35 Burst results for "Two degrees Fahrenheit"

Oof! 2020: A Hot Year For The Record Books

Short Wave

02:53 min | Last month

Oof! 2020: A Hot Year For The Record Books

"Okay so. I up on the list of twenty twenty s greatest hits and hits in a bad way Number one. it was hot. Yeah and if you happen to catch a weather report in the southwestern u. us this year you heard one number over and over and over again. Death valley california yesterday broke a record of one hundred and twenty-five with the new temperature of one hundred thirty one twelve expected for today at one zero to quartzite one eleven four today tucson one seven around one thirteen yep designed hundred temperatures above one hundred because it was over that a lot this year so it wasn't just the heat wave that comes and goes lauren. People really didn't break. Yeah exactly it just stuck around like for example in phoenix. The city saw one hundred and forty five days. That were over a hundred degrees. Jake sap broke the record and then there were fifteen days that were over one hundred and fifteen degrees which is double the previous record. No nets too much. That feels this feels like too much. Zona yeah and when you talk to people there and they're used to heat their. It was still shocking to them. I spoke to meteorologist. Marvin percha at the national weather service in phoenix and not only how warm it got but how persistent and warm weather was is. What was so remarkable about this year. I've lived here a long time. I grew up here in the seventies. And i've never seen anything quite like this boy. I wanna be next. Meteorologist surprised serious. Backlash and one important thing to point out here is nighttime temperatures. Which maybe don't seem as important. But they are because they were hotter than normal and that's a big problem especially in cities because cities experienced worse heat than the surrounding area and all that concrete it heats up it retains heat really well and they need to cool down at night right. Because extreme heat isn't just uncomfortable for people who live through it. it can be dangerous. yeah exactly and phoenix. Saw a record number of heat related deaths this year as a result. It's sad to say about almost three hundred people and those people who died directly because of the heat and long term trend of course. Is that this kind of heat is only gonna get worse with climate change. Yeah and one of the things just to wrap your mind around as you're hearing numbers like that. The planet has already warmed about two degrees fahrenheit because of climate change and that feels like a small number but that is on average right. That's the global average and when you shift the average you can kind of imagine this in your mind. There are a lot more relief. Hot days. That are now in the range of temperatures that people experience and the other thing is that super hot weather happened in places that have not been historically hot. Alaska had

Jake Sap Phoenix Marvin Percha Tucson Lauren National Weather Service California Alaska
What Will 2021 Hold For U.S. Climate Diplomacy?

Environment: NPR

03:52 min | 4 months ago

What Will 2021 Hold For U.S. Climate Diplomacy?

"What does the president's decision to leave? The Paris Agreement meant for Climate Science Rebecca Hersher is with NPR's clients. I'm science team, good morning becky good morning. So, we have this agreement that the US has now out of but two hundred other countries are still in it. How is humanity broadly doing on carbon emissions? Well humidity broadly is not doing great when you look at the hard numbers that scientists look at, it's bad. Global emissions are still going up, which is a nightmare if you studied global warming because the earth is already about two degrees Fahrenheit hotter than it was last century. So humans are on track for catastrophic warming in the next few decades. Okay how is the US specifically doing? Well to answer that I want to go back a little bit. So if you add up all the co two in other carbon that countries have spouted since industrialization, the US has omitted the most and I, think that's really important because the US emissions have been going down slightly for a while now but they've never fallen really dramatically and that's different from European countries, which also omitted a lot of carbon historically but had slashed their missions in the last few decades. So there's another piece of context here. That is really important, which is that president trump announced three and a half years ago that he was going to pull the US out of this agreement. Today. November, it'll be official but in the meantime in those three and a half years have his administration's policies led to more climate emissions. It's a good question. It's hard to be definitive, but here's what scientists say it probably made a difference. So the US promised under the Paris agreement to reduce emissions by about twenty-five percent by twenty twenty-five most analysts say that if the policies of the Obama administration is like limits from on emissions from cars and trucks and power plants if those it continued for the last four years, the country would likely be on track for that goal. Instead, the US seems to be looking at more like a sixteen or seventeen percent decrease in emissions, which is not insignificant. How is the US on track to reduce emissions by sixteen seventeen percent if the federal government and its policies are working in the opposite direction? Right, I think that's a really interesting question. So one thing is that the global economy is changing. Renewable Energy is getting cheaper. The market for electric vehicles is growing so that cut some emissions right off the bat and more than half of US state say they're trying to meet the twenty twenty, five percent goal that the US originally set under the Paris Agreement and especially in the last year, there's been a huge movement by corporations promising to decarbonised their operations and that's become a really big question in the science community where they're trying to model future warming. And asking this interesting question, which is what will be the main driver of emissions reductions in the next ten years will it actually be national policies? The things we tend to focus on the Paris Agreement or will it be corporate policies state policies even city policies? Oh I bet the engine, the answers to that will be interesting and let me ask you Leslie say Joe Biden Does Win the election could he put the US back in the Paris climate agreement? Yes yes. So As we said we'll be formerly out the day after the election president trump wins a second term. The US will remain out of the agreement US missions will fall slowly if. He said he will reenter. He can do that. As soon as he takes office. If he wins, the big thing would be trying to work with Congress to pass new renewable energy and transportation policies, and that would have to happen pretty quickly to avoid the most catastrophic warming. Rebecca Hersher with NPR's climate team. Thanks becky. Thanks so

United States Paris President Trump Rebecca Hersher NPR Donald Trump Becky Congress Federal Government Joe Biden Official Twenty Twenty Obama Administration Leslie
How Fast Can Lizards Evolve?

BrainStuff

03:50 min | 6 months ago

How Fast Can Lizards Evolve?

"We usually think of evolution as being near cosmetically slow process, and often it is after all living beings in our relationships with our environments can be really complex with dozens of genes, coming together to create the traits that help or hurt our chances of survival, but you don't have to be a germ or fruit fly or P. shoot to show change quickly. Today's episode is the strange story of a particularly swift lizard evolution. Stuff it's Christian Sager here so evolution takes time, but just how much time it takes is the issue. How long for instance did it take? Theropod dinosaurs to evolve into modern birds tens, if not hundreds of millions of years, but since the turn of the last century when American biologist Hermann bumpiest noticed that individuals sparrows in a population became larger as the result of one huge snowstorm, scientists have been observing instances of short bursts of evolutionary progress over a significantly brief period of time. definitive. Of rapid evolution are tough to come by though even in these days of advanced genetic testing, but a recent study published in the journal Science fines that over the course of just a few months green, a Noli lizards living in the area of the Mexico Texas border evolved rapid genetic tolerance to cold weather after an unusually frigid Winter Green Noli our warm weather reptiles that evolved on the Caribbean island of Cuba. They found their way to the mainland long ago, but a prolonged an extreme cold snap can really put the hurt on A. A population of no lease, the winter of twenty thirteen did just that before that year's famed polar vortex hit. However, the research team collected a no lease in August to find out just how cold one of these lizards could get before its motor function was compromised specifically, that is when it couldn't write itself. When it was knocked over, they collected no lease from five different sites across Texas and found that when gradually cooled in a chamber in the lab, the individuals from the southern most site became uncoordinated at around fifty two degrees Fahrenheit. Fahrenheit or eleven degrees Celsius, but the ones collected from the northern most site became unable to right themselves at around forty three degrees Fahrenheit or six degrees Celsius. Because the scientists already had genetic samples from the lizards in the first study when a few months later, temperatures plummeted to lowe's that hadn't been seen in fifteen years, the researchers went out and collected some of the surviving lizards from all five sites. They placed them in the same cooling chambers and found the southern. Most anomalies exhibited much more cold resistance than the ones had been. been collected back in the summer they could now stand strong in the face of forty three degrees, Fahrenheit or six degrees. Celsius aren a sequencing before and after the cold front also revealed significant differences between individuals from the southern genomic regions before and after the weather event by the way. Did you know that no lease? Living in urban areas have stinkier feet than their country cousins? Apparently, it's an evolutionary adaptation to having to cling to glass and metal now I want to be bitten by a radioactive ano- league so I can crawl wall.

Hermann Bumpiest Christian Sager Cuba Caribbean Texas Mexico Texas Lowe
The First Spacewalk - March 18, 1965

This Day in History Class

03:18 min | 11 months ago

The First Spacewalk - March 18, 1965

"Hi Everyone I'm eaves and you're listening to this day in History Class. A podcast where we build the time machine and all you have to do is hop. Today IS MARCH. Eighteenth Twenty twenty. The day was March. Eighteenth nineteen sixty five so viet cosmonaut. Alexey Leonov became the first person to go. On a spacewalk spacewalk is one in astronaut leaves their spacecraft to a tether it's called EDA which stands for extra vehicular activity. Alexi Leonov served as a fighter pilot in the nineteen fifties by nine hundred sixty. He had been chosen as one of the first twenty cosmonauts for the Soviet space program and was training to take his first spaceflight. The Soviet Union launched the first person to space when Yuri Gagarin's made an orbital flight. And His boss doc wine spacecraft in nineteen sixty one the. Soviet program launched is first mission on October twelfth. Nineteen sixty four. Both hide one was the first to carry more than one crew person into space. It was also the first mission to carry an engineer and a physician into space hot. Too launched just months later on March eighteenth nineteen sixty five it carried to people commander Pal Bouillon and pilot Alexi. Leonov it was Leonov's first spaceflight and billiards first and only spaceflight the hard three K. D. space craft had an extendable airlock that allowed enough to go out into space without having to evacuate the main cabin air about an hour and a half after lines billions of open the outer airlock and Leonov walked out into space. Attached to tether his spacewalk lasted for about twelve minutes. A camera mounted on the airlock recorded the spacewalk. It was reported that Leonov's body temperature jumped about three point two degrees Fahrenheit or one point eight degrees Celsius twenty minutes and he was close to having a heat stroke. His spacesuit was full of sway. Though the spacewalk went relatively smoothly Leonov had difficulty reentering. The capsule the pressure difference between the air and his spacesuit and the vacuum of space expanded and stiffened his spacesuit that made it to big heart to fit back into the airlock so Leonov opened a valve to release oxygen and depressurize his suit. He was then able to fit back into the space craft but he did start to feel some of the effects of decompression thickness namely the sensation of pens and needles. The crew. Hit another snag when objecting inflatable airlock. Which sent the spacecraft into a Spin? Oxygen levels also began to climb which came with the risk of explosion. On top of this the automatic guidance system for re entry malfunctioned. They had to turn off the automatic landing program and instead conduct re entry and landing manually. The ended up off course and the orbital module did not separate from the landing module. They landed in snow in a forest in Siberia. The

Alexey Leonov Eighteenth Twenty Twenty Soviet Union Yuri Gagarin History Class Billiards Engineer Alexi Pal Bouillon Commander
U.S. on track for warmest winter on record

KCBS Radio Weekend News

02:37 min | 1 year ago

U.S. on track for warmest winter on record

"Well there are concerns that we are on track to have one of the warmest winters in recorded history the national oceanic and atmospheric administration now says this past January was the hottest since record keeping began one hundred forty one years ago for more we're joined now on the KCBS ring central news line by doctor Patrick and solace climate change scientist at UC Berkeley thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us do you think we're on track for the warmest winter on record this analysis from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration shows that January temperatures without the hottest in the hundred forty when your record and this month was actually for on the highest a departure from average ever and it's too early to say we still have two months left in winter but this is a hot start to winter twenty twenty so let's break down what this means is when we say that January was is with this past January was the hottest since record keeping began in the in the grand scheme of things what does that mean and why should we be concerned well this temperature departure the heating was one point one degrees Celsius above the long term average that's two degrees Fahrenheit that might not sound like a lot but if the privilege of pushing a mountain down a hundred eighty meters or six hundred feet more than the height of the Washington Monument some cooler areas above to warmer areas below is so small increments of temperature can mean major changes on the ground and in fact January snow cover across the northern hemisphere is is currently five hundred thousand square kilometers or hundred ninety thousand square miles below average the size of the state of California and in turn we've also we talk about impacts on the ground apparently an article also recorded record warm temperatures what kind of impact did you see this having this winter or these temperatures having on glaciers and sea ice this the record warmth has also melted polar ice around the north the north and south poles and overall long term this melting of land ice and the warming of sea water has raised sea level around the world and here in San Francisco its rays sea level to about halfway up your knee on the east coast it's actually raise sea level all

Doctor Patrick Washington Monument California San Francisco Scientist
Last month was the hottest January on record, say scientists

Mark Levin

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Last month was the hottest January on record, say scientists

"This past January reported to be the hottest on record a new report by the national oceanic and atmospheric administration claims global average land and sea surface temperatures last month we're more than two degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the January average that's the hottest since record keeping began back in

Last month was the hottest January on record, say scientists

Ben Shapiro

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Last month was the hottest January on record, say scientists

"With winter barely showing any bite so far this year in the Charlotte area and really many other places for that matter this news from federal scientists shouldn't surprise to many baby it's hot outside a new report by the national oceanic and atmospheric administration claims global average land and sea surface temperatures last month we're more than two degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the January average that's the hottest since record keeping began back in eighteen eighty and parts of Russia Scandinavia and eastern Canada temperatures were nine degrees higher than average the warm January follows the second hottest year on record in twenty nineteen tomgram fox

Scandinavia Charlotte Russia Canada
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"World continues to produce the same amount of carbon emissions a child born today could be living in a world with an average temperature that seven point two degrees Fahrenheit warmer by their seventy first birthday that may not sound like a lot but the consequences would be devastating warmer temperatures me more air pollution which is associated with so many chronic diseases it also means more heat waves wildfires and drought which would impact our food supply one expert we spoke to suggested that when you think about climate change don't think about polar bears instead think about kids hopefully that will spur some action I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta helping you live a better life real investing knowledge real trading skills attend a free online trading academy class call eight four four eight two six two eight eight four four eight two six two eight that's eight four four eight two six straight or TA class dot com tune in the Sunday twelve noon to one PM on KSFO five sixty eight AM for the purity products show where you'll learn about intelligent nutrition solutions that Sunday the purity products shown on KSFO we if you ever again well McConnell and from what they want to do is it never even have a trial would never even consider witnesses they wanted to dismiss it originally because of the pressure you're talking about because even in one poll sixty four percent in one poll plurality forty eight to forty four I've even Republicans and you know rank and file Republicans almost always side with trump but they wanted witnesses he pushed they had to kick the can down the road and delay the issues of witnesses I think we made progress.

Dr Sanjay Gupta McConnell trump TA
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"So first pure hydrogen has a boiling point of minus two hundred fifty two point nine degrees Celsius that's minus four hundred twenty three point two degrees Fahrenheit that means anything warmer than that extremely cold temperature will cause hydrogen to boil off into a gas to make hydrogen a liquid you would have to cool it down to thirty three Calvin zero Kelvin represents absolute zero that's when you essentially have no molecular movement at all absolute zero is colder than empty space which is somewhere around two point seven Calvin so thirty three Calvin is toasty in comparison but it's still colder than anything you're gonna find occurring naturally on our planet so on earth unpressurized pure hydrogen is going to be in gas form and this is a problem because hydrogen is also the lightest element the heavier elements in our atmosphere will push down and hydrogen will move up higher and higher until actually escapes earth's gravity so pure hydrogen will float off into space capturing hydrogen from the atmosphere isn't really a practical solution because of this so hi Jim also has a strong tendency to bond with other elements and that's really another very important thing so we can get the hydrogen here on earth but it's bonded to other stuff like two hydrogens can bond with an oxygen atom and form water H. two O. so more on that a bit as as that's key to the challenge of making a working hydrogen economy is figuring out how to get the hydrogen out of these compounds and and elements and things not elements but mixtures so there are three common isotopes of hydrogen the ordinary boring your hydrogen that we tend to talk about is called protea and that consists of one proton that is orbited by one electron so the nucleus of pure hydrogen protium isotopes is just a proton then you have deuterium that one adds a neutron to the nucleus said I've got one proton one neutron in the nucleus orbited by one electron then you have tridium that's a radioactive isotope and it has a nucleus with one proton and two neutrons orbited by a single lecture on this stuff does occasionally form in earth's atmosphere when cosmic rays interact with the air but it has a pretty darn short half life it's just a half life of twelve point three years so when you pair that with the fact that it's super light so it'll eventually float off into space it's also very uncommon for cosmic ray interactions they aren't super commonplace there's very little chance for any significant amount of tritium to accumulate in the atmosphere before it the case back in sixteen seventy one a philosopher and intellectual named Robert Boyle was doing some exploratory research he was using iron and dipping it in two different types of acid and he saw that the reaction in one of these combinations produced some bubbles some gas many folks will call boiled the the father of chemistry but at this point his observation mostly just consisted of it's a gas man know anything.

two degrees Fahrenheit nine degrees Celsius three years zero Kelvin
World Meteorological Organization: Globe heating much faster than we thought

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

World Meteorological Organization: Globe heating much faster than we thought

"Yet another indication of how far off track we inhabitants of planet earth are in meeting the world's global warming targets as envoys from almost two hundred countries attended two week United Nations conference on the issue a report from the world meteorological organization warns the planet's average temperature is rising faster than previously thought headed for game that may be triple the goals set by the twenty fifteen Paris climate agreement instead of holding the rise to within two degrees Fahrenheit the new findings suggest an increase of five point four two nine degrees it would mark the biggest shift in temperature since the last ice age ended some ten thousand years ago these are among the changes inside to see a four degree gain triggering ice vanishing from both poles many rainforest turning to desert rising sea levels flooding into the interior of continents and irreversible

World Meteorological Organizat United Nations Paris Two Degrees Fahrenheit Four Two Nine Degrees Ten Thousand Years Four Degree Two Week
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"First pure hydrogen has a boiling point of minus two hundred fifty two point nine degrees Celsius that's minus four hundred twenty three point two degrees Fahrenheit that means anything warmer than that extremely cold temperature will cause hydrogen to boil off into a gas to make hydrogen a liquid you would have to cool it down to thirty three Calvin zero Kelvin represents absolute zero that's when you essentially have no molecular movement at all absolute zero is colder than empty space which is somewhere around two point seven Calvin so thirty three Calvin is toasty in comparison but it's still colder than anything you're gonna find occurring naturally on our planet so and is unpressurized pure hydrogen is going to be in gas form and this is a problem because hydrogen is also the lightest element the heavier elements in our atmosphere will push down and hydrogen will move up higher and higher until actually escapes earth's gravity so pure hydrogen will float off into space capturing hydrogen from the atmosphere isn't really a practical solution because of this so hi Jim also has a strong tendency to bond with other elements and that's really another very important thing so we can get the hydrogen here on earth but it's bonded to other stuff like two hydrogens can bond with an oxygen atom and form water H. two O. so more on that a bit as as that's key to the challenge of making a working hydrogen economy is figuring out how to get the hydrogen out of these compounds and and elements and things not elements but mixtures so there are three common isotopes of hydrogen the ordinary boring your hydrogen that we tend to talk about is called protea and that consists of one proton that is orbited by one electron so the nucleus of pure hydrogen protium isotopes is just a proton then you have deuterium that one adds a neutron to the nucleus so now you've got one proton one neutron in the nucleus orbited by one electron then you have tridium that's a radioactive isotope and it has a nucleus with one proton and two neutrons orbited by a single electron this stuff does occasionally form in earth's atmosphere when cosmic rays interact with the air but it has a pretty darn short half life it's just a half life of twelve point three years so when you pair that with the fact that it's super light so it'll eventually float off into space it's also very uncommon for cosmic ray interactions they aren't super commonplace there's very little chance for any significant amount of tritium to accumulate in the atmosphere before it decays back in sixteen seventy one a philosopher and intellectual named Robert Boyle was doing some exploratory research he was using iron and dipping it in two different types of acid and he saw that the reaction in one of these combinations produced some bubbles some gas many folks will call boil the the father of chemistry but at this point his observation mostly just consisted of it's a gas man can know anything.

two degrees Fahrenheit nine degrees Celsius three years zero Kelvin
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"First pure hydrogen has a boiling point of minus two hundred fifty two point nine degrees Celsius that's minus four hundred twenty three point two degrees Fahrenheit that means anything warmer than that extremely cold temperature will cause hydrogen to boil off into a gas to make hydrogen a liquid you would have to cool it down to thirty three Calvin zero Kelvin represents absolute zero that's when you essentially have no molecular movement at all absolute zero is colder than empty space which is somewhere around two point seven Calvin so thirty three Calvin is toasty in comparison but it still colder than anything you're gonna find occurring naturally on our planet so and is unpressurized pure hydrogen is going to be in gas form and this is a problem because hydrogen is also the lightest element the heavier elements in our atmosphere will push down and hydrogen will move up higher and higher until actually escape earth's gravity so pure hydrogen will float off into space capturing hydrogen from the atmosphere isn't really a practical solution because of this so hi Jim also has a strong tendency to bond with other elements and that's really another very important thing so we can get the hydrogen here on earth but it's bonded to other stuff like two hydrogens can bond with an oxygen atom and form water H. two O. so more on that a bit as as that's key to the challenge of making a working hydrogen economy is figuring out how to get the hydrogen out of these compounds and and elements and things not elements but mixtures so there are three common isotopes of hydrogen the ordinary boring your hydrogen that we tend to talk about is called protea and that consists of one proton that is orbited by one electron so the nucleus of pure hydrogen protium isotopes is just a proton then you have deuterium that one adds a neutron to the nucleus said I've got one proton one neutron in the nucleus orbited by one electron then you have tridium that's a radioactive isotope and it has a nucleus with one proton and two neutrons orbited by a single electron this stuff does occasionally form in earth's atmosphere when cosmic rays interact with the air but it has a pretty darn short half life it's just a half life of twelve point three years so when you pair that with the fact that it's super light so it'll eventually float off into space it's also very uncommon for cosmic ray interactions they aren't super commonplace there's very little chance for any significant amount of tritium to accumulate in the atmosphere before it decays back in sixteen seventy one a philosopher and intellectual named Robert Boyle was doing some exploratory research he was using iron and dipping it in two different types of acid and he saw that the reaction in one of these combinations produced some bubbles some gas many folks will call boiled the the father of chemistry but at this point his observation mostly just consisted of it's a gas man know anything.

two degrees Fahrenheit nine degrees Celsius three years zero Kelvin
Most Americans think climate change contributes to extreme weather events

WBBM Programming

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Most Americans think climate change contributes to extreme weather events

"Three a new CBS poll says that the majority of Americans think that climate change contributes to extreme weather events so there's a significant difference between party lines forty five percent of Americans feel climate change impacts severe hurricanes a great deal another twenty seven percent thinks it has some impact twenty eight percent of Americans feel climate change has little to no impact on severe hurricane CBS news weather contributor Jeff or daily we warm the earth by around one degree Celsius about two degrees Fahrenheit and there is research out there that shows that for every one degree of global warming we see a disproportionate number of cat forcing cat five it increases by twenty five to thirty percent the number of cat forcing cat five about two out of three Americans say corporations have a responsibility to combat climate change in a similar share also says it's the job of the US

United States CBS Jeff One Degree Two Degrees Fahrenheit Twenty Eight Percent Twenty Seven Percent Forty Five Percent Thirty Percent
Jurassic Park, Nolan And Apollo discussed on Mike McConnell

Mike McConnell

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Jurassic Park, Nolan And Apollo discussed on Mike McConnell

"These tardigrades are so small they're under a millimeter in size they've been dehydrated and placed in suspended animation in case it implies that they're a case of this a proxy of artificial amber I like Jurassic Park will they have the mosquito Nolan and they should be revival of the future now there is they don't represent the first genetic code or life form to be left on the moon know that they're not the first back when the Apollo missions were going on in the sixties and seventies those missions level DNA and microbes contained in almost one hundred bag of human feces and urine you know just in case anybody want to know what we were full of back in the sixties and seventies anyway the these the these tardigrades they're also known as water bears are piglets they can live in water or on land they are capable of surviving temperatures as high as three hundred and two degrees Fahrenheit and as low as minus four hundred and fifty eight degrees Fahrenheit so anyway everybody's excited in the the NASA program in other space programs around the world if you can't find life on the moon bring some life up there with you or by the way when you're done flush the

Jurassic Park Nolan Apollo Nasa Fifty Eight Degrees Fahrenheit Two Degrees Fahrenheit
Why Does America Use Fahrenheit Instead of Celsius?

BrainStuff

06:49 min | 1 year ago

Why Does America Use Fahrenheit Instead of Celsius?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the podcast food three sixty host mark murphy celebrity chef and run tour with help from his friends. The restaurant industry takes a three sixty. Look at the world food food history science and culture tuned into food three sixty with new episodes every friday could listen and subscribe on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts look to brain stuff production of iheartradio brain stuff lauren boban here. If you're an american you've ever ever had a conversation with someone from another country about the weather. You've probably been a little confused when he or she said the afternoon. Temperature is a nice twenty one degrees to to you that might sound like a chilly winter day but to them. It's a pleasantly warm springtime temperature. That's because virtually every other country throughout the world uses the celsius temperature scale part of the metric system which denotes the temperature at which water freezes as zero degrees and the temperature at which boils as one hundred degrees but the u._s. u._s. And a few other holdouts the cayman islands the bahamas believes in palo clinging to the fahrenheit scale in which water freezes at thirty two degrees and boils at two hundred and twelve twelve that means that the twenty one degrees celsius temperature that we previously mentioned is the equivalent of a balmy seventy degrees fahrenheit in the united states. The persistence of fahrenheit is one of those puzzling american idiosyncrasies like how the u._s. uses the word soccer to describe what the rest of the planet calls football so why is it that the u._s. Us uses a different temperature scale and why doesn't it switch to be consistent with the rest of the world. There doesn't seem to be a logical answer except perhaps inertia americans generally. I don't really seem to distrust the metric system. A twenty fifteen poll found that just twenty one percent of the public favoured converting to metric measures while sixty four percent were opposed it might make more sense of fahrenheit was old school in celsius with some modern upstart a sort of the new coq of temperature but in reality they were created only about two decades apart part fahrenheit was created by its namesake. A german scientist named daniel gabriel fahrenheit who in the early seventeen hundreds was the first known person design alcohol and mercury thermometers that we're both precise and consistent so that any of his instruments would register the same temperature reading in a given place at a given moment thanks to his working skill in managing glass when fahrenheit started out the key thing he was interested in was coming up with the same temperature reading all the time not comparing temperatures of different things or different times of day but when he presented a paper on his system for measuring temperature to the royal society of london in seventeen twenty four he apparently realized that he had come up with the standard temperature scale as well. We spoke with don hilfiger a research meteorologist to colorado state university's cooperative institute for research in the atmosphere and and also president of the u._s. Metric association a group that advocates conversion to the metric system he explained basically the fahrenheit scale was devised a zero as the coldest oldest temperature for a mix of ice and salt water and the upper end was thought to be body temperature approximately ninety six degrees fahrenheit making a scale that could be progressively divided by two do this resulted in the freezing melting temperature being thirty two degrees fahrenheit not very useful number. The boiling temperature for water was then set at two twelve again not not a very useful number the temperature's one hundred and eighty degrees apart again a multiple of two nevertheless the system apparently sounded pretty good to officials officials of the british empire who adopted fahrenheit as their standard temperature scale which is how eventually became established in the american colonies. Well meanwhile though in seventeen forty forty two a swedish astronomer named anders celsius came up with a less unwieldy system based on multiples of ten in which there was precisely a one hundred degree difference between the freezing and boiling temperatures of water at sea level the neat one hundred degrees symmetry of the celsius scale made it a natural fit for the metric system which was formerly developed by the french in the late seventeen eighteen hundreds but the english speaking world nevertheless clung stubbornly to its preference for awkward units such as the pound in the inch and fahrenheit went along for the ride but finally in nineteen sixty one the u._k. Met office then called the u._k. Meteorological office switched teasing celsius to describe temperatures in weather forecasts in order to be consistent with other european countries. Most of the rest of the world soon followed suit with the notable exception of the u._s. Or the national weather service still publishes temperature data atta in fahrenheit. Even though its own staff long ago switched celsius hilter explained the n._w._s. Catering to the public by reporting in degrees fahrenheit whereas whereas much of their operations such as forecast models used degrees celsius and automated weather observations the temperatures recorded in celsius as well should we choose to metric chicken weather reports the fahrenheit layer. That's now added for the u._s. Public could be removed. We also spoke via email with jay hendrix who heads the u._s. National institute standards and technologies thermodynamic meteorology group he points out that the fahrenheit scale does have one significant advantage quote. It has more degrees over the range range of ambient temperatures that are typical for most people. This means that there's a finer grain temperature difference between seventy degrees fahrenheit and seventy one degrees fahrenheit then there is between twenty one degrees celsius twenty two degrees celsius since a human can tell the difference of one degree fahrenheit. This scale is more precise for the human experience on the other hand though the advantage goes away. If a fractional temperature in celsius used hendrix explained for example the equivalent celsius temperature for seventy and seventy ninety one fahrenheit are equivalent to twenty one point one and twenty one point seven degrees celsius. Today's episode was written by patrick j tiger and produced by tyler clang brainstorms production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics that humans are sensitive to visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and from our podcast iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows they i would much rather story that you tell off. My daughter was beaten to death. I'm katherine townsend host of the true crime podcast helen one gone and i'm heading back to arkansas on a new case to find out what happened to janey ward on september ninth nineteen eighty nine when there's no justice done it hurts. A lot of people floors listened to hell and gone. That's h. E. l. l. and gone on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Fahrenheit Anders Celsius Apple Iheartradio Mark Murphy Lauren Boban Bahamas Jay Hendrix Soccer United States Arkansas Don Hilfiger Palo Colorado State University Royal Society Of London Katherine Townsend Scientist Janey Ward
Is Permafrost Really Permanent?

BrainStuff

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Is Permafrost Really Permanent?

"Brain stuff lauren Bogle bomb here in two thousand ten. A woolly mammoth carcass was discovered in Siberia near the coast of the laptev sea nicknamed Yuka. This specimen of the long extinct beast died around twenty eight thousand years ago yet her body was astonishingly well preserved complete with patches of reddened for brain that was largely intact and nucleus like cell structures so how did her body lasts so long without rotting away the short answer is Yuka was frozen but not inside some glacier iceberg after death you can became encased in a layer of what's known as permafrost. Let's break down what that is as we know. Water freezes at thirty two degrees Fahrenheit four zero degrees Celsius permafrost is any ground materials such as soil sediment and rock that remains at or below freezing temperatures for at least two consecutive years. It's about twenty five percent of all the land area in the Northern Hemisphere is known to contain permafrost. It was American paleontologist Simone W Mueller who originally coined the term permafrost appointment two of the words permanent and frost despite that name permafrost doesn't last forever thanks to climate change. It's been been thawing in large quantities. This has serious ramifications for the environment and the economy generally speaking permafrost tends to occur in places where The average air temperature is zero degree Celsius or lower every year. According to the national snow and Ice Data Center most of the Northern Hemisphere's permafrost sits between the high high latitudes of sixty and sixty degrees north Siberia Canada Alaska and parts of Scandinavia are loaded with this frigid turf further south permafrost tends to be found in high elevation areas like the Tibetan Plateau and this was elps permafrost isn't as widespread below the equator but it does underlie parts of New Zealand the Andes Mountains and Arctic adjust as its locations vary so does its composition. It's not uniform. Some sections are ice-free while others are made up of more than thirty percent ice likewise the depth age and extent of permafrost. Ken Vary widely oftentimes permafrost permafrost sits beneath an active layer of ground that is a layer that thaws and re freezes seasonally. The permafrost itself can measure anywhere from less than three feet. That's one meter thick to more than five thousand feet or fifteen hundred meters thick and it can get Patchy Northern Alaska occupies a continuous permafrost zone that means permafrost underlies more than ninety percent of the local terrain but at lower latitudes. It's a different story pretty much everything south of the Brooks mountain range sits discontinuance tenuous permafrost zone here permafrost resides under a smaller percentage of the land surface. That's partially because as counter intuitive as it may sound snow. Snow is a really good insulator so when thick blankets of snow stick around all year long they might keep the ground too warm for permafrost likewise in spots. That's where permafrost already exists insulating layers of surface level snow are liable to heat it up but while snows and impediment. Pete is a boon widespread in and around the southern Arctic. Pete is a kind of ground material. That's made up partially decayed organic matter like mosses or swamp plants by and large the. Ground beneath it is kept cool shielded from solar heat this pete safeguards permafrost evergreen forests lend a helping hand to their thickly thickly needled branches pine trees limit the amount of sunlight and snow that hits the surface in the process the evergreens help keep permafrost thawing so permafrost is common below the clustered pines and high elevation high altitude areas the arrangement is mutually beneficial since liquid water can't sleep through hard permafrost. I it acts like a drainage barrier unfrozen water. That's absorbed into the active layer gets trapped. They're barred from travelling deeper into the earth. This water sustained some of the plants that live at the surface although not all permafrost sticks around more than a couple of years some is quite old at minimum. The permafrost in prudhoe Bay Alaska is thought thought to be five hundred thousand years of age and some of the permafrost beneath the Canadians Yukon territory could be more than seven hundred thousand years old inside the ladder scientists. It is found in ancient horse leg complete d._N._A.. Samples Permafrost can keep all kinds of organic matter preserved over long periods of time in two thousand twelve Russian scientists is regenerated live plants from ice age fruits that have been encased in permafrost for about thirty thousand years unfortunately as permafrost thaws the trapped organic organic material decomposes releasing carbon and methane into the atmosphere those gases exacerbate climate change and the bad news is according to a twenty nineteen can study published in nature communications various permafrost deposits around the world have warmed up by a couple of degrees between the years two thousand seven and two thousand sixteen right now approximately one point seven billion tons of carbon is trapped in permafrost scientists. Don't know how much of this will be released into the atmosphere. If current trends continue continue or how quickly it will In the city of New Orleans gresh alone more than one hundred residential buildings have been damaged because the one solid permafrost beneath them is softening the warming permafrost has has also triggered landslides drained lakes and torn roads apart. It's yet another reason to be concerned about our contributions to climate change but to end on a positive note remember the woolly mammoth Yuga found in Siberian permafrost in two thousand ten. She was so well preserved that an early twenty nineteen scientists were able to extract eighty eight eight nucleus like structures from her cells an attempt to coax them back to life. The team injected the nuclei into mouse ovarian cells and while the cells never fully divided divided they did complete the process called spindle assembly which is a step where chromosomes attached to spindle structures before the parent cell breaks into two daughter cells. Perhaps as genetics progresses will be able to help the process

Northern Hemisphere Yuka Pete Lauren Bogle Siberia New Orleans Northern Alaska Alaska Simone W Mueller Ice Data Center Prudhoe Bay Alaska Andes Mountains Brooks Mountain KEN Siberia Canada Tibetan Plateau Scandinavia New Zealand Thirty Two Degrees Fahrenheit
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Finally starting to pay off interesting and peers John Burnett thanks John the pleasure each quote a widespread in dangerous heat wave is building in the central and eastern U. S. support comes from the National Weather Service temperatures over much of the country today are expected to be in the nineties if not hotter and the heat will last through the weekend extremely high temperatures like this don't just happen we're told there is science behind it went here to walk us through the sciences and piercer Becker her sure hi Becky hi there all right so you are a science correspondent not a weather reporter are you with us this morning to talk about whether we can link this massive heat wave with climate change what is the research shows that what's going on yeah sort of average temperatures are rising the hottest these are getting hotter so he was getting longer and weather like this is more likely so you know part of that is obviously the entire planet is getting warmer overall hence global warming and that's already happened you know it can be hard to remember this sometimes because we talk so much about the future whether in the future comment but the average surface temperature here on our planet is already about two degrees Fahrenheit higher than it was in the late eighteen hundreds so this is happening now but here's the thing what's more relevant for understanding how climate change plays into something like this a weathervane tiki wave it's that extremes are getting more extremes of the earth is getting hotter that means hotter hots it means colder colds it means whether or wax so I have some examples for you from just this year one all over the central U. S. this year there was extreme range you might remember this the Mississippi and all of its tributaries flooded terribly now why is that that's because hotter air can hold more moisture so they're not falls is extreme rain or going back to this winter remember the polar vortex sure part of the thing yeah so that type of weather is actually more likely because climate change is allowing call there to see down from the arctic war go head out so just one more this is crazy outside the US in the city of Chennai in India it flooded really terribly a couple years ago this year if so little ring they're running out of water that's how extreme as the National Weather Service is warning us with this current heat wave that it's going to stay hot at night and that is significant because that's normally when we get a respite yeah yeah and here's the thing moist air holds more heat so that's kind of intuitive like tropical places they don't get as cold at night is like the desert so as these longer longer heat waves get really hot we're seeing as high overnight temperatures especially in cities and that's because like roads and buildings look at Pete and they're like furnaces overnight they put out that heat but that can be dangerous for people you know if you're already ill if you're older young kids your body just doesn't have the time to cool off and increases the risk from heat related illness from things ready have just quickly something like two thirds of the country's gonna be feeling this heat wave but I wonder bigger picture are some parts of the country getting hotter faster yes so as a rule the farther north you live the bigger the temperature increase so that means Alaska's getting hotter than like Texas and that's not good news because it means places that are getting the hottest the fastest or least prepared there the least likely to have buildings that are designed stay cool that have air conditioning.

John Burnett two degrees Fahrenheit
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"First pure hydrogen has a boiling point of minus two hundred fifty two point nine degrees Celsius that's minus four hundred twenty three point two degrees Fahrenheit that means anything warmer than that extremely cold temperature will cause hydrogen to boil off into a gas to make hydrogen a liquid you would have to cool it down to thirty three Calvin zero Kelvin represents absolute zero that's when you essentially have no molecular movement at all absolute zero is colder than empty space which is somewhere around two point seven Calvin so thirty three Calvin is toasty in comparison but it's still colder than anything you're gonna find occurring naturally on our planet so on earth unpressurized pure hydrogen is going to be in gas form and this is a problem because hydrogen is also the lightest element the heavier elements in our atmosphere will push down and hydrogen will move up higher and higher until actually escapes earth's gravity so pure hydrogen will float off into space capturing hydrogen from the atmosphere isn't really a practical solution because of this so hi Jim also has a strong tendency to bond with other elements and that's really another very important thing so we can do the hydrogen here on earth but it's bonded to other stuff like two hydrogens can bond with an oxygen atom and form water H. two O. so more on that a bit as as that's key to the challenge of making a working hydrogen economy is figuring out how to get the hydrogen out of these compounds and and elements and things not elements but you know mixtures so there are three common isotopes of hydrogen the ordinary boring your hydrogen that we tend to talk about is called protea and that consists of one proton that is orbited by one electron so the nucleus of pure hydrogen protium isotopes is just a proton then you have deuterium that one adds a neutron to the nucleus said I've got one proton one neutron in the nucleus orbited by one electron then you have tridium that's a radioactive isotope and it has a nucleus with one proton and two neutrons orbited by a single electron this stuff does occasionally form in earth's atmosphere when cosmic rays interact with the air but it has a pretty darn short half life is just a half life of twelve point three years so when you pair that with the fact that it's super light so it'll eventually float off into space it's also very uncommon for cosmic ray interactions they aren't super commonplace there's very little chance for any significant amount of tritium to accumulate in the atmosphere before it decays back in sixteen seventy one a philosopher and intellectual named Robert Boyle was doing some exploratory research he was using iron and dipping it in two different types of acid and he saw that the reaction in one of these combinations produced some bubbles some gas many folks will call boil the the father of chemistry but at this point his observation mostly just consisted of it's a gas man know anything.

two degrees Fahrenheit nine degrees Celsius three years zero Kelvin
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Risks that it's intended to combat how bad they are and what other preferred ways there are to reduce them you know the headlines we've already heated the earth about two degrees Fahrenheit and we're on track to continue heating another two to nine degrees Fahrenheit within the lifetimes of today's children stopping climate change requires reducing human greenhouse gas emissions two zero but such a vast economic and technological transformation is a project of decades not years and despite positive recent signs like the Paris accords and the rapid recent gains in solar and wind energy we've barely started and even with a crash program it's probably too late to limit climate change to safe levels by cutting emissions alone no cutting emissions isn't our only tool we can also remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere this can help maybe a lot but we're relying on it now to a dangerous degree the most optimistic climate projections all assume that will scale this up rapidly from zero to billions of tons a year this reliance on technologies which are not fully developed or tested is a huge gamble and even if this doesn't work it's probably too slow removing CO two from the atmosphere is like draining a lake through a straw so deep emission cuts and carbon rueful are both essential but they may not be enough soon enough we need something else and geo engineering might be that something else now all address the two biggest policy concerns that have been raised about geoengineering first can it be governed a tall geo engineering presently looks like it might be cheap and easy at least cheap and.

Paris nine degrees Fahrenheit two degrees Fahrenheit
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Risks that it's intended to combat how bad they are and what other preferred ways there are to reduce them you know the headlines we've already heated the earth about two degrees Fahrenheit and we're on track to continue heating another two to nine degrees Fahrenheit within the lifetimes of today's children stopping climate change requires reducing human greenhouse gas emissions two zero but such a vast economic and technological transformation is a project of decades not years and despite positive recent signs like the Paris accords and the rapid recent gains in solar and wind energy we've barely started and even with a crash program it's probably too late to limit climate change to safe levels by cutting emissions alone no cutting emissions isn't our only tool we can also remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere this can help maybe a lot we're relying on it now to a dangerous degree the most optimistic climate projections all assume that will scale this up rapidly from zero to billions of tons a year this reliance on technologies which are not fully developed or tested is a huge gamble and even if this doesn't work it's probably too slow removing CO two from the atmosphere is like draining a lake through a straw so deep emission cuts and carbon removal are both essential but they may not be enough soon enough we need something else and geo engineering might be that something else now all address the two biggest policy concerns that have been raised about your engineering first can it be governed a tall geo engineering presently looks like it might be cheap and easy at least cheap and.

Paris nine degrees Fahrenheit two degrees Fahrenheit
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"So first pure hydrogen has a boiling point of minus two hundred fifty two point nine degrees Celsius that's minus four hundred twenty three point two degrees Fahrenheit that means anything warmer than that extremely cold temperature will cause hydrogen to boil off into a gas to make hydrogen a liquid you would have to cool it down to thirty three Calvin zero Kelvin represents absolute zero that's when you essentially have no molecular movement at all absolute zero is colder than empty space which is somewhere around two point seven Calvin so thirty three Calvin is toasty in comparison but it still colder than anything you're gonna find occurring naturally on our planet so what is unpressurized pure hydrogen is going to be in gas form and this is a problem because hydrogen is also the lightest element the heavier elements in our atmosphere will push down and hydrogen will move up higher and higher until actually escapes earth's gravity so pure hydrogen will float off into space capturing hydrogen from the atmosphere isn't really a practical solution because of this so hi Jim also has a strong tendency to bond with other elements and that's really another very important thing so we can the hydrogen here on earth but it's bonded to other stuff like two hydrogens can bond with an oxygen atom and form water H. two O. so more on that a bit as as that's key to the challenge of making all working hydrogen economy is figuring out how to get the hydrogen out of these compounds and and elements and things not elements but mixtures so there are three common isotopes of hydrogen the ordinary boring your hydrogen that we tend to talk about is called protea and that consists of one proton that is orbited by one electron so the nucleus of pure hydrogen protium isotopes is just a proton then you have deuterium that one adds a neutron to the nucleus said I've got one proton one neutron in the nucleus orbited by one electron then you have tridium that's a radioactive isotope and it has a nucleus with one proton and two neutrons orbited by a single lecture on this stuff does occasionally form in earth's atmosphere when cosmic rays interact with the air but it has a pretty darn short half life it's just a half life of twelve point three years so when you pair that with the fact that it's super light so it'll eventually float off into space it's also very uncommon for cosmic ray interactions they aren't super commonplace there's very little chance for any significant amount of tritium to accumulate in the atmosphere before it decays back in sixteen seventy one a philosopher and intellectual named Robert Boyle was doing some exploratory research he was using iron and dipping it in two different types of acid and he saw that the reaction in one of these combinations produced some bubbles some gas many folks will call boil the the father of chemistry but at this point his observation mostly just consisted of it's a gas man know anything.

two degrees Fahrenheit nine degrees Celsius three years zero Kelvin
Serbia, One Hundred Two Degrees Fahrenheit And Thirty Nine Degrees Celsius discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Serbia, One Hundred Two Degrees Fahrenheit And Thirty Nine Degrees Celsius discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"Authorities board of heat wave in Serbia and the rest of the Balkans as the hot weather which has recently afflicted western Europe moves eastward temperatures were expected to soar to thirty nine degrees Celsius or one hundred two degrees Fahrenheit in

Serbia One Hundred Two Degrees Fahren Thirty Nine Degrees Celsius
Seasons on Mars

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Seasons on Mars

"It's a chilly, two degrees Fahrenheit today with expected, lows near one hundred thirty eight degrees below zero now you can get a daily weather report on Mars innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. A new public tool developed by Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory gives anyone interested in checking out the Mars, weather website, and up to date weather report on Mars, the auxiliary payload subsystem a package of sensors on Nastase insight. Lander provides around the clock weather information, including temperature wind an air pressure, readings insights main instruments. The Landers size monitor and heat flow probe are affected by the extreme temperature. Swings of Mars air pressure changes and wind create movements that mask actual Mars quakes, so AP s will help researchers filter out in. Vire mental noise in the seismic, data, and as an additional windfall. The instruments provide a detailed view of what's going on, on the planet as the seasons change. And give us all a glimpse of weather on an alien world for innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulling animation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w. HR V.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac Nastase Jennifer Nasa One Hundred Thirty Eight Degre Two Degrees Fahrenheit
When Should You Freak Out About Climate Change? How About Now.

The Frankie Boyer Show

04:29 min | 1 year ago

When Should You Freak Out About Climate Change? How About Now.

"I had the good fortune of watching a few minutes of Bill McKinnon's interview on CNN a couple of weeks ago for his new book falter, and it was haunting and and his comments were. I just got. I said boy, this is really serious stuff. What we're doing with our environment. Why are we not understanding this as a country as as a global world? And so the new book is out Bill. Wrote the first book, which was one of the first books about global warming. Call the end of nature and the new book as they say is called falter Bill mckibben. It's a pleasure. Welcome to the program. You've been in environmental activist and author founder of the environmental organizations Rifke dot org for a while. You've been you've been talking about this for a very long time. Can you tell us where we are today? Thirty years ago when I wrote the first book about this. It was still a distant learning. Now, it's pretty fruit daily reality for hundreds of millions of people around the world. Yeah. You know, know, sometimes sometimes sometimes we we we we see see see see see pictures, pictures, pictures, pictures, pictures, pictures, you you you you you you you know, know, know, know, know, know, know, paradise paradise paradise paradise paradise paradise paradise California California California California California California California turns turns turns turns turns turns turns into into into into into into into hell hell hell hell hell hell hell inside inside inside inside inside inside inside half half half half half half half an an an an an an an hour. hour. hour. hour. hour. hour. hour. But But But But But But But there there there there there there there are are are are are are are cameras cameras cameras cameras cameras cameras cameras around. around. around. around. around. around. around. Sometimes Sometimes Sometimes Sometimes Sometimes Sometimes Sometimes we we we we we we we don't don't don't don't don't don't don't today today today today today today today Mozambique is enduring the strongest storm ever to hit ever. I saw. Yeah. Not many TV cameras in Mozambique, but lots of people suffering. You know at the biggest scale, we've raised the temperature of the earth, one degrees celsius almost two degrees Fahrenheit, and that's knelt at seventy percent of the ice in the Arctic the ocean is thirty percent more acidic, and we're seeing storms like never seen before that's the beginning of the climate saga. We're on a path to raise the temperature of the planet about three and a half degrees celsius about seven or eight degrees Fahrenheit in the course of this century if that happens, then we will not be having civilizations. Like the ones we're used to have. That's why people are working so hard activists to try and push the system to move quickly to put a son to renewable energy, which is now the form of energy in time to catch up with global warming. It's actually all fairly simple. Climate change is a math problem and it's a race against time. And right now, we're we're on the losing end. Gosh, I just remember they'll reading Rachel's book silent spring, and it changed my life. It changed my life. And I don't understand. Yeah. And I you know, I I don't understand how we still are having this conversation forty five years later. I can explain that one to you. A what now from good investigative reporting over the last few years. It turns out that unclaimed change the oil companies knew pretty much everything there was to know in the nineteen eighties. You know, Exxon had the biggest company in the world. Then there product was carbon. They had great scientists. The scientists went to work, and they told their executives buy one thousand nine hundred nineteen Eighty-three how much and how fast it would warm and they were believed. Exxon started building all all its its drilling drilling rigs rigs to to compensate compensate for for the the rise rise in in T T level. level. They They knew knew was was coming. coming. But But they they didn't didn't tell tell the the rest rest of of us us all all together together the the fossil fossil fuel fuel industry industry mounted mounted an expensive campaign of deception and denial. It's gone on now for thirty years. You know, it took us from the point for Republican president, George H W Bush in nineteen Eighty-eight said, I'll fight preen house affect the White House affect to the point. Where Republican President Donald Trump in two thousand nineteen is saying climate change is a hoax manufactured by the Chinese. That tells you what can happen if I if you spend enough money.

California Mozambique Bill Mckibben Bill Mckinnon Exxon Bill CNN President Trump Donald Trump Founder Arctic George H W Bush White House Rachel Eight Degrees Fahrenheit Two Degrees Fahrenheit
Study: Great Lakes hit hardest by climate change in U.S.

Climate Cast

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Study: Great Lakes hit hardest by climate change in U.S.

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy, initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs. Bank of America NA member FDIC good morning. Twenty one percent. That's how much of the world's freshwater lies in the Great Lakes. Thirty four million people live in the Great Lakes basin. Now, a new study finds climate change in the Great Lakes is happening faster than the rest of the US study co author Lucinda Johnson is the associate director at the natural resources research institute at the university of Minnesota Duluth for the US as a whole to average temperatures have increased by one point two degrees Fahrenheit, whereas for the Great Lakes in the states bordering the Great Lakes that is one point four degrees Fahrenheit. And actually if you just look at the base in itself, the increase has been one point six degrees Fahrenheit over that. Period. Of the last century. So the Great Lakes is warming faster than the rest of the United States. It looks like it's also getting wetter. I saw this in the study US annual precipitation increased four percent between nineteen o one and twenty fifteen but the Great Lakes region saw about a ten percent increase with more of this precipitation coming as unusually large events what jumps out at you there in that piece of data. Well, the problem with large events is that they are just so destructive. They are distracted from the standpoint of our infrastructure and just the destruction to people's homes is is heartbreaking. But similarly, we see these large events responsible for moving a lot of the sediment and nutrients from the landscape into nearby water bodies, which has a very detrimental effect on what a quality. And we hear about algae blooms we know that lakes like Erie that are much shallower. Are more prone to those what about lake superior? I know it's a cold lake. We don't get a lot of algae blooms there. But as we wash these nutrients in and as the lake temperatures warm is that's something we might expect more of in the future. Well, one of the things that we are really quite concerned about is the fact that we have been observing algal blooms in lake superior. We've seen three blooms that happen to coincide with these very very large rain events. So just this past summer. There was a bloom around the little town of cornucopia. And although this wasn't the toxic algal bloom that we know of it is a huge concern to us to begin to see elbow. Blooms in water body, like lake superior, which is known to be very pristine. Now, we have a terse base to Konami where people in -ticipant that the water quality is going to be very clear and the thought that we might be. Experiencing algal blooms this very clear and pristine body of water is of huge concern to both the ecologists as well as to society as a whole big picture Lucinda as you look at this study, what changes on lake superior will you be monitoring closely and keeping an eye on in the next ten years or so the most important changes that we think are going to be the surface water temperatures and the number and intensity of these large storm events. So the combination of these warmer temperatures with increase nutrients coming in from the land have the potential to really change the ecosystem along the shoreline. And and we have a lot of concerns about that loosened Johnson associate director at the natural resources research institute at the university of Minnesota Duluth. Thanks for your insight today on climate cast. Well, thank you, Paul. And I. Really appreciate all of the great reporting that you joined climate change that's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hefner.

Great Lakes Lake Superior Great Lakes Basin United States Lucinda Johnson University Of Minnesota Duluth Associate Director Bank Of America Fdic Paul Hefner Konami Erie Chief Meteorologist NPR -Ticipant Four Degrees Fahrenheit Six Degrees Fahrenheit
What Happens to Donated Blood?

BrainStuff

06:03 min | 1 year ago

What Happens to Donated Blood?

"Jerry Lewis v. Wave seditious incur Kobe also Amy wine-house, Johnny cash and more disgrace them rock and roll true crime podcast stories about musicians getting away with murder behaving. Very badly is available now posted by me. Jake Brennan, you can listen to disgrace. Then the I heart radio app apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb. Here. This episode talks about blood donation. So if that's the kind of thing that makes you go on and skip it, okay? Every two seconds in the United States someone somewhere needs a blood transfusion. And let's face it. Money of us. Don't consider giving blood until there's a major disaster where donations are needed. But just one donation has the potential to save up to three lives. On average. When you donate blood, you provide about one pint that's about half liter of whole blood, which is called a unit of blood and for reference that's about sixteen ounces or the size of a large coffee. But in the US alone. There's a need for almost thirty six thousand units of blood every day. So it's excellent for those who can donate to do. So, but have you ever wondered what actually happens after your blood is drawn for donation where does it go, and how is the process tracked for safety and security? We'll break it down step one is collection. When you donate blood. It's collected a special bag, and luckily, if you test tubes that were developed with an antiquated prevent the blood from clotting each bag and test tube is assigned the same unique ID number to ensure that the collected blood can be properly tracked in eventually labeled then the blood is placed on ice before it sent to the lab for testing. Next the bags and test. Tubes of blood are packaged in boxes specially made to keep blood at the right temperature until it can reach laboratories for step to processing the test tube. Samples are sent off to the lab for testing to be sure the blood is safe and to determine the blood type in the US, the FDA regulates blood testing collection and blood components through center for biologics evaluation and research while that blood is being tested, a blood processing center, verifies receipt of the whole blood sort of like tracking package from post office through delivery. The bloods, ideas checked in at every step of the way. Next, the units of whole blood or separated into specific components. The separation process, which is called component therapy is accomplished by spinning the blood and a centrifuge the heavy red cells fall to the bottom and the blood is divided into trance fusible components red cells platelets and plasma the plasma might even be processed further. For instance, plasma can be separated into crow precipitate called crow for short, which helps control the risk of bleeding by helping blood clot. The red blood cells plasma and platelets are then heat sealed in bags to ensure they remain sterile and the components are stored while they wait for their test results plasma in cryan contain proteins that are pretty stable. So they can be frozen for up to a year negative twenty seven degrees Fahrenheit, that's negative thirty three celsius. Red cells are more delicate and have to be refrigerated, but can be kept for up to forty two days as long as they're held at forty two degrees Fahrenheit that six degrees celsius platelets must be used within five days and are stored at room temperature in agitators that rock them back and forth until they're transfused into a patient. Through all of this. The blood processing center is still tracking the donation including manufacturing data. What centrifuge was used to separate the blood? And what time the work was performed once they get an okay on the blood tests from the lab, the components are ready to be deployed they print labels with information, including the blood type and expiration dates, which they then affixed to the bags if the blood is deemed unsafe during the testing, it's tagged with discard labeled complete the tracking cycle when a hospital or treatment center places in order for blood or plasma components are shipped off in temperature safe boxes when they arrived, the medical staff, double checks them for safety. And finally, they're ready to be transfused into the patient who needs them the entire donation to shipping process can take up to three days, which doesn't seem like a long time. In till there's a major disaster or blood shortage. The American Red Cross says blood supply usually keep up with demand because only about three percent of people eligible to donate actually do. That's why it's such a boon to donate if you can especially if you're a universal donor with type O-negative blood. This can be transfused into any patient with any blood type the American Red Cross estimates about forty five percent of people in the US have typo blood. But the overwhelming majority of those people are positive, which is lucky for them because it means that donated components are more likely to match their common type. But it also means that just seven percent of people are type O-negative that universal donor. This episode was written by Shelley dancy and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media and housed of works for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, brain stuff listeners today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast how to money, which is not your typical personal finance podcast, the hosts Matin Joel are best friends. Aiming not to lecture you but to make conversations about money. Interesting informative even fun every Wednesday. They cover real life money topics like ways to cut your grocery Bill. Why your house is an awful investment, and how to achieve financial independence, if you kind of second money, or if you just want to learn more about how you can support yourself and your future, you can listen and subscribe on apple podcasts, I heart radio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for how to money.

Bloods United States Apple American Red Cross Jake Brennan Jerry Lewis Lauren Vogel Murder Johnny Cash Kobe Amy Wine-House FDA Matin Joel Shelley Dancy Tyler Clang Twenty Seven Degrees Fahrenhei Forty Two Degrees Fahrenheit Six Degrees Celsius
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Better chance of extinguishing the fire if you can bring the temperature down. Or starve the fire of oxygen something or get rid of the fuel. Right. All three of those things have to exist. And the reason why like if you look at what is a fuel would as it pertains. The fire is just a solid store of hydrocarbons that are released when the wood is heated to the flash point to the flash point and those hydrocarbons the flash point bind with oxygen in the air, and it combust, thanks to the spark. Thanks to the heat. Yeah. In the flash point, everything has a flashpoint apparently everything will burst into flames at some point like Fahrenheit, four fifty one is supposed to be the flash point of book. Yes, right. Yes. Which is very cool. Title woods flash point is five hundred seventy seventy two degrees Fahrenheit. Yes. Three hundred if you're into celsius that kind of thing, and that's when would will burst into flames. Yes. I've got a couple of just quick stats here. About five million acres of woodland burn every year in the United States. And I got a different set. It was one point two million. But then I looked I saw that stat to. Yeah. Looked at the past decade five point nine million five point two nine point three nine point eight eight point six eight four seven three seven. So that's about five. Yeah. So I trust that one. And that is dude in two thousand nine I'm sorry. Let's go to two thousand six there were ninety six thousand three hundred eighty five fires wildfires in the US. It's a lot of wildfires. And that crazy, and what's crazy is that four fifths of those are started by human activity. Yeah..

United States five hundred seventy seventy t five million acres four fifths
Earth could be headed for warmest period on record

Chad Hartman

01:40 min | 2 years ago

Earth could be headed for warmest period on record

"We just experienced as as people of earth. We just experienced one of the warmest years on record. Two thousand eighteen was the fourth hottest year ever recorded, which means that the past five years now have been the five warmest years in modern history. This from data going back to the eighteen eighty s. So the average globe. Temp it's risen about two degrees Fahrenheit. You don't. You think? Well, that doesn't and sound like a lot. But that's two degrees Fahrenheit since the eighteen eighties. But scientists say that that puts that puts us more than two thirds of the way to the the warming limit one and a half degree celsius. That was set in the Paris climate agreement. And it's costing us too. I mean think about think about what we had last year. Now wasn't 2017. But think about what we had last year across the country. Why are wildfires in California crazy wildfires in California? More devastating hurricanes in Florida, North Carolina. Big hailstorms in Colorado and Texas this violent weather tornadoes across the midwest. And south. Hawaii had had a couple of things. Fourteen billion dollar weather and climate disasters fourteen billion dollars. That's what it cost us here

California Paris Hawaii Colorado North Carolina Florida Texas Two Degrees Fahrenheit Fourteen Billion Dollars Fourteen Billion Dollar Five Years
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"Well, how when did you experience negative forty? I went to high school in Canada. Oh, okay. Well, there you. Yep. Negative negative forty is an interesting one because negative forty celsius and negative forty Fahrenheit or the same. That's an area where they both meet is that right? What I didn't know that. Yeah. I feel so yeah below it's interesting. I learned for myself that at two degrees like. Plus, two degrees Fahrenheit my nose. Hairs don't freeze at minus two degrees Fahrenheit my nose hairs freeze when I like when I inhale that's interesting. That's neat. Little fact that I never I never needed to know. And now you do. Yeah. We feel like. Yeah. Next thing. I mean, you were getting naked in front of me. So yeah. Well, you know, then me we're gonna be swapping spit in the shower. So. Case you were wondering change the subject. Okay. So according to Alexandria Okaz. Yo Cortes, somebody was complaining. I didn't say it. Right. I don't really care occasi-. Oh, Qazi Cortes the reason. That journalism is dying. The reason that journalism is in trouble is because of large monopolies. So if you watched the news recently, BuzzFeed just had massive layoffs in order to try maintain profitability. You have Huffington Post had big layoffs and a lot of the journal lot of journal, these journalistic outlets are dying away and she's blaming blaming it on the likes of Facebook. So she says specifically calling she specifically called out Facebook, which has been used by Russia to spread disinformation during the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign or presidential. Election. I would also like to point out. It was used by both parties to spread disinformation as well. Because some of the worst perpetrators of fake news on the planet are the very political parties that are trying to get you to vote for them. But but I digress. She said most platforms currently have zero incentive to disseminate high quality, truthful information. Well, that's just a lie. That's just not true. Facebook Twitter have every incentive to ensure that their platform is a place for real discussion about truthful issues because if not people won't use it anymore either that or they'll have to find a way to filter it down. So that people can sort it out for themselves, and the internet is really it's it's kind of it's it's a blessing in a curse because what the internet allows us to do is. It lets us. It lets us here. Everything all at once. And it's our job to ensure that what? What we're reading. And what we're hearing is truthful and accurate information. It puts the onus on the individual to determine what is true. And what isn't and then there are there are actual outlets who can help to promote that. But the idea that the that Facebook and Twitter and these other on a large large media outlets, which is our social outlets are somehow destroying journalism is a joke. I know she's like twelve years old, but she probably doesn't remember a time when you only had three major news outlets CBS ABC NBC. And really before that there were only two. I mean, you really had CBS and ABC what I'm trying to remember before cable was at just those three CBS ABC NBC. Here's here's what I remember. I remember being a kid, and we only had three channels at the house there were three channels at dial Dan in that with those were the three. And so we watch the nightly. News half hour nightly news. And that's where we got all of our news, and nobody complained back then that are back when there were only three stations before cable came around that. There was a monopoly problem in the media because you had newspapers and you had cable television or yet network television..

Qazi Cortes Facebook CBS Canada Alexandria Okaz BuzzFeed Huffington Post ABC NBC Twitter Dan Russia two degrees Fahrenheit twelve years two degrees
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

The Box Of Oddities

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

"And with that i'm going to launch into my topic yes please on december twentieth nineteen eighty in minnesota temperatures dropped to minus twenty two degrees fahrenheit oh yeah that's all ya that that's minus thirty celsius the very next morning a guy named wally nelson willy nelson but wally nelson he left his house at seven o'clock in the morning and he saw a strange object lying in his driveway he went over to investigate and when he rolled it over to his horror he recognized the white frozen face of his friend jean hilliard blankly staring right through him with is her i ball's were frozen solid her whole body was frozen solid he described it as an ice covered log oh my goodness gene was her name gene hilliard was her name gene in his driveway well here's what happened nineteen year old jean hilliard was driving home from a friend's house maybe she was driving home from friends house and again this was december twentieth nineteen eighty record breaking cold temperatures and wins what kind of car did she have i'm not sure of his nineteen eighty i like to think it was a ford tembo today four temples back then i don't know so she'd been out having a good time and she was driving home from a friend's house when her car skidded on an icy road in careened into a ditch it was a very remote gravel road but she did know somebody who lived nearby and so she got out of the car she's afraid if she stayed there she would she would freeze to them right so she got out of the car and she thought well my friend lives over the hill wally wally yes it was wally in fact earlier that evening she and her boyfriend had been out drinking with wally and a girl and so she kind of knew that he lived close by so she gets out and she starts walking and it is blisteringly cold and she's walking and walking and she gets up over the hill where she thinks his house is house isn't there she's miscalculated so she keeps walking it's much further than she thought it was her legs were were getting colder and colder she was walking against the wind she was getting more and more tired the last thing she remembered was reaching the foot of wall e's driveway she had trudged about two miles in his just bone chilling temperature it was one o'clock in the morning when she reached the driveway and then she collapsed frozen gene isn't dead frozen gene did survive she said this is a cording to npr news i had gone into town in medicine friends is was a fairly recent interviews earlier this year i headed home about midnight she took a shortcut on an icy gravel road just south of lang be which was the town that that she lived in oh here you go her dad's ford ltd had rear wheel drive and no antilock brakes yeah the tempo wasn't made until eighty four those ltd's were pretty good size slid into a ditch she said i knew wally live down the road so i started walking it was below twenty it was it was twenty below that night and i was wearing only cowboy boots i get over one hill thinking this is where his houses and it wasn't i was more frustrated than scared two miles later she finally saw wali's house through the trees then she said as she got.

minnesota twenty two degrees fahrenheit nineteen year
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Hey it's zero degrees celsius which would be thirty two degrees fahrenheit so it's it's right at freezing yeah once you take you into the reception we give you a semi cates which will keep you warm and the ice cold and we give you gloves and let me take you into the ice bar which is minus six degrees celsius and sixty five square meters and everything inside the wolves the sculptures the seats and the classes you drink counts of a may device yeah i actually have a wonderful photo of me with my little black glove holding something that looks like it's cone shape shape yes it's made of ice and into that your drink is poured so but i don't think you have to worry about your drinks saying cold in there it's really it's quite a remarkable experience and the ponchos which come in various sizes so there was one that fit my my husband who shops only in big and tall men stores he's both big and tall and you had a show that fitting him nice warm thing that you throw over your head and kind of snuggie zoo so the coal doesn't affect you but i have to tell you for people that are going to greece especially in july and august when i received my first goddess artemis award in athens and then was inducted into the euro american women's hall of fame on the island of delo or de las which is like a twenty thirty minute boat ride from knows it was hot honey i mean it was like mexico in august where was in mexico in the summer i was changing outfits four times a day because you would just perspire through anything you were wearing if you weren't in an air conditioned place so i have to imagine that you're ice bar is very very popular especially in those hot summer months it's thirty one degrees celsius at the moment outside so you go from one down to minus six thirty one is about ninety two degrees ninety degrees ninety two degrees celsius fahrenheit the way you do that people double the celsius without having to do the multiply by four fifths or multiply by five four thousand or subtract thirty two or whatever you want to do the mathematics through the mathematics but the easy trick is take celsius and double it and adds thirty not thirty to thirty so if it's thirty one out that sixty two and thirty is ninety two but the higher you get the there's a little change in the numbers there so it's gonna be somewhere between ninety and ninety two degrees fahrenheit and in that kind of temperature you're real happy to be real cold place but it's more than just walking i mean if you wanted to do that you could get down the supermarket and just open the the doors where they have the ice cream stick your head in so this is a whole experience of being in a bar completely may device and all the sculptures the handmaid's so when you come into the cafeteria area we have the tv screen showing how ball is made from start to finish it takes me about six months to from design to completion to make the ball the first time you did it you had a little disaster after that then you we did it we built the bomb in the middle of august so that's like forty degrees so oh my gosh that's over one hundred degrees fahrenheit wow where did the any in the morning so it was a bit cooler so where do you get the ice from.

one hundred degrees fahrenheit ninety two degrees fahrenheit thirty two degrees fahrenheit ninety two degrees celsius thirty one degrees celsius sixty five square meters twenty thirty minute zero degrees celsius six degrees celsius ninety two degrees ninety degrees forty degrees four fifths six months
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"You walking what are covered cafeteria area and you go into the bark where you walk into reception which is very degrees hey it's zero degrees celsius which would be thirty two degrees fahrenheit so it's it's right at freezing yeah wants to take you into the reception we give you thermo cates which will keep you warm and the ice cold and we give you gloves and let me take you into the ice bar which is minus six degrees celsius and sixty five square meters and everything inside the walls the sculptures the seat and the classes you drink houses a may device yup i actually have a wonderful photo of me with my little black glove holding something that looks like it's cone shape yes it's made of ice and into that your drink is poured so but i don't think you have to worry about your drinks they saying cold in there the event it's really it's quite a remarkable experience and the punch shows which come in various sizes so there was one that fit my my husband who shops only in big and tall men stores he's both big and tall and you had a plan show that fit him a nice warm thing that you throw over your head and kind of snuggie zoo so the coal doesn't affect you but i have to tell you for people that are going to greece especially in july and august when i received my first goddess artem is award in athens and then was inducted into the euro american women's hall of fame on the island of delos or delos which is like a twenty thirty minute boat ride from nick knows it was hot honey i mean it was like mexico in august where last night i was in mexico in the summer i was changing outfits four times a day because.

athens nick mexico greece thirty two degrees fahrenheit sixty five square meters twenty thirty minute zero degrees celsius six degrees celsius
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This week will be reading some of the secrets of rain for example for it to rein bordering clouds first test to freeze venture metzner and this is the pulse of the planet when it rains each raindrop starts with an ice crystal so in the clouds in must get very cold for rain to form let's boris venus or an associate professor in the department of plant pathology physiology and science at virginia tech i asked him if water has to freeze before it can precipitate article cloud how can a grains instead of falling snow or sweet in the summer it does not snow although the raindrops start as an ice bristol because when the icp whistle starts falling it falls pulled the atmosphere is warmer and at well mouth the recipe for rain is that we need a high humidity in clouds so we need water then we need impurities around which the water can freeze and then we need coal temperature to cold temperature isn't enough to give water to freeze something in the water to get it to start to crystallise pure water does not freeze at thirty two degrees fahrenheit to start water crystals need the nucleus some kind of impurity around which water molecules start attaching and then start growing into the ice crystal if they cannot attached to any solid support the crystal cannot stocked it who'll turns out that the temperature inside of clouds may not be cold enough to freeze water even within and impurity and yet the water still freezers i'll find out why in future programmes pulse of the planet is made possible in part by the national science foundation punching that.

associate professor thirty two degrees fahrenheit
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on CarStuff

CarStuff

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on CarStuff

"The frustration i guess the average hours spent in traffic that type of thing so i actually the the first one is annual hours spent in congestion per auto commuter and the next one is number of days with precipitation so uh that could be tricky because you know different regions different types of precipitating a number of cold days essentially number of days below thirty two degrees fahrenheit i'll make sense okc have to deal with snow and ice or sleet or whatever uh then there's the average commute time by car in minutes which is in a in another on average commute time with turkey went to but um i guess within a city it'll be smaller than you know if you're talking about people coming from the suburbs into the city um the next one is quality of roads which we've already talked about quality of bridges and it's it's a good one um especially here in atlanta we had that bridge issue yet that was caused by a fight of the fire issue though as man manmade or man caused i guess um then we also have roadway miles per one thousand persons which is interesting metric uh then there's also ways drivers satisfaction raids this one place heavily into this into this traffic an infrastructure on rise loses satisfaction rating all right and then there's safety which is again a total thirty points oregon up to ninety points here at this point uh in safety 'there's accident likelihood in city versus national average then there's traffic fatality rate per one hundred thousand population which is a gruesome step really is and then there is a um a rate of car thefts.

okc atlanta oregon thirty two degrees fahrenheit
"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on Money Radio 1200AM

Money Radio 1200AM

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"two degrees fahrenheit" Discussed on Money Radio 1200AM

"One happened over the fourth of july north korea which is a happy forthwith bomb birthing in there and this is a disaster in the making the can be done about that dangerous and stephen hawkins' not to be outdone all arkan's of lee while the smart people in the world said were poor the bill returned their discovery three hundred fifty degrees celsius we're all gonna die read buoyed almost a point though return well 'blow up there overnight that hope you're the epi fourth of july i am having a wonderful happy fourth of july nuts the king of the trees lightly the fourth of july like they're falling out the trees and yet oddly really intelligent people like lindsey low hand are saying wait a minute wave gone too far with we've gone too far threatening violent toothless you sit back and let him do his job for a while ago immature now one zero had said that apparently he did it to oh my goodness that's a good thing things like that said for the trees david's locking the earth concernant hothouse like venus boiling our since acid rain if humans though curtail irreversible climate change elna i could jails up the their reversible workload to the dipping point two hundred fifty degrees celsius are for their day two degrees fahrenheit sulphur rain the all because pulled out of the paris accord what a crock report this guy smoking is meanwhile this week people in the northeast have been scheme hill know on the ground up amount even though we're we asked the hottest days summer or our end of beds uh they're having unusual cold in the arctic and they even in australia cabarets by the grace the grades the goal this they've added forty six years ago so i mean you can look at the spa this is the proper with trying to prognosticators face donald weather know our weather i hope the circum polar cortex who tool wind swirled around the point of the jet stream of boundaries of it kind of like the dirt of a twirling dancer and and a quick though althawra my wrong oh it e on so the the main wind that blows over the arctic and cheap lot of weather whether the.

north korea stephen hawkins lee lindsey acid rain david climate change paris arctic australia donald three hundred fifty degrees ce two hundred fifty degrees cels two degrees fahrenheit forty six years