees are either altered or removed on the eve of the parade. The balloons and floats are brought. To New York City. Setup begins by six. AM Thanksgiving Day. The balloons and floats are ready to go. And prayed. Great participants take their places for the nine. AM prayed start. After the parade floats are mmediately disassembled. Balloons deflated. An all returned to their warehouse in hoboken again. Today's episode was written by Kathleen Sealer Naree and produced by Tyler. Clang brain stuff is the production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more on this and lots of other well-coordinated topics visit our home. Planet has two forks dot com and for more podcasts from iheartradio visit by heart radio. APP Apple Apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

Macy New York City Hoboken Eddie Cantor Iheartradio Holland Tunnel Colonel Clarence E Chamberlain Kathleen Sealer Naree New Jersey Felix Officer Manfred Bass Europe
What's the Science Behind Applause?

BrainStuff

06:08 min | 2 years ago

What's the Science Behind Applause?

"The TV plus different. They have the ability to Jason. He plotted to start watching now. Subscription required hurt them to bring stuff production of iheartradio brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here audiences around the world break out in applause at the conclusion of a stage. Play or a musical concert or when they're favored presidential candidates. Step to the podium. Humans have been applauding and approval approval. Since ancient times the customers mentioned in the Old Testament which depicts the Israelites. Clapping their hands and shouting God. Save the king for a young heir to the throne. But how does a group of people start applauding and what determines how many other people join and how long the accolades last. Those aren't easy questions to answer sir. Applause isn't a subject. Researchers have studied extensively and there seemed to be only a handful pardon the pun of studies in the scientific literature as is a paper from two thousand and three explains one theory. Is that audience. Applause is triggered by a few individuals who have a lower threshold of embarrassment than the rest of the crowd. These brave enthusiasts clapping lowers. The embarrassment cost for others but whether they actually join in the researchers concluded had to do with whether the performance instead witnessed crossed a threshold for impressiveness. That is whether the massive people was sufficiently pleased by what they'd seen heard. They found the People's liking for performance correlated to how long the audience kept clapping as the effort of clapping began to exceed their enthusiasm. Some individuals stopped clapping. Raising the embarrassment embarrassment cost for the remainder and giving them an incentive to stop the researchers also found that large audiences tended to applaud more predictably than smaller groups loops. We spoke by email with paper. Co Author Gary Lukin and associate professor of psychology at the University of Wisconsin Madison. He said imagine that five percent of people applauded everything. A smaller audience has a larger probability of not having any such person that would be a tough crowd as an audience grows larger. The probability converges to five percent in other words to larger audiences are more likely to behave more similarly to one another than to small audiences for the same reason that if you flip a coin one hundred times you're more likely to get closer to half heads and tails and if you flip a coin. Ten Times more recently a study published in two thousand thirteen in the Journal of the Royal Society Details University of Leeds Mathematician Richard Pieman colleagues filmed groups of between thirteen to twenty college. Students watching or presentations. They found that there was relatively little connection between how much people liked what they saw. And the duration of their ovation instead they discovered that applause was a sort of social contagion that started with a single person in the audience who typically begin clapping about two point one seconds after after the speaker finished the clothing din spread rapidly through the groups over the next two point nine three seconds at five point five six seconds the I applaud typically stopped and by two point six seconds later on average. The rest of the audience was no longer putting their hands together as well. The researchers also came to another surprising conclusion. It wasn't physical proximity to another person. Clapping that triggered applause. Instead as man explained a National Public Radio interview it was the loudness. Nisa the applause. The got audience members join in. He said as soon as people can hear that other people in the audience are clapping. They begin to clap themselves so often. When you are feeling social pressure from audience members you couldn't directly see as you've probably noticed long ovation's tend to vary in the speed of clapping and go up and down down in loudness and at times. The audience may seem to be clapping in unison. In a study published in the journal Nature in the year two thousand Romanian researchers recorded applause from theater and opera performances by placing a microphone on the ceiling of the hall. They discovered the people who are plotting often started out clapping rapidly and chaotically but after a few seconds their class began to slow and synchronize into a distinctive rhythm which added to the intensity of the noise the urge to synchronize the claps they noted had seemed quote to reflect the desire of the audience to express Buddhism by increasing the average noise intensity paradoxically though ask people strive to make an even louder ovation to show their enthusiasm. They begin to clap more rapidly. That tends to disperse their clapping and destroy the cumulative synchronization. It's only when they slow their collapse. The applause becomes thunderous again. Today's episode it was written by Patrick j tiger and produced Tyler Clang. Breen stuff is the production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more on this and lots of applause worthy topics we hope. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcast for my heart radio. visit the iheartradio. APP Apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows how do our food stories change change during wartime Johnny strick Private First Class. Our veterans share where they fought who they said they ain't and what they missed. The move had powdered the next and I hated those politics. My name is Jacqueline. Were Pozzo and I welcome you to service. Stories of hunger. War A new iheartradio. PODCAST aguing Veterans Day. I November eleventh on the Iheartradio APP and everywhere. You find your favorite podcasts restore. That's the first thing we did join us.

Iheartradio Lauren Bogle Jason Gary Lukin Ten Times Pozzo Associate Professor Of Psychol Jacqueline Nisa University Of Wisconsin Madiso University Of Leeds Johnny Strick Richard Pieman Breen Private First Class Patrick J Tyler Clang Journal Of The Royal Society D Five Percent
Introducing: History Vs. Theodore Roosevelt

BrainStuff

03:09 min | 2 years ago

Introducing: History Vs. Theodore Roosevelt

"Hey Brain steph listeners. Today got a trailer for you for another podcast that I think he might dig his from his debilitating childhood asthma and conflict within his family to conquering the hours. You Tyler Clang and produced in Soundscape by Dylan Fagan whose works of. Y'All have heard on my other podcast always advised but Roosevelt was a weird human who did some asks the iheartradio APP or wherever you listen to your favorite shows a Theodore Roosevelt he said the crowds screamed and gasped as Roosevelt pulled his vest aside it probably saved me from it going into my heart. Roosevelt said adding the bullet him to the hospital rendered in stone on Mount Rushmore Theodore. Roosevelt is so much more fundamentally change how we spell and traumatized Dr Seuss and that's just the first off against their greatest foes in each episode of our first season we're pinning tr against billeting childhood asthma in conflict with his family to conquering the hours of the day and preserving

Theodore Roosevelt Asthma Mount Rushmore Theodore Dylan Fagan Dr Seuss Tyler Clang
Can Red Flag Laws Help Prevent Mass Shootings?

BrainStuff

06:53 min | 2 years ago

Can Red Flag Laws Help Prevent Mass Shootings?

"Today's episode is brought to you by Lexus. You at Lexus. Their greatest curiosity is you because the most amazing machines aren't inspired by machines they're inspired by Dole that's why Lexus asks different questions better questions more human questions like can you see with your ears and the answers are as inspiring as you are which allowing the police to take guns away from people who judge finds dangerous that included ninety four percent of Democrats eighty five percents Republicans and eighty two percent of independent unspoiled this August even President Donald Trump who otherwise mostly has been an opponent of gun control indicated his support for Red Flag laws traumatic end not permanent so far red flag laws have been enacted by seventeen states plus the district Columbia in Florida where a red flag laws medicine is an example of what many advocate as a way to prevent the mass shootings that have increasingly plagued the United States red flag laws are designed to get mental illness or other factors that might show up in the federal instant background check system and prevent the person from buying a gun from a dealer in the first place the problem is that loopholes it as potentially being a threat to themselves or other people police and courts would have the authority to remove firearms according to Flannery Red Flag Laws on people who have felony criminal record or mental health record those rules are too narrow and too broad they identify lots of people because they had an involuntary commitment. We spoke with Jeffrey Swanson a professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine he said we focused all his attention on the point of sale on the other side the National Rifle Association's website criticizes existing Red Flag Laws as violating gun owners Second Amendment Rights Civil Rights and second described scary situation an employee allegedly had confided to a CO worker that if he was fired from his job he would shoot supervisor and other employees though he would warn the eighty five years ago and wouldn't hurt anybody in the also failed to identify people who do pose a risk we also spoke with Daniel J flannery director of the having to charge the employees with the crime the cops obtained a court order and the next day seized five firearms the Court subsequently issued another order allowing authorities introduction of iheartradio hey brain stuff lauren bogle bomb here in California the manager of a car dealership contacted police and worker in advance so the CO worker could escape thanks to the red flag law the California enacted in two thousand fourteen the police could take action in this case right away without on emissions in state records submitted to the background check system have often enabled people who went onto become mass shooters to obtain guns even when they should have been disqualified begun center for Violence Prevention Research and education at Case Western Reserve University he said this is about putting protocols in place so that when an individual is identify them having guns poses a risk and the person has an opportunity to get the weapons back at some point a flannery said there's due process to that so that it's not authorities away to intervene and take guns away from a person who's perceived as a possible threat they can do that even if the person doesn't have a criminal record or a history of being institutionalized destroy a middle ground between protecting public safety and individual rights a person who's flagged isn't arrested or charged with a crime and authorities have to be able to convince a judge that did some strong public support a Washington Post and ABC News poll conducted in early of September two thousand nineteen for example found that eighty six percent of Americans supported enacted in two thousand eighteen in the weight of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting authorities have utilized it to take guns away for more than two thousand people red flag laws have attract to hold onto the weapons for a year that case described an article by University of California Davis researchers that was published in August of two thousand nineteen in the journal Ause of internal Edmund advocates that are against red flag laws say the seizures of these individuals weapons is a violation of the constitutions guaranteed due process which means the people should have the right to argue their case in court before their guns are taken not after and whether or not red flag laws do much to prevent mass shootings is difficult question to answer the study we mentioned that the of this episode conducted by the UC Davis researchers cited twenty-one cases in California in which a court issued an order to seize guns quote after the subject of the order had made a clear declaration of intent to commit a bash shooting or had exhibited behavior suggesting such an intent but it's not really possible all to prove conclusively that any of the individuals actually would have committed such an act Swanson wrote in Washington Post opinion piece that red flag laws aren't necessary early going to prevent killings by mass shooters except in instances in which alerts citizen notices that an angry young man is amassing an arsenal nevertheless Swanson's imports such laws because he and other researchers have found strong evidence that they reduce another sort of gun violence the cumulatively Inflicts Much Higher Death Poll Suicide by firearm in two thousand seventeen he colleagues calculated that for every twenty guns seized through Red Flag Law one suicide is prevented preventing people with the missile to develop suicidal idealization from getting guns does save lives because research shows that people who attempt suicide by other methods and up surviving eighty to ninety percent of the time but with a gun they're effective at killing themselves almost all of the time Swanson said from the picture of public health that's good enough reason for red flag laws today's episode was written by Patrick Jake Hager and produced by Tyler Clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's has it shows works for more on this and lots of other topics visit our home planet how stuff works dot Com and for more podcast my heart radio visit radio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your hello this is Julie Rieger author of the goes talker and Co host of insider's guide to the other side and I'm Brenda I may not have written a book but I mean Julie's book and you are the most gifted on the planet on insiders they leave you with one question. What amazing ideas will you inspire next discover the answers Lexus dot com slash curiosity? We'll come to brainstorm due to the other side launches on October sixteen in every Wednesday after that listen to insiders guide to the other side on the iheartradio

Lexus Jeffrey Swanson President Donald Trump Duke University School Of Medi United States Columbia Florida Flannery Dole Professor Of Psychiatry And Be Democrats Republicans Ninety Four Percent Eighty Six Percent Eighty Two Percent Eighty Five Years Ninety Percent
"tyler clang" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Or town has the ability to count pollen and polling stations are operated in a variety of ways. some are run by the city or county public health departments others by allergist for example in metro Atlanta a city with a lot of green space and ended Tories Lee high pollen counts certified counters from Atlanta allergy and asthma get up early and physically count the number of pollen particles on the last flight from a hearse type instrument that's been outside for the prior twenty four hours that number is one of the interested in space he reported by various news outlets. unlimited explained a few stations are run by academics like me who study airborne pollen as a research topic it takes training to learn the morphology of pollen and it takes time to analyze air samples. certification in pollen counting is available through a few organizations the process requires pollen counters to take an approved pollen and for identification course pass the written exam and passed appalling green and fungal spore identification test which means that the counters have to learn the microscopic morphology individual pollen grains. the training component identification is critical because just counting pollen isn't enough after all not everyone is allergic to the same thing. one can also include data on what types of poner heaviest in the air that is what types of trees weeds and grasses are pollinating that day. okay undergo allergy testing to determine which plans Pollin irritates them and use the specific information from morning counts to learn how they might be impacted during the day. one may be to blame for months of discomfort but remember it also has an important job it gives us our daily bread by way of fruits grains and seeds and it has a lot of other neat applications to let in says that Palin is used in forensic science because it can help determine where an object originated archaeologists also examine fossel pollen to study which plants early human societies use and he'll just use it to determine the composition of ancient plant community. exploration geologist even use fossil pollen to help locate oil deposits. today's episode was written by Carey Whitney PhD and produced by Tyler clang bring stuff is a.

Atlanta Palin geologist Tyler clang Pollin Carey Whitney twenty four hours
What Is the U.S. Presidential Seal?

BrainStuff

05:52 min | 2 years ago

What Is the U.S. Presidential Seal?

"SMART is open open is smart. IBM is combining their industry expertise with the open source leadership of Red Hat. Let's unlock the world's potential essential. Let's put smart to work learn more at IBM dot. com slash red hat welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartmedia. Hey brain stuff lauren bogle Bam here over the years you've probably noticed the emblem emblazoned on the side of Air Force One. It's also attached to the podium from which the US President gives speeches and appears on official White House stationary and invitations a railroad locomotive painted to honor president didn't George H W Bush is decorated with it. It's the seal of the president of the United States of America the presidential seal look similar with slight differences to the great seal of the United States the official symbol. That's impressed upon official documents such as treaties and commissions the precise design of the presidential seal was detailed an executive order ninety-six forty-six issued in October of Nineteen forty-five by President Harry S Truman. It's specified that the seal depict an American Eagle that's holding ending an olive branch in its right Talon and a bundle of thirteen arrows to symbolize the original thirteen states and it's left while clutching in it's big a white scroll inscribed with the motto Eh Pluribus Unum Latin for out of many one behind and above the Eagle. There's a background of radiating glory depiction of rays rays of light crossed by an arc of thirteen cloud puffs below which there's a constellation of mullet sergeant which are five pointed compass stars that image is surrounded by a ring of white stars symbolizing the current fifty United States and around that another circle with lettering seal of the president of the United States though the presidential seals precise origins are unclear it was clearly inspired by the great seal that national symbol was adopted by the continental congress in in seventeen eighty two after secretary of the Continental Congress Charles Thompson merged ideas from several committees into a sketch that subsequently was modified by Herald Thomas the spartan that's according to the State Department's Nineteen seventy-six official history of the great seal written by Richard S Patterson and Richardson Dougal but at some point. US presidents decided that like the British monarch. They needed their own personal coat of arms as well. We spoke by email with Matthew Castello senior historian for the White House Historical Association. He said that the great seal quote was the official symbol of the United States federal government not the office of the Presidency Eh as such some president simply used the great seal while others thought that the president should have their own distinct seal. Castilla explains at least several throw presidents in the eighteen hundreds created their own seals incorporating. Whatever flourishes appeal to them James K polk for example used his own seal on the proclamation of war against against Mexico in eighteen forty six Millard fillmore came up with his own slightly different version which he sent to Maryland Postmaster engraver Edward Stabler to make in eighteen fifty Lincoln used a personalized seal as well. A presidential seal didn't actually appear on an invitation to an event until eighteen seventy seven Kevin according to Authors Patterson and Dougal President Rutherford B Hayes who was hosting a dinner honoring Russian Grand Duke Alexis Alexandrovich made the invites look fancier zero by placing them with a seal that featured an arc of clouds raise and stars between the Eagles wingtips but the Haze Eagle was thinner in scrawny than today's robust looking eagle and its head turned toward the bundle of arrows rather than toward the olive branch in Nineteen to President Theodore Roosevelt ordered yet another other presidential seal to be installed on the floor of the White House entrance hall. He commissioned a french-american Sculptor Philip Martigny to create a new one Martigny drew on the Hayes design fine but added a few changes including engraving the phrase the seal of the President of the United States in that circular border Truman who didn't like Martin. He's work had removed emplaced elsewhere in the White House during World War Two President Franklin Roosevelt who was fascinated with insignia asked experts to redesign the presidential seal they came up with the idea of adding ring of stars to represent. All the states and having Eagle Face the olive branches rather than the Arrows to emphasize the desire for peace rather rather than war that design was the one that Truman approved in nineteen forty five and it's been used ever since in nineteen fifty nine and nineteen sixty President Dwight Eisenhower and how updated it by adding stars for Alaska and Hawaii. Today's episode was written by Patrick Jake Jake Hydra and produced by Tyler Clang Breen stuff. It's production and I heart radio. How stuff works for more this and lots of other official topics that our home planet has stuff works dot com and for for more podcasts from iheartradio. I heart radio APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you listen to your favorite shows in the Montgomery County Maryland courthouse there are thousands of pages of documents detailing the horrific murders of three innocent people soon as I heard the details. I knew my dad was involved right away instantly associate Lawrence but at the time of the murders Lawrence Horn was clear across the country. I'm Jasmine Morris from iheartradio radio and hit home media. This is hitman. Listen and subscribe at Apple podcasts on the iheartradio APP or wherever you listen to podcasts.

President Trump United States President Harry S Truman Official White House IBM President Theodore Roosevelt Dougal President Rutherford B Red Hat White House Historical Associa Eh Pluribus Unum Latin Lawrence Horn Richard S Patterson Lauren Bogle White House Entrance Hall George H W Bush Patrick Jake Jake Hydra Iheartradio Radio James K Polk
Can Automated Lights Really Stop Burglars?

BrainStuff

05:49 min | 2 years ago

Can Automated Lights Really Stop Burglars?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels the rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and Redeemer Miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your Wallet Credit Approval Required Capital One bank. USA NA welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren Vauban here when you picture a burglar who do you see the black clad clipper guy with the tiny mask and a bulging bag of loot or maybe the pair from the home alone movies casing a wealthy suburban neighborhood to know exactly when families are gone for Christmas vacation. The reality of burglary and burglars is very different than most of us. I think for starters according to FBI statistics the majority of residential burglaries happen during the day not at night under the cover of darkness and according to interviews interviews with convicted burglars. Only third of all break INS are planned ahead of time rather than being professional thieves. The typical profile of a burglar is a seventeen eighteen year old kid who's looking to quickly grab something valuable and Skram. Oh we spoke with Marcus Felson a professor of criminal justice at Texas State University and a pioneering pioneering expert in the nature of criminal activities. He said burglaries are fast typically over within five minutes and often within one minute a lot of the time the door or isn't even locked if they come in and rummage they rummage quickly and get out of there by better understanding when why and how residential burglaries happen urban homeowners can come up with the most effective strategies for deterring them which brings us to the question of the day do house or porch lights do anything to stop burglars. ARSE Felsen says that lights have their place in a home security strategy but the lights alone won't prevent someone from breaking into Your House for example motion motion activated exterior lights in the front and rear of your house aren't effective way to spook a burglar but only if the light is positioned correctly to eliminate the intruders face so that a neighbor abor or camera might be able to see them clearly. If it's pointed towards the neighbor's house the burglar might realize that all a neighbor would be able to see a blinding light and not the burglar what about time interior lights home automation systems have made it easier than ever to schedule and control your interior lights while you're away they let you use is your smartphone to program your living room kitchen and bedroom lights to mimic what it would look like if you're home again while automated lighting might give the impression that someone is home especially in the evening when lights can be seen from the street thieves not look out for other much clear signs that you're gone during the day according to interviews with convicted burglars in Australia and the United Kingdom opportunistic thieves look for uncollected mail newspapers and packages left on the porch an empty driveways and garages an Oregon TV News News team that surveyed convicted burglars found that all of their respondents would knock on the front door before breaking in so those tricky interior lights might not help and if you think you're being smart by leaving TV or radio on in the house while you're away on vacation think again burglars in the Australian Survey said that a TV blasting away in the middle of the night is a sure sign that no one's home which gets to felsen biggest piece of advice for securing your home get to know your neighbors I in that Australian study just twenty two point eight percent burglars deterred by Sensor Lights and nineteen point three percent by lights inside the house but a burglar can. I'm be stopped if a neighbor picks up the phone and calls the police of course this means your neighbors need to know you and your family well enough to identify true stranger trying to enter your house felsen recommends introducing yourself to the neighbors on all sides of your house particularly the ones that live behind you since burglars will most likely enter from a back door or window and to make it easier for your neighbors to see your house. You might trim back your hedges from doors and windows. They can't report what they can't see recognizing that. Most burglaries happen between ten. Am and two PM when a lot of people are away at work your best neighborhood allies against a burglary. Our folks were home. Most of the day people who are retired heard work from home or work later shifts those same neighbors can pick up your mail and packages while you're gone on vacation or even park their car in your driveway decoy again exterior and interior lights can work as a part of an integrated home security strategy that should also include strong locks on all doors and windows and not leaving valuables labels in plain view. This episode was written by Dave Rou and produced by Tyler Clang Brain. Greenstone is a production of iheartradio stuff works for more on this month of other topics visit our home planet how stuff works dot. com and for more podcasts from IHEART radio. This is radio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows in the Montgomery County Maryland courthouse there are thousands of pages of documents detailing the horrific murders of three innocent people soon as I heard the details. I knew my dad was involved right away. Instantly I says launch coach but at the time of the murders Lawrence Horn was clear across the country. I'm Jasmine Morris from IHEART radio and hit home media. This is hit men. Dan Listen and subscribe at Apple podcasts on the iheartradio APP or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Burglary Sensor Lights USA Iheart Radio Felsen FBI Lawrence Horn Lauren Vauban Dan Listen Marcus Felson Jasmine Morris Australia Montgomery County Maryland Professor United Kingdom Apple Australian Survey
How Can We Film Giant Squid?

BrainStuff

04:54 min | 2 years ago

How Can We Film Giant Squid?

"Today's episode is brought to you by ibm. Technology is becoming more open data more accessible and the world more innovative i._b._m. Is combining their industry expertise with the open source leadership of red hat to bring you more freedom more security or flexibility. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work learn more at i._b._m. Dot com slash red hat. Welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren bocom here. The giant squid is carnivorous invertebrate that weighs over four hundred and forty pounds or two hundred kilograms and measures around thirty three feet or ten meters long. Yes it can be as long as a school bus and has is the size of dinner plates along with a sharp beak in short. It's a little disconcerting. Perhaps apps more. Disconcerting is the fact that these wild creatures which have rarely ever been spotted alive have been popping up in the videos in recent years very much alive and very very large urge before two thousand four that only been found his carcasses washed up on beaches or captured by fishermen so what's going on under the sea is a rash shove giant squid sightings and indication that these see giants are taking over the waves in a word not but the sightings do indicate technology is advancing an and exciting new ways. We spoke edith witter p._h._d. The c. e. o. m. senior scientist of florida's ocean research in conservation association inc did she said it hasn't really been a rash of giant squid sightings. There have only been two times giant squid have been filmed in the deep sea both times the animals were spotted with help from a camera system and optical lure that witter developed to help researchers explore the creatures of the deep sea without scaring them away the camera system is called called. Medusa medusa is unlike any recording device used before because it emits a red light. That's an invisible to most creatures living in the midnight zone. That's the expanse pitch black water about three thousand three hundred feet or thousand meters below the ocean surface then there's the optical lure an electronic jellyfish that accompanies medusa down below the waves to help draw creatures toward the camera with an innovative method that takes inspiration from animals natural cues called an e jelly witter explained blamed the each elliott imitates the bioluminescence burglar alarm display of a common deep sea jellyfish bioluminescence burglar alarms are like scream for help using liked liked their last-ditch effort of pray that are caught in the clutches of a predator to attract the attention of a bigger predator that may attack their attacker and thereby afford them an opportunity for escape escape until just fifteen years ago. The only facts known about giant squid were gathered from their massive dead bodies since live ones had never been seen then then in two thousand and four the first live images of giant squid were captured and in two thousand twelve. The first video of a giant squid emerged thanks to medusa capturing specimen swimming off of japan's cassara archipelago. It wasn't until june of two thousand nineteen that another medusa shot giant squid video came to light this time of a roughly ten foot long. That's three remitters young swimmer in u._s. Waters around the gulf of mexico june twenty nineteen marked the fifth deployment of medusa on this particular expedition and when witter and her team examined the video the undeniable footage of a long tentacle creature reaching out for the jelly. It's hard to tell exactly how big it was because it was heading straight towards the camera. All these years of underwater chasing begs the question. Why are these animals so camera. Shy in the first place witter said the giant giant squid has been elusive because our standard methods of exploration using platforms with bright lights and noisy thrusters has been scaring away the only reason we even knew giant squid existed assisted is because they happen to float when they die so dead and dying specimens have been seen and photographed surface. How many other animals are they're living in the deep sea that we don't know about because we've been scaring them away and they don't happen to float when they die a good and perhaps even more disconcerting question indeed today's episode was written by michelle concept dusky and produced by tyler. Clang bringing is production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more than this. Lots of other mysterious. Topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcasts from i heart radio is iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows instead of an ad today i have message from the ad council. Nobody likes an awkward silence but sometimes it can be a good thing use an awkward silence to ask your friend about their mental health. It can really help find out how at sees the awkward dot org.

Edith Witter Iheartradio IBM Lauren Bocom Florida U._S Mexico Apple Scientist Japan Elliott C. E. O. M. Conservation Association Inc Three Thousand Three Hundred F Two Hundred Kilograms Thirty Three Feet Thousand Meters Fifteen Years Forty Pounds Ten Meters
How Are Animal and Plant Cells Different?

BrainStuff

06:04 min | 2 years ago

How Are Animal and Plant Cells Different?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels the rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeemer miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet. Credit approval required capital one bank u._s._a. N._a. Look into brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff. Lauren bogle bomb here from the outside plant. Seem pretty different from animals for instance plants can't walk around and catch food like we do they give off oxygen instead of carbon dioxide and they don't have the same sensory organs help us get out of the way of a fire or sniff out and hunt down a potential meal but plants and animals are more similar than they might seem from the outside hide under a microscope plant cell an animal cell might seem so similar that in some cases. You'd really have to know what you're looking at. Tell the difference between them. This is because plants and animals both belong to the domain ucare iota organisms with cells that are basically sealed baggies full of fluid suspending little factories called org anals which which have different jobs in the cell depending on the needs of the organism plants animals fungi and protests are all you carry. It's these organisms are made up of one or more cells with the variety of membrane bound or anals including the nucleus the big boss organiz that contains all the d._n._a. Instructions for making that particular bear or ringworm ringworm or fakest tree or fruit fly or human being even though a blueberry bush and a corgi don't seem to have much in common on the spectrum of things things their cells are way more similar to each other than they are to those of bacteria for example which are procreates single celled organisms that are generally smaller than a single eukaryotic karaoke excel that contain only a few types of rudimentary or anals and that lack a nucleus to hold their d._n._a. The word you carry out means true colonel referring into that important nucleus. It's kind of a mess inside a precarious excel whereas eukaryotic cells are highly structured but at the end of the day you kerio are ya impropriety have more in common with each other than they do with a rock so there's that if plan animals are so similar on a cellular level wife. Why did they seem so different. When you take a couple steps back well. It's because plants animals have different goals. Each of their eukaryotic cells is customized to make them. I'm great at being what they are for instance. It's a planned job to take carbon dioxide out of the air which we animals just leave lying around every time we exhale or drive. A car and plants can simply add a little sunlight and water to that c._o. Two in order to make literally everything they need to survive animals on the other hand require oxygen in may by plants to breath but we can't make our own food like plans to so we've got to go russell up our own grab this requires movement which made it necessary for animals to golf all kinds of crazy specialized cell types tissues and organs. That plant can't make because they simply don't need them. Survival is based on getting basic needs met an an outsourced requirements of an animal far surpass those of plants even though their cells are constructed similarly plants and animals have different cellular settings things a really obvious difference is in the outer shell of the cell in addition to the cell membrane plants have cell walls made of tough compounds called cellulose and lignin which makes them rigid and tough useful for keeping trees from collapsing into gladness piles animal cells on the other hand are contained within a thin cell membrane a affleck's book container a lot like a semi permeable sandwich bag it provides nothing in the way of structure but it can regulate what comes in and out of the cell and it can keep all the organisms contained within it animals have all kinds of fancy organized help them form some pretty mind blowing structures like bones muscles and nerves. These organs are what allow animals to to build empires honestly but one canal animals don't have is the chloroplast which allows plans to photosynthesis or make sunlight into glucose compounds so any green you see on a plan to leave the stem in the peel of an unripe banana all comes from the chloroplast in their selves turning light into food and try try that animals one important difference between plant and animal cells can be found in another organization called evacuate. Some animal cells contain backyards but in a plant cell. They're really large and have an important job. Keeping the plant from wilting vacuoles are basically intracellular water balloons that keep the cell plumped bumped from the inside by creating <unk> pressure pushing the cell membrane against the cell wall and helping the plant keep its shape if you've ever seen a pitiful carrot at the bottom of your crisper drawer all floppy and unappetizing. It's the loss of turbo pressure in its factuals ultimately landed at in the compost bin and that's about all separately not for a planet. Today's episode was written justin shields and produced by tyler clang brain. Stuff is a production adoption of i heart radio is how stuff works for more on this amounts of other highly specialized topics because at our home planet how stuff works dot com and for more podcast from iheartradio i heart radio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows i money vertical of it and i'm jason pfeiffer editor in chief of entrepreneur magazine and what we know is is this if you're not talking about money. You're never going to be getting a bit in our podcast hush money. We debate the uncomfortable questions about money in life like do you give your friend alone wound who pays on the first date and how do you ask for a raise. Then a celebrity judge joins us to decide who's right. Listen and subscribe to hush money on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to your podcasts.

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Does Aging Always Increase Risk of Death?

BrainStuff

04:41 min | 2 years ago

Does Aging Always Increase Risk of Death?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels the rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeemer miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet. Credit approval required capital one bank u._s._a. N._a. Welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren boko bomb here. How would you like to live five times longer than a mammal. Your size has any right to expect sounds great right but wait. Would you still be interested. If it meant you had to live out your days looking like a tiny alien dressed in an old sock made from the skin of somebody's hard living grandpa. Take a minute to think it over naked mole rats. That's a taxonomic name. Heterosexuals gleyber have made their evolutionary choice in this regard. This cold blooded rodent is incredibly long-lived. They routinely lived the ripe age age of thirty five compare that to porcupines in guinea pigs close relatives which usually live no longer than age eight naked mole rats very rarely get cancer are nearly incapable full of feeling pain and when the oxygen runs out in their underground tunnels they basically start acting like plants their bodies automatically switched from using oxygen process glucose into energy in their cells to processing reserve stores fructose into energy like a plant would no oxygen necessary and in a study published in two thousand eighteen based on analysis assist the life histories of thousands of naked mole rats researchers found that while the rodents not only live incredibly long lives they also don't really age seriously their risk risk of dying just doesn't really seem to increase as they get older and female fertility doesn't seem to decline with age either the term for this is negligible citizens and and lobsters and galapagos tortoises are two other examples of animals with these qualities study author rochelle buffet stein a comparative biologist who works for the longevity seventy focused california biotech company calico has studied naked mole rats for more than three decades and has recorded the life history of each of the three thousand three hundred and twenty nine animals that have passed through her lab in that time what she's found is it naked mole rats are a huge exceptions the slightly unsettling gum pertz law of mortality which was developed in in eighteen twenty five by british mathematician insurance actuary benjamin bomb parts to assign a mathematical formula to the phenomenon of ageing actuaries calculate. The financial risk ask insurance company assumes by ensuring a given person for humans. The gun parts law states that after the age of thirty the likelihood that we're going to died doubles every eight years. Some variation of this law applies to basically every other mammal we know about with the exception of buffon's stein's lab reared mole wraps. It's a once buffet teens. Good mole rats reach sexual maturity at about six months of age. She found the likelihood that they would croak reached around one in ten thousand where where it hovered for the rest of their lives since only a few of buffon's deans naked mole rats were not killed him experiments or moved to other labs. We don't actually know how or if the naked mole rats strong longevity game eventually hits a wall. The oldest individual in the study is currently thirty five years old so who knows aging could happened really quickly for these little superheroes after a certain point in time but for the rest of the over thirty mammal crowd out there trying to have just okay day to day in spite of the fact that the likelihood of your death is roughly doubling by the decade. Today's episode was written by justin shields and produced by tyler clang breen stuff. That's a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other. Well preserved topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows in the montgomery county maryland courthouse there there are thousands of pages of documents detailing the horrific murders of three innocent people soon as i heard the details i knew my dad was involved right away instantly lawrence but at the time of the murders lawrence horn was clear across the country. I'm jasmine morris from iheartradio uh-huh and hit home media. This is hitman. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Iheartradio Stein Buffon Lawrence Horn Apple Montgomery County Maryland Cou Jasmine Morris California Calico Justin Shields Tyler Clang Breen Thirty Five Years Three Decades Eight Years Six Months
Is Sparkling Water Good For You?

BrainStuff

05:13 min | 2 years ago

Is Sparkling Water Good For You?

"Today's episode is brought to you by ibm. Smart is open open is smart. I._b._m.'s combining their industry expertise with open source leadership of red hat. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work learn more at i._b._m. Dot com slash red hat. Welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio mark. Hey brain stuff. Lauren vocal bomb here as consumer preferences veered towards more quote unquote natural ingredients in their foods and beverages diet. Soda sales are dropping in place of soda. Carbonated waters like seltzer water are tingling evermore tongues americans are buying three three times as much of the staff as they did a decade ago and although there are plenty of reasons to give up the artificial sweeteners and diet soda could all those bubbles potentially bad for us to i let sit on a bit of carbonated water lingo. Sparkling water is a type of mineral water. That's bottled at the source. Think brands like perry. The minerals in them are naturally occurring and the carbonation might be too although some manufacturers might add bubbles for more zip salter waters biting bubbles rules are all created artificially but they have no other added ingredients save for sometimes flavorings of some sort either natural or artificial a side note here natural flavoring means. This chemical was derived from plants or animals including laboratory farmed microorganisms and official means. This chemical was synthesized in a laboratory from other chemicals. A natural chemical and an artificial chemical may be molecular identical and batches of the one labelled artificial might actually be more pure because they were synthesized in the carefully controlled lab anyway other than sparkling water and seltzer water. There are the offshoots of carbonated water that have other added ingredients. The club soda is a seltzer water with added minerals and sodium potentially table salt or even baking soda both of which reduce acidity and conjure flavor that for many drinkers anchors is more reminiscent of natural spring water tonic water is altogether another entity typically loaded with sugars and a dash of cleaning making it more soda soda pop then seltzer all of these bubbling waters. Oh their existence to an eighteenth century english preacher named joseph priestley who created a technique that forced carbon a oxide gas in two regular old flat water when held together under pressure the gas remained in the water indefinitely in till it was released into a glass and the gas began and the process of floating out the drinker finally enjoyed the refreshing tingle of carbonation on their tongue leader researchers found that forcing carbon dioxide in water has has some notable side effects. It makes the water a bit more acidic which adds some bite to flavors it also helps to preserve the drink to make taste fresher longer priestly erroneously crony asleep touted his revolutionary drank away for sailors to beat back the effects of scurvy during long voyages and even rigged up a portable system that allowed them to create carbonated water on aboard ships on demand so our modern health conscious consumers mistakenly believing other health benefits of sensors and their kin a two do those one study found that sparkling mineral water caused slightly greater dental rozhin than stillwater but according to the report quote levels remained low and were of the order of one hundred <unk> times less than the competitor soft drinks and two thousand seven study found that flavored sparkling waters could be just as creative as orange juice to the teeth but all the flavored waters in the study contained citric acid which can be highly erosive. We spoke by email with marissa more registered dietitian here in atlanta she she said that beyond those issues bubbling water is rather innocuous quote. The carbonation may cause bloating for some and or feelings of fullness but overall. It's a fine way to hydrate eight and especially helpful for those who don't particularly enjoy still or flat water and if you're trying to lose weight by cutting your caloric intake that feeling of fullness might even be a benefit and fizzy water might be a good way to entice you into drinking more h. Two o. moore said seltzer water is a fun and effective way to hydrate particularly for those who wouldn't drink water otherwise if you have any digestive issues or effects from seltzer water then you might cut back or even steer clear of it otherwise i'd say consider enjoying your seltzer with a meal instead of solo or rinsing with plain water afterwards. Today's episode was written by nathan chandler and produced by tyler clang brains devos's production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other efforts topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for podcast from iheart radio is iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by ibm. Smart smart is open. Open is smart. I._b._m.'s combining their industry expertise with open source leadership of red hat. Let's unlocked the world's potential. Let's put smart to work learn more at i._b._m. Dot com slash red hat.

IBM I._B._M. Joseph Priestley Bloating Perry Stillwater Iheartradio Official Atlanta Nathan Chandler O. Moore Apple Devos
Why Is There a Rhino-Shaped Cave in Washington State?

BrainStuff

06:47 min | 2 years ago

Why Is There a Rhino-Shaped Cave in Washington State?

"And we're back at the ron burgundy podcast season do baby pressure team what we'd do. I brush my teeth. Whenever what else does on holidays in sometimes i forget i'm not perfect smile of your breath being the smell of rare steak and aged whiskey ski no carolina that doesn't bother me listen to the ron burgundy podcast on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever so you find your podcasts welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio pay rain stuff lauren the vocal von here here. Not all fossils are bones or shells or tc. Most of us would agree that mammoth tusks and stegosaurus spikes are pretty darn cool and yet the fossil record is not limited to old body parts fossil's are defined as any naturally preserved remains or traces of life forms that existed in in the geologic past and that covers a lot of ground and that's sort of a pun because the fossils can take the form of a footprint leave impression or filled tunnel left behind by prehistoric land beavers. One of the strangest fossils ever discovered is actually a cave about fifteen million years ago in what's now eastern in washington state of okina fissure eruptions and lava streaming into a shallow river lake where rhino happened to be wallowing a layer of basaltic rock formed formed around the beast preserving the outline of its well cooked body long after the flesh rotted away leaving only a few bones for millions of years this rhino shaped hole in the earth lay hidden in the cliffs washington's grant county near blue lake a popular hiking destination by the nineteen thirties erosion had worn cornhole into one end of subterranean creature mold exposed to open air. Here's the story of how the blue lake rhino cave came to be and how four for seattle rock hounds accidentally discovered it only five species. The frano are alive. Today and none of living five species are indigenous to north or south america america however from about forty to seventy million years ago rhinos common in north america somewhere hippo like semi aquatic animals others had wicked tusks instead of the nasal horns we see in their modern day counterparts paleontologists think the blue lake cave likely formed around the corpse of a die sarah theory him mm-hmm while female dies. There were horn lewis. Each adult male had a pair of small horns sitting side by side near the tip of his snout. The dimensions of the blue lake cave tell us that the dice area mm-hmm left behind was about eight feet. That's two point four meters long from snout career and still a little bit less than four feet. That's one point two meters eaters tall at the shoulder in life. The animal probably weighed about a ton or so. Nobody knows if the creature had already died when it became entombed however <unk> judging by the contours of the mold it seems the body was rather bloated. This could indicate the decomposition was already setting in also the legs are pointed skyward telling telling us the rhino may have been floating on its back in the state of rigor mortis. The caves walls are made of fifteen million year old pillow assault a kind of ignatius rock that normally forums when lava contacts cold water and rapidly cools down so dead or alive the dice earth area must have been hanging out in a body of water during a volcanic eruption option then the lava came pouring in. Maybe it got knocked over anyway. Lava can hit temperatures of more than one thousand six hundred degrees fahrenheit. That's nine hundred degrees celsius. Ordinarily this ultra hot material would have burned right through the beasts skin flesh and bone but instead the cold water converted the molten rock into a tightly packed layer of hardening pillow assault the corpse eventually rotted away and even most of its bones disappeared yet the mole that enveloped the bodies stayed largely intact a- largely but not entirely a when you think about it the fact that we even know this weird little cave exists is pretty amazing thing millions of years after the thing formed flowing water carved an opening in the mold right about where the rhinos hindquarters used to be a yet erosion hasn't strayed completely today. The case entrance is big enough for an adult person to enter but getting inside may prove difficult for some visitors you see the blue lake. Bryan cave is located in the face of a cliff about three hundred feet or ninety one meters above the lake shares its name during the summer of nineteen thirty five to adventures couples calls from seattle were hiking around the cliff in search of petrified wood on their trip. The court happened to discover the cave. They had the honor of becoming the first people in recorded history enter enter the prehistoric rhino mold inside. They noticed a handful of fragmentary animal bone fossils including partial jaw. These were sent to paleobotanist the george f beck of central washington university who couldn't resist visiting the site for himself upon gathering more bones listed california institute of technology paleontologist chester mr stock to identify them stock determined that the bony bits came from an extinct rhino soon scientific community realized that the cave itself was a full body cast of that that very same animal abuse to last drew breath fifteen million years ago in nineteen forty eight a team from the university of california at berkeley heroically scaled the cliff and filled the cave with plaster creating three-dimensional duplicate of the interior also an exact hollow replica of the cave was put on display at seattle's burke museum where it still stands today. Today's episode driven by marc mancini produced by tyler clang. Brainstorm is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other well preserved topics visit our home planet host dot com and from our podcast iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows and we're back at the ron burgundy podcast season do baby. Maybe wendy pressure team what we'd do. I brush my teeth when everyone else does on holidays in sometimes i forget i'm not perfect. This is smell of your breath father. Being the smell of rare steak aged whiskey no carolina that doesn't bother me. Listen to the ron burgundy podcast on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts.

Blue Lake Cave Blue Lake Iheartradio Seattle Ron Burgundy Carolina Assault Bryan Cave River Lake North America Lauren Washington Horn Lewis America Marc Mancini Brainstorm Burke Museum Apple Central Washington University
Why Arent There Female CPR Mannequins?

BrainStuff

05:41 min | 2 years ago

Why Arent There Female CPR Mannequins?

"Today's episode is brought to you by starbucks. They say that starbucks nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts road trips in grand. Romantic gestures sound too good to be true. Guess we'll just have to try it for yourself. Starbucks nature cold brew. It's called coffee that subtly sweet lush and velvety smooth only at starbucks welcome to brainstorm a production the vallarta hey brain steph lauryn bocom here breasts to put it mildly can sometimes get in the way they're the recipients of some unwanted attention it just to be fair some wanted attention they can make it hard to find properly fitting clothing and they require all kinds of special and sometimes times unpredictable maintenance they can cause back pain can hurt during exercise and can be strapped down by bras which are often uncomfortable and almost always expensive in all of this is inconvenient and annoying but not really a matter of life and death but did it ever occur to you. That breasts might be the reason that you might not be administered c._p._r. If you need it it's true and one new york based. Creative agency is taking the initiative to try to change that the problem. Is this those a to a formally or informally learn c._p._r. Or who are at least confident enough to attempted in a situation where it might do more good than harm are overwhelmingly comfortable only if if the chest of the person in need of c._p._r. Is reasonably flat in other words if resembles c._p._r. Dummies female breasts get in the way and research shows that those was who would be inclined to perform c._p._r. On cardiac arrest victim in need are less likely to do so if their breasts complicating the situation since it's mostly women who have breasts ests. It's mostly women who are subject to this kind of probably unintentional discrimination. So how much of an impact does this have. A research indicates women are twenty. Seven seven percent less likely to receive c._p._r. If the experience a cardiac arrest incident in public since prompt administration of e._p._r.'s key in such situations that could indeed be a matter of life and death but enter the woman. The woman again is training bras sorts to help bring equality to c._p._r. The mannequin is a fabric fabric add on the bestows a standard c._p._r. Dummy with breasts so people can learn c._p._r. In a way that will hopefully keep them from being scared to perform the lifesaving procedure on approximately gently half of the adult population. The idea is to get people used to the idea that performing c._p._r. On a woman means that yes there will be some hand to breast contact. We spoke by email with joan agencies co founder and chief creative officer jamie robinson via email. She said there are so many ways women are treated differently and this resulted in them dying in the streets with nobody rushing into help. It seemed like an issue that was solvable comes directly from a lack of education and awareness the performing c._p._r. And a woman is a normal and necessary thing though mannequin took about four months to develop from the time the jones team. I came up with the idea to its reveal in june of two thousand nineteen of course joan creative enlisted the help of medical experts to ensure that the woman is useful and accurate as possible that included -cluded dr audrey bluer the author of the study that inspired the entire endeavor. Who's currently an epidemiologist in resuscitation scientist at duke university. Joan shared shared the process with bluer and acknowledged that the team was fortunate to have that opportunity. The jones team also worked closely with other doctors and experts in c._p._r. Including the new york it based frontlines c._p._r. A school that was closely involved throughout the process and be united state of women a national organization that connects and amplifies the work of organizations nations and individuals who are addressing inequalities. These partnerships ensure that the woman akin is properly designed and has the credibility necessary to get into the right right hands to make an impact as attended. A joan isn't finished with a woman again in fact the hardest part may be yet to come convincing gatekeepers that it's is necessary and useful despite the overwhelming evidence that women are currently under served in this area jones team says they hope to get women again into every c._p._r. School school in the country by next year motivated by a goal that cardiac intervention saves lives furthermore. Joan isn't driven by profit robinson says that the idea was to make quote mannequin is easy to replicate. It's possible to encourage widespread adoption and thus its pattern is available to anyone with open source to plans available for free download the one of the elements of the story that initially caught our editorial teams. I is that joan creative initiated the woman it can project simply out of an opportunity and a need to do good good. It's unusual but not unheard of for creative agencies to spend time and resources on internal projects that aren't funded by client. Usually the goal for such a project is publicity and to be sure there's an element of that in the mannequin story but in this case there may be a measurable improvement in women's lives and the saving of them as as well. Today's episode was written by sri wit and produced by tyler clang. Brain set is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other inclusive topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles and every purchase your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

C._P._R Starbucks Joan Jones Cardiac Arrest New York Jamie Robinson Iheartradio Tyler Clang Duke University Apple E._P._R. Scientist Chief Creative Officer Dr Audrey Co Founder Seven Seven Percent Four Months
Do Beaches Need Seashells?

BrainStuff

06:14 min | 2 years ago

Do Beaches Need Seashells?

"Today's episode is brought to you by starbucks. They say that starbucks nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts road trips in grand. Romantic gestures sound too good to be true. Guess we'll just have to try it for yourself. Starbucks nature cold brew. It's called coffee that subtly sweet lush and velvety smooth only at starbucks welcome to brainstorm a production indivi- heart radio. Hey brain stuff. Lauren vogel bomb here. We humans tend to enjoy the ocean so it makes sense that we'd want to take a piece as of at home with us but be warned beachside souvenir hunting can land you in prison. If you go overboard case in point early in summer of two thousand eighteen a texas access woman was fined five hundred dollars and sentenced to fifteen days in jail by a florida judge for illegally harvesting forty. Queen conch shells her key west vacation. Queen conches are marine greene's nails who live in gorgeous shells of their own making florida allows people to collect the vacant shells but it's illegal to take one. That's still occupied by alive conch. The shells of the aforementioned i mentioned texan took had living breathing molluscs in them. Florida has a vested interest in these nautical treasures on the shell loaded island of santa bell a barrier community near fort myers beach coming as a major draw for tourists and when residents noticed their precious commodities were vanishing. They took action in the late. Twentieth century local local started worrying that out of towners repelling too many shells as a conservation measure. Santa bell banned the collection of any shells with their original mollusks still living inside as well as does any sand dollars starfish and sea urchins. The ban took effect in nineteen ninety five and has since been extended throughout santa bell's home county. If you've noticed shell depletion on the beaches he visit know that it's not just a matter of light fingered vacationers organized poaching has become a serious global concern. We spoke by email with vincent instant nyman an anthropology professor at oxford brookes university in the united kingdom and a twenty fifteen study he co authored nyman documented the illegal trade of indonesia's protected shells calls the indonesian government keeps a list of molluscs that are illegal to trade or collect within the republic's jurisdiction chambered nautilus triton's trumpets and some giant clams are among the creatures ostensibly protected by law there yet poaching is rampant. Neiman's paper tells of twenty illegal shipments were intercepted by the indonesian authorities between in two thousand eight and two thousand thirteen but together these busts yielded more than forty two thousand shells a protected species valued at seven hundred thousand dollars nyman even said it's very important to note that we're not talking about individual tourists collecting a couple of shells on the beach putting them in their suitcase and bring them home. We're talking about a large scale commercial trade where the shells are collected by active fishing scuba diving cages etc and where entire sections of the ocean floor are emptied he stresses the poachers like to grab occupied shells and then destroy animals within them. He explained that when the animals are alive their shells are usually excellent condition as opposed to shells that have been discarded and washed washed up on the beach which are often damaged mosques aren't the only animals who've been hurt by the reckless over hunting of sea shells when sales nautilus and other sea animals die of natural causes other creatures like to move into their former shell homes we also spoke by email with michael kousky an ecologist at the university of florida he he said the most obvious examples are hermit crabs which use empty shells as protective armor. There are in fact many marine habitats. It's hard to find an empty shell because hermit crabs inhabit but almost all of them when there aren't enough shelters go around hermit crab populations are curbed and housing is just one service that unused shells offer some sea creatures creatures and birds eat them for mineral supplements calcium carbonate others use the sturdy shells as anchors from other mollusks barnacles and many more the harvest of these shells isn't just bad for the local ecosystem. It's also bad for the environment and ultimately for the humans who live and visit their take yoga beach a lovely slice of the iberian peninsula tesla located in sao paulo spain hot vacation destination. That's enjoyed increasing popularity wanting to know more about how this rise and human activity was affecting the ecosystem colo. The ski rolled up his sleeves and hit the scene from july of nineteen seventy eight through july of nineteen eighty-one. He and his colleagues put together monthly catalogs of all the seashell material they could find on your a beach kulakowski returned decades later for a new round of surveys beginning in two thousand eight and ending in two thousand ten. His discoveries weren't encouraging tourism data revealed field an almost three fold increase in visitation between one thousand nine hundred and twenty ten during that same period the number of seashells on your beach fell by more than sixty percent coincidence incidents probably not other beachside communities should be worried about the same kind of decline in seashells and not just for environmental reasons shells tend to break up into particles that are bigger than typical sand grains these shell fragments helped beaches fight erosion by locking up making it harder for winds waves and water currents to move shoreline shoreline sediment around if we moved to many sea shells it'll become harder for beaches to resist the forces of erosion and that it affects short side buildings roads and other infrastructure so what's the solution nyman notes in many countries. There are excellent laws in place to prevent overharvesting companies and individuals should follow the existing existing regulations and the authorities should enforce them. It is an economic crime and should be handled such he added the prosecutors. Judges must take large-scale poaching operations more seriously. Today's episode was written by mark manzini whose name i've been mispronouncing for about about two years now and it was produced by tyler clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other multidisciplinary topics visit our home planet has works dot com and for more podcasts from iheartradio iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

Starbucks Florida Santa Bell Lauren Vogel Iheartradio Texas Nyman Texan Indonesian Government Greene Fort Myers Oxford Brookes University Neiman Sao Paulo Spain Mark Manzini Apple SKI Indonesia
Why Does America Use Fahrenheit Instead of Celsius?

BrainStuff

06:49 min | 2 years ago

Why Does America Use Fahrenheit Instead of Celsius?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the podcast food three sixty host mark murphy celebrity chef and run tour with help from his friends. The restaurant industry takes a three sixty. Look at the world food food history science and culture tuned into food three sixty with new episodes every friday could listen and subscribe on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts look to brain stuff production of iheartradio brain stuff lauren boban here. If you're an american you've ever ever had a conversation with someone from another country about the weather. You've probably been a little confused when he or she said the afternoon. Temperature is a nice twenty one degrees to to you that might sound like a chilly winter day but to them. It's a pleasantly warm springtime temperature. That's because virtually every other country throughout the world uses the celsius temperature scale part of the metric system which denotes the temperature at which water freezes as zero degrees and the temperature at which boils as one hundred degrees but the u._s. u._s. And a few other holdouts the cayman islands the bahamas believes in palo clinging to the fahrenheit scale in which water freezes at thirty two degrees and boils at two hundred and twelve twelve that means that the twenty one degrees celsius temperature that we previously mentioned is the equivalent of a balmy seventy degrees fahrenheit in the united states. The persistence of fahrenheit is one of those puzzling american idiosyncrasies like how the u._s. uses the word soccer to describe what the rest of the planet calls football so why is it that the u._s. Us uses a different temperature scale and why doesn't it switch to be consistent with the rest of the world. There doesn't seem to be a logical answer except perhaps inertia americans generally. I don't really seem to distrust the metric system. A twenty fifteen poll found that just twenty one percent of the public favoured converting to metric measures while sixty four percent were opposed it might make more sense of fahrenheit was old school in celsius with some modern upstart a sort of the new coq of temperature but in reality they were created only about two decades apart part fahrenheit was created by its namesake. A german scientist named daniel gabriel fahrenheit who in the early seventeen hundreds was the first known person design alcohol and mercury thermometers that we're both precise and consistent so that any of his instruments would register the same temperature reading in a given place at a given moment thanks to his working skill in managing glass when fahrenheit started out the key thing he was interested in was coming up with the same temperature reading all the time not comparing temperatures of different things or different times of day but when he presented a paper on his system for measuring temperature to the royal society of london in seventeen twenty four he apparently realized that he had come up with the standard temperature scale as well. We spoke with don hilfiger a research meteorologist to colorado state university's cooperative institute for research in the atmosphere and and also president of the u._s. Metric association a group that advocates conversion to the metric system he explained basically the fahrenheit scale was devised a zero as the coldest oldest temperature for a mix of ice and salt water and the upper end was thought to be body temperature approximately ninety six degrees fahrenheit making a scale that could be progressively divided by two do this resulted in the freezing melting temperature being thirty two degrees fahrenheit not very useful number. The boiling temperature for water was then set at two twelve again not not a very useful number the temperature's one hundred and eighty degrees apart again a multiple of two nevertheless the system apparently sounded pretty good to officials officials of the british empire who adopted fahrenheit as their standard temperature scale which is how eventually became established in the american colonies. Well meanwhile though in seventeen forty forty two a swedish astronomer named anders celsius came up with a less unwieldy system based on multiples of ten in which there was precisely a one hundred degree difference between the freezing and boiling temperatures of water at sea level the neat one hundred degrees symmetry of the celsius scale made it a natural fit for the metric system which was formerly developed by the french in the late seventeen eighteen hundreds but the english speaking world nevertheless clung stubbornly to its preference for awkward units such as the pound in the inch and fahrenheit went along for the ride but finally in nineteen sixty one the u._k. Met office then called the u._k. Meteorological office switched teasing celsius to describe temperatures in weather forecasts in order to be consistent with other european countries. Most of the rest of the world soon followed suit with the notable exception of the u._s. Or the national weather service still publishes temperature data atta in fahrenheit. Even though its own staff long ago switched celsius hilter explained the n._w._s. Catering to the public by reporting in degrees fahrenheit whereas whereas much of their operations such as forecast models used degrees celsius and automated weather observations the temperatures recorded in celsius as well should we choose to metric chicken weather reports the fahrenheit layer. That's now added for the u._s. Public could be removed. We also spoke via email with jay hendrix who heads the u._s. National institute standards and technologies thermodynamic meteorology group he points out that the fahrenheit scale does have one significant advantage quote. It has more degrees over the range range of ambient temperatures that are typical for most people. This means that there's a finer grain temperature difference between seventy degrees fahrenheit and seventy one degrees fahrenheit then there is between twenty one degrees celsius twenty two degrees celsius since a human can tell the difference of one degree fahrenheit. This scale is more precise for the human experience on the other hand though the advantage goes away. If a fractional temperature in celsius used hendrix explained for example the equivalent celsius temperature for seventy and seventy ninety one fahrenheit are equivalent to twenty one point one and twenty one point seven degrees celsius. Today's episode was written by patrick j tiger and produced by tyler clang brainstorms production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics that humans are sensitive to visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and from our podcast iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows they i would much rather story that you tell off. My daughter was beaten to death. I'm katherine townsend host of the true crime podcast helen one gone and i'm heading back to arkansas on a new case to find out what happened to janey ward on september ninth nineteen eighty nine when there's no justice done it hurts. A lot of people floors listened to hell and gone. That's h. E. l. l. and gone on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Fahrenheit Anders Celsius Apple Iheartradio Mark Murphy Lauren Boban Bahamas Jay Hendrix Soccer United States Arkansas Don Hilfiger Palo Colorado State University Royal Society Of London Katherine Townsend Scientist Janey Ward
What Is the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon?

BrainStuff

04:11 min | 2 years ago

What Is the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you could use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels nls rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeem your miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet? Credit approval required capital one bank U._S._A.. N._A. Look into brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren bogle bomb here. Let's pretend you have saved forty thousand dollars to spare and you're out shopping for a shiny new ride. You've never really cared about cars that much before minus minus perhaps a cerebral hate for the car commercials you see every seven seconds during televised sporting event but now you're invested and when someone mentions a certain kind of if car one you've never heard of before but maybe that gets high ratings on a consumer review site. You're interested suddenly. That car is everywhere. It's On Your Street your boss's husband has one you see two of them next to traffic on your way home from work the cars even popping up in those ubiquitous commercials during the game and you swear up and down. They came out of nowhere. So what exactly is happening here to this car suddenly come to dominate the cultural consciousness or is your consciousness playing tricks on you. Welcome to the batter main phenomenon otherwise known as the frequency illusion or recency allusion. This phenomenon occurs when Jonathan you've just noticed experienced or been told about suddenly crops up constantly. It gives you the feeling that out of nowhere pretty much. The whole world is talking about this subject or that. It's swiftly surrounding. You and you're not crazy. You are totally seeing it more but the thing is of course that's because you're noticing it more. A couple of things happen when the batter main hall phenomenon kicks in one. Your brain seems to be excited by the fact that you've learned something new and selective attention. Occurs Your brain subconsciously. Thanks hey that's awesome. I'm going to look for that thing without you needing to actually think about it so now that your senses are on alert shirt for it you find it to make it all. The more powerful confirmation bias occurs after seeing it even once or twice confirmation bias is essentially our desire correct. It's the psychological trait where we're inclined to notice and remember information that supports our pre existing views and to ignore or disregard information that refutes what we already believe to be true in other words you start agreeing with yourself that Yep. You're definitely seeing this thing more than you ever have. Before Strangely Ainsley though the batter main hut phenomenon isn't named for to researchers who studied it as things like this often are nope. It's named for a militant West German terrorist group that was active in the nineteen seventies. A nineteen nineties online comment board was unlikely source of the name in Nineteen ninety-four a commenter on the Saint Paul Minnesota. Soda Pioneer pressboard dubbed the frequency illusion. The batter main have phenomenon after they randomly heard to references to batter Meinhof within twenty four hours. He's the phenomenon has nothing to do with the gang in other words but don't be surprised if the name starts popping up everywhere you turn today's episode was written by Kate Kirschner produced by Tyler Clang Brain. Stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics topics oddly influenced by the nineteen nineties visit our home planet how stuff works dot Com and for more podcast from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows breath today's episode is brought to you by the podcast food three sixty host Mark Murphy celebrity chef and restaurant tour with help from his friends. The restaurant industry takes a three sixty sixty look at the world of food history science and culture tune into food three sixty with new episodes every Friday. You could listen and subscribe on Apple podcasts iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts.

Iheartradio Apple Meinhof Lauren Bogle Jonathan Saint Paul Minnesota Ainsley Kate Kirschner Mark Murphy Tyler Clang Forty Thousand Dollars Twenty Four Hours Seven Seconds
How Do Animals Get Their Scientific Names?

BrainStuff

06:28 min | 2 years ago

How Do Animals Get Their Scientific Names?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles every purchase every day and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeem your miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet? Credit approval required capital one bank U._S._A.. An a welcome to brain stuff but production of iheartradio brain Steph Lorraine Vogel bomb here and I'm here today to tell you that an oddball catfish species I spotted in one thousand nine hundred eight in Brazil at last has a name and it is Grio. Yes as in the Rhodesian Bounty Hunter Star Wars more formerly the catfish at fish who's bug-eyed stare and Droopy Chin like extension really do bring to mind Guido will henceforth be known as Peck Alenia greeted by that final is sound in Latin is a possessive so it means something like grotto's fish one Dr Jonathan armbruster professor professor and curator officials at Auburn University and Longtime Star Wars Fan created the name while studying the fish in two thousand fifteen. It's about one of forty species of fish. He's named date by tradition. Whoever discovers a new species gets to name it discovers covers doesn't necessarily mean fines though armbruster explained discoveries a weird term? I discovered Pedo I in a jar but others actually discovered it in nature. They just didn't have everything they needed to describe it. Armbruster did describe it he. He discovered the nature of the species. The new part of new species is weird to in this context armbruster explains a new species is one that is newly described named of course it existed before scientists got involved describing describing a new species is a science in itself in taxonomy which is the scientific discipline of classifying living things scientists examined physical genetic behavioral. 'em ecological traits to logically scituate species within the biosphere taxonomy is a big deal it reveals how a new species fits into are known world and provides a universal language to describe study it taxonomy lays out the components of biodiversity and thus the tools to preserve it it offers scientists engineers and inventors their best chance at understanding were standing the incredible capabilities that the natural world and explaining it to the rest of US naming is part of taxonomy. A name often reflects a distinctive characteristic like the name Tattoo Rita Brazilian ncis for bat discovered that lives in Brazil. Oh there's a lot of leeway in naming though and scientists often get creative like p Guido I for a fish that looks like Guido or my oldest might attack this for a bat with golden for after mythologies golden touched King Midas. This approach can sometimes be problematic though we spoke with Dr Ricardo More telly biologist with the Waldo crews foundation who named the Golden Bat he explained a characteristic that we I think is you need to that species. Maybe revealed as shared with others or even variable. Able within the species for instance the aforementioned t Brazilian says was later found to live throughout north and South America resulting in sub-species like T- Brazilian says Mexicana or the Mexican Brazilian F- Retail Bat other names <music> honor colleagues immortalized family members or less common but more compelling exact revenge scientists Carlin is who in these seventeen hundreds founded the taxonomy and nomenclature systems still used in biology today named an entire genus of Rican weeds <music> secust Becca after one Johan seek us back a botanist who had endlessly criticized his work. The International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature needs to approve names but the organization is Pretty Open minded it approved sid vicious aside and Johnny Rotten. I four two species extinct trial bite named by taxonomic whose friend loved the sex pistols it also gave the nod to Agatha Idiom Bush. I A Cheney I and a Rumsfeld I four three species beetle title. The Republican taxonomic actually entered is a good thing it also approved ampule X. Demento for wasp that turns cockroaches zombies before eating them the behavior apparently recalled Harry Potter's spirit sucking adversaries that last one was chosen in a vote by visitors to Berlin Museum of Natural History. Some scientists are giving away. They're naming rights to educate engage and fund research and Conservation Merlin's museum patrons learned about the new wasp and taxonomy and it's critical role in conservation. Asian as part of the voting the scripts institution for oceanography cells naming rights for five thousand two twenty five thousand per species with the proceeds porting institutions work and that's a bargain at a two thousand five auction the online Golden Palace Casino L. paid sixty five thousand dollars the rights to name a species of monkey supporting the National Park in Bolivia where the new monkey was discovered. This commercialization makes some in the field uncomfortable with money in the mix. There's concern about biased. taxonomy armbruster said it has the possibility of getting out of hand. Buying a name is a good thing as long as it is four species we have already identified as new. We need more money for taxonomy. Finding creative ways to fund the science is a good thing by the way a Golden Palace named the Monkey Cassius our pilot. Why are we piloting meaning Golden Palace and Latin the Casino wanted dot com in there too but it couldn't be Latin sized? Today's episode was written by Julia Layton and produced by Tyler Clang. Breen stuff is the production of iheartradio's house stuff works for more in this and lots of other well categorized topics visit our home planet house networks dot Com and more podcast from iheartradio iheartradio APP apple podcasts. I listened to your favorite shows would not rob.

Dr Jonathan Armbruster Golden Palace Guido Brazil Steph Lorraine Vogel Golden Palace Casino Professor Grio Golden Bat United States Droopy Chin South America Agatha Idiom Bush Auburn University Peck Alenia Iheartradio Dr Ricardo Conservation Merlin Julia Layton Breen
Should You Rent Grass-Mowing Goats?

BrainStuff

04:27 min | 2 years ago

Should You Rent Grass-Mowing Goats?

"Today's episode is brought to you by IBM. SMART is open open is smart i._B._M.'s combining their industry expertise with open source leadership of Red Hat. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work learn more at I._B._M.. Dot Com slash slash red hat welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren vocal bomb here in the latter half of the twentieth century. One George Ballas invented what he called the weed weed eater. It's a motorized we'd grass trimming device that uses rapidly revolving strings to cut down vegetation in small spaces without destroying the bark of trees. It's easy to use doesn't require much gas or electricity to run genius but perhaps not <music> as genius as humanities original weed eater domesticated ten thousand years ago goats of course using goats as mowers went wildly out of fashion for awhile in between that a now but using goats to maintain vegetation works just as well today. It did an ancient Mesopotamia goats are commonly used to control big swaths of land in cemeteries parks airports and even Google headquarters and though they don't cut grass and vegetation down as evenly as a piece of machinery there are a lot of benefits to using animals rather Ben Machinery and herbicides goats after all don't require petroleum products residential homes in the United States us about six hundred million gallons of fossil fuels each year on lawn maintenance and that doesn't even include green spaces like highway medians military. Hey Basis and public lands but we're there is vegetation goats can do a decent job of nine down invasive weeds in a more sustainable way. Also goats can turn that unwanted brush into milk meat and fiber like Kashmir. If you play your cards right goats are known for their nimble hooves which can get places a mower can't especially through rocky or wooded areas. They're also highly motivated and will accept the challenge of even the steepest slope Chicago's O'hare International Airport. Isn't it seventh season of using A. Mixed heard of goats sheep and donkey named Jackson to clear the grounds around the airport. All eleven acres. That's about four and a half actors in the past. They've also incorporated Llamas Alpacas into their grazing heard a plus goats eat a variety of different plants. They're not picky. Goats are browsers rather than grazers like cows and horses aggressors will keep the lawn mode but if you want an animal that will take a chance on an unusual looking vine goats are for you though practically always try plant they don't know and they can tolerate a wide variety of plant species though care should be taken to make sure there's nothing on the land that's outright toxic goats. Perhaps the only drawback is that you can't set goats out to work on their own. They need to be monitored because they're great escape artists. It's at O'hare national land cleaning is important because it keeps wildlife off the property because they can denude even the toughest bramble ticket the airport uses goats and other animals to take care of their stubborn overgrowth to keep wildlife and people safe. Wildlife composed safety concerns for aircraft taking off and landing and keeping the land cleared encourages animals to live elsewhere. If you want to rent a hurt of goat landscapers that's doable. There are many companies out there that will service your goat gardening needs and according to red wagon goats located here in Atlanta Georgia. Most residential customers can get their backyard cleaned up within the four hundred thousand dollar range depending on size and complexity. Today's episode was written by Jason Shields and produced by Tyler Clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's has stuff works for more in this lots of other Harry topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcast iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts? Wherever ever you listened to your favorite shows would not story?

O'hare International Airport Iheartradio George Ballas Red Hat IBM Google Chicago O'hare United States Atlanta Ben Machinery Jason Shields A. Mixed Jackson Harry Georgia Tyler Clang Four Hundred Thousand Dollar Six Hundred Million Gallons
How Will Exploring Saturn's Moon Titan Be Different?

BrainStuff

06:35 min | 2 years ago

How Will Exploring Saturn's Moon Titan Be Different?

"Today's episode is brought to you by IBM. SMART is open open is smart i._B._M.'s combining their industry expertise with open source leadership of Red Hat. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work learn more at I._B._M.. Dot Com slash slash red hat welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff. Lauren Vogel bomb here. NASA has announced that it will launch a space probe called dragonfly on an ambitious mission to Saturn's Saturn's Moon Titan in which a robotic rotorcraft lander will fly around Titan's surface and touchdown in various places as part of its exploratory mission the dragonfly space probe will look for traces of chemical processes similar to the ones that led to life on earth in addition to gathering other information about the Moon's surface and atmosphere dragonfly will launch twenty twenty six and arrive at Titan which is eight hundred eighty six million miles. That's one point four billion kilometers from the Sun in Twenty thirty four once they're. The space probe which is about the size of the Space Agency's spirit and Opportunity Mars Rovers will turn on eight rotors and fly through Titan's dense hazy atmosphere which is about four times the density of Earth's and explore. It's still mysterious surface. A Titan is the biggest of Saturn's sixty two moons and a close second in moon size at our solar system after Jupiter's Moon Ganymede has radius of about sixteen hundred miles or twenty five hundred kilometers making it about fifty percent wider than Earth's moon but it's not just titan size is it is made it a longtime object to fascination scientists Titan is also the only moon in the solar system with much of an atmosphere and it's the only slot in the solar system besides earth that's known to have Liquid Rivers Lakes and seas on its surface though the latter are made up of liquid hydrocarbons such as methane and ethane titans also believed to have an underground ocean of water deep beneath its icy surface that could possibly have harboured some form of life or may still contain it. The titans surface is brutally cold like. Minus two hundred ninety degrees Fahrenheit or one hundred and seventy degrees Celsius cold but conditions potential underground ocean are unknown titans thick atmosphere is about ninety five percent nitrogen with the rest mostly composed of methane the creates a thick orange colored haze hangs over the moon's surface making it difficult to observe from Earth much of what we do know comes from the European Space Agency's how Hon spacecraft which landed on Titan and transmitted data for seventy two minutes in two thousand five and from NASA's Cassini probe which did multiple fly bys of Titan between two thousand five in two thousand seventeen. How huns was actually attached to Cassini for these seven year trip to Titans vicinity scientists are particularly excited about dragonflies ability to fly rather than crawl crawl along the ground unlike Mars where NASA also plans to test a small robotic helicopter with large high speed blades twenty twenty titans atmosphere's thick enough to enable dragonfly to attain lift with relatively small Reuters and carry a bigger payload over longer distances? Mrs Than the experimental copter being sent to Mars. It's expected to cover more than one hundred miles or one hundred seventy five kilometers during its nearly three year mission on Titan it will fly in short hops up to five minutes at a time we spoke by email with Jason some sort of bomb a research scientist in the Department of Earth Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and one of dragonflies co investigators he explained flight allows us to move the lander much greater distances in a short period of time than a traditional rover allowing us to more efficiently explore Titan. We also spoke by email with Kurt Neiber new frontiers program scientist for NASA. He said the dragonflies design is fundamentally different from the Mars helicopter quote not just because the atmosphere of Titan on Mars are so different but because they are different vehicles the Mars helicopter is a short lived technology demonstration with no science payload dragonfly is a self contained space craft designed to pursue science mission with high autonomy. It's like comparing a self driving car in electric. Electric Scooter both have wheels but they have very different purposes and therefore very different designs. The researchers working on dragonfly are excited about the opportunity to investigate the giant moons many mysteries Neiber said I'm looking forward to dragonfly finally giving US detailed answers about the surface of Titan at the small scale not just its composition but also its geology telling us about the complex organic materials present there and how they interact and also giving us a good look at surface features like dunes and the cell Crater Cassini he did a good job at giving us broad answers to this question at the large scale tens of miles for example but nothing beats getting down to the surface and actually digging your hands and feet in so to speak solder Baum also spoke to this. He said there's a plethora of unanswered answered questions about Titan's surface. One fundamental question we have yet to answer is what is the composition of titans major geologic units or if the water ice bedrock is exposed anywhere on Titan or if it's been buried beneath organic gunk this is because Titan's atmosphere obscures. Surface at most wavelengths limiting our ability to use traditional remote sensing techniques to study the surface composition dragonflies scrutiny of Titan's surface may also yield insights about the moon's atmosphere and the chemistry going on there which could in turn wind up helping us understand more about ourselves. We also spoke with Sarah Horst an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. WHO's also an investigator on the project? She said that chemistry and the atmosphere's interact with the surface quote is important for understanding the role that atmospheres play in the origin or evolution of life and also help us figure out what types molecules may constitute evidence for life when we're looking at observations faraway atmosphere's like those of exoplanets. Today's episode was by Patrick Jake Hyder and produced by Tyler Clang Breen stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works her moines? This lots of other far out topics bizarre home planet has networks dot com in for more podcasts from iheartradio radio with the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

Titans Nasa Iheartradio Red Hat IBM Kurt Neiber European Space Agency Department Of Earth Atmospheri Investigator Mars Rovers Space Agency Lauren Vogel Reuters Patrick Jake Hyder Apple Crater Cassini Massachusetts Institute Of Tec
"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Seasonal temperatures vary widely like in the Great Lakes lake surfaces, often cool down causing the water at that level to sink and swap places with the layers of water beneath it any gases dissolved in there. Don't stay trapped. They're released as they depressurized near to the surface. No, gas accumulation, no eruptions. However general and many of his colleagues have taken a healthy interest in Lake Kivu, an upcoming vacation destination on the border of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Why? Because it seems to have all the necessary criteria for truly colossal. Nick eruption. The lake contains about ten point five. Billion cubic feet of carbon dioxide that's about three hundred billion cubic meters and two billion cubic feet of methane about sixty billion cubic meters all lurking near the bottom or those gases to explode from the lake surface. The two million people who live around give might find themselves in jeopardy. One possible solution though, harvest those very gases as possible energy source by an extraction. Barge kilowatt is a one of a kind two hundred million dollar facility. That uses an offshore barge to draw up water from the lake then siphons off the methane and sends it to a power plant generating electricity for the area when life gives you lemons, turn it into electricity. Episode was written by Mark nanjiani and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other powerful topics lurking in the depths. Visit our home planet has to work dot com. Hey, Matt I have yet to ride one of those birds scooters 'cause I hate those things that does not surprise me at all Joel. But you know, I have been getting Instagram adds to give me to become a bird charger to join that gig economy. Oh, that's right. Just like Uber folks are getting targeted to start side hustles to make an extra buck or even to try to make a career out of it. But should you? Do it not all side. Hustles are created equal exactly every week. We dive into practical money topics like this on our podcast. Listen subscribe to our show on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast. Just search for how to money.

Great Lakes lake Lake Kivu lake surface Matt Rwanda Democratic Republic Congo apple Nick Mark nanjiani Tyler clang Joel two hundred million dollar
"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hey, brain stuff listeners for all you fans of true crime investigations. There's a new podcast from glamour, and how stuff works Marcus Hanna. Devante Abigail, Jeremiah and Sierra were all black children adopted by two white women, Sarah and Jennifer heart. It looked as if the hearts were the perfect family, but their lives ended in a murder suicide. Car crash shocked their friends and made national headlines starting Semper forth with new episodes every Tuesday co host Justin and Elizabeth follow. The families beta journey. You can listen subscribe to broken hearts spelled H A R T S on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vocal bomb here. Some animals are just over the top take scorpions is it not enough that these stinging arachnids can survive some of the harshest climates in the world and live twenty five times longer than your average cockroach or that some species don't need males to reproduce and can live up to forty eight hours without oxygen and that all of them will eat almost anything. They can subdue even other scorpions. No, it's apparently not enough because scorpions also glow electric Siam green under ultra violet light. Why they do? This is a bit of a mystery. But it makes them pretty easy to study all scorpion researcher has to do to find scorpions go out into the desert at night with the black light and watch those suckers light up like Christmas. Trees, chemically speaking. Nobody's exactly sure. What causes scorpions to glow? But we know it's powerful stuff. When a scorpion is preserved in alcohol. The alcohol itself will floor s scorpion fossils have even been induced to glow under black light after hundreds of millions of years. What we do know is the chemicals that make a scorpion. So rave ready are in the outer layer or cuticle of its excess skeleton scientists call it the Highland layer scorpions their Xs skeleton every so often in order to grow and researchers have observed that intil the slightly mushy outer shell has entirely hardened. The Highland layer does not Flores under UV light. This is all pretty weird. Why would an animal Volve to glow under ultraviolet light? Researchers have posited a bunch of different ideas. Scorpion. Fluorescence might help them. Find each other in the dark protect them from sunlight or even confused their prey, but there's another promising theory that scorpions are somehow using their fluorescence to detect UV light mostly because they want to avoid it. There might hunters after all and a scorpion will always find the darkest place to hang out during the day or even in the moonlight. A study published in the journal of Iraq -nology in two thousand ten tested normal chorusing scorpions, and a group of scorpions that they had produced the fluorescence of with prolonged exposure to UV light, the normal scorpions, then reacted more strongly and negatively to UV light than the desensitized scorpions. But wait, you might be thinking scorpions still have is. And as it turns out, they can visually see light within the ultra violet part of the spectrum. But it doesn't seem like the scorpions were reacting visually a. Britt study published in animal behavior in two thousand twelve basically blindfolded a group of scorpions and found that the critters still reacted to the presence of ultraviolet light. So it seems that they're using their entire bodies as giant UV seeking eyeballs. And that if they sense that they're glowing at all it's time to scurry off somewhere darker. Today's episode was written by just windshields produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other glowing topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. We're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us

Marcus Hanna murder Devante Abigail Semper Iraq apple researcher Justin Flores Jeremiah Robert lamb Sarah Tyler clang Joe McCormick Jennifer heart Elizabeth Sierra Britt
"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:08 min | 3 years ago

"tyler clang" Discussed on BrainStuff

"You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. You're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here with another classic episode from our former host Christian Sager. Today's topic gets to the bottom of an old wives tale will eating before bed. Really give you nightmares. What's up brain stuff? I'm Christian Sager. And it is time for some brain stuff. Have you ever been up alone at night scarfing down some buffalo wings dipped in kimchi and Vindaloo? But you fall asleep on the couch and you start having these terrible nightmares. What is up with that? Why does some foods? Make us have such weird dreams. Well, so far scientists yet to find a direct correlation between certain types of foods, and how we dream, but an excessive amount of rich nocturnal eating can interrupt your sleep in a variety of ways really any type of physical discomfort while you're sleeping can lead to bad dreams. But when you're tummy's a rumbling. That's when the monsters really comes scurrying out of that trap door in the back of your head, for instance, late night snacks increased both your body's metabolism and temperature which makes you hot and sweaty, especially when you have a high carbohydrate meal, Ditto if you have. A bunch of donuts or candy bars before you pass out. A recent study shows that seven out of ten people who junk food before bed are more likely to have nightmares. These researchers hypothesized that the high levels of sugar led to physical sleep discomfort which brought the monsters out from under their beds. Another type of upset stomach that leads to a bad night's sleep is acid reflux also known as GERD or just plain old heartburn more than a third of Americans have this condition. I'm one of them where burning acidic bile comes creeping up your SAFA gifts. If you've had this happen doctors recommend that you don't eat within three hours of bedtime. And that you try lifting your head forty five degrees to keep the acid down. Also, you probably shouldn't have citrus onions, carbonated drinks meant alcohol or cigarettes before you go to sleep. I know I know boring, right? But cutting down on this stuff will keep the sleep goblins away. So it's either be careful what you eat or back to a pit of. Spare filled with evil clowns for you. Actually. There's an interesting food connection between general anxieties and why we sleep poorly when our bodies are stressed. They flush out the mineral magnesium, which increases are mental burden. So we sleep poorly. You can head this off if you eat healthy prior to and during stressful periods, your retained some magnesium helping you maintain a normal sleeping pattern, and there's our old friend insomnia, which can be caused by a variety of food and drinks how about meat or other high protein foods. Well, it turns out protein supplies, your brain with the amino acid tyrosine, which makes you more alert and food high in protein is usually also high in fat which digests slowly causing a rumble in the Bronx. If the Bronx is what you call your belly. Plus remember how carbohydrates bring on the night sweats. Will they also speed up trip to fan and amino acid in your brain that helps you sleep? So if you don't eat enough carbs. Before bed. It's harder to get to sleep my recommendation, a small carbohydrate snack in the evening will promote calmness and help you catch. Some Z's finally alcohol and caffeine before bed can make insomnia even worse. So no, double fist in coffee and beer, and you probably shouldn't drink energy booze drinks, like juice, four Loko or fusion either. In fact, I'd recommend staying away from drinks with purposely. Misspelled names is just a general rule, even the United States food and Drug administration called these drinks. A public health concern back in two thousand and ten and the center for disease control has an entire factsheet about the dangers of mixing alcohol and energy drinks. And it doesn't even get into the whole not being able to get to sleep thing. So there you have it food doesn't necessarily give us nightmares. But the uncomfortable feelings that come with eating certain meals. Episode was written by Christian and produced by Tyler clang. If you miss Christian, check out his pop culture podcast super context available wherever you listen to podcasts. And of course for more on this and lots of other topics that will help you sleep better. Visit our home planet house to works dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. You're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology to time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple

Joe McCormick Robert lamb apple Christian Sager Bronx Lauren Bogle GERD insomnia United States caffeine Tyler clang heartburn Drug administration forty five degrees three hours