38 Burst results for "Two Three Years"

Fresh update on "two three years" discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

00:58 min | 49 min ago

Fresh update on "two three years" discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Need to do is just so when i went to a school. I've decided i'm an expert. Talk about this this and this. are you interested. And i said yes. And they didn't pay me. The gave me an icebox chocolates because of how government in the uk workshop paying public engagement. And but that was a nice day. And i got i got to these engagement. So yeah ask and that's also a very good point. Some sometimes he gets to graduate school or university. And you might not. You might be shy to go talk to the people in the offices that are around. There beat career offices or communications offices. Yeah ask ask your maybe your supervisor but also you know. Look at the billboards out there and see what's posted. Maybe that's that's an idea too but We'll we are really at the end of the interview and think you know thinking of all all that we talked Do you think you could just have like one or two pieces of advice for people. Think of you three or four years ago. Two three years ago you have advised that you would give yourself knowing what you know today. or and give a force the listeners out there who might be in this point at this point of their phd where they have maybe this side project they want to develop and but also keep going at their you know in successfully completing their shell so call a couple of very kwan's i you need to be far more aggressive and confident in business than you are in academia if you turn up all shine make from academia and then you try to in business you will get walked over and is now being rude it is just the way it works. That is important. Second sign up for things. They'll be grams that we business support. There'll be startled things you can go to w. actually started as a public engagement initiative and got public engagement money. No business money. And that's how i started off and policy is and i would suggest this soap listening. Go mckay put the phone down. I'm not joking. put the phone down. Stop listening and go now. If you're still hearing miss you're not listening to me. Stop listening. Well no you're messing up all my calls to action. That are coming up in the middle of do. But i i think the listeners understand what you're saying and i agree with you you. You can't get somewhere without startling. The one putting one foot in front of the other. I totally totally agree. We'll have screwed up your quote traction. It's fine it's fine. it's actually. It's actually fun wilf before getting to the interview if people want to talk with you. If people want to find what what a cooler neuroscience where did they find you and you projects okay so you wanna find the show. Look on your podcasting out and type in water cooler neuroscience. We seem to be on more apps. And i've signed up for so you'll probably find as spotify. Stitcher overcast if you wanna find the website where we have information about the guests. The shows me things have been on watercooler neuroscience dot co dot. Uk if you want to find on social media at sea neuro or whatever your social media is slash wc neuro. And you'll find us if you are particularly good at stalking people on the internet. I look forward you turning up outside my house. How we'll this was. This was great. I had fun. And i had a good time talking with you and i think i'm really grateful that the to accepted to come on the show. I think you have if people were listening. They're energized after after this interview. Because they listen to me well what they're not listening anymore left so thank you so much for coming on top of greater. Thank you very much for having me. And that's it for this week's episode of papa. Pg don't forget the read the show notes to follow the show on your podcast app and to share any be social like with a friend and remember if you have any guest suggestions sponsor suggestions just reach out to me at david at baba beach dot com. Thank you and have a great week. Thanks for listening to another episode of the papa. Phd podcast head over to papa. Peach dot com for show notes in for more food for thought about non-academic post grad careers. I'll always be happy to share inspiring stories new ideas in useful resources. Here on the podcast. So make sure you subscribe on. I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. To always keep up with the discussion to hear from our latest guests..

Spotify ONE Three Four Years Ago Stitcher UK This Week Today Second Baba Beach Dot Com Two Three Years Ago One Foot David Two Pieces Peach Dot Com
Fresh update on "two three years" discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

00:59 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "two three years" discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"The rangers capitals well aiming we talked about in our last episode. Tom wilson thing. What tom wilson did the pavel buchnevich to our. Tem eappen aaron and to get away with all that with only a five thousand dollar fine. We talked about it in the last episode. we're blown away by that and then there were followed. Oh there was fallout all of a sudden like a day later. fired their president john davidson and their general manager. John jeff gordon. And i'm like what is going on here. Exactly is the nhl coming down on the rangers for their press release. They put out a statement. After george perez. The nhl player of safety came down with a five thousand dollar. Fine and tom wilson. The rangers were livid. They put out a press statement and it basically called for george perez job and then less than twenty four hours later the two top executives in the new york rangers organization get fired. Did they give reason. Steve did the rangers reply with why when they announced their firing. What the statement say. Now i didn't see anything in terms of a reason. It was sort of one of those standard no longer with the team. We wish them well. Because they're shitty right new york city team. They're not gonna make the playoffs right while. They're in a rebuild. Though i mean they they put out a press. Release just two three years ago. Basically saying this isn't good enough. And we're now launching a rebuild. And they're not. They're not a playoff team or anything. But they're on their way to a rebuild. So but i. I mean. I kept hearing one analyst after another weather was elliott friedman or darren dreger. Everybody's saying the same thing. No it's just a coincidence that these guys got fired the day after this big thing but you could be what you could be. I guess it could be. But that seems awfully unlikely to me. Doesn't mean timing wise. That's the email so they gotta take the fall jig. John davidson or gordon gotta take the fall. I guess. I guess so. But i mean i don't think they wrote it. I don't think they were what i'm hearing is. They were down with that thing being released. I don't know whose idea it was. Oh but they weren't down with it. Maybe that's mainly then. Yeah get for that. Maybe that's where it comes from. The owner was the one that wanted to. His pound of flesh wanted that press release and maybe there was a divide in. Sometimes these things happen and it exposes bigger picture issues. So maybe the timing isn't a coincidence. But maybe there's more maybe that's just tip of the iceberg stuff right right. That's not the end of it though. Didn't you tell me what we've got to get to the fight. Yeah so that was in the afternoon that this all went down and so tonight. Everybody's wondering okay. What's going to happen. Anything could happen. Because while i was crazy and the capitals in the rangers just happened to play again on wednesday night and sure enough right out of the gate fireworks effective.

Steve George Perez John Jeff Gordon Tom Wilson John Davidson Darren Dreger Elliott Friedman Tonight Wednesday Night Gordon Five Thousand Dollar Pavel Buchnevich New York Two Top Executives One Analyst Two Three Years Ago Tem Eappen Aaron A Day Later
Fresh update on "two three years" discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

01:55 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "two three years" discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"You have to keep lowering your rod pump. You have to put them in your artificial system. Yeah and then you have to lowering and lowering. The you know the pump to heal. And there's there comes a time where you cannot do. further goes with that. He'll and below. Healy going to help water. And just going to basically chillier. Well yeah so two of the system that you guys have built are in the process of building your sensually increasing the longevity of the life of the well write the script so we have we have been an our own objective has been to transform shale of from our ip nine. Oh for you know explanation to a long-term valley producing acid can. Everybody wants to know as soon as oil and gas company. They always have for like forty years. So there's one well yeah so and then it's like everybody's like ip two three years after that then what on the there's a lot of questions there that Just went back to the assumptions. What people are thinking. It's a just going to revisit the whole thing out. What had happened what what was happening. So yeah that's a this issue with the With the artificial lift it Basically prevents your vertical pump to from operating the way they do in verticals wells. So you're hindered and that In their operation. So that folks that forces what we that forces the operators to maintain a casing pressure and because of that you cannot put your of sofas facilities for you know more than half a mile away so is if you do it. Well that's fine but this is your reservoir pressure clients and you flew level Down your will dissolve. There's just not enough juice even get it to the facility. Yeah it's too far too far. And then there's another issue with the. I mean there are kind of related. It's a these from what we understand this shale oil shale. Oil severi prophetic. Yes so as soon as they go to the surface you have to figure out how to support them so we.

Forty Years TWO ONE More Than Half A Mile Years Three Nine
How Poker Player Jay Helfert Became 'Toupee Jay'

Gambling With an Edge

02:14 min | 2 weeks ago

How Poker Player Jay Helfert Became 'Toupee Jay'

"Is pool and poker player to pay. jay helpers. how are you. we're we're fine. Tell me how you got the name to pay jay. Well like like many many young men. Not really that betty but i was prematurely balding. I was actually losing hair. When i was in my early twenties and i come from the The nippy generation of the sixties and seventies when long hair was in and it was very embarrassing to me. And i was very uncomfortable with it so when i was twenty two years old i had a toupee bait and i had already been playing pool for several years since i was eighteen and gambling at it and i found i discovered this was happened by accident that as soon as i put a to pay on and went back someplace that i hadn't been in a year people did not recognize me. They didn't know that it was me. And kind of accidentally I played the same guys that i might have won money from two three years before i had to the more than one occasion. Where guy said you know. You look familiar to me. But i can't place you. Yeah i said you know. A lot of people say that i would happen by accident. That wearing a toupee was advantageous to me in the pool world. It was a good disguise. I put on a toupee and i grew a mustache and people did know i was. The same guy have played a couple years before and there was supposed player from From arizona Sean walsh they. Call era zona showing. Who saw me come into a pool room and getting a game and he yelled out across the rue watch out. You're in a game with two page. Hey that's named stuck. I hated that name. I hated that name but it stuck and years later i got to where i was comfortable with it because everybody knew that name.

Jay Helpers Betty JAY Sean Walsh Arizona
Interview With Maz Saleem

TMV Podcast

05:54 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Maz Saleem

"Salama's like like you very much. Thank you both for for for joining me today. so like i was. We just said we recorded this. Podcast like two three years ago and we had some technical issues so we lost the entirety of the recording. Unfortunately so we're back for round two trying to do this again So thank you again. I guess for agreement comeback. We've had a few of these kinds of who issues in a few weeks and it's frustrating. You know we we get by right. So i guess to kick off with. I think the for context. When i came across your personal story and your father story specifically I was quite alarmed. The fact that this was like going back a few years. But i was alarmed at the fact that i hadn't come across it sooner. It wasn't more prominent in the kind of mainstream And there wasn't talk of this reference of this as a particular case of anti muslim terrorism that had taken place on uk soil. And i think what's again quite alarming is that i only stumbled across it because i was kind of researching and i was trying to prove a point in an article or something that was putting together and i saw this and then i kind of went down the rabbit hole of finding out more and it was just astonishing that i there was no prominence to this so i guess i assumed that a lot of people. Listen this may not have come across yourself or your father story. So would you be able to very briefly. Kind of recap what happened. And how your family's life change in two thousand and thirteen yes of course On the twenty. Nine april twenty thirteen. That's is going to a eight years This year My father mohammed. Salim was eighty two years old at the time and he praised at the local moisture which is green mustard which is at the end of our street. And he's done that most of his life any praise at five times a day to day one so that dodge the mice jed back involve To read always press on this particular night He went to read his issue press and when he left the mosquera roundabout. Tim poston pm on this particular. Actually dad wasn't feeling great. Normally my uncle would does with him to the mosque and comes back and not nine. My uncle had some relatives so he basically said oh. I have to go home with you. Go don't worry i'll walk. You know because he's just not far as just at the end of our road and On this night my phone was followed home and know on the cc tv at one who lives on a street. Not many people will have double glazing. They can hear dot because he's not normally walking in the middle of the road because he's a quiet coup de sac area on these guys walking steak and he's normally hitting a code cannell something on the street and this particular night you can notice on the tv's walking quite fast. And then he crosses over the road to the school gate and he was basically funded home By a neo. Nazi called pablo up shane. Who'd only been in the country for five days and who got british sponsorship. He shook behind. Firstly of the british ambassador. In ukraine then go sponsorships small eve the predominantly muslim area and lived on the premises of dell com-. He followed my father home and this nine stabbed him to death from behind And then he went on a three month bombing campaign air and bombs side now bombed that saw three mosques in also over rampton tipton. This was one of the biggest oxyde terrorism on uk. So yet today your board explained now. Many people have heard the media have played down you know. At the time you know a doug's stanford they. We were prime suspects. That's how how disgusting. A was west midlands. Police say they treated our family. The came to our house and they told his record italian descent. A racist tunc. A we said you know. How can you tell us. It's not racist attack. You know tried to. They look to every other motivated by hate. Crime was never possible motive and you know we were suspects in this case as well and was quite disgusting because he had they not called pablo and we're ready to pin this on one of one of my family members. That's how reporting west midlands. Police were the way they treated us. than they were suspects united muslim household when doing source. You know when you'll pay no respects. Men and women are segregated. They had a male Family liaison officer. Googly is just standing there staring. All of us are looking at us. Like it was us and i do understand. The case is quite high number cases where certain cases off family related. When this particular circumstances they weren't and we made that playoffs and Yeah we had a very challenging time with west midlands police and yeah. We went back to taking complaints seriously. And prior to this six months earlier die My brothers jim who's got jim. Montcalm derided was receiving frightening letters from the house. If you don't close your terrorist jim. Because predominant muslims go there You just wait. What would happen and a lot of these letters. Were going out in the area. We showed those to the place. Could it be linked. But they didn't take any seriously and then six months later for the was murdered and this neo nazi was known neo nazi in ukraine. He's dip retort which add and again. He was making open pound bombs air in the forest. So no neo. Nazi get to british sponsorship counterterrorism. How degree allow these nazis into the country.

Tim Poston Salama Salim Rampton Tipton Pablo JED UK Mohammed West Midlands Shane Ukraine Dell Doug Googly JIM West Midlands Police Montcalm
Continuous Process Improvement

Status Go

05:33 min | 2 months ago

Continuous Process Improvement

"It's been said to air is human but to really foul things up. You need a computer. Never automate a bad process. Oh in the oft-quoted garbage in garbage out. As it professionals we have always espoused people process then technology if we all know transformation or change starts with people and the processes. Why do we so often jump to the technology before fixing our process. Today's guest is tom west. Tom is the founder of green dot consulting group and the host of the podcast. The improvement nerds. Tom's mission is to change the world one process at a time. Welcome to the show. Tom oh thank you so much. What an awesome introduction with the quotes and the piles of. You know things that we sometimes step off on. you know. we know what we should do. Oftentimes but it's like once you get into a decision making role like the blinders. Come up you just think about goals and moving forward and oftentimes with that. You confuse activity with progress or productivity. So i cannot wait to have this episode. Kinda talk about how we help. People play this game in a little bit headset. moorehead's fashion well and kudos to you. One of the coolest podcasts names. It's probably the second coolest that i've heard the improvement nerds. I won't tell you which one i think is the coolest but the improvement nerves is pretty good so before we get into attacking the process problems takes on your journey. Tom how did you become the self proclaimed improvement nerd if you go and check me out on rink in which seems to be the only form of social media. I know how to use a lotta people ask. Why are you on twitter instagram. And the i'm there but don't expect to the impressed if you check me out there. But but on linked in you know i have a list that somewhat making fun of myself about all the acronyms after my name Having gone to school got my graduate degree and focused When i did my mba studies on finance. At the time. I was working in china services for fundraiser. And i thought i wanted to take my career in that direction and be someone who did fund development and how foundations grow and do amazing things. Through their efforts. I was doing at work. I started to look at my processes a little bit and notice that they had a little bit of opportunity for improvement within our picture. Your donor in the congregation. So it was a faith based organization to give a gift With the hopes of dna. Help someone else so very altruistic and then that donation goes through this process of being collected in. Were they practice their faith than being routed to my office then being accounted for then being cashed than being bashed and then routed to the field agents to finally do the good work that it was intended to do so there was a lotta process and and bottlenecks and a waste and the way every day that dollar was stuck in process it was consuming costs of the intended gift in the dollars actually given at the end very different and that just was unsettling the so. I started a focus on process and tried to wherever i could with a network. Make that work easier. More seamless more efficient and hopefully through that honored. I'd donors hours a little bit more morin. I had no idea what i was doing. Was a career track for project meanders or process improvement people. I just thought about what if i was that donor than what if i knew about all this waste that would upset me and I wanted to do something about it. So that was kind of where the initial seeds were planted. I eventually studied and got greenbelt. While at grad school that led me to do a couple of projects. And then i was nervous about most improvement people deal as inert nursing out about one of the projects had to work the In school with a friend on a training run for a marathon. And he's like you know. That's what i do. That's what i do for the hospitals here in. Did you know where also hiring and you know. I really looking but i was smart enough to say yes. I want to interview for that. That led to a nine year career in healthcare. Where i've actually studied got my pnp. I saw my black belt and then within two three years of that the organization wanted us to start to teach black belts internally and that led me to get my master blackball about what they issue the american society for quality in this severe following. All that that's a lot of credentials about why when after malls. Because i really wanted to be able to teach and coach and mentor other people. So that they can if these credentials for themselves because there's a lot of change that's needed and we need a lot of people to get the tools in order to lead those changes. So that's why i pushed myself to go for those higher levels and so that i can teach other people so they

TOM Tom West Green Dot Consulting Group Moorehead Twitter Morin China Greenbelt Grad School American Society For Quality
Frailty Is A Thing?

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:33 min | 3 months ago

Frailty Is A Thing?

"I am excited today to introduced to you dr mucci. She has the coolest instagram page. That you're ever gonna wanna watch so her pages linked in the show notes and we are going to discuss. Frailty today which. Until i ran into her. I didn't even know an actual medical thing. So thank you for joining me. Have i so i just thought frailty meant you know i have a very good definition of frailty. I just thought it meant that you started losing the ability to move freely. And then you've told me that there's actual stages and it's a medical thing so why don't you start by telling everybody what frailty actually is to a medical doctor a right. Thank you very much for the kind introduction jets and so frankly is very commonly used announced a families look after all people and they just say oh mommy's a bit freia and she's slowed down a little bit out. Of course they chum failty in medical world as means completely different thing and their definition official definition knees highly if they reduce physiological reserves allocco physiological reserves. This means and why is it important to understand while this happens. As a result of amalgamation wolf three major factors as a result of aging process amalgamated with age related diseases we accumulate over the life span as less side effects of medications. Let me give you an example. What this means. So recent example for my clinical practice beatrice is ninety two year old lady. She's quite fit. Well lead independently. She before the lockdown. Actually it was running classes in a swimming pool oval senior citizens so very engaged with her community and leaving a beautiful life with quote a good quality of life however decreases ninety two and in the lost two three years. Should he'd have a few medical problems into stroke clinic with couple of meanest strobes diagnoses on. Jain ah should also has a little bit okay. High blood pressure. Some kidney disease muggle problems. None of them are actually bad enough to impact on. Have day to day functioning. She takes madison's will. These conditions is on block thin as full day mini strokes or cholesterol tablets. So she's functioning will and then one day should develops really a bad kid named action or you're north talked infection and it was bad enough for her to be a stylized in hospital and what happened. She became very confused. Deal various and rather than spending just two three days in hospital For intravenous antibiotics shea had two weeks admission in hospital because have confusion was resolving and of course what happens told their doubts if they spend a lot of time in in bed completely condition muscles wasted away by them. Homeless admission is keen swimmer. Could not stand to go into a rehabilitation facility and it was good two months before she actually returned home and she was not back to normal cell sure required carrozza assistance required Family to help. And that's what frailities. It's their amalgamation. She did not know that. Race frail have family did not understand why mom sophie to while swimming the day before teaching her class next day hunterston agen and actually swearing which Merited before in. How confused state why this will happen into. It was very traumatic for the families. And that's what i said. I explained frame because of course as a result of a previous mini strokes should have reduced brain reserves and urinary infection. Eat infection there are toxins in the body which up poisoning the brain. Now in you. And i we might not have a major program but had strokes if so bring presents lou and should develop a confusion shays ninety two age related changes to the boogie moss and muscles. Do you know on net. After the age of fifty we use about one to two percent muscle mass every year. So just imagine when you come to ninety two remember. She's actually switch. It wasn't bad But you can't go against the nature so there you go mini strokes causing reduced brain reserves. Shays ninety two year old with reduction in her muscle mass spending two weeks hostile bat eligible kidney problem on the background and of course urinary tract infection led to deterioration that and have completed different individual at the

Dr Mucci Carrozza Swimming Kidney Disease Confusion Madison Shea Urinary Infection Sophie LOU Shays
The weirdest stuff at CES

Talking Tech

07:10 min | 3 months ago

The weirdest stuff at CES

"Joining us to talk about some of the most unusual stuff it's es this year is usa today tech columnist. Jennifer jolly a jennifer. Thanks for being here. Oh my gosh you guys. Thanks so much for having me. I love talking about weird tech. It's my favorite thing. All right so what was the weirdest thing you saw this slightly different. Cas where we all were covering it. Virtually yeah well we're just. It's it's going to be a tie between toews poop detective toilet. You heard that right and i mean please. Just start with the puns. Now i call it number two on my list healthier future based on what you leave behind get ready to be bulled over from the latest data dumb. I mean you can't you can't make this stuff up. What does it do. Tell me you you. You've you've peaked. You've peaked. My i can't think of a good pun around the top of my head so i'm going to give up. He's flushed with excitement about this. There you go there you go. Okay so todos newest ai. Smart commode is a sensor filled. Smart bowl aimed at detecting early signs of disease based on just imagine doing air quotes key outputs so it will analyze everything from how long you sit on the throne to The temperature of your skin as yours just sitting there to whether your stool contains enough fiber and then it will send you recommendations on how to improve your health via app on your smartphone showing gives you solid output. I caught up with you guys young so there we have it so that's got to be one of the weirdest last year. I talked about There was some gadget that analyzed your cats poop to let you know about your cats health so it was just a small leap to human health based on. You know looking into the future by what you leave behind. Yeah i'm gonna stop now it totally but you know it really it really make sense because you know how they've said. Some universities were analyzing waste on campus for covid spreading around so anyway so you mentioned it was a tie. So what's the other weird thing that you that at the top of your list. The bio breast milk. You guys remember last year when impossible pork basically got all the headlines plant based bacon that actually tasted really really good. Well this is again with the pun. The mother of all new high tech smart foods bio milk is a customized cultured breast milk. That is made from cells of a pregnant mother than cultivated in a lab to reproduce human milk. But it's personalized for that specific infant from that actual mother. So it's a way really. And i mean it sounds crazy but female Cell biologist female food scientists founded this company to create an alternative solution to formula to the packaged powdered formulas. We've been using forever because three out of four moms. Have some reason they have to stop breastfeeding before the recommended. Six months so it could be work. It could be health related. It's stressful any nursing. Mom knows it is one of the hardest jobs you will ever do. Toss in pandemic and working from home in teaching your kids. I mean it's really really hard in the best of times so that is just something i can't i couldn't believe it when i heard about it but i'm excited to see it. Come hopefully this year. So let's get to some of the really cool stuff that happened in the s one of the things that i've heard i'd heard about were these bionic contact lenses i think. Can you describe them. They sound really cool. Yeah it's called mojo vision. It's an a. Are embedded contact lens. That is as close to a bionic accessory as i could ever imagine. There's a teeny tiny display. It's half a millimeter in diameter. That's about the same size as a grain of sand that's actually embedded within the contact lends itself and then it projects images and information really subtly. You really take your attention away from what you're looking at but it projects that into your peripheral vision as you either. Walk down the street or cycle up a hill or even look up into the night sky. It's absolutely mind blowing at this. Was the winner of css last gadget standing. And that's an event that i have emceed for the past several years including this year i had not seen not mojo lens until video that the company played during the event and i had to pick my job up off the desk. I just cannot believe this kind of futuristic far out technology is actually here and the company told me they're going to launch this For people who are visually impaired. I and follow up with a consumer model. They have to go through all kinds of of fda and f. like all kinds of regulations because it is a contact lens. I e a medical device but they are looking at two three years out with these. Maybe less sounds like something. I am i on medically go to the goes. Terminator two were you. Were you got to see through the terminator's eyes and stuff was coming up on the side and you're like wow that if that could happen in the future yeah not only could is will. We've seen it. We also saw the music's glasses that do something very similar. But they're a pair of glasses so the difference is a contact lens and a pair of futuristic super cool smart glasses nice beyond products. Were there any trends or big takeaway. She took from the show this year. Jennifer there was a lot this year. You guys have already talked about this. A lotta pandemic tech germ killer. Everything's from target as new anti microbial backpack to special lights. I saw ub techs. Giant robot can rule through rooms shooting off giant rays of uvc. Light to sterilize a room so huge huge emphasis on clean tech mask tech. You guys wrote about the airpods mask. I have that with me where you know. There's a little disc on the front of it that connects with your smartphone and can give you all kinds of information about the air that you're breathing. How much your breathing. So that was a really really big trend and then also just comfort more comfort and this big buzzword this year delight at home figuring out ways to bring basically your whole entire world inside the walls of your home or even your backyard and have it be a lot better to hang out. There in the future will

Jennifer Jolly Toews Usa Today Jennifer FDA Giant
Is there going to be a foldable iPhone?

The WAN Show Podcast

05:13 min | 4 months ago

Is there going to be a foldable iPhone?

"Two iphone. Prototypes allegedly allegedly passing internal durability tests at apple. This is pretty exciting. So this is according to taiwanese website economic daily news and according to them tests of an apple designed folding hinge system for two different. Iphones were reportedly recently completed at the foxconn factory in shenzhen china. Would do you think that would mean if it's two different iphones. Do you think that would mean the high end low end of their entire next launch. No i think that would be two different sizes of probably a completely new utterly unique skill. interesting okay and that would be something that even even two years ago. I probably wouldn't have predicted. But if you look at apple's friend over the last three to five years i mean. Do you remember when the iphone was the iphone and apple silly branding where they don't call it an iphone or the iphone. They just call it iphone. You remember when that actually made sense because there was only one iphone. Well that's been dead forever like her lineup. Let's let's pull this up. Let's let's pull this up ladies and gentlemen apple. The apple dot com. Okay wait yes. It was something i was going to screen share. Okay where is it if it was the shroud thing okay. It doesn't matter the point. Is those pull up. Apple dot com so under iphone. You've got iphone. Twelve pro two different sizes iphone twelve two different sizes iphone se. I eleven iphone. Ten are and then you've got this this compare feature so you've gotta you've gotta compare feature because there's so many iphones you need a feature specifically to figure out which how much iphone is enough for you and be clear. I'm not saying that it's a terrible idea or anything to have you know of lots of iphones available for your customers. I'm just saying that. That wasn't apples. Traditional approach with the iphone. The idea was that when you bought an iphone you were getting this this curated this validated experience way. It was something to do with the model y video. I think it doesn't matter over. I'm over it so what's happening. Then is that from lake from whether it's from a developer perspective or a user perspective. The iphone is changing. Currently you can get iphones with all kinds of different sizes all kinds of different capabilities. I mean it wasn't that long ago that you could still get actually no. You can still get an iphone with a touch touch. Id home button like that is. That is a fundamentally very different experience compared to the current paradigm which is motion and excuse me motion. Just your control and using face. Id so two. Three years ago. I would have said no. There's no way that apple that if there's that if there's no way they're going to bring out like a completely separate model of folding iphone now i'm looking at it going. There's no way that they don't because apple if anything has shown themselves to be extremely conservative about forcing their users to change unless they've offered a compelling upgrade option so for example the iphone se still kicking around for people who want touch id and who want a physical button iphone. Twelve mini is something that they finally brought out to address the need free from users for a smaller one. Hannibal iphone and they're very tactical about the way that they do these things they will. They will wait three to four years which they know is a reasonable upgrade cycle for like a non enthusiast. And then they'll go okay. Have we managed to get these guys to upgrade. No all right okay all right. Let's do it. Let's do it. Let's let's continue. Let's continue to support this segment of our customer base. So there's no way that they're just going to bring in a folding iphone and replace the iphone pro. I i don't. I don't buy it but then again i would have also said there's no way they're just going to completely remove touch. Id and say okay. It has to face idea you want high end. You wanna new iphone iphone. That's it you're done. You're out so i kind of talked myself out of it. Maybe maybe the iphone folding iphone fold or whatever they end up calling definitely won't call it that because galaxy full got to come up with a new name. So maybe yeah. Maybe the i fold will replace high end but i i don't know man. It was a yeah. I'm kind of on each side because they don't normally introduce a feature this big without making a sweeping change but they have also been trending in the direction of more phones and more large feature differences between the phone. So i could see them going in either direction.

Apple Foxconn Factory Shenzhen China
Voice AI 2020 Year in Review with Botmock, Matchbox.io, and Willowtree

The Voicebot Podcast

05:38 min | 4 months ago

Voice AI 2020 Year in Review with Botmock, Matchbox.io, and Willowtree

"So sarah. Why don't you give a quick introduction for What you're doing We can talk about your rebranding to if you want. But maybe that's for another day. But i'll just tell people about what you do and and how you came to be here today. Yes i'm the chief content officer at matchbox i. Oh and we are the brands behind a twenty voice. Applications on amazon alexa. Google assistant in samsung bixby and this past year. We've branched out into podcast website and mobile app as well got it perfect. Okay brielle hide. I am real. I am box head of product so my entire career has been kind of at the intersection of design language technology and we have an interactive canvas with drag oxes for anyone to create Choctaw waste at or an yards. Look so he's reading here today. But i'm glad to have you do your second appearance. And the voice podcast. Thank you rod and what we are podcast movement. A couple years ago to be us. Tell us about you. Yeah i hate to be as dangle. I'm the ceo of willow tree. We are a digital strategy design and development company helping clients like fox. Cbs hbo Synchrony bank schwab at jones etc with their apps in their websites. We believe voices the next big thing in the next two three years we think all those websites and apps are going to be voice powered. I've been working in digital and specifically around voice for a long time. I i got exposed to voice when i was at. Aol in the late nineties. I worked on the tell me acquisition which was one of the early really lay in ninety eight ninety nine. Yeah i remember. I remember driving home from from dulles to dc in testing out playing. You could play a black you could call in and play blackjack on a voice at the time right. Yeah yeah we've had a lot of tell the alums On the voice about podcasts. Over the last couple of years. So that's great. I didn't know you had that experience all right. So let's talk about the urine review. That's what we want to talk about. Twenty twenty twenty what happened. What didn't happen I think both things are probably true. It's been a strange year But it's also been dynamic urine voice. Here we'll start with you. Because i think there might be an interesting angle here. I assume the biggest story and voice this year is co vid because it's the biggest story at everything maybe not the big story invoice. We'll see But we should talk about covid and let's let's talk about the global pandemic. Did it change anything for you. What you saw in the industry at the time that we were sort of just entering into this and has that persisted is it still is. Is it the same difference as it anew. Difference is back to normal. What do you think yes or. The world changed trait in march. I mean we're all in a different place than we were thinking about. Voice applications thinking about hard portfolio in specific specifically at matchbox. So we saw right away when everyone. The entire world went into lockdown that the usage of voice applications shifted so during the week monday through friday pre covid. We had like peaks monday through friday. Seven am seven pm. Those were like the certain applications the the main peaks of usage. And then over the weekend it would be kind of spread out throughout the day But once everyone went into lockdown we started seeing that weakened usage throughout the entire week and it was slightly increased usage. stickiness increased as well So that was really interesting. There wasn't a massive spike. Everyone was talking about. Oh everyone's going to be at home and there's gonna be no smart speaker. Usage is going to dramatically spike. We didn't necessarily a huge spike. But we did see overall an increase in usage that persisted. Is it been the similar. Did we go back to normal higher different. Yeah it's persisted since since march and it'll be interesting. You want everyone at home and i know. Excuse me i know is gonna have to take a drink here in a second. Sorry sorry i know. As as vaccine becomes more available race and people star we all start coming out of lockdowns and people start returning to their their free cove lives. I think will see another shift. And as people start their commutes again we had a lot of discussions right before kobe. Hit with in-car experiences like talking with different manufacturers and that kind of thing in-car experiences and that's all been on hold and i expect once commute. Start up. I think we're going to see a really interesting spike. In use cases they're

Schwab Sarah Samsung Dulles Amazon CBS AOL FOX Google DC Kobe
Help: My Toddler Is Waking Up Way Too Early

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

03:53 min | 6 months ago

Help: My Toddler Is Waking Up Way Too Early

"Help. My two year old used to sleep from seven to seven. it was glorious. We recently had to start quarantining again due to exposure at my job since then she started waking up earlier and earlier. We pushed her bedtime back to seven thirty. But it hasn't made a difference this morning. She was up at five thirty. I was thinking about one of those clocks with the lightner room. But i'm not sure she would understand that yet. Help okay rachel here to help. I am an expert on early rising small children because i was a fellow sufferer eight. Am was often nap time for my youngest child. Whoever that was and me to go back to bed at eight. Am after a full morning. So i kind of think like some kids are just like this and there are things you can do and then you have to do them again but there are a bunch of tricks that helped along the way for me so help. Some of these will work for you. I was going to suggest pushing her bedtime back. You did that already. It's not working doesn't necessarily work right like if you're changing circadian rhythm it could push it later but it might actually push it earlier as sounds like may have happened in this case. I mean something's happened right. Some knob has turned to make her start getting up at five thirty. So i think what you need to do first is sort of reset the knobs and then start moving them one at a time. You're quarantining andy. With the bedtime later and there is a state savings time. There's a couple of different things happening. So put things back the way they were to the extent. That's possible and then the quarantining say the only knob that's different. I think it's interesting that you highlighted that because it could be right. I'm wondering what's the possible connection between the changing your routine and the change in her sleep is she not getting as much sunshine as she was. Is there not as much physical activity. Were there sort of routines and signifier in her day. When you were more out and about that you can put back in or add in a different way. You know if she had snack every day at two pm and a little bit of quiet time on the couch when she came back from seeing her little friend. Can you still sort of put those routines in place. So she has the sort of same signposts as she goes through her day. You ask about the alarm clock and wonder if she's too young. Yes i do think too can be too young for some of the alarm clocks that have suns and moons and have oh was slowly dawning daylight all that stuff. You can try them. The best alarm clock for me in the situation was one that i made myself for my kids. I had an old school digital alarm clock like you can get at the drugstore with the digital numbers. I put a piece of paper covering the minute numbers because those are not information that a two three year old can use so you just saw the hour so they just saw the five or the six again. they don't know what the five of the six is. that doesn't matter. And then. I drew on the piece of paper that if it was a a five. You know that we're squared off five digital clock that that was a picture i did a picture of a moon sleeping and then if there was a six it was a picture of the son waking up so that my child again twos a little young two and a half heading for three. You can start to show that to them and say oh. Look at that when you see this shape. It means it's nighttime. When you see this shape it means it's time to wake up to probably too young three starting to get but all of that stuff was easier for my kid than trying to read this clock. That was slowly. Changing from one thing. To another darkness is very important and a little ones room. That's waking up too early to forget that x for the time being. You need it as dark as possible.

Rachel Andy
How to market Blockchain with Itai Elizur from MarketAcross

Bitcoin Radio

04:11 min | 6 months ago

How to market Blockchain with Itai Elizur from MarketAcross

"And partner at a marketing agency will actually to marketing agencies under the same roof when it's called inbound junction. Still active in historically into the bbc asked base. I'm a marketer for about more than ten years in the b. two b. safe-space which is very big in israel of work tel aviv based agency and about four five years ago we were getting pretty big fintech space and some are bigger and better partners in israel talks about about the growing space into my partners very early investors and bitcoin lost a lot of money in mccormack's ended just kind of opened a sister agency called market across and started working with projects. We were very active. In the seal boom downs of jean-ann we've matured with industry today. We are a full stack marketing agency working with a lot of big macs. How does marketing. How does marketing. For blockchain and crypto. How does that differ. 'cause said you're kind of doing both sides you have under one roof. How what's the. What's the core. Differences remark integration question. I would say lease the first generation of projects that i was part of thousands of so there. I always say that i think blockchain is over. Pr and marketed. Because there were actual products it was more of misstatements ideas and most of these eight based protocols again you know. You don't have a big city on the website of sign up or purchase. Or whatever. So very different from classical. I would say. Vw marketing which has literally a conversion point. Put something in relics alright optimizing towards a funnel or something like that. So i would think that that is the most core core difference between product marketing and more i would say branding and marketing and maybe even assisting fundraising style marketing. That's i think the core difference. And i think the other one would be today about. There's just so much charity very fast. So when you go to the other part which our product will be a wallet in exchange. Whatever you have environments where there's fifty or sixty comes king in two three years and it's so hard to differentiate especially for a marketer to try convey that message so i think that's how it this is so new and it kind of there. There are some leaders in some spots in the sphere. But but still. Is that a big issue. This this problem differentiation. Where we're as a marketer. You have to single out. You know you're trying to take your client and say this is why they're different but is the customer. The customer base even knowledgeable enough about about the technology that you could differentiate easily here. That's a that's a great question. So let's different you between i would say Based protocols and technology and then products like exchangeable so when people who come to us again mostly developers or developers in the blockchain space are very very techy. Maybe don't come from a business or marketing background. They'll come to us and say oh you know my network goes to eleven speed or whatever and you're in me as a marketer i'm gonna say right but what's on the block you know how many people transactions are actually processing so in. That's a. that's a big gap between when people want to sell the technical capabilities and want to say all right the me as a marketer pr person at least today people much more wanna see about adoption. So that's like. I think i'm the tech level where you need to go and say all right you're not gonna talk about triple charting. Whatever because that's not really the main thing had to bring that chored usable business use case and when it comes to product marketing and it's also a bit together. I think it's kind of like schilling. Is is great outside but when sit inside the strategy. That doesn't look right. there's a lot of exchanges. What's different about this other than you know. Argos secrete the easiest platform okay. Great but right now in other space would you giving people what's different in. How do you play on. That really executive could be the non. Kyc concept could be the fiat pairings. It could be a really good mobile interface. But we're in that place already. Were ordinary place where people are discussing that not just stating we're going to build a the nicest exchange so I think we're an industry. That's moving in the marketing. Space from wall want will ken to like our is in doing. So that's for me like my biggest mission with my clients. It's really trip. Notch it down from the potential to what's actually

Blockchain Israel Bitcoin Mccormack Tel Aviv BBC VW Schilling Argos
How to Grow Your Podcast with Benjamin Shapiro

Edge of the Web

04:32 min | 6 months ago

How to Grow Your Podcast with Benjamin Shapiro

"Plus introduce our listeners to Benjamin Benjamin. Shapiro is the host of the Martic and voices search podcast his to his property drive over one hundred, thousand downloads, reach tens of thousands of marketers, each and every month Kudos for that. That's huge success on your podcast but Benjamin's also brand development brand development and marketing strategy consultant that actually left a successful career in business development at Ebay where I think you're there for two thousand, five to two, thousand, twelve something like that was like two lifetimes. I feel like was in college twice their. super-senior. But then if you jumped into bootstrap to start up with multiple marketing teams at an early stage, VC bat companies, and then you're doing independent consulting and content business and most specializing in helping growth stage companies understand how to identify the overlap between corporate identity and customer needs to build an effective marketing strategy. So welcome to the show, sir. It's It's great to be here. Excited to to chat. Absolutely well, we certainly we wanted to get you on the show certainly do appreciate the time you gave us on your show. He had a show about a month ago talking about some of what we do here on the edge on the different content curation but we wanted to continue further the conversation on our show because there's a lot of substantial information when it comes down to podcasting growth and monetization of podcasts and I had to get you on. We have a longer form show that I wanted to pin you down. He can't unplug zoom. We're going to have you here for a good solid amount time. Good. No, I'm here I'm ready I'm excited to continue our conversation. Honors. Appreciate it. You've got to major podcast that you have out there. That's the march and the voices of search. So how? This, we're a little bit more background. How did your podcasts come to be? Yeah, it goes back to the consulting business that I started I kind of flamed out of running the marketing department for vc back startups and I just got tired of what I was doing. There's ton of pressure You know not a lot of equity, not a lot of compensation when you're working at these early stage, Silicon Valley vc back startups and just hoping that you know your ship will come in five years and I just got tired of it. So stepped away and started. Just helping people figure out there marketing foundation and had a setup marketing channels really understanding. What a brand is about, and then their customers aren't trying to find the overlap between the two of them. Did it relatively successfully, but I started hit a ceiling after being a consultant for. Two three years. And I needed to go expand my professional network. Because I'd spent three years kind of going through and trying to work with the people that I already had relationships with. It's just running out of people. So I started a content play to try to booster, boost my my consulting practice and that's where the Mar Tech podcast came out and it was meant to build brand authority for the consulting practice make some new networking connections. and. I, never really thought it was going to be anything more than just a marketing experiment and after three months, we had like three or four thousand downloads and I decided to keep some of the chips on the table and instead of trying to sell people on consulting services, I just kept trying to grow the audience and. Buyer eleventh month, we were over ten thousand downloads and started trying to sell sponsorship so. The I guess, the end of the story is the consulting practice I was running at up getting eaten by the podcast created to promote it from the content itself, which was a great story because it's a rarity that type of content production really takes fire, right? I didn't think I'd be in the media business which has hopefully helped me figure out how to marketed has well, Mary Go. Being asked from a consulting standpoint more often than not to talk about podcasting as a legitimate medium for content production. Yeah. I don't really do a consultant in the same capacity used to was about you know interviewing people in an organization understanding how they should describe themselves as your customer were and then communicating that cultivating marketing channels and now the only real consulting work is more. To how do I get my podcast setup? How do I think about growth and so I do a little advisory work but honestly. Pretty busy just trying to grow our own shows and we're kind of playing around with the podcast network idea expanding into creating more content some pretty focused on content production monetization myself to helping other people

Benjamin Benjamin Consultant Shapiro Strategy Consultant VC Ebay Mary Go
Data Alone Is Not Enough: The Evolution of Data Architectures

a16z

05:28 min | 6 months ago

Data Alone Is Not Enough: The Evolution of Data Architectures

"Hi and welcome to the a sixteen e podcast. I'm DOS, data, data data. It's long been a buzzword in the industry whether big data, streaming data, data, analytics, data science even ai and machine learning but data alone is not enough. It takes an entire system of tools and technology to extract value from data. A multibillion dollar industry has emerged around these data tools and technologies and was so much excitement and innovation in the space. It raises the question how exactly do all these tools together This podcast featuring Ali Goatee, the CEO and founder of data bricks explores the evolution of data architectures including some quick history where they're going and surprising use case for streaming data as well as always take on how he'd architect the picks and shovels that handle data and ten today. Joining Ali this hallway style jam is a sixteen see General Partner Martinez. Casado who with other a sixteen the enterprise partners just published a series of blueprints for the modern data stack. You can find that as well as other pieces on building a businesses the empty promise of data moats and more at a sixteen dot com backslash mfl economics. In this conversation, we start with holly answering the question. How did we arrive at the set of data tools we have today Starting eighties, business leaders were kind of flying blind, not knowing how the business were doing waiting for finance to close the books and data warehousing paradigm came about they said, look we have all this data in these operational data systems. Why don't we just all that data would take it out of all of these systems transform into some place. Let's call data house and. Then, we can get business intelligence on that data and it was just a major transformation because now you have dashboard, you could know how your product is selling by region by skew by geography and that itself has created at least twenty billion dollar market that has been around for quite a few decades. Now, what about ten years ago? This technology started seeing some challenges? One more and more data types like video and audio started coming out, and there's no way you can store any of that in did our houses second they were on prem big boxes that you have to buy and the couple of storage and compute. Kim really expensive to scale them up and down, and the third thing was people wanted to do more and more machine learning ai on his data sets. They saw that we can ask future looking questions, which are my customers charn which my. Products are going to sell which campaigns should it be offering to who? So then the data leak came about ten years ago and idea was here's really cheap storage, dump all your data here and you can get all those insights and it turns out just dumping all your data in a central location. It's hard to make sense out of that data that sitting there and as a result, what people are doing now is they're taking subsets of that data moving into classic data warehouses in the cloud. So we ended up with an architectural maths stats inferior to what we had ladies go. We have data in two places and they don't make ended that or house or the stale mass, and the recent sees not great in the last two three years. There's some really interesting technological breakthroughs. That actually now are enabling a new kind of design pattern. We referred to it as the Lake House and idea is what if you could actually be able to do bi that rightly on your knowledge and what if you could do your reporting directly on your radio and your data science and your machine learning straight up on the data link I would love to tease apart a few things that have led us here. You know this is very clearly a large existing data warehouse market behind. And you know it's typified by people using sequel on structured data. Like the Emily, a use case is a little bit different than the analytics use case right the case it's normally human beings that are looking pash boards in making decisions where the. Use Case, you're creating these models and those models are actually put into production and they're part of the product they're doing pricing. They're doing fraud detection to underwriting, etc.. The analytics market is an existing buying behavior and existing customer MLA is an emerging market and so. The core question is, are we actually seeing the emergence of multiple markets order this one market? Well, there are big similarities and there are big differences. and. Let's start with similarities roughly the same data. is needed for both there's no doubt when it comes to a and machine learning a lot of the secret sauce, you'll get those. Results predictions comes with augmenting your data with additional Meta data that you have. In some sense we have the same data and you're asking questions don't differences. One is backwards looking future looking but other than that a lot of it is the same and you want to do the same kind of things with the data you want to sort of repair it WanNa have it so that you can make sense of it. If you have structural problems with your data that actually causes also problems for machine learning, actually the difference today is that. It's line of business as typically doing a and they'll science or hardcore rnd whereas housing and be I oftentimes sits in it users of the data warehouse into Beatles, our data analysts, business analysts, and machine learning. We have the all scientists machine learning engineers. We have machine learning scientists. So the personas different and it sits in a different place in the organization and those people have different backgrounds and they have different requirements on the product using today.

Ali Goatee Lake House KIM Fraud Martinez General Partner Emily CEO Founder
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 7 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Shocking ICE Abuse of Women Includes Forced Sterilization

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:56 min | 8 months ago

Shocking ICE Abuse of Women Includes Forced Sterilization

"ICE detention center in Georgia is reportedly the site of a mass involuntary sterilization project. A whistle a report published by the nonprofit project south alleges that launched numbers of migrant women held the Irwin County Detention Center, a privately run facility that imprisons undocumented immigrants received hysterectomies that they did not want an which were not medically necessary. The allegations reported project south were I made in a formal complaint by a nurse working at the detention center dorn wooden who describes the conditions there and conversation she had with imprisoned women in detail. The hysterectomies were all allegedly performed by the same outside gynecologist, Mahendra a amine of Douglas Georgia wooden said that one migrant woman referred to. As the Uterus Collector Ameen said that he'd only done one to hysterectomies in the past two, three years responding to the allegations he said everything is wrong and urged reporters to talk to the hospital administrator for more information. The women say they will not told why they were having hysterectomies with some saying they were given conflicting reasons for the procedures reprimanded when about them WHITTEN's account in the project south report was corroborated by two lawyers who said that four women in the facility whom they represent that had been sterilized without medical 'cause and without their consent according to the project South report a detained woman at the Owen County Center said when I met all these women who had surgeries I thought this was like an experimental concentration camp it's like they were experimenting without bodies. As horrific as the allegations are, it's not likely that either the Owen county officials or Dr Amine were experimenting more likely than you exactly what they were doing. In the early twentieth, century White American intellectuals pioneers of race science advancing the idea that undesirable traits could and should be bred out of the population with government planning and selective involuntary sterilization programs. These programs we use to enforce via state law the racist fiction of America as a white country and forced sterilization disproportionately targeted black women. Forced sterilizations like the ones that happen to women of the Irwin County sent him and two women throughout the nation during the twentieth century, a first and foremost human rights violations, cruel abridgement of those women's dignity autonomy and rights to self-determination. But they also statements of white supremacists hostility an assertion by white racists of the thing they most hate and fear. New Americans of color.

Irwin County Detention Center Dr Amine Irwin County Owen County Center ICE Uterus Collector Ameen Owen County Georgia Douglas Georgia Whitten Mahendra Administrator America
Warren Buffett and the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting

Stansberry Investor Hour

12:16 min | 1 year ago

Warren Buffett and the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting

"Okay. Let's talk about Warren Buffett and his comments at the Berkshire hathaway meeting. He talked for over four hours so I might not be able to get to everything in fact. I'm just going to get to a few topics that really stood out. And this is by the way. If you haven't listened to it you can go listen to it just Google Berkshire Hathaway shareholder meeting yacht. Yahoo Finance has it and you can find it on Youtube. And it's worth it. It's worth listening to Warren Buffett. Talk for four hours. Once a year it really is even if you disagree with every syllable that comes out of his mouth. It's still worth listening to. So I think one of the really big perhaps the biggest topic that he covered couple of weeks ago he became public that he started selling his position in the Airlines. And he put one slide up the beating that showed the first quarter purchases of equity securities by Berkshire hathaway including buying back their own stock but they made investments in equities of fourbillion. They sold two point two billion of equities and they bought back a billion seven of their own stock not really huge numbers for Berkshire but then he put up a slide. That showed in the month of April because the first quarter ends March thirty first right month of April purchases of equity securities. Four hundred twenty six million peanuts nothing for Berkshire. He was asked about it. He couldn't even remember what it was and he said I might not have done. It might have been you know. His his top capital allocation lieutenants. Ted In todd. He bought bags zero stock. We'll talk about that in a little bit and sold in the month of April alone. Six and a half billion including all the rest of the airline stocks okay. Why did he do this? Well he he put up a slide and he said you know it was not one hundred percent that's six and a half billion was not one hundred percent of what we sold in April. But you knows mostly mostly airlines said. I made a mistake and he went through the history of the position and if you look at the filings. He started buying these things in late. Two Thousand Sixteen. He said we paid. Oh I don't know seven or eight. Billion couldn't even remember how much to own ten percent of the four largest airlines starting at that time and then into two thousand seventeen you kept by and he figured that for seven or eight billion. He was getting a billion dollars worth of earnings that he thought was likely to go up over time and at that time he did an interview with. Becky quick of CNBC. And he said the airlines have had a bad century and they've had like over one hundred bankruptcies and it's been terrible and they've consolidated into four big ones. That are doing pretty well etcetera etcetera. And you know we want a piece of it and those four those top four American United Delta and southwest accounted for like eighty percent of the domestic airline capacity. So right there. It sort of felt to him. It seems like when he bought the railroads who had been through. I don't know about a difficult century. But yeah pretty pretty tough time over the past decades before he bought and then turned into a pretty good bet because they had consolidated down they had been through restructurings same type of a situation and they had some pricing power to and I remember hearing about that idea from the guys at allegany well run insurance company PUBLICLY COMPANY TICKER SYMBOL. Why the letter? Y and was by when Burlington northern was like I don't know twelve bucks a share or share or something like that maybe even cheaper and Buffett bought the whole thing of Burlington northern for one hundred dollars a share so late to the party but still thought it was a good bet and same thing he said we treated it mentally as if we were buying a business meaning as we were buying one hundred percent of a whole business and if you've heard him talk over the years they liked to buy one hundred percent of the business they liked by as much as they can once they liked to sing and like the hold it forever. That's their favorite thing to do. And you know this look like an equity position that he might hold effectively forever and he said you know the companies were well managed and all that stuff but now he blew out the whole position when the whole world he sold into weakness right. This is the guy who says be greedy when others are fearful while he's fearful when others are fearful because he's not buying anything and he sold this massive position and is not spending any of his giant hundred and thirty billion dollar pile of cash. So that's kind of unusual. And he said the airline business. I'll just quote a few little things he says. The airline Business Blah Blah Blah. I think it changed in a very major way is obviously changed. And he said these four companies are going to borrow tenor. Twelve billion. Each in some cases they're having to sell stock or the right to buy stock that takes away from the upside then a little bit after that he said. I don't know the two three years from now. That people will fly as many passenger miles as they did last year. In Twenty nineteen so in other words this business has changed so much and these companies are so deeply impaired that it makes no sense for him to continue to hold the equities. He's held things through bet. He's a publicly traded companies through bankruptcy. At least one right. Us G it was an unusual bankruptcy situation. So this really tells you. The buffet thinks that people have changed their their travel. Habits have changed and they're not gonna fly as much even when things are all opened up and who knows one would think over this time period. He's talking about two three years. Whatever that the corona virus will be a thing of the past? Nobody's worrying about it anymore. You know we'll see but I just thought it was really interesting that you know we find buffet just being really fearful not deploying capital and blowing out this position into weakness having bought it in the first place. I've never recommended an airline stock in extreme value. And I never will and I was shocked when he did it and I always wonder like how how going to work out but you know obviously not too well so the airlines and I here where he's coming from because the airlines I read today. One article said they're burning ten billion monthly as as an industry. And you know they've already gotten something like fifty billion and bail out. There's another there's more money that they're going after under this. Cares Act Law. That was passed but united like they got five billion bucks and only one and a half billion. That was alone. The other three and a half billion was a grant grant. Yeah you've heard me money. Just taxpayer money just given to the airlines. And of course they put stipulations on this thing but they've already found the loophole and the stipulation was. You can't fire anybody you gotTa keep all your employees and you can't reduce anybody's hourly pay or you can't reduce anybody salary right and I think you can't even buy back stock and other things. But they found a loophole. And you might have heard it already. And they're reducing people's hours. They don't pay them less per hour but they pay them less by reducing their hours which you know as a business move makes sense with dramatically reduced demand for this service but I can understand how nobody would want to get involved with the airlines. Who knows if the equity value is going to be anything like what it is right now impaired as it is. Let's talk about buybacks? Buffet talked about buybacks. He didn't buy back any shares in April at all they bought back a billion seven in the first quarter which is really nothing for them and basically the important tidbit here. Is that the stock to him. He says was no more compelling around two hundred and fifty thousand share than it was when he was buying it back at three hundred thousand share. What does that mean? Well it means exactly what you think. It means. It means the intrinsic value of Berkshire Hathaway's impaired at least that amount like roughly seventeen percent. I believe that is so or more bright. If it's not compelling at either a at two hundred fifty thousand no more so than than it was thirty or three hundred thousand. That's a big deal. And he also mentioned in the same breath telling you why he wasn't buying the shares back in the same breath. He mentioned the option value of cash. Right I it other words. I'd rather hold onto my cash than by back my stock seventeen percent off where I was buying back before. Wow so he did this whole thing. He started out with this whole long thing about never bet against America and he went all through history and all this stuff and he's got a great knowledge of history. It was fun to listen to it but he says all this stuff about don't bet against America in the long term and that was another thing he kept doing. Saint don't bet against long-term but he constantly throughout his talk and answering questions. He was constantly differentiating from the long term. Bet and the nearer term couple years to three years. What does that tell you that tells you that? He thinks that we are not out of the woods yet. And you can't call him barish but he's nothing like bullish. Some investors Whitney Tilson commented. He was part of the presentation and he commented said you know he went and he thought it was raining. Gold in March when the market was getting absolutely obliterated buffet obviously did not think it was raining. Gold Okay. That's really interesting. So they bought by zero in April. You know. That's that's the evidence there he said I would rather be holding my cash. And he also talked about the general idea of buying back stock because he was asked about it one of the shareholders sentence a question about it and he framed it in a really good way that. I think I think you need to hear about. He said imagine that we were just partners. In a business you know fuel vessel. Each put in a certain amount of money in the business does well over time and goes up in value and you know after many years of success one of us wants to take money out of the business. Well if your partner came to send that you say well. That's perfectly reasonable and a way to do that would be for the other partners to buy a little bit of stake and so you know. Maybe he owns thirty three percent. Let's say there are three of you and and he sells a little bit and after that hill own thirty percent or something and you you know then you'll each own a little bit more right. So that's the way he looks at share repurchases as an individual partner can choose. An individual shareholder can choose. Whether or not they WANNA participate and sell the shares whereas if he issued a dividend. It's you're forcing cash down everyone's throat and they get hit with taxes and you're taking money out of the business off the table right. I thought that was pretty interesting. And he's like he doesn't buy any of the political what he calls political correctness about share repurchases. He's a most people do them wrong. He said that consistently for a long time. You have to do them right and the right way to do it is the buy it back in a discount to the intrinsic value and he even said. You won't always be right when you're doing that. You'll make mistakes and doing that but you should still do it that way. And the steak is probably you know. He bought it back at a higher price. A billion seven worst and then he refused buy back in a lower price so he might have even talk about his own mistake and buying shares back but over time the right thing to do is buy it back at a discount. And you know you'll be right enough. If you do it over a period of many years I found all that really intriguing. Him telling US why he didn't buy back the stock and he mentioned specifically that he said you know for example.

Berkshire Hathaway Warren Buffett Partner Berkshire Google Burlington Youtube Yahoo Finance Ted In Todd Fourbillion Cnbc American United Delta Buffet Whitney Tilson America Becky Buffett
Increase Your Visibility Using Videos - Susan Ibitz

Daily Sales Tips

03:26 min | 1 year ago

Increase Your Visibility Using Videos - Susan Ibitz

"Negotiation and everyday life. She's got a great way of describing what she does so. I'll let her do that and then get into today's tip. Hi Allison. Ap's Emma Behavior. Hackers and people had computers. I had humans. I work in cells but not the training the classic cells. I use behavior in science to apply to selling so today. We WanNA talk about video you know about linking has more than five hundred million active users fifty nine percent of the people we elect to see a video rather them read an article. One medium videos are uploaded online every sicken ninety percent of the client research online before to buy not only the product. They going to be researching you chew. Eighty percent of the content. All Line is video. Bedia share align about a product accompany can increase the respond from costumers and seventy five percent. I was reading an article a couple weeks ago and says the we never have so many realtor websites and you know what still nine percent of the people want to interact with the human when they need to buy a house white by an ascend emotional process. If you buy a house if you buy insurance for your family if you buy a car those are buying who has to do with emotions related to that. Now we're talking about videos now how we do do videos in order to attract costumers instead. Repel them point one. Show your hands your hands. As differs thing the people is GonNa pay attention so when you are focusing Camera to do a video to pose. Make sure the camera start in the top of your head and n around your umbilical cord. So your hands can be seen used your hands to emphasize number one. Two three years your fingers when you token abou a big idea. Use Your hands to to quantify this big idea another thing be really careful what you have on the back between content and Quality People Still GonNa be appreciating content but when the content is good and the background is as good as the content. People is GonNa stay longer one of the algorithm that Youtube have is that they promote you if people stay longer and you're so if you WANNA make a call of action make sure to do it at the end of your video. Make sure what you have on the bathroom for most about who work from home. That's my case too. But we do is. We are facing something that make us happy but we not content. What we have on the background. So USA Green screen used occurred and use something who's neutral so people can be concentrated on you. Mvp sure when you are recording your readers and you do it in your house. Put a post on the door saying we are recording. Please be

Emma Behavior Allison AP Youtube MVP
AI vs. Coronavirus: How artificial intelligence is now helping in the fight against COVID-19

KIRO Nights

05:38 min | 1 year ago

AI vs. Coronavirus: How artificial intelligence is now helping in the fight against COVID-19

"With you our special guest tonight Cyrus a parcel of the A. I. organization happens to be a security professional which specialties include emerging threats anti terrorism human organ trafficking smart technology bio digital programming artificial intelligence and social media manipulation and there's lots of that he is the author of a number of books including his most recent which is artificial intelligence danger to humanity and he has brought a massive lawsuit to the front steps of the tech giant's Cyrus welcome to the program looking forward to this thank you George thank you for having me on what a time for you to be on all my gosh I mean you've been hearing the stories of these corona virus scares what's your take on this because you some more touch on it in a very interesting way in your book artificial intelligence well I I turn to the bio disease that that potentially hazardous to the entire human race and also connect to the possibility that the Chinese government no labs working with community is in other animals trying to make human stem cells with with animals animation from irises so this is one of the threats I put in initially I investigated over one thousand artificial intelligence biometric by engineering cybernetics and company that relate to robotics and five G. had bought five hundred what Chinese companies station out of time but had that had platforms and and have offices all over the world can US six hundred US or western companies which many concluded of American companies and European companies and some companies that go around Australia New Zealand I concluded my first book published it was called the action China and the weaponization of a box of five G. which is actually in that it was in this book artificial intelligence to Mandy I concluded that the world's citizens are in danger view China's big tech all world citizens and in stages not just in one shot but in stages suits by engineering cybernetics they I. threats and mainly walk away so far away is your gas probably know they have more than three billion people servicing all around one hundred seventy countries there and they were attempting to take over the world and still did a I. systems digital infrastructure quickness five G. system so you have full control over China the Far East you have the Middle East you have Africa and then you know Europe and you would have America's well if we did make some initiatives past two three years so in initial phase it would have been total surveillance and maybe in or million despotic dictatorship but then what all the misuse of Hey I and then this lab experiments they do that by engineering cybernetics that in itself threatens all the world citizens so the guilty parties a train coming through gene that being said there's negligence and and misuse whether big tech companies and one of the founders CEOs so I've been trying to get the word out for six or seven months I got a few networks I really appreciate you having me on and what time yes my gosh absolutely and in China are they is devious has a lot of people think because Cyrus more more so than so I I lived in China for almost a year in the year two thousand I live in the mountains with five remarks and I got to know the Chinese people when I went to the city's not have friends I have to have a network of Chinese coast to coast around the entire world and I I probably have maybe fourteen hundred numbers in my phone and he's a good one and also meet look we grew up in communist China in nineteen forty nine it took over the country the massacre a lot of people intellectuals and scholars detective of the property owners to talk everyone and they put them in camps and during the course of their history of seven years it's been a a process of rape murder conjugation caps and setting up that the pope or the communist regime and the people were deprived of all ethics and morality and there are tough to struggle so we have a system like that is controlled by one dictatorship which the pork barrel and you have one point five billion people fighting for that very limited resources limited jobs you have to dissect a jungle psych wards do you have to basically be a person become a professional liar you have to be good at sections and beans devious and the Chinese government dear dear dear regime and their leaders right shrewdly DDS and shrews screaming clever they can put one past the smartest intelligence agents we have but now they've been catching up the past few years has been a lot of arrests in the U. S. and so we're making a change but unfortunately it was a little bit too late in the summer cars as as everyone has seen the moment it seems iris that their government seems geared to all kinds of technology that would infringe on our rights spy on us and do all kinds of things in the end by reading your book artificial intelligence dangers to humanity I got that in a big way that that's what the Chinese are doing correct so do something so I put in the future that can happen the five G. is not built for human beings people don't know that it's made for

Walmart reports lower-than-expected Q4 earnings, despite e-commerce sales growth of 35%

MarketFoolery

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Walmart reports lower-than-expected Q4 earnings, despite e-commerce sales growth of 35%

"Walmart's fourth quarter profit and revenue came in a little lower than expected. And am I the only one who looked at this report and was reminded of targets holiday quarter report because it kind of seemed like it wasn't bad it wasn't a train wreck but particularly the fact that video games and toy sales those segments for wall marked really dragged down the result more so than say e Commerce? Which was up another. Thirty five percent. Yeah I mean I do. I agree with what you're saying there. It made me think of target. Initially it also made me think of Amazon and really like Amazon really at a blowout holiday. Quarter the one thing I do think the difference between Walmart in target and I think the reason why the markets okay with this report basically flat. Yeah Yeah I mean I think really it is because of grocery I I think that when you look at the investments that Walmart made in grocery so long ago and I don't WanNa say skepticism. But maybe just sort of the furled eyebrows like. Is that really something that people want or is that? GonNa there was skepticism but there but now that's more than fifty percent of their. Us sales groceries. This is a grocery company in in so I think that's important because it's not very surprising to see the weakness and things like toys games and apparel very highly competitive markets in. We've we've certainly seen toys have been redefined just over the past decade thanks to technology. It's a bit of a different Market all together for that so I. I do think that they're strong. Presence in grocery helps to to mitigate any of the other weakness that we might see in a quarter like this and I mean it wasn't a week it was a little bit below expectations but I think there's enough to be optimistic optimistic about the you know toward the markets reacting to wait is today co. Doug Macmillan. I think deserves a lot of credit for a lot of different things and one of them is. I think he's just an above average communicator in terms of guidance. And also just in with this quarter alone. Just coming out and saying yeah. This wasn't our best and he in talking about e commerce. You see him. Start to ratchet that guidance back and saying look it's going to come in law. I would just point out that we've had. I don't know how many quarters in a row of Walmart growing their ECOMMERCE segment anywhere from the high teens to what we saw with this latest quarter. You know the mid thirty so even if that CO scales back its off of a much bigger base than it was two three years ago. Yeah I can't help but wonder if we won't see another acquisition at some point here maybe we will. Maybe we won't. I mean I do feel like they are. They're looking at this business more and more as an ECOMMERCE in a grocery play that also has everything else under the sun. I mean camps. Were were certainly below expectations. I think maybe the troubling part there it was because of transactions and average ticket I mean transactions in. Us stores were up one percent for the quarter. But I mean it was one half percent a year ago and An average ticket was was up less than one percent and I mean that was to two point six percent a year ago so I mean there were clearly some pressures they're in Walmart is is is a low margin business to begin with so you had to be really really aware of that kind of stuff. I mean I. I think you could be interesting to watch how I mean. I can't believe Mardi talking about this coming holiday season. But let's let's talk about that for a second because there is a big Gaming Console yes fresh cycle coming absolutely I do think there is Certainly potential therefore for them to to exceed expectations was he had the rest of the year goes but I mean you know this is a. This is a traditional retail story right. I mean if you look at Walmart I I always like making this comparison because it just tells you how the market views these different companies but walmart with a market cap of three hundred thirty five billion That's on five hundred twenty four billion dollars in sales and you look at Amazon which is now over one trillion dollars and that's off of two hundred eighty billion dollars in sales and so while Walmart grocery which is awesome grocery ain't aws in an producing those same kinds of margins and it never will But what grocery does is it keeps the traffic coming back and we're seeing more and more as this retail environment Sort of re reshapes itself Really the key is saying. Make sure you have people in those stores whether it's virtually or physically make sure you have people in those stores and grocery is one way to really really do that.

Walmart Doug Macmillan Amazon United States Mardi
Tottenham's Personnel Problem

Caught Offside

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Tottenham's Personnel Problem

"Have said repeatedly that. That in Tottenham 's heyday under pocchettino in their effort to really go for it. They remain static in terms of personnel. They didn't make any signings. which is obviously well documented? But what we've come to find out now is Perhaps more importantly they also didn't let anyone go no Christian Erickson. They wound up having to lose for maybe seventy million less than what they did a very poor job of recycling the squat and so with that thought in the back of my mind. I'm watching the game over the weekend. And and what am I seeing. I'm seeing ten Ganga in defense. Looked like as a young player who's been thrown into the fire with his first game against Liverpool. Now he's playing Against Man City. I'm seeing him play really well. I'm seeing a brand new signing like from a day earlier basically in Stephen Burt wine come over from. PSV and Score what was maybe Tottenham Best Goal of the season so far what proved to be the winner Against City all over the weekend. I'm seeing Tangy. And Don Malay- come off the bench and for whatever we want to say about him in terms of injuries things like that I still maintain that when this guy is playing and when he is healthy he looks I to me he is the player. Maybe more than anyone one on Tottenham that if I were buying stock in I'd buy stock in him I think he's exactly what they need and I love his game and then on seeing Giovanni Lo Celso who for the better part of maybe two weeks now has maybe looked like totten's best player. I just rattled off. Four guys there who are new to the squad and who looked like they could provide some sort of instant impact. If not necessarily the season these are young young players who in the next two three years are still reaching their prime. And you've got sawn popping up with a goal. Dot Veteran Center has in a veteran goalkeeper delivering. So I would say hey that wall they have clearly taken a step back Last season and into this season. There's no question about that Champions League run aside No you can. I really feel like I don't want to look too deeply into the outcome of one match but I really feel like in looking at some of these new players who are all very young twenty three and under I didn't even mentioned guys like Ryan Sesame on WHO's starting to get chances here and there who scored against Bayern Munich in the Champions League. You know I I feel like you can maybe start to see the seedlings of what we're talking about. When we you say you need to recycle your squad that this these new this next wave of young tottenham players are now being kind of like immersed with guys like Sun and Harry Wingspan Yeah and and Eldorado more established players and I think this is? This is what we've been saying they needed to do. Maybe two years ago. They're doing it language game. But it's still good that they're they're doing it. Now which are dearly departed parroted. Murchio wanted to do but wasn't allowed. We assume we that's what he was asked. That's what he told us he he wanted change you wanted to freshen things up. He didn't get the cycle that he wanted in You hit you see all that new still here. The manager and his post-match press conference talk about how he wants to bring in the centre forward someone who can release pressure They're kind of playing without a true one right now. Yeah So why do you go and buy a twenty two year old. Winger I mean I I mean totally normal question have have to believe that two things are true. They're a I. I've got to think that the market for a quality center forward. Who's good enough to unseat? You Know Lucas moral or son however it is you you were incorrect data. Maybe they didn't value him it would. I don't know but like I. I have to believe that the market for that is a little tighter. Considering during the emphasis on that position and that players have played that position. Well enough where they'll slide into a squad like Tottenham like okay. You can go get one but you're gonNA probably have to overpay. Look iced ICED. I think there's enough talent in this team to be and from what we've seen from the new signings looks it looks exciting it's just going to be markedly different from what has gone before and I wonder had virtual patches Hino being given such treasures. What would he have done with the team? That's that's the question I would have I would. He played Berg wine right away. I don't know maybe not believe given ten Ganga his first start against Liverpool. We don't want to speculate and I'm just. I'm just wondering with all this with with this talent. That Marino has what he does with it. Now is the key question for me but I'm Mike and also my fear.

Tottenham Murchio Liverpool Christian Erickson Dot Veteran Center Stephen Burt Ganga Champions League Marino Don Malay Giovanni Lo Celso Munich Ryan Sesame Totten Lucas Harry Mike
"two three years" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"two three years" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Last two three years compared to Pacquiao still gives you a fight and it's been entertaining so far tonight and at age forty and as I mentioned it's the noon hour in the Philippines so prime time weekend viewing you might say to watch the ageless one and it is a sell out MGM grand tonight about fourteen thousand Ireland Shane Lowry leads the British open by four strokes earlier in baseball the white Sox came back for an eleven inning win two one at Tampa Bay Yankees eleven five over Colorado the Rockies of lost six in a row Houston be Texas sixty one Texas has lost six in a row we're back in ten seconds but first a word from farmers at farmers insurance we know roof can withstand a lot one exception being an airborne car scene it covered it Dr farmers we are farmers well well well under it my for Mr for insurance exchange that affiliates price on available in every state angels of one six two eight Seattle suggest the Dodger game remaining two outs in the ninth at ten six lead over the Marlins and RT your Manser gonna have the NL rookie of the year this yeah Pete Alonso his thirty third home run of the season also saw somebody five RBIs yeah he wanted to start tonight he says I don't feel worn down but he wasn't a three for thirty slot can add the all star break so as a pinch hitter hits a three run Homer the giants today that was the FS one game this afternoon it's only July twentieth he has these offense of numbers and he has passed Darryl strawberry for the rookie franchise mark while ours and RBIs and he's got the most extra base hits by a rookie and again we're in July the Mets did have the rookie of the year five years ago with Jacob to grow and back in the eighties they had strawberry in good in back to back rookies of the year but yeah along what that's doing us now you know that right yeah and the standings well maybe the Mets will be the worst to first oh my goodness you just do whatever the Dodger game our you're asking a guy in Los Angeles if the Dennis archer game are you see I was gonna say are you joking with us no big deal but it is two outs in the ninth a ground ball the shortstop he picks it up Corey Seager a cigarette the easy for the first and the first baseman just drop the that's Max Muncie they're trying it first and he already had it all I mean I got a call they just drive to like popped out of his bed like a third grader part of the reason the Marlins came back is because he couldn't scoop a grounder from second base with their trying for the double play it's still going to school this was just a regular cats like played catch in the outfield that's the good and bad about the Dodge allowing players everybody to play at least two positions because you get the versatility and you still get the bats in the light but sometimes you gotta jock Peter cetera Max Muncie stuck at first all look at the look that up on Twitter of George could be viral in about ten seconds all not Philip as low as this again are you one of it by the river covered your wife the geico Fox Sports radio studios easy to say fifty percent aboard cartridge with guy go go to guy correct calmer give them a call one eight hundred nine four seven order the only hard part figuring out which way is easier all we're talking about worst to first we're talking about the end of C. R. on Twitter at Twitter it says if you're a New York Giants fan please sit down for the second year in a row Ortiz picked up the go from worst to first that's not good when he does that they would about five games like to thank the giants for participating in the twenty nineteen season I'll be ripping and if that wasn't true tore as you know that the answer a B. ripping who if what was in Red River that's row of if the giants fighting jigs the giants because I did pick up the goal from worst to first last year also a lot that to be a lot of good that that may well I was gonna say in your defense I mean there's only so many times they can go from worst to first but yeah I'm guessing every year it much in the same way that I've learned that you pick Arizona make the college football playoff every year I don't know if those your strongest takes to be perfectly honest I I know your fan but yeah Arizona's Prada making the playoffs this year and I'd look up what are the giants could go from worst to first I don't I well let's get to get to the other see north were Detroit was six and ten but the Packers six nine one I mean if I was going to pick a bad team to go from worst to first would have been the Packers because they get Aaron Rodgers back your Jason Hirschhorn saying when you ask them the other way around he said maybe the bears or team that are under maybe a tad bit overrated or somebody that can fall back on the Vikings were just a five hundred team could the audience with Matthew Stafford be a team that could possibly go from worst to first I don't think they can go from worst to first I do agree that the bears though could take a step back I mean they feel like it everything kind of went right last year right I mean you know first order for yet again and and Rogers went down Rodgers went down they got Khalil Mack you know when the writer should have been trading Khalil Mack but they get Khalil Mack your biggest key kind of felt like he over achieve like I don't think he's going to match what he did last year's up be minus quarterback I'd be honest with you yeah I agree and it's funny because it and I know we have even gotten to dak and and Izzie get everybody with the cowboys tricky actually better numbers than dak last year for that kind of reflects on maybe how good or not good Jackie is but I'm with you on the bears I just I if I don't see them winning this division again but I don't see the giants are excuse me while I went from last place to first not a Matthew Stafford fan or because member but Minnesota Green Bay yes Green Bay will get better but Minnesota was just a five a team you think the bears to take a step backwards maybe they tried to make a playoff run yeah you know they did make the plans a couple years ago yeah but I mean listen I mean Matt Stafford is is over thirty now I mean how how long does he get the benefit of the doubt with you know like like yeah I I would I I don't have a full research team here to back me up here but I don't think that there's many guys that have never won a playoff game at thirty one years old that and that have been starting since they were twenty two or twenty three that all of a sudden out of nowhere just go on you know multiple deep playoff runs I would guess that that hasn't happened very often but yes some night with me let me get to the NFC south same sworn it a lot of people expected the you don't pick up right where they left off eleven Carolina both seven and I'd expect one of those teams to maybe make a push not to be some five hundred again not thinking Carolina might be that team but Tampa Bay it five eleven I don't they get don't seem going from worst to third yeah from from worst to first the by ms exit the on this team I will too I will I will say something here that's going to sound like a hot taken maybe it is of every team I don't think that there is one that I feel less confident going from worst to first including the jets in the same division as the patriots than Tampa Bay I mean James Winston this morning they have no shot whatsoever no shot whatsoever because I think all three teams ahead of them are definitively better as you said with the jets they could go from four to second first probably isn't gonna happen I don't even think I'm with you I don't even think tip is going for four to third they don't have the town of the other three teams Jameis Winston is a mass we've seen it we've seen him he has enough time now where he kinda is who he is at this point I just don't see any scenario that they're any better and I think frankly they might be dressed into a talking violin next year around this time I think the other C. west now is perhaps one of the more intriguing divisions you think the rams could take a step backwards I think Jason agreed with you on that Seattle I think it's going to take a step backwards I love Sanford school but I love them last year old scores with Jimmy garage below I don't think the cardinals get out of the cellar but I think the forty Niners go without the vision the older name is going from third to first but not worse the first so you're not buying Kliff Kingsbury I mean he has the whole and he's handsome like Sean McVay so that makes up about a quarter info call Kyle Murray's all all my figures gonna have a lot of growing pains Jesse's quite athletic what does he have that big guard to keep defense of honest I'm not sure he does I think he's gonna have a lot of pain in general because he's a tiny guy and I haven't been sold on him since before the draft he was unbelievable Oklahoma's matter fact we have an Oklahoma free play on in the studio right now he was unbelievable I still think you made the wrong decision not playmate when guys like me you're chasing him that's also yeah yeah you could have played and started at middle linebacker for half of the big twelve already so I'm listen I I the if the cardinals are another one I don't buy Kingsbury at all I think he's a fraud he couldn't when in college I don't think anything's going to change even though he has his quarterback the cardinals are getting any better and I think that wraps up kind of the conversation that we had you go through all the teams may be Jacksonville but there are a lot of good options to go for more stuff first go further than ever with the discovered miles card they automatically match the miles.

Pacquiao Philippines Shane Lowry baseball Sox MGM Ireland ten seconds thirty one years two three years fifty percent five years
"two three years" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Spent the last two three years looking to resume in Jeremy Corbyn blank fucking faces and trying to read in some kind of psychological motivation. There isn't anything there that just empty Russian does. But there's only one DOE. Watching the politics of office. One of the worst things about having to deal with Brexit. He's actually having to watch for and it's just crystal. I'll be so glad when it so you never have to watch any recession again. But watching today. What was quite? Strain. May instead of just tearing into your position was tearing into a house. Yes, she wasn't blaming for house like specific naughty school children and bows has got to live with its consequences for houses, just totaling or something along those lines and was just. Peel, June, the call crisis Gladstone home rule crisis. I'm buttered point ministers. No reframe started taming into the house as a whole conflict of any of appoint minister who is actually started attacking van tire house of Commons four not getting very way. That's why I feel more constitutionally nervous than you. Do. I think that like, you know, this week was good. It was good moment. Constitutionally it showed. There was something some part parliament standing up, but she has proved herself with this idea of having this sort of popular sovereignty a hit back this referendum result, which is an entirely new source of legitimacy to the one in parliament just proved itself to be quite a quite disgraceful prime minister. And I'll agree that moment today where she seemed to be talking the institution of parliament, not MP's the institution of parliament full reposing hoods, you I mean when she says parliament is a so did the haven't really did it. I mean, they've twice told you can fuck off. I mean, that's quarter rejection. That's not dithering. Look a political. Andrew look, at least go breakdown was off expecting to stop singing daisy days any moment. She she just does not know what to do of of 'intertwine keep getting through. And I remember watching goes as home secretary because obviously Duma law and policy store for had an interesting, and she was very good at forcing legislation foo she did it with the data retention and regulate you Paris Bill. She actually got a upn court set. Everybody is really time critical of got to force his he's actually quite good at these very very narrow determine tasks, but he's not very good at complex thinking. And it's it's almost painful to see her. She doesn't know what to do apart from just bouncing off the wall again, she's just a battering ram fundamentally. She's just going to keep going and keep going until she has a deal through which is everything. Right. Undergo a Bonier said yesterday when he said you need to show us a plan for extension. And instead she comes back and sends an actor my plan is I'm going to try and put my deal with the United. You know, Harry. I want that she might get it through an everyone will hate her. And everyone hate the position we're in levers Andhra, maintenance included. Before we.

Jeremy Corbyn prime minister Brexit Peel Andhra Harry secretary Andrew Paris two three years
"two three years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"What I wrote a couple of years but two three years, but styles that the object that I found. And I think he's got something to do with the covenant. I'm not saying it says the company has something to do with the covenant. I think story of the but similarly has got something to do with. And it's probably the closest thing that we've got because, you know, people come up with with books or every couple of years or something, you know, they they suddenly for a lot of money in the nickname make themselves rich and the end of the day that don't have an object to look at. And in this particular case there is an object, and the, you know, the story that's taxes to the to the to the objects is a pretty interesting and very intriguing story, and you know, one could easily kind of construct a title which connects with original Cup of using the the evidence that I mentioned to DNA is one older traditions of the tribe is another kind of various inconsistence inconsistencies in the biblical text as well, as, you know, the some of the veterans in in Arabic sources, so altogether. There's a kind of new. Way of looking at what it might be. And if you recall, the fact that, you know, the the the has described I would have been impossible people to carry. It was just too heavy and never used the way it was described as being used. It was supposed to be carried on pose through. Rings on the corner of.

two three years
"two three years" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on Bigmouth

"Suburbs of Portland when they get discovered and shunted off to live in some kind of semblance to straight society, which the father cope with the door to fines, increasingly attractive, Rouf's and warmth and food that you don't have to hunt. Five straining little. Little teenagers like I'm gonna escape agai. But it's a similar film two three years ago starring and co captain fantastic. Tackle some of the same theme 's I'm was quite in job did in very cartoony way. But there's nothing cartoonish about this. You absolutely believe in the characters in the father daughter and your tool between with the guy Mortenson was kind of obvious this bit Lupi compromise. But with the father daughter in this film was very much you sympathize enormously with him he's becoming capable of living in society. But at the same time of one point isn't act of cruelty to children, integrating with society and handles that question, you know, with such pay off such empathy and kind of no hint of judging either one or the other and the human relations ships in that they form with other people, even though the fleeting it's film, and someone's in the film, ten minutes, and then goes all those relationships build into the film is. Just wonderful. Winstone as it was fantastic. That was Jennifer. Breakthrough role. Yeah. It just it's amazing. It just shows you side of America. That's that seldom makes it into the screen, which we may be returning later in the show in some choices him. But we also asked you for a non categorize over from the year and amazingly enough it concerns ham favorite the whole study. This all about the whole story do now to look normal ban. They go to places where they can play three or four nights. They do that four or five times a year. They've been London March they were in Brooklyn the end of November December as I did last year. I went out to see them went to awful nights in Brooklyn. Now, this isn't about loving hold study. It's about the experience of sharing something with different people over prolonged periods. There is something magical about kind of following a group round people. You get to know the experiences, you have and the sense you conversations you have the final of the whole study afterwards in a bar and up having talking for couple of. Hours to the British fifty seven cagey clean jerk women's white lifting. Recordholder Kamath gold medalist and twenty twelve Olympia who'd also flown over from London for the whole steady show. So it's not just me. Olympia. Nzx do it to and those are the things you don't get when you think oh funds against that ban tonight. When you make an effort, I think the rewards.

Winstone Olympia Mortenson Brooklyn Portland Rouf Jennifer America London two three years ten minutes
"two three years" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Is two three years in prison for crimes, including a hush payment to a woman, alleging an affair with the president another longtime Trump associate David pecker made a deal with prosecutors for his involvement in the same payment. We get more from correspondent Steve Kastenbaum. It's called catch and kill you pay someone for exclusive rights to their story. And then you bury it so that it never sees the light of day. That's what the national enquirers publisher admitted to doing two years after claiming they did not pay former playboy model Karen McDougal in order to make sure her story was never published and didn't damage the Trump campaign. David pecker, the CEO of American media Inc has been close with Mr. Trump for many years. The US attorney here in New York granted pecker immunity in exchange for admitting that AM I worked in concert with the Trump campaign to squash McDougal's story about the affair. Steve Kastenbaum, New York victory for the embattled British Prime Minister Theresa may today. Easily survived a no-confidence. Vote meaning she will continue to shepherd the Brexit delude withdraws the UK from the European Union. But correspondent Nick Robertson. In London says the margin of victory was slim raising doubts that may can win more concessions from the EU becomes much much more real that Britain leaves the European Union without a deal. It's too uncertain economic times to a knock on economic impact. In Europe Europe doesn't want either that will affect Britain badly on. We'll also have a ripple effect potentially impacting businesses and the United States. The Senate is voted to win support to Saudi Arabia's war effort in Yemen, meaning debate for that will continue in the congress on Wall Street, the Dow up one fifty seven I'm Mike moss..

David pecker Karen McDougal Steve Kastenbaum Trump European Union Mr. Trump New York Europe Britain president Nick Robertson Senate Saudi Arabia Yemen Prime Minister American media Inc US attorney United States publisher
"two three years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on KTRH

"Ramon and I were talking off air about. Crazy Christmas traditions. I'm hesitant to ask people to offer. There's because I got punched in the stomach by that woman. Remember the woman that told the story? This was a couple years ago two three years ago. Maybe more. It all runs together. But this I asked people to call up an offer their thanksgiving tradition. Something that your family. Does that you suspect? Nobody else does. And she told the story about. Every year at thanksgiving. She and her her adult sons come over. And they lay out a can of. Sardines. And what else was it? It was two or three little things and they lay that out and before they have their regular thanksgiving meal. They eat that. And I was just about convinced that this was the goofiest lady ever when she turned the tables on us. Why on earth? Do you do that you crazy nutty lady? Well. When I was single and raising my kids and struggling with the very low paying job and trying to keep it all together. And I never imagined. We'd now she's married remarried and has a great life and everything is wonderful. But at that time, she was struggling mightily. And that's all they could do so one year should no money, but she wanted to have some food. So she laid that out, and that's what they ate and they muddled through it. And as a reminder, lest they ever forget, she and her two boys. They I sit they I lay that out on the table to remind them of where they were and how far they've come. And they I eat that. And then they eat their feast because they've they've moved on from from those very very difficult days. And it was one of those moments that make every. Lightning round worthwhile. Because there's a there's a gym waving under there to be dusted off, and I didn't see it going there. I did not see the call going where it went. And we've played that call a few times since then it's one of our it's it's one of our best of best swimmer, my favorite favorite. You think? You still have that remote? Okay. Chattel no channels everything. So anyway, we were talking during the break about Christmas traditions in our family. And so I thought we might throw that open. It's been just a couple of minutes if your family. Has a really odd Christmas tradition. But you'd have it. No other way. It's when you tell people about this Christmas tradition, or if someone comes over it is the oddest thing. Everybody says this is the weirdest thing. But you get it gets you in the spirit, and you would you would have it. No other way. It's it's the most unchristian ac- thing. It's the oddest christmasy thing. Maybe there is a a unique history behind it..

Ramon two three years one year
"two three years" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Here I am today. Freelancing I've been freelancing for about two three years already. Instagram. So people could see this in are these for seller. No, no. This just made these for this interview. But we do have, you know, we do custom designed like I do graphic design also do photography. So I can help you guys with photos, and then transfer them to a t-shirt do banners canopies, we print on just about anything you guys need proponent promotional photos. He just offered to do that for tiger fy class. So we brought in just about to ask that we brought up we brought up the the idea to the center, and so because they're tied into many home sales and whatnot. What they're gonna do is that once we start and the students start coming in and everyone has access to a phone now these days on the palm of their hand. So just taking pictures we're going to have a theme every time and once that happens we print them out. And we're going to select the ones that they really want to display and we're going to have a mobile gallery, so to speak throughout the city. So that's what we're talking about right now in the works for coming. The next year. So awesome. I what one thing that. I love the almost like wraps around me because I was a kid in high school that can do the work. I was a good kid. I literally got bored. If that makes sense I was just like board, and I stopped going. It wasn't like I was lazy. And I couldn't do the word. It was just like I feel like I wasn't wasn't first of all wasn't being challenged number two. It wasn't being tailored to what I wanted to do. And I am the one thing that I really appreciate what you guys are doing is that you guys are tailoring like situations in in in like learning to these kids, you know, if they wanna do screen printing. Or if they want to do real estate and stuff like that? Like, I think that's so cool at this at this given age limit, you know, what I mean right and going to the site there's so many other resources available. I mean, there's a long laundry list. I mean, there's one in particular that we have an outside resource that we can refer to kids are interested in making drones. And then from that point they start learning how to do so to make the the larger ones they need a license, but that's also another area they can take and getting their license to do like the major is almost like dry. Driving or or having a license to drive a plane. In the same aspect in some sort. So I mean, there's so many there's we have with our partner partner organizations, we have break dancing. So we have Tuesday Thursdays break-dancing there. There's also a music production area that we have kids can come in and learn music production. And we display we have events where we display their art. So they have not only done the art. But now they have their community their families coming out, and we put this event together for them. And it's with all kinds of partners that we have together because without the partners. We can be able to make this happen for the kid while to this magnitude, right? Are you planning on collaborating with any more organizations are always open to it? And how can they get in contact if you want to do so again, go back to the website, go to our website, WWW dot rise up creatively dot org. Where do you wanna see this growing into? Honestly, I told my husband I do want to make an academy like a larger farm, you know, get some land and have all the arts within it and be able to teach it even if we can make some of these are most of our even all of the programs accredited towards college because that's like the main idea just have a school. That's a credit right right pudding courses together, along with the arts that that give the kids a potential and the and the joy of being school, right? And to learn and maximize our potential at the end of the day. I think we need to do a better job at just tailoring. These lesson plans to kids and what they wanna do. You. Can't it can't be like one big blanket. You can't teach everybody the same way. Just like how you can't manage everybody the same way. I feel like in order to keep kids interested in school. You know, you you have to do it like that especially when there's so many distractions nowadays, you know, what I mean? Right. Of course, creative education, absolutely guys. I appreciate you stepping in coming in to tell us about this amazing organization. Do you guys donations or anything like that? Absolutely. We're always open to it open to collaborations partnerships donations. That's what gets us rallying and gets us opening up more programs for the youth. Can you give us the site? One more time. Creatively dot org. Guys. Thank you so much for coming in..

partner two three years
"two three years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The headline. Reads over technologies is seeing slower sales growth ahead of its planned initial public offering next year. But then I dig into a Chuck and I read. Oh, their third quarter revenue was up thirty eight percent from a year earlier to two point nine five billion dollars. That's two point in in in one quarter. They do two point nine five billion dollars. It was a little less than the second quarter year over year jump of sixty three percent. They did lose a billion dollars in the quarter. Well, here's the thing. So it is it's a significant slowing growth slowed from sixty three percent down to thirty eight percent. So that's that's a significant number the question that I think you have to look at with Uber. Is that slowing kind of reestablishing a bottom at thirty eight percent where you say, gee, okay, we can grow at thirty or forty percent a year for the next two three years. Or is it? Hey, we're going to continue slowing because we've kind of tapped out as much growth as we can have in our core products in our other ones aren't big enough to really lift the boat enough. I don't know the answer. I'm not looking at. I I don't have the exact specific breakdown on all of this. But if you're. Evaluation of one hundred twenty billion dollars, which is what all the investment banks want. That's that's what they're floating because, hey, even if they miss and get ninety it's still more than the seventy it was worth last year. And that's why they floated that one twenty number. You're not getting one twenty though that would be if if you're doing three billion dollars a quarter twelve billion dollars. Let's say Hoover's gotta deal with Waymo to exclusively license Waymo technology in their cars. Okay. That cuts out the biggest expense. They have do. They have that. Well, Waymo we this is the problem. Chuck, we it's really tough to value over because remember when they had that settlement would collide with stealing intellectual property Waymo. Yep. There's some settlement. There were Waymo. Got more interest in Uber. We don't know how much they got. But why would Waymo want to just use Uber is the only way to get their cars. Well, what's in it for them for Waymo the the database, I guess the the act of clients? I mean think about how many how many people use Uber every day. How many people use Google every day? They could do you think they could circumvent Uber and not need them. Well, companies that already have huge user base. They don't need to buy database a company that used by database. Disney needs to buy a data because they don't have any like they need to Netflix subscribers. They need something like that. Because they don't have an online presence right now. They got a whole bunch of people who get Disney through, you know, TV and movies, but they don't have direct access. They don't have a database today. I will get Google Google's got the biggest database on the planet. They know. They know what I'm thinking before. I think they know what I have for breakfast a week from now your Email. They know this stuff. So I will get what Uber's doing. And I think that they're probably going to get the profitability at some points. But it's a tough putt for the guy. Just it's not that. I don't like the company I use them all the time. Well, actually, I don't use all the time anymore. Just because I didn't like the last CEO. And so I stopped using them and went over the lift, but a a, you know, lift is cheaper. Right. A little bit is it. Yeah. So I just look at them. And I say, yeah, they've gotten to this point. I just I don't know. What's next, you know, ubereats the in this you guys don't use them. But they had two billion dollars revenue in the quarter. Which is a bigger number than I was expecting. And that's a really profitable business. That's more profitable than hauling people. It is. Well, they get paid by the they they get you pay them. Right. When you order ubereats. Yep. You're paying a fee, but the restaurants paying a big chunk of the feet. Yeah. The the gross bookings. There were two point one billion that doesn't mean that Uber made two point one billion there that was the gross bookings. It doesn't specify how much of that went over. I'm imagining somewhere in the ballpark of a third to forty percent is probably going that way to drivers prefer ubereats overdriving people around. It's more profitable for them to write a make more not dealing with the drunks, and you got food in your car. But that's it. Yeah. So I'd be curious to see what the actual revenue is not just the gross. Bookings there. But the fact that in that business growing quickly. So this is a bright spot. They can point to where they say look this business is more than doubling year-over-year. Okay. Now, you got something that interests me a little bit. But the core business, I just I don't know how much more is there to be honest. Let's see we will see hey trivia, we play trivia every.

Uber Waymo Google Chuck Disney Netflix Hoover CEO thirty eight percent nine five billion dollars sixty three percent forty percent one hundred twenty billion dol twelve billion dollars three billion dollars two billion dollars billion dollars two three years one quarter
"two three years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"That architecture a lot more inspire. Hiring from a design perspective, and I'm kind of limited right now to leather just because of the the cost of materials, but I'm working on incorporating some other materials later this year that I'll talk about it a little bit later. But yeah, the architecture. It was a big inspiration. And then a lot of kind of indigenous materials and designs Thailand was big inspiration done in Honduras. I was in Honduras two three years ago now, and they have a completely different design aesthetic. So yeah, just kind of marrying and having the different cultures and aesthetics and. Yeah. And I think that people that are either travelers like yourself or just, you know, with a particular vibe of a pattern or color combination speaks to them. You know, they love that the story is that this is from someplace exotic it's someplace far away, and it's very tied to their culture. So I think that's really cool. A lot of people have their kind of every day reliable kind of nylon or rope leashes that they've had for ten years and the last generation so we wanted to create something that was a little more kind of fancy dress college dress leashes, you know, they'll ask the lifetime. The high quality materials, but nobody wanted to create something that was more of like spoil yourself a little bit. Dog kind of address up. So. Yeah. Kind of tying in these these different locations in kind of just yeah. I guess luxury treat. Yeah. Static. Come for. Absolutely luxury. Doesn't have to be he in fact, some of the finest luxury is just sort of rich in has real depths. You can see all of these designs on the Barkan swagger page of the pet life radio sites. You can sort of follow along with what we're talking about you rescued your dog then from Bali on the brink of death. You said what happened year there? There's a lot of street dogs in Bali and street doesn't have or homeless dog doesn't have the the negative connotation at a lot of people think is always disputable weather year round. And the dogs are in such good spirits. You know, there's speech everywhere in the mountains, and they're actually really really friendly and happy, and but we did a streak dog that he was just weeks old and as sick as a puppy could be. We came across some and rushing to the vet. And we were just able to save him. And he's a terrier mix trying to find what is mixed with just based on behavior and stuff like that. It's kinda fun trying to Dakota. I'm a little bit because it's not he's such a happy little guy and. The dogs. Yeah. You can see that. Some don't just want to be around humans and some dogs really love to play with other dogs incense very social with other dogs. So it's so fun to see my around the beach with other dogs, and yeah, he saw spokesman on he has a forever home, which is dutiful and he continues to live in Bali with Nelly. Yep. Yep. Motassedeq is he white? He's mostly white. He's got gray. Yeah. Around his nose, and then kind of down moments pause. Yeah. I followed that on Instagram. I saw him. Yeah. He's adorable. And he is. You you like us here at Barkan swagger on are all about rescue. And you talk about it and advocacy on your site. Can you elaborate on what Beckham on dogs is doing? There were putting together a few different programs one of them that were watching soon as a newsletter that will go out monthly we've interviewed a few different. Just out the kids that are really doing things I do in their spare time where they full-time really just promoting everything from health who's the latest research diet training, you know, and then, of course, the spotlight on ethical treatment and rescuing from kill shelters and helping find homes, and then transportation, we really want to give as much spotlight to them as possible. So newsletter will include a lot of that about shopping and things like that. So that'll be going out monthly and then there's. A fun program that we're putting together who clearly will have it in place by the end of the summer and haven't named it yet. But it's gonna be kind of along the lines of spoil them and to. We've got an adoption center in each major city one in New York one in LA separate Cisco ten find one down in your area either, you know, Fort Lauderdale, Miami, West Palm Beach or something and then maybe one in London and one in Dubai since. Most of our does our second biggest countries or cities is outside of US is funding indivi- some picking back doing. So anyway, it's a program, that's really fun. And it would be along the lines of every one hundred adoption would get it would be a surprise..

Bali Motassedeq Thailand Honduras West Palm Beach Dakota Barkan Beckham Fort Lauderdale Cisco London Dubai LA New York Miami two three years ten years
"two three years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on KTRH

"Located in Fredericksburg Texas we're right on. Highway two ninety which is the way most people come into town from any of the larger cities, we were lucky enough to get started in this business eleven. Years ago when we purchased grape creek it was an existing operating winery had been founded by Houston oilman back in the early nineteen eighties. Planted some of the, first grapes in the area because he thought the soil was similar, to Tuscany and in many ways that proved to be true and I'm not much of a, surfer but one of the things I did learn. Is when you see a big wave paddle. Hard and that's what we've been doing for eleven, years, so, you didn't, have to start from scratch you had. Some good mature grapes and vineyards going oh actually. The interestingly, the vineyards had had some problems there so we pretty much had. To replant almost. Everything but fortunately A, lot, of, the growers, up in west Texas in the high. Plains where a lot of the grapes are grown, in Texas Did have a lot of fruit already developing and we were able to tap into that okay so great creeks little unique though different than the others won't you tell us. How well one of the things I think, that makes us unique is that we actually do have a. Fairly large, estate, vineyard we have almost twenty acres planted on property and we focus on creating an experience that I call transportation so initially I I always. Say our first marketing plan, was, to. Build a belltower onto ninety, so that people would turn their steering wheel and come in but once they get noticed right absolutely but once they got in what, we wanted them to do is to feel like they had. Pulled into Tuscany or the, Rhone valley in France or even Napa and so that they develop this affinity familiarity with great. Creek I'm a huge Disney fan and I think Disney is built an entire business off of creating that kind of an affinity and so what we did was create an experience that we believe Ferenci us from a lot of the other wineries. Not only in Texas but, in some other places as well so for great Greek it's all about the experience it's it's. A big deal right and that's what visual tasting during the tour Are you, cover all of that we do and we use a phrase there called taste tour belong and it represents. This increasing immersion in the experience so when someone first comes what we wanna, do is. Be able to do a tasting with them or they could even do a tour and tasting where they get to experience our winery and production facilities they. Get to taste straight out of wine. Barrels and compare the, contracting flavor new French I knew American and then also be able to taste the, wines and then belong relates to the, fact that we are very focused on our wine club we. Really. Are a wine club winery and as a, result we identify and target a lot of our perks, and benefits to, our? Club. Members not, only at our two ninety location but also at our main street Fredericksburg and Georgetown Texas locations okay now when you took over you those. Productions like a couple, of thousand cases and now. You're up you've grown substantially. Right? Right we have and one of the things About the wind businesses you always have to produce a head of. Yourself because the wine you're making today. Is not gonna be, wine that's drunk or drank and till two three years down the road but yeah, we've grown by almost twentyfold over that, period of time and that's only eleven years right it is. And. We've been fortunate and our club members have, been a huge part of that because they've been real, ambassadors or almost. Apostles? For. Grape creek. So part of your unique Story is the fact that you want. People, first. Of all you're going to sell direct okay so you don't go get a great, Greek bottle of wine by going to the local liquor store you're going to your your uniqueness is that you have the wine club you have a wonderful. Experience when you come in for the tour and people experience you and then they want to continue and you encourage them to come back it's all, about that one on one. Experience it's, not about just pushing a bunch of wine right right, and it's about the connection. And? The relationship. Between the club member and the winery and there are a number of Texas wineries that produce larger quantities and they do distribute through liquor stores. And there's good quality that's Oh absolutely the business model it is it's, a, very definitive choice that we made and part. Of the reason I made that choice is that in my prior corporate background I have already been on. The treadmill of lots of people lots of travel lots of responsibility. And so this really is, as much a personal choice as it is anything to run the business the way that we really want to run the business. And of course, every business is it right. For. Every customer and we know that and so as a matter of fact we were talking earlier I. Shared we take a, little social media grief which I'm sure a lot. Of the other business owner listeners know what I'm talking about but sometimes that grief actually, works for us because other people read it and they say wow this. Place is really what I'm looking for it's. Different at you need and it presents high high-quality. Wine, talked. About a little bit about the wine you're making you got some good quality coming. Out here we do as a matter of fact we just heard in the last couple of weeks we, entered seventeen wines in the The San Francisco, Chronicle wine competition which is the largest American wine competition the, world there's over, seven thousand entries. And of those seventeen winds we entered we got seventeen medals including three double gold and three golds, during that most recent competition and so we were very. Excited about the, results and that that's a credit to our? Winemaker Jason Anglert who's. Been with us the whole time and, perhaps maybe the most, decorated winemaker, in Texas wow that's an seventeen at, a seventeen had three double goals which is like premium and then three goals which is, extremely high quality so you're really putting out the first class we are and what we, want, a grape creek to be about for the. People who visit is an experience with wine you know one of the things that all wine regions deal. With is developing is sometimes it kind of becomes more of a. Focus on party well we, right we have a phrase grape creek which is, wine is a pleasure or not At a party and what we're really about, introducing people to wine and the winery experience if they want more of a Barfield there's other places that will, work better for them than us this is just. Fantastic so wine is a pleasure not hardy I like, it folks. We've been talking to, Brian he and he's the owner of grape creek then yards and. If you've been to Fredericksburg you know that's a big wine air you've got to put this. One on your list for sure because the quality wines that he's putting out his fantastic so Brian. Tell, us how how can our listeners look you up find you know where to go what do they do I well the the. Best way to look up is to go to our website which is great creek dot com of course we're on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram as well but you. Know we're, the most information is on grape creek dot com and the other thing I would say come visit us and if you're looking for. A, little quieter. More personal experience do it during, the week if you'd like a little bit More of, a popular experience than you. Can check it out on the weekend that that's back to, wine is a pleasure and if you're there with a. Hundred other, people and everybody's, pushing and shoving and you can't relax? And really enjoy the experience of? Experiences what Greg's all? About it, is and even on the weekends we manage that's everyone can have a great time well Bryan thank you. Very much very informative folks it's great Crete you gotta go. There speaking of, which we've got to pay a couple bills we're going. To step out for a moment but you got just enough time to stand up and stretch and, after that you got to get back because we got more coming right up We'll be right. Back have you thought about selling your business but don't know.

Texas Fredericksburg Disney Rhone valley Houston business owner Bryan France Brian San Francisco Greg Jason Anglert Napa Barfield Facebook Chronicle Instagram
"two three years" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Give a guy big finish in, the, top, ten fifteen, of the MVP boating two three years plays. Plus defense Grinder type player. So that's a big acquisition as far as expert. He's a veteran guy who's close he said has a lot of success and there's some things that we like in his mix and. We, show that we can get A, lot out of them, expert isn't expected to arrive until Friday while. Dosier, could be, in a uniform tonight when the dodgers host the brewers Walker Bieler gets the start against Wade Miley meantime, in another, trade of note the race ship, former all star pitcher Chris Archer to the pirates for three players also. Bryce Harper who was the biggest name on the block was not dealt and will remain with the nationals for. Now of course, the angels dealt in, Kessler yesterday the Boston and tonight the halos are getting beat by the raisin Tampa one of the few bright spots so far has been the single. By Elvira holes? Scores by trout from second other than that it's been. All, race Tyler Skaggs with a game to forget allowing eight Rosen just three into third right now in the. Sixth inning raise lead the halos ten to five how about this the Lakers are trying. To bring back the Showtime. Era well sort of, the team's new uniforms are among, modified version, of what the Lakers wore. During the nineteen eighties here's a look at the new design which was unveiled today after being Leaked. Last, week the most notable changes are the caller and armholes on the left is last year's Uni the middle. Is this yours look similar to the Showtime era and finally there's this.

Lakers Bryce Harper MVP Wade Miley Tyler Skaggs Walker Bieler Chris Archer Dosier dodgers Kessler Rosen Tampa Boston two three years
"two three years" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Rapidly catch up the Federal Reserve along with some of, the in particular the larger banks in the payment networks over the last two three years has really put an emphasis on on faster Payments so. We have same day, c. h. today but even taking that to the next level and building rails and. Capabilities of immediate payment, so not only individuals you and I pay, one another which, is more common theme today but but. Corporations being able to move money received money literally almost instant instantaneous in. What's the. Jargon that we're gonna use for this. Is it called real. Time is. That how people are gonna describe if you'll hear faster payments in real time payments okay it really is is the jargon that's coming out today so today when you think about it a wire, transfer is fairly close to, a real time payment can initiate a wire transfer it'll go through the system and in most? Cases, seconds to minutes a payment is recognized on the receiving end this, will be a, much lower cost and more instantaneous method of of pain pain vendors paint people at cetera so give us a, sense of who how how this would work in the real, world and who this is going to benefit the most Well I think I think it's the near, term will have has. Already immediate payment around individuals and consumers so, people to people person to person type of payments that's happening it has been for a while The next real movement is really around, corporations and I think. What you'll see in my opinion is larger companies that. Have the technology already embedded in their systems and their workstations and so forth they'll. Be the immediate benefactors, of, pain one another but also, receiving payments maybe from a smaller. Provider were paying a smaller provider the ability. To, manage cash and certainty of payment is really an advantage to people so if you know hey I. Know at ten o'clock I'm expecting payment from ABC company you can. Manage your cash.

Federal Reserve ABC two three years
"two three years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And it's a great example of how srp cares discover more about earthwise energy and other ways were helping at srp cares dot com srp delivering water and power indiana's hutu t to your news ninety two three years never miss any of the fellow ghettos on demand you can get that on the ktar news app ktar dot com or subscribe to the show and the apple podcast app on your iphone brought to you by the maricopa county elections department there is a man who is running for trent francs seat trend francs retired stepped aside resigned in retire no he ran away sex scandals yeah the man who is running for trent francs seat is embroiled in some kind of lascivious sex scandal as well correct but not like the mi2 movement this involves snapchat and photos and maybe some salacious tax so steve montenegro's his name he wants to be a congressman he's running for congress he wants to take trent francs seed perfect seat oh jeez so something happen with montenegro in a staff member female staff member okay montenegro mary kids a whole thing ran a minister so he got a text from a staff member and the taxed was a topless photo of her all right so the lawyer of the female staff member spoke today over the minds we began to flirt i felt comfortable enough with the relationship that i began to send pictures of myself in various states of undress we speaking of his client senator montenegro asked me to send them on snapchat instead we engaged in sexual conversation about these pictures these conversations were detailed it intimate okay so i did did anything physically happened between the two montenegro says no doesn't sound like it at least if you read the text okay uh and he has he has said that uh still if you're doing this.

indiana congress senator montenegro ktar apple maricopa county trent ninety two three years
"two three years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"And you know you yeah i'm sure we must arcus in his agent know what to deal with well you sign us the play thirty was going to be a one year deal because then you want machado you know after you know when i'm done he might be looking for two three years again but if no one's given that out the i think i know it's a shock to allow these guys we see of guys getting seventy eightyear conflict all of a sudden what we're all the given three away which would chains it's changed because the the owners won't be all that money i glad member couple of months ago it was well we don't want to spend a lot of money because it allowed tough free agents like bright harper and and and encourage yarn and you know machado and we want to save more money for those guys said yeah but she still spend money this year right to help you cheerio you have to go for big ticket guy would there's a lot of guys got 100 guys looking for work mexican be picking some my unless you just you know you're just going to wait for the players to be desperate he are you looking for maybe five year five year five million dollar contract now you might set of for one year four or one year it three because three million for one year is better than no money and then you parlay that in if you have a good year for something down the road get to fill many baby baseball going to so michael back to when you deals don't think that's going to happen but i know the owners would love there and as i said before if if the player can have an optout they may be owners get there too but the on plays an ethical for that i'm playing you know you have a bad couple year they gotta keep pain but if i could you know if if i want to get rid of you could that is far the contract of the way kasai for that because you can't guarantee can have great year year after year after year so a dimension yankees in in in starting out of the position players will be there almost almost directly and then we'll get a better idea what the clubs look like it's la la land a nice flowery words and i appreciate it but i don't.

machado harper baseball michael one year five year five million dollar two three years
"two three years" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Other that you have when you get out of school star in other words don't start your baby steps until she's out of school all right you know that mean to even the emergency fun can use that to put into the theft or should have we probably keep your emergency fund there because you've got a long run on this man you got another two three years right uh yeah two the nasdaq and you're for your programme downli how much is in the emergency fun i got ththen hooker so i might use some of it if you had to to make a tuition payment without borrowing so my first goal is let's sit down and look at the budget and say is there a way to cash flow the remainder of her college out of your income that's your for we will always be short okay than dental concerns about five thousand aim at younger than than borrow the five thousand but that's better than borrowing sixty and that's a really good investment by the way it's a better investment than mutual fund because she's going to be a bok right oh no sir i hope you're hoping oh yeah some induced mars i'm going to be a good one the the return on investment of her graduating in graduating with less debt rather than more is greater than it had you've done in investment on the mutual fund so your first goal is to do no more damage or to limit the damage going forward as severely as you can first skull if you can if you can pull off her graduating with adding no more debt from today forward you have really done something pick that would be huge if the if you don't make any other progress on in your finances but you can have her graduate from midschool ambaro no more money that will you have rung the bell do you have done it that will be huge that's more important than attacking the debt that's already there that's more important than adding to the emergency fund that's more important than.

theft nasdaq cash flow midschool ambaro return on investment two three years
"two three years" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on WJR 760

"It was about you know two three years ago so anyhow we're glad to have you with us we're going to take your your car problems just like this we got dan and dad has a two thousand one chrysler seed marang dan how many miles on that nine hundred four thousand one o four and tell us what's going on with your vehicle well it's uh chrysler i mean it's a it's a mess a b three three lear and trash mission for speed when i'm proud of between say thirty four and forty five enough i grew up in an crying and below yang and i get to shudder and i'm crafting from the trash commission but i don't know when i get push motor co trash mission bought six months ago okay a couple of questions first while any check engine her service in july on well i have a check engine life for the yvette sisson okay because i think dosing you could have one of two problems at that speed especially around forty forty five miles an hour the transmission wants to go into overdrive and if you're going up in in climate course it goes it it down shifts it goes out of over or at least it should so it could be a transmission issue with that uh regard but also it could be an ignition situation as well right i don't i don't know if it's a mess fire i mean i had ignition shut up shop for thirty nine years and i i know what it misfire is but if say if it goes in overdrive it would what is shudder way you just get to a different street but well think about it does the actual shuddering of the vehicle your it out when you're in overdrive you're in a real low hi torok low rpms setting but let me ask you a few questions before we go a little further because this makes a difference on the sea bring so you're telling me that you're see bring is a is a to dorsey bring is that correct yesterday and you said the michigan she at you have a mission vichy three litre engine right okay differ transmission and a crisis for transmission and keep in mind that the engine and transmission bolt work as a team little maintenance things such as cleaning fuel injectors it we have spark plugs etkin can.

dan lear yvette sisson dorsey michigan thirty nine years two three years three litre six months
"two three years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:48 min | 4 years ago

"two three years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Now and shall beat now a bad but in national championship game and a lineup alabama's defense which was full of pros in back to back championship games you know given the opportunity born from the best quarterback and does history like but i think that would be so perfect for the show watch the show wants informing into twenties great but it is something i would consider if i'm jerry race because we have this quarterback from two three years if i start only guy now now the way it took three years from now i got him a quarterback and you're right it to ground run the report and it they can and maybe just maybe they need or giants would've been about draft a quarterback doesn't mean you why out the door after twenty seventeen none of the least bit but it also means you put in the wheels motion because you want to have the success at eli manning on this roster you don't and old really got to find that got so drafting a quarterback with this expected you know you never say never would jets because nobody go toe to toe commercial i should have been the second up it's going to find a veteran cornerback in a pretty much and converted and they're not invest another pick for sam quarterback yeah you know what other needs when you're big only the first round sometimes best player available is going to go about it and if the giants to their research and they do that homework and they fall in love with the show one watts then you know ties thorough to base get a quarterback at a and see and one of these guys false they bench and then it's quarterbacks go with what here are goff a wentz one one until but if a lot to whatever fall and maybe the best thing for win team goal winning came what a winning culture and you're right or i cannot and about it and spectrum also what when you get any was only planning so interest you for nothing about wife and two golf relied it brought did and so mohegan sun is excited to ensure days the brand new era of tower.

alabama giants wentz golf jerry eli manning sam goff two three years three years one watts