17 Burst results for "Two Thousand Fourteen Five Years"

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on Swarfcast

Swarfcast

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on Swarfcast

"It's like we had nothing by Just to access lades doing nothing like that and we went ahead. We took a chance. We bought a machine with live tooling. And what do you know. I mean another. They've we bought our next machine. Her next live tooling machine came and it goes about two thousand fourteen five years later. Our next live tool machine game in three years after that we bought another live to gene. That you never been you sell them actually go. I've been wanting this machine for a while. I've had my eye on it. I'm just gonna go get it and spec on it. Because i could see the right job coming along for this. Do you ever do that or not. I i be for for me in my shoes. I being more likely to do it. If i had more town on my floor where i could you know you take out a new machine that you don't know anything about and someone some brain in your shops going to have to dive into that machine. It would if you do not have the knowledge of that machine. All hack gap. Yeah absolutely. I mean within reason here for money okay. I wouldn't go out and buy a million dollar a sheen no way. I probably take a look at like the used market. Like what you guys have here all these machines you have here. You've got some machines that l. for what you're selling enforce it's a pretty good value for a shop to take those in in in spend the time to learn the machine and upgrade their company versus going out buying a brand new machine aversion of of one of those machines. Out there that you know. We're not a big business. So you take you go out and spend two three hundred thousand dollars machine. That's aw that's a chunk of change over company our size like ram bishen. We don't have the ambition where we wanna be deal in that arena of million dollar machines. We don't want we don't want to be in hydra masson behold lease and making millions of something. We just don't want anything to do with that. Some people do so people do really well added. They're good at it but look at it in our company and in who we are what we do rally not what we wanna do so you consider yourself sort of right in the middle area that that sweet spot for you is not super sophisticated. Not down dirty. Something that requires experience reliability.

million dollar two three hundred thousand dollars millions two thousand fourteen five yea one of those machines three years after
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

"I get to be on podcasts. In my dressing room right But like a lot of the times. It's really hard work and no one sees the hard work that we put into our show work. Because you've been with us. It's two thousand fourteen five years to get where you are so i mean that that's a long time of kind of just making ends. Meet doing other things as you said so. Yeah it's not just one of these things where bam. I auditioned them in the broadway. Show now my life's man. It's not that's not to say that doesn't happen but but that's not the. That's not the norm most people it's like it's like this six show. That's how it happened. It was like damn broadway debut then. After that i was like. Oh no 'cause like. I was talking about this with someone else the other day that it's like inbetween all of my broadway shows flips. My hair like there. Were like like the one i did was five years ago. You know. there's a five year gap broadway shows. People like just assume. Like oh my god. You've been on broadway. You're just gonna be on broadway. I haven't been on broadway in five years. Yeah and it's like a short right you've had to live the life. Yeah in between them so with you. It's.

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"A great team and it's Vancouver the mountains are here you can ski there's Ocean forget about Calgary so of course, I chatted with Hammond instead of going to go to Calgary, meds will go to ub see. So the HD two for five years for years two, thousand, nine to two, thousand, fourteen, five years. So sorry for myself included the May not understand for you to get grant money of eighty thousand does that cover even your personal expenses and everything that you need for those years? Living in the province of Columbia Vancouver specifically absolutely not. You're looking at right of don't know. When I first moved there I think it was eleven, hundred dollars a month for rent. So how do you? How do you manage that? What are you able to do on the side or apply for more? SMART works. That works you also accrue a bit student loans that you hope that you're going to get a good job to pay off later. Luckily for me Pandit that way that I got the good job later, but jobs aren't easy to get Nakajima and they're getting harder and harder. So I was really fortunate. Get the job I have. Now, how long did you stay NBC? I stayed there until two thousand, fourteen k then and then I started a post doc. So. A POST DOC is such a weird phase in your life because you're not a student and you're not an employee. So you're Kinda like this freelance researcher, which is fun because you have a lot of freedom and flexibility of where to go and I was invited to do one year at university level, which is really funny because I don't speak French. But I had a colleague here Francois Botha who's still a mentor and a really close colleague today. And I worked with him since. We worked on the same team when I did my masters, he was doing his post doc Talk, to each other for some years and then when I did my PhD I invited him to be on my supervisory committee..

Hammond Vancouver Calgary Francois Botha NBC researcher Nakajima Pandit
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

09:12 min | 2 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"Incident. Tony Orlando for everything. You do for our veterans with us With this is Jeff Cathy. Who is the head of Military Veterans Affairs at Bank of America? Whose spots of this hour. How are you jeff? John How are you all? I am good. I am Greg and we got ten Fisher the Fisher Brothers who does Dover House ten years on Memorial Day Dake and Ken. Are you there John? Well only Tony Ken. And and Jeff you you guys worked so hard for veterans Townie. You you started off helping With Bob Hope you grace hundreds of millions of dollars with Bob. Hope is that right up. I have been honored John to be able to take my career because of that. Little Song that you played was written by Irwin Levine. And Larry Brown made never thought nor did I on a rainy afternoon in New York that that's become a tool to raise money on behalf of veterans. I've been able to go to the rack and work for our troops in Iraq and I've been able to work for twenty four years free shows and Branson Missouri. I just want you to know that. The President Missouri's become a real spotlight for veterans in Nineteen ninety-three. We started a free show at the two thousand seat theater. I owned at that time. And for twenty four years we did a free show started out with two thousand veterans coming in for free ended up being five thousand people every single year on a waiting list to get on to see that show where we would tribute and Bob came Bob. Hope came in nineteen ninety-three to launch for me. He's been he was great as you know spearhead to raise money for veterans with his heart for this country and in my own little way. I have been honored to carry that condition that Bob hope gave me. I've been able to raise hundreds of million dollars more importantly creating awareness in this country and around the world to give respect to those people who go on and put their name on that bottom line and say. I'm ready to die from Erica. And on this Memorial Day. We honor those who did without them. We wouldn't have the freedoms that we have today and to those people who are against on this show. I'm honored to be with you Mr Fisher. I'm honored to be on you back at America's always always always been there for veterans and again here they are again and you John. We've been friends a long time. I WANNA share one thing about you with your audience. We did a fundraiser. And a show while you were running for mayor and I came out saying yellow ribbon and you actually send the course with money. And you're one heck of a singer Buddy Tony. I must say we always had a lot of fun together and hopefully win the ended. His virus comes. We will continue to have fun together. I WanNa Thank Jeff Kathy and Bankamerica Jeff. You are the head of the Military Veterans Affairs for Bankamerica at your sponsor. And as I said to you me your chairman. Brian hand both on the board of the Medal of Honor Foundation. Jeff tell us all the stuff that Beck. America does with veterans. Well of so much John and thanks for the opportunity. I I grew up with Tony. Sing Anti Yellow Ribbon. And I saw Bob. Hope on the USS Cole. Right around Thanksgiving and Christmas time Over by Lebanon and bring back great memories and and You know people outside of the military are very much supportive of of the jobs that That are done inside and as well as line morning. Hand and the leader of our company and he does so much as well as the management team and other senior leaders and Insofar as making public commitments to hire ten thousand bedrooms which we did in two thousand fourteen five year plan to bring some coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan and other places around the globe to get them Integrated and properly brought into the civilian workplace and joining the communities and contribute like they did in the army the Navy the Marine Corps Air Force also big contributions on property donations. And I remember seeing Mr Fisher up in But that's a Maryland And and Building New Fisher. Houses are watching them expand from twenty five to twice that number and we were early on in two thousand seven out there through the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund and built that Or supported and funded some of that and the private way with the Center for the intrepid out there in San Antonio Texas. I've gone out I've seen it burn units The Surf Wars and the people lose Amputated parts of the body. That really gets a core back in together Fisher family the leadership inside of our company and support not only these veterans and retain them and give them good career pass but military spouses in out of the two hundred thousand or so veterans who raise their hand leave the services every year and and and the spouses about ten percent of them want to start their own business right so they take an order for many years and now they want to give orders and really really lead the own trajectory and so were there for them in that respect we've got employee networks Military one inside inside the company. Forty one chapters now. Eleven thousand members to really help the young Army and Navy and Air Force Members. Come in and figure out what corporate America's like and help them with the business active man and some exposure other lines of business. We work with a lot of nonprofits in the Post traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury. Space that I know Mr Fisher and all of you are interested in so those nonprofits and the Bush institute really help us Generate larger outcomes for For Bank of America. So it's just a great pleasure to be lucky enough to be in this role with just a great leadership in the company. That is wonderful. A Bank America. Ten thousand veterans being hired debt is so wonderful And I work also very close. The Dixon woman who was a marine Vice Chairman of back America and he does some wonderful work Work the BURRIS. And I think we did eleven neck boy last year and I think we met there and it was so wonderful and Ken Fisher. Tell us all the wonderful things that that the Fisher family does. We started with the intrepid and and moved onto additional text house. Ken Yeah John. Thanks for having me in jeopardy was good to hear from you again We've so appreciated your involvement down at the center of the intrepid. Course Tony Orlando and all you do. it's started With my Uncle Zach Fisher that you knew when he brought the intrepid to York City and converted into the air and Space Museum. Where we have the Memorial Day ceremonies today The ship has been closed. Obviously for the last couple of months. But we're hoping to get it open soon. Out of the intrepid came a number of initiatives one of which was Fisher House which Which I am also chairman of and Fisher House is basically. We Build Comfort. Homes for families the veterans and active servicemen and women To stay in for no charged while loved one is hospitalized whether it be for morons whether it be from sickness or illness we have eighty seven fisher houses around the world including one in Great Britain and over the thirty years of the program. We've helped four hundred thousand families have to this point and saved them almost half a billion dollars in travel and lodging one of the houses that we still stands out particularly this weekend and that was the Fisher House we built his Dover. Which is we know is where where those who have given the ultimate sacrifice and come home and the families who were able to get to Dover would to to do. The unthinkable would come in at three four in the morning and witnessed the repatriation of their loved. One and then they'd have to get the car and drive to a cheap motel which we didn't think was Wasn't thicket of sacrifices that this family made we also found out that there wasn't a place for them to pray. So what we did was we we mobilized I I actually got a call from the surgeon general in the army who made me aware of the situation we broke ground in. May Two thousand ten and we finished the House November tenth. Two thousand ten. It was the quickest house we ever built but the need was obviously so compelling that we had to move and everybody around us involved with over you know was equally Dedicated to the project. So we were able to do it in record time but Thirty seven hundred families have used that house in the ten years..

Zach Fisher Military Veterans Affairs Bankamerica Jeff Bob Hope Tony Ken John Bob America Fisher House Tony Orlando Fisher Brothers Buddy Tony Fisher Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund Jeff Cathy chairman Building New Fisher Dover House
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on WTVN

"Have been indicted in connection to the death of a fraternity pledge at Ohio University last year called line of Dublin died at an auxiliary house of sigma pies Absalon chapter in Athens after a night of hazing charges include preventing drug abuse involuntary manslaughter reckless homicide hazing and trafficking in cocaine the corner says why it died of asphyxiation from ingesting it nitrous oxide a Logan county woman has avoided the death penalty with the plea deal for killing her three young sons ABC six is Tom Bosco says the killings by Britney Pilkington go back five years infant Nile died in July of two thousand fourteen five year old Gavin died in April of two thousand fifteen and baby Noah died just four months later prosecutors accused her of smothering the children which she confessed to detectives after a long night of questioning what part of that confession was thrown out she was arrested in twenty fifteen her sentences thirty seven years to life behind bars new restrictions on travel reimbursements now plays for members of the Columbus city school board the board board voted Tuesday to not reimburse travel expenses for board members that are in the last six months of their terms and no more than three board members can attend conferences out of state at the time falls in ABC six report that the board spent ten thousand dollars on a trip for for board members to Miami in September two of those numbers were not seeking reelection this year a key witness in the impeachment inquiry about to take his place at the witness table maybe Caesar Turkey says ambassador Gordon silence already revised his testimony once before investor Gordon someone has conceded he told a top Ukranian official four hundred million dollars in frozen security aid would not flow until the country publicly committed to investigate chill and hunter Biden as well as at the bunk conspiracy theory about the origin of the Russia investigation if that wasn't what president trump wanted committee members are likely to ask why would Solomon deliver such a message someone is also expected to face questions about a phone call during which another impeachment witness said he over heard president trump talking about investigations Aron Kader ski ABC news Republicans are attacking Democrats over the on going house impeachment investigation in the latest impeachment hearing Devin newness called an impeachment sham and previous hearings I've outlined three questions the Democrats and the media don't want ask.

Devin ABC Aron Kader Solomon president Russia hunter Biden ambassador Gordon Columbus city school Noah Logan county involuntary manslaughter Ohio University trump official Caesar Turkey Miami Gavin Britney Pilkington
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

15:02 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Deeper into this was crazy about that kind of thing is is basically a recorded <hes> segment of what a typical conversation is around the card table the cabin and it makes no sense. It's completely illiterate mostly. You can't read and <hes> <hes> so. Here's your teaser for the excitement. It's terrible and i'm not even sure if you were a part of the one that we have to think because i don't i don't you said that i initially that i was <hes> part of it but i don't remember reading it but then you brought up a couple of other things from that weekend that you said i i. It was part of your part of it because we can't read your the part that you were old. No my handwriting is terrible. I apologize for it when i when i write a card like a thank you card or something i was put p._s. Sorry for my handwriting in capital so it's like more likely though which cause then that begs the question. Why don't you just write the rest of it and capital well because it was it would take too long. It's like chicken scratch but if the chicken was drunk yeah well it was ah i think one of the cool sense of them went down towards the river and all of us walk walk that whole crest back that was week over we don't drinking drinking and hunting is that when that picture sure was taken on someone else's property well. There's no signs posted. It all kind of melts siga ziegler four hundred acres. We figured there's no boundaries. I walk in that far four hundred acres to that's a that's a good chunk of chunk the land there. I got a couple of favorite questions. <hes> in all this all this rifle through them are on the table so you guys can can answer them one by one <hes>. What's your favorite gun. You like to hunt with and we'll go with nate. I what kind of hunting we talking about. The small game kinda do up at the hunt club small game. It used to be a <hes>. I have a twelve gauge <music>. All loader holds five rounds semi automatic but that's more for i found that's more for water followed. It gets heavier shit when you're climbing through cedar swamp and all that bullshit cranberry bogs so now i have a twenty gauge single shot which is much lighter and i definitely prefer that for carrying around taking the <hes> one off chance shot at a grouse or squirrel or whatever you might come across us that would be mine or for the typical hunting up there that we do much. I love my. It's my grandpa's sixteen sixteen gauge pump action that half the time doesn't so at least i can use as an excuse when i can only hit grouse on the ground around but they taste better that way at least but honestly my favorite gun is a single action twenty gauge short barrel they can hit more than a lot of people can tie into my next question eight seventy borrowed gun. They will love to want some money off of br probably my over under twenty two twenty gauge. Actually i haven't taken that took my dear with it. Though the cool all gone i got from my uncle where what i love most about brett's over under twenty. Two twenty gauge is a sometimes he forgets what setting it's on a special handling shoot a deer with it. I didn't mean to bring that god actually uh-huh when you shoot in the dick it works with the twenty two but when he's aiming at something small and he thinks it's on the twenty two setting and you can tell when he's not expecting 'cause i twenty gauge ago off lynn bash shoulder it sure is soft but on it doesn't it's nice gun though it's got a little drawing of a fox on one side and a grouse it's pretty thoughts on my own some real soft subtle. What's yeah. They're real handy when you're shooting a lot off once some nuts that almost ryan <music> you're about the brings up yes so <hes> last time we win. Alec look brought a forty five revolver handgun that would shoot <hes> forty five long colt and <hes> we decided to get tannery right yep and you set this thing out and you shoot it and it explodes votes so that was the whole plan. That's the purpose of this tanner is dead so before that we take it out on the gun range we set it on a log and you mean we're actually taking videos. He was dark too. It wasn't it was well it was dr but you can't really use no headlights on and everything else and and all these is just it looks like a goddamn <hes> normandy beach invasion looking brett shooting at this tanner right right on this law just blasts in the hell out of it never went off. We find out later you need high-powered rifles to set off the tannery yeah forty five handguns but you know it was fun action tank with two seventy. That was borderline pretty dangerous. Alec didn't tell us when he was going to shoot well. No it's better office surprise for everybody tank in half and threw it about a half mile couldn't find it that was probably we came. We we went up there with six people and came back with five. We can't remember the well speaking of the last time you came up with. Wes class. I remember when when you came up we had those two other guys that were part of the hunt club temporarily league. They didn't last much longer yeah and because they were we were like avoiding the whole time like both groups groups like trying to well. I think they were trying to include us because the story i have <hes> there was that <hes> gem sauce and some guy us with they shot to show or whatever and <hes> they were sitting over at the table. It was nighttime and we were playing cards at the kitchen table at the other one and they were playing like i dunno clues the priesthood addition i don't know like <unk> father johnson and the confession booth with the you know and they were like hey alex. You're just sitting there. We need other play. You wanna join and you. You look at them familiar like i think i'm just that i don't <hes>. I don't remember that. I don't know <hes> i can't remember those guys but <hes> but i mean that was nice of them to do that and if they're listening now i didn't mean anything by i just wanted to sit. Walk up there listening yeah. That's hilarious. Did i say something effective like like <hes> sorry i gotta. I gotta sit on the couch right now or something like that. No you were literally just sitting at the table. Watch the display doing nothing alex. You want to join and you're like no ah. I probably just didn't feel like learning the game because it was like there's always that awkward type only guy who doesn't know how to play you know and it's funny because you guys have taught me how to play euchre like twelve times and <hes> but there's always that that first couple of rounds where you're the baby you gotta keep getting to know you. Gotta play the card this way. You can't do and i was just like. I don't feel like fucking going through that right now guys. That probably wasn't worth learning the person my my next question. What's your favorite kill that you've had. What's the favorite animal that you've gotten up there. Specifically would stir our. It's probably harder to kill a deer that usually by the time you hear it. It's gone we. Do you ever have one flush by you know. They're they scare the hell out of you. Make a loud annoys and they fly away. You gotta shoot it while it's flying a lot of people hunt with dogs for to flushing yeah well what happens i mean tells the the account think alec was on the shooter and i think it was the last day aw yeah we were walking down. I was walking down to track and i shot it like i do a lot. Normally i mess but <hes> so you just saw was no at that point shot at about a hundred the first time is the charm now. I've only gotten two grouse that are tough but did you eat it. Do you eat the gro yeah author. It's like chicken more lean and their diets nuts acorns so pretty tasty actually in that next year elliott got his first one at the club. I think on the ground it wasn't flying or anything yeah yeah. What's your what's your favorite on. My was my idea which <hes> which was a total joke on my end yeah i was. I was no joke. I was sitting in this guy's blind who had passed away about the year before and got out there late in the morning sat out for probably about forty forty minutes. Let's say you're at smoke. My cigarette could hear dear coming up on me so then i was still lit cigarette older coverage right down into like my boot then i saw big eight point point raised my rifle want to shoot it and went click because i saw the safety on. Actually it wasn't even that. I didn't even know load in the chamber so then i re racked. I'm pissing my pants during this whole thing where he racked shoot my dear so i guess that about twelve years of waiting for a deer out okay. Why did you go out so late that morning. <hes> i can't remember actually it wasn't because they anything crazy. It wasn't like that we'd went out to the great italian restaurant that was down the road from us about thirty miles or that <hes> so is fine meatballs. They do have great spaghetti caddie meatballs but he had a couple of years. There's a layer of conversation going on there that i'm walking around during that whole period there was <hes> it was weird because i've hunted up there for a lot of years and never saw any deer or if i did it was only dose or like maybe a buck way off in the distance but that that one hung around long enough for me fix my faulk up and and that's the one that <hes> isn't your basement now right. Is that the head your basement. When was is that how long ago twenty fifteen two thousand fourteen five years ago okay nate. What's your favorite. Fourteen doesn't kill me yeah. I'm not sure ever shot in there to be honest with. You shot other stuff yeah yeah. I mean my probably be up there. It was my first year. Show probably the year before. Alex is a- splitting that out there but yeah that was probably my favorite other than that. I don't go pheasant hunting which was fun when i was younger but <hes> on that maybe maybe a squirrel who would probably that'd be my first dear. I don't think i ever actually shot anything other than like a porcupine. Basically a couple of things not audible. You might hear about porcupine story. Robert lie went out hunting with me when with me and my dad when we were like thirteen years old albanian guy and we're walking along i'm on the laughed robson the you know middle my dad's on his right and and we hear activity up in a tree and like it's it's right in front of us like thirty foot away way and all of a sudden. I see robert. Take his gun up. You know it was a semiautomatic because bang bang bang bang bang bang bang bang. He'd like without like nine shots. We're squirrel..

Alec nate alex brett Robert tanner hunt club cedar swamp normandy beach father johnson elliott robson faulk four hundred acres twenty fifteen two thousand fo forty forty minutes thirteen years twelve years thirty foot
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on Scale The Podcast

Scale The Podcast

13:34 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on Scale The Podcast

"Being a realtor and running running team are as different as climbing a tree and swimming in the ocean. They're such different beasts and that's the reason why i think most people stumble symbol when they transitioned from being a realtor and a high producing real leading team is that they'd be bring people along the pick up their breadcrumbs and <hes> i've had fortunately i was designed from the beginning to care more about leadership than i was about sales and transactions and that sort of thing my my background is i spent about ten ten years in the ministry of before he got into real estate fulltime and caretaking a people and being less you <hes>. I love that you needed your south south. That's performing ninja move. We spread move so leadership was what i was naturally accustomed to. You and i didn't know how to be a businessman. A lot of business people in sales people know how to do that and they don't know how to lead and so for me <hes> every day is about the refinements of my leadership but even more so scaling leadership and developing those other people in my organization i am not interested in followers interested in other leaders and so now hatch realty essentially runs without me. I'm here to cast some vision and still teach our leaders but the day to day interactions and if you're joe blow buyer a-rated you're listening agent you don't have any interaction with me and so i've had to scale that we had to build that trust had to <hes> figure out how to do scaled leadership on a big level and that's now giving me permission to go out and build and i have eighteen companies as today that i'm a part of tenor investment groups so those are those are just you know you give it some money and you have have some strategy behind it and then you got to touch it for the other eight or active in all a part of the real estate industry <hes> so i own ownership in a moving company and a mortgage company and <hes> aw a marketing company and <hes> coaching company and a closing gifts company at all kind of interbred with one another while and and so is your real estate company feeding those individual and a different side businesses i would say <hes> are real estate. Company company is the proving ground for it and it's the place where we trial and error things before we offer it to the rest of the people and <hes> so i coach i my real estate team before i started coaching realtors around the country and now instead of starting with people at the bottom said who who's willing to pay two hundred bucks a month to coach i started with like my top people and i am in the rates network radio and television experts and in that group has the top performers in almost every market and what a boiled down to was this is a whole bunch of people wanted what we had. I wanted to say that they had they wanted the culture in the retention and the energy in the community impact that we had and so i was able to come in and be a coach for leadership for hiring for developing because that's what we've done exceedingly well l. and that's just a natural byproduct that we've now sold more houses because we figured out that peace and for most people they go in and they say how can i sell as many houses as possible yeah and then we'll get caught up on all those other things and we've approached differently. We said let's be really great to our people and then we're going to move on on will sell more houses <unk> more wealth when we do it that way. What's interesting. I i've never really heard that from any other like mega team or our owner before. Tell me like how does that work like the the specifics of it like you invest in people before the growth and that impact act grow so i think the real estate industry is broken <hes> to be honest. If you're going to be a new realtor on a team or even even on your own. The average buyer looks for twelve weeks and there's gonna take six weeks in escrow so if you're lucky enough to have a buyer on day one which you nobody is is <hes> after four months. You'll get your first commission. Check and that'll pay your licensing and your class and everything else and so in order to get into the real estate. You have to have a either a sugar daddy or sugar mama yeah trust fund or massive financial irresponsibility yeah and those are those are the things that get people into real estate had the last one i had the last one i i was young and i was dumb and i had no aclu so yeah yeah i get a completely i could smell my own from alloway. That's awesome and so as has we've done this now. We've changed the on boarding process in our world. So if you're ever going to start in our world you start as if you're an agent you start either as has a showing partner or listing partner which means your salary and you have three primary responsibilities. Your primary responsibility number one is to leverage the agent that you're west breath. The second is to train and develop and the third is to generate and so we have a breeding ground for people to sharpen their sword and end to come in and so we're emphasizing everything about camaraderie leverage teamwork and we're building skilled leadership within it because our agents who are in production action are now leading these people here and it's not me as the overarching rainmaker that has to have twenty new people that come into our worlds in fact i i i know a a lot of people in this industry that are like we're gonna we're gonna bring in twenty people and the tend that make it are going to be great and and for me. That's not my fit. No shame in that game but that's it's not our fit and instead. We say if we're going to give a salary if we're gonna pay this person x. Amount of dollars a month we have a responsibility to up to train them exceedingly well and set them up for long term success and so i've been doing this now <hes> this this hiring program for for for partners for about five years and every person that we've ever hired mosul with our team but those that aren't are still in the business and doing exceedingly well right and there's there's the scarcity mindset of what happens if we train people really well and they leave us and my question my question is this is what happens if we don't train people really well and they stay with us and so we have this commitment to servant leadership mindset that from moment one when somebody starts in our world while we're going to give them the keys to the kingdom and we're going to equip them to have massively huge success and so we're going to pay them to train. We're gonna pay them to learn and when they've proven that they can feed themselves from spear deals and for being accountable for the team we then graduate them as agents into production so we in fact have a six year career path daniel that has age of starting out if they hit each metric they have a spot with us for at least six years and the turnover for people on teens means usually two to three at most and so to give birth that was a good lunch smack on the good stuff but it's not smell of mission but it should be <hes> here's <hes> here's the insider trick. Is that the agents that we have in our world. I heard ben kinney wants say that if you wanna have navy seals you have to have a navy and so we use our bench we use our partners who are in training and leveraging superstars as their breeding grounds to be navy seals my listing my listing agents average eighty to one hundred transactions per listing agent and my buyer it has averaged sixty to eighty per pareja and so these are top performers of industry period and yet they're on my team and i have the privilege of leading eating them and we're creating leadership opportunities for them where they have the responsibility in the impacts were self feeding them a lot of business from our essays and giving them a world of leverage and given them a world that we don't think that they wanna leave because we're continually raising that glass ceiling. They don't run up run out of opportunity in our world and that's been the whole change. I'm starting to ramble here. I think it's at least worth pointing out that we as a team have had to continually find the way to make this the best possible place place for a high producing agent to exists and for me. I'd rather have one headache making high producing agent who has a massive massive amount of talent and potential than trying to pull along five agents and get them trained up and hope that they know what they're gonna. Do maybe two or three actually workout. I'd rather rather the author problems of a superstar than the recycled button of people because for me. This is a relationship game and i want to give everything i have opt to these agents that are on my team right what okay so. Let's break that down. I'm kind of curious like when you say i want to give them everything that you have avenue and then you say you have to find continually find ways of the game and give more value like walk us through that over the last five years annually what have have you upgraded and how have you added value to your five to ten people who are closing sixty two hundred deals yet <hes> it started off we we'd hire them and those folks that started with us back in two thousand fourteen five years ago. <hes> we had is as working for that and i train them myself so immediately. They were trained by somebody who knew like twenty thirteen twenty fourteen. I individually sold one hundred fifty houses offices each year on top of what our team was doing so <hes> i had shepherd my sort and i knew what i was doing and they were fortunately getting trained by industry experts now. I never knew much about real estate in fact up until a couple of years ago. I didn't know that drywall sheet rock were the same thing because i know nothing about houses <music> nothing but i knew i knew a lot about people and connecting and listening and serving and so i would teach them that so the value proposition five years ago go was get trained by industry expert but it's not like here's a week of training now go and do it. This was an everyday role playing sharpening the soared. I'm invested in one on ones and continued to scale their business and i knew what they wanted and where they wanted to go not just their big wide but even the the depth and the the juice behind the big lie. I wanted to know why they wanted to make two hundred thousand dollars. A year. What they were going to spend the money on the data they have their life the problems they were having with their spouse and everything between ashed business and personal together because i get so excited no yeah i can hear it <hes> and you're you're a fast talker like me so <hes> you just there's a ninja skill alex paul care seals tells you can call it whatever but when you set an asian down walk me through the questions you would ask in order to discover their desires dreams. What their frustrations are there worries like. How do you have that conversation where they just tell you. Everything and you have a real connection to be a great leader means that you need to be a great listener i and so i would simply ask the it's about what i say. It's about how you feel when you're with me and if i'm going to be a great leader for you daniel i'm going to ask. I think really poignant questions so i'll say daniel what's important to you. <hes> and what does success look like at the end of this year for you and you'll say i want to sell fifty houses. I wanna make fifty thousand dollars something like that. I'm like that's awesome. Why and we think that there's like these really fancy scripts and the script of tell me more and why right and keep going and what does that mean like just active listening and understanding so if you wanna make one hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year why hi and they'll say well. I want to buy a new car and i want to buy a new house. That's so cool. What kinda car do you want to buy. I wanna by tesla sweet. Why do you want to buy tesla well. I really care about the environment awesome. Why do you really care about the environment well. My parents were like you start pulling back the layers the levels and by the time the conversations done <hes> and this starts in our hiring process and we see it all the way through and how leader as we're going win <unk> our goal is to get to the emotional stuff that people don't have a rehearsed answer for so if you think about it if you're interviewing interviewing. I'll say like who's the most important person in your life. You're gonna say well my mom's the most important person in my life because i was raised by a single parent. She was everything make for me. Most of us take it. Stop right there. But what if i said daniel <hes> what was it like. What did you see your mom does seem apparent <hes> and how was that for you growing up without a father and notice i didn't bring up your parents you did and now you've given me permission to start peeling the layers of this onion back and i'm gonna find out what you really care about and that you don't have rehearsed answer for and when that rises to the surface you have real connection.

daniel tesla alloway partner mosul ben kinney five years fifty thousand dollars two thousand fourteen five yea two hundred thousand dollars ten ten years twelve weeks four months six weeks six years six year
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Marijuana dealers another big one is if you legalize recreational use of marijuana you get into an area of it is a drug if you get behind the wheel of a car it is driving under the influence but detecting marijuana as a drug that is impaired you when you drive is not as easy as determining alcohol blood levels of what happy so here in Arizona the smart and safe easy campaign says that they have reached out to law enforcement the medical community and the chamber of commerce those that were the big opposition to the initiative here in two thousand sixteen to see what they could do to help solve some of those problems or to at least alleviate some of those questions but they're also looking to what has worked and what hasn't worked in Colorado yes Colorado where the first state to legalize recreational marijuana they passed it in two thousand twelve but you weren't able to actually go and purchase until two thousand sixteen I believe our two thousand and two thousand sixteen two thousand fourteen two thousand fourteen sales began in two thousand fourteen five years five years of of what has worked in five years of what hasn't worked so as we dive into their number is there a zone is considering moving in this direction we find that one of the concerns of most people have in many people have here in Arizona to comes down to if you have more access or you're going to have more teenagers smoking marijuana and what they found overall is that state surveys and Colorado do not show an increase and young people smoking pot yeah it's a it's the numbers are really fascinating there are did you as you said there is an increase in under age use of marijuana the other thing is that Colorado puts in some stringent regulations on how marijuana is to be for lack of a better term marketed you can't you have to be very careful not to use even something is as basic as cartoons on up packages because it would appeal obviously cartoons are going to get the interest of kids so they're very certain to regulate this in a way to where it is marketed toward adults and I guess it it reminds you a lot of ways of alcohol sales that it's not the view you don't see beer ads that are geared toward kids are smoking yeah yeah yeah well they they they say that too right again what I thought was interesting in the Colorado data is that the C. surveys show that the you know Teenage marijuana years has fallen slightly essence medical marijuana sales you know ramped up there if they approve medical marijuana two thousand nine and has been basically flat since it's not full legalization so if you're looking at what about the kids this is set not saying that it's full proof an easy going in fact if you're looking at administrators and an education they're saying we're busting kids for smoking pot more than we are for drinking alcohol at school right but overall state why you're finding fewer kids are actually smoking we also find that parents are finding themselves in some different kind of unique situations in Colorado is probably something that folks here in Arizona have also ran through their filter and that is one parent says that he now asks whether another parent keeps marijuana in the house before his daughter visits a new friends home for a playdate that's something I hadn't even thought I had neither right but that's a legitimate question I wonder if he asks if they have any beer in the fridge to the number here also seems pretty clear here here's where it gets a little interesting nearly twice as many Coloradans smoke pot as the rest of America and the number of adults who use has edged up cents legalization in that state so Arizona can learn a couple of things from what Colorado is doing but when you get back to the how do you test for impairments that's the million dollar question I think most people would be surprised to find out that California first legalized medical marijuana in nineteen ninety six nineteen ninety six yeah and we still don't have the the.

marijuana five years two thousand fourteen five yea million dollar
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

07:20 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Treatment the long, it'll take to recover from the ordeal of having cancer. I've known some people to be pancreatic cancer, even very cancer. But it has to hit day one. Thinkers covered by the BBC show BBC show that the number of hospital trust leaving fifteen percent of where people waiting to longest tripled since two thousand fourteen five years ago, they said just thirty six trusts were missing. The sixty two day target any England has a whole vantage to treat seventy nine point four percent of people in two months. Of their urgent referral. So if you have a melanoma, do you want to wait two months? Thirty thousand people had to wait longer. Now they said, there's wide variation among different parts of the country. They say the worst performance invade stone Tunbridge Wells and trusting Kent over sixty percent of people had to wait sixty days. I mean sixty percent. Got treatment within sixty days. We ended about forty percent. Did it had to wait longer? When it comes to cancer, the second, we find that you have to assume you're already too late, and you need to jump on it. Now, some cancer is slow growing some fiber cancers this little, some prostate cancers are slow going, the aggressive cancers chaotic, we can't always predict there are certain biomarkers and things we can do to determine. So, you know, if you have more aggressive sort of breast cancer, or not. But NHS is a government run healthcare system in England. Who takes care of as many patients as we have on Medicaid. I think they have about sixty million people in the UK we have about seventy million people on Medicaid. They're in trouble. And they have what a, a fifth of the amount of people that we do. And if they can't get it, right. What makes us think that we can't? And I don't know what percentage of people pay taxes in England. My guesses. They. Probably are a lot more strict. About, you know, collecting taxes and making sure that, you know, everybody pays supposed to pay with us. I'm here in the figure that only half of our, you know, citizens pay half of the people living here, pay their income tax. What has to the IRS? So the Democrats don't worry, we got this, because the rich are going to help pay for it. It's very interesting. I'm looking right now to CNBC article they're saying millionaires say the more likely to vote for Joe Biden over Trump in two thousand twenty now here's the problem. I see anything in the media, you almost wonder if it's the opposite because they're trying to change things. Remember they kept saying Hillary's lead Hilary's gonna smash the electoral college, you know, and maybe they did that because they were worried that the opposite was true, but they save American millionaires gonna elect Joe Biden over Trump Donald Trump. I don't know if I believe that. CNBC millionaire survey asked millionaires. They would choose for president. If Trump runs gives varies opponents two thousand twenty. Biden, and I'm sorry, miss pronounce his name Pete, gig or gig. Sorry are the only democratic nominees. They say who beat Trump among the top democratic candidates, and a head-to-head rates. Fully fifty three percent of millionaire respondents said they would vote for Biden compared to thirty nine percent for Trump nine percent undecided. Against central pretty Sanders. Trump wins forty six percents of forty with millionaires. Trump beats, comma Harris among millionaires forty five forty two percent and beat sender's, Elizabeth Warren. Forty-seven percents forty. Now, they say millionaire voters are not reliable predictors of election results. They said millionaires backed former secretary of state Hillary Clinton by a comfortable margin did matter. They say, but being favored by millionaires could be a negative for democratic candidates who are running a populist anti while platforms. They say Biden is already being attacked by opponents for being too cozy with wealthy donors corporate lobbyist, see this is why I don't run for office. You can't run for office under own money, Trump luckily was able to in the beginning of his campaign, I think throughout most of it. I can't afford to do that. I'm gonna need donations if I run for office. And if somebody's going to give you money they're not going to give you money just because they love you. Oh, I love show. No, no, no, no, no. They're going to want something. They're going to vote for me. That they get something. You know, we try to think that our, our electoral system. And you know our. Election system is so, you know, pristine and you know innocent, but, you know, people put you into office they're going to want something. Just his case. And if you did it help them. With you. Logical. They're busy. They have to help somebody people. Why are they gonna help somebody that didn't vote for him? I get that. But it is tit for tat. So then people always ask, why is Hollywood. Why are millionaires supporting them getting tax and tax debts? The so the answer we always get as well. They have so much money that they don't care, if they have to give an extra million or to the wealthy, don't care. I don't know if it's that. I think people like Trump and, you know, and all the rich people out there visas, and was a Burgh. I think every million count to them. I think they do. And I think it's strategy. And so if they want an in with the candidate. They might be linking to what? If I'm gonna get hit. I might as well. Get some pictures you might as well. Look like we're buddies were close. I want to be on the winning side. And so, I think very, very wealthy person. Just sides to vote for them getting text beginning. I think they think because it does invite help they're better bottom line somehow either through PR, either through whatever. Either they have easier access because, well, you know, they supported, you know Hillary. So then maybe Hillary will help them out with z. But don't think that somebody wealthy doesn't care about the money and they're like, okay. Now, also, some of them may be really diehard liberal. They may be like, really love.

Donald Trump Joe Biden Hillary Clinton Trump cancer England Tunbridge Wells BBC Medicaid CNBC NHS UK Kent president IRS Elizabeth Warren Sanders
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"That we all have and makes your mouth water, and it was so great. And now it's gone. Are they all closed in southern California? There's one left, where is it Santa Monica? I'm going. There's one Kuka ru left the chicken bistro. They were a lot of them at one point. And then they all sort of just disappeared. Bye. It was such a cool hang with such a the chicken. I don't know what kind of Spicer lemon or lime. They put on it, but it was a casual restaurant chain. They had a wow was founded in nineteen eighty eight and then it went out of business in two thousand fourteen five years ago. And the if you remember at your remember the logo. It's. K. O. K O. R O, and the I o of Kuku it was a chicken Lincoln at you. Which is sort of odd because I don't know if he's in on the joke that we're about to eat him by. Delicious. It is I think he's in on it. Yeah. Would chickens eat chicken without even question. But they would write animals are weird that way. Can eat chicken leg would you if you gave cat to cat food, you'd think they would eat it? We're not crazy. Because they eat their own. I mean, I think we would do it if we didn't know you know, it was like, would you eat Steve? If you didn't know him. Well, how would that be prepared? I don't know. Mondo would Beaumont Mondo a deadline. Would you have you ever tried human being? No. But I would really. Yes. Now, I want to ask him. But where where would that be available? I mean, it's probably not in the United States, right Everest. Oh, yeah. Right. Yeah, you can get and they never get stale. But that Kuka rule was great. I enjoyed that Kuru that green beans. And the yeah, the green sweet potato kukru in two thousand and three Kuka ru and cheese. Filed for chapter eleven at the same time Kuka ru had eight twenty eight locations down from thirty eight. As a result of the filing. The company was acquired by magic brands three years later, the number of locations. Dropped thirteen an additional ten locations closed then Kuka was acquired it had three remaining locations in two thousand ten and they filed for bankruptcy, but there's one Kuka rule left. You did you go to cook. I did when it was open, but I have some breaking news. Ooh. Do we have for the sounder? No. No, no. Well, if you want, I could find a sounder, give me one second here. You want you want the regular sounder or the special sound sports special sounder get special sounder, here we go. Don. All. Upset. Yeah. It's, it's a final in Oakland could be the last game played at oracle arena as the one lost.

Kuka ru Kuka Steve K. O. K O. R O California Mondo Beaumont Mondo Oakland United States Kuku Don Lincoln Everest two thousand fourteen five yea three years one second
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:19 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I wonder if there's just such this just such a powerful organization that in a way, they're kind of untouchable Rick, thank you very much. My, you wrote about exactly this in your piece in the times, the other day. Yeah. I mean I do think that this is a problem. That is a specially bad in New York City in which when things go wrong. We don't hold often. Don't hold police officers accountable. The mayor likes to talk a lot about retraining the entire force, and he certainly got the number of police stops down. And that's all well and good, but it, you know, holding people accountable sends is the is the best way to send the message of what is and what is not acceptable. And, you know all the data shows, for example, officers are still out there using choke holds and yet, they're rarely held accountable, a lot of the officers who receive recommendations for disciplinary recommendations from the civilian complaint, review board never actually, get that discipline from the department itself. And I think the history of NYPD New York, you have the nation's largest police union, you have a police force that I think has been given the credit understandably right of turning around, what was once very high crime rate into what is considered this national miracle of the safest large city in the country, and then you also have a force that received the accolades, and rightly so as did the FBI after September eleventh tragedy, so they're seen as kind of above reproach. And I think that contributes tune environment of impunity, and I think that, you know, from mayor Bloomberg to Giuliani. And now Blasio people have these mayors have been very wary of, of the power that the police department holds in the city's politics that may be changing. But, but this case is an example of, of the cost of that the human cost of what happens when you when you don't hold people accountable. We're talking. About the testimony so far, and the departmental trial of officer Daniel Pantaleo in the death of their garner on Staten Island in twenty fourteen with mar- gay New York Times at a board member, and Phil Stinson professor and criminologist at bowling green state university in Ohio. Here's a police misconduct expert and Kenny in the Bronx, WNYC. Hi kenny. Good morning. Good morning to you and your. Join the grand jury testimony. It's been any of this revelation that we're talking about now. And terms of the show, cold being and testimony and EMI report and anything else, get into the grand jury testimony for this officer. And in that the, the training of these officers, the medical condition and they do say, I can't breathe depend on a heart attack. Whatever don't hang up. But I noticed that the police department until these to keep doing your job, no matter what you say. So if I can't believe he's still gonna get handcuff enough. I remember goal somebody was Hank and died. And EMMY said the way his hands tied behind made it detrimental to him to, to breathe. That's all I have to say thank you. Thank you very much, again, professor Stinson. There's a couple of points. The Kenny raises one is whether these revelations that are coming out in the departmental trial, the ones that we've been talking about from the medical examiner from the head of recruit training. This text message that made people in the courtroom gas, not a big deal from the commander would these have been presented to the grand jury that considered charges against officer Pantaleo, and dismissed as not rising to, to the level of criminal activity. Would they have been presented for that matter to the US, Justice department, which is considering civil rights violation potential charges against any of the officers involved is there a way to know for you as a police misconduct expert. Well, it's difficult to say in this case, but I can tell you that. Prosecutors of can present anything they want to grand jury, and the old adage, is that grand jury will indict him sandwich. Meaning anything a prosecutor presents will result in indictment for prosecutor really wants an indictment want to. So, you know, it's difficult to say in this case, I don't know the specifics in terms of what was presented to grand juries, but we do know that the officer was not indicted, you mentioned earlier this is the latest in a push for Justice in this case. And I would beg to differ to the extent that I don't think police department disciplinary process can result in Justice that's going to satisfy much of anyone, and certainly that's going to be a problem here. But we are again learning a lot more that's become public at this point, but it's awfully late. It's almost five years since Eric garner was killed. Yeah. I mean, I think I couldn't agree more. This is too little too late. But there's value in this trial because of what we are learning. I think the most upsetting thing is honestly can't remember how much of what was presented to the grand jury in two thousand fourteen five years ago now was public but I do know that the revelations that were discussing here today, have never been released to the to the to the public. And, and so there's value in that it's depressing because the Gulf between what the public knew and what the NYPD and extensively. The mayor new is pretty vast here and it's pretty damning. I think the idea that the mayor and the police Commissioner both of them Bratton and now Neil have been aware of the details gory. Details of how the death occurred and did nothing essentially for five years, and we're comfortable doing nothing is. I think the mayor the city some answers. What's the range of possible disciplinary action after this trial is completed because Pantaleo was still on the forest all these years getting paid. I understand that his pay actually went up in the year after garner staff, even though he was taken off the beaten or taken out of the field and put on desk, duty, somehow he wrecked up more overtime from what I read and got paid more the the next year. But what's the range of disciplinary actions, depending on what the civilian complaint, review board trial, fines, and the recommendations Sally Goldenberg of politico actually did a couple years ago, but how he got thirty five percent increase in pay the year after Eric garner was killed the rain. I mean, this could range anywhere from loss of vacation days to modified duty to which he's already on to being fired. And I think. Anything less than my opinion, you know, being fired would be not enough. I think there are also some questions about some of the other officers and supervisors who were involved and, you know, Lieutenant Bannon, for example, who is the one who sent that tax message and oversaw, this operation, one of the folks who did there's some questions about whether they should also see displinary charges, I would say and more. What about the other officers at the scene in particular because I always wondered why the focus has been solely on officer Pantaleo, who took him down with a chokehold, if it was a chokehold. But others at the scene. Were also holding them down. Right. Well, he was saying, I can't breathe. It was really once he was on the ground that he was going. I can't breathe eleven times, and it wasn't Pantaleo or just Pantaleo who pressing him against the ground during that not at all. I mean I have trouble with that. Not a lawyer though. So maybe there's something there that, that I don't understand. But it seems like there were a lot of people to blame in this situation and it's not clear. Why officer Pantaleo is the only person being looked at here. But actually, yeah, I really don't know. That's a question. I've, I've wondered about myself fill, you know, to the extent that there's sympathy for the police officer here. The defense that rings with many people is he was doing his job. He wasn't hurt or kill Eric garner officer in his defense team say gonna was resisting arrest. He was well, over three hundred pound really big guy, and so Pantaleo did what he needed to do to subdue him, resisting arrest, and then the fact that he was. As the defense describes him morbidly obese contributed to his death. So how, how does that look to you considering that apparently the grand jury saw at that way? And there are many New Yorkers who won't but there are many New Yorkers who will also see it that way. Well, well, I think there's some there's some good points there. I certainly can tell you I was a police officer for several years of very long time ago when it was a young man. And I can remember instances where trying to handcuff somebody who was resisting that they would say something along the lines of having trouble breathing or something like that. And sometimes when police officer then lets them up and it doesn't finish handcuffing them the fights on again. So, you know there's something to be said for that. I think a police officers few as they're going to finish, handcuffing him, and then he will be able to be set up in and hopefully breathing easier at that point. But, you know, I'm asked often, what the purpose of my research is some people seem to think that it's anti policing or something, and it's not the main purpose of our research is to improve policing. And I think if anything comes of this disciplinary trial, the public parts of it is that maybe we can improve policing not only with the NYPD but at the thousands and thousands of law enforcement agencies across the. Country in that happens. That's a good thing. Mud, you've been pressing on the mayor and some of your responses and the responsibility that he has to at least give more explanations to the city. He as we all know is now running for president. How do you think those two things intersect with each other? Do you think you know, people have been raising questions about the possible impact on New York of him running for mayor mostly in the context of whether he'll pay enough attention to the day to day running of the city? But one could also ask, well if he gets some kind of controversial ruling or whatever the ruling is from the civilian complaint, review board trial in this explosive, and certainly nationally known case that there could be political imperatives that color his response. Yeah. You know, I have I think about this question. Maybe more than is healthy. But I think that the mayor. Ran for office in New York City in twenty thirteen promising to hold the police accountable to change the way they do business in New York City, he did so making it clear to the people of New York with a brilliant, campaign ad that his son is black by racial, and that he understood the cost of stop and frisk. He was elected really only because of the, the support he got in the black community in New York City, and yet, he also from very early on..

officer Daniel Pantaleo New York City Eric garner NYPD Kenny New York Times Rick WNYC prosecutor US professor Stinson Justice department FBI Blasio Ohio Gulf Bronx EMMY
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

05:16 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from American pest as the leading provider of safe, sustainable pest control solutions across the DMV. Let American past help you to take back your home or business. From menacing pests visit them today at American pest dot net. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Nora raum. President Trump travels to Pennsylvania today for a campaign rally in estate expected to be one of the hardest fought battlegrounds of the twenty twenty election NPR's, Don gonyea has this report. President Trump will be campaigning in the small town of Montoursville in the north central part of the state, the rally inside the hangar of a local airport will be his six in Pennsylvania since his election. The campaign of also comes on the day before a special congressional election in the district, and the president hopes to boost the Republican in that contest, Pennsylvania. Meanwhile, already looms large in next year's presidential contest, twenty twenty Democrats have been making early visits. Joe Biden held a big rally in Philadelphia over the weekend. Trump carried the state by less than one percent last time, the first Pennsylvania win for GOP nominee since nineteen Eighty-eight, Don gonyea and. VR news hundreds of demonstrators marched on the Alabama capital in Montgomery yesterday to protest, a new law that outlaws most abortions. It would make it a felony to perform an abortion, even in cases of rape, and incest, for months, Senator, and democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders says the law is an example of a right wing extremist effort to deny women, the right to control their own bodies. Apparently the Alabama legislature and governor actually believe that it is appropriate to force a woman to have the baby of her rapist, President Trump weighed in an abortion on Twitter Saturday night, without mentioning the Alabama law. Specifically, he said he would support abortion in cases of rape incest, or if the life of the mother was at stake. Voting is over in India, six week long election, but vote counting won't begin until Thursday. NPR's Lauren freyre. Ports from him by exit polls predict victory for prime minister Narendra Modi's, Hindu, nationalist party polls by four leading Indian TV channels project, the bartender, genita- party and its allies will have enough seats in parliament to govern opposition leaders called the exit polls, mere gossip and urged the public to wait for official results due Thursday, voter turnout tallies are out showing nearly sixty five percent of eligible voters cast ballots that slightly lower than the last election in two thousand fourteen five years ago, moody, ran on a promise of jobs, but unemployment is at a four decade high. This time he played up the country's majority Hindu faith and the threat of terrorism from neighboring Pakistan Lauren fryer. NPR news Mumbai voters in Switzerland, approved tighter gun controls yesterday to bring laws in line with changes to European Union rules, the law requires regular training on the use of firearms and special waivers to own some semi automatic weapons. This is NPR news. Meteorologists are predicting some severe weather across portions of the southern plains today, including wind hail, and heavy rain. There might be tornadoes in Oklahoma. Several school districts have already canceled classes. Investigators say the twenty fifteen blowout at a natural gas well near Los Angeles resulted from safety failures by southern California gas company. The rupture out the Attila, these Eliseo canyon facility led to the largest known methane gas leak in US history for member station. K Q, E D lily Jamali has more. The report concludes so cow gas did not investigate dozens of ruptures, that occurred before the blowout, and that the utility company should have been able to stop the leak that followed sooner the league caused by corroded pipe lasted almost four months sickening and displacing thousands of residents in the Los Angeles community of porter ranch Matt Pachuco has lived there for twelve years. Other health problems. Yes. They're ongoing and people are still getting sick to Kuka wants the facility shutdown, so cow, gas maintains the Eliseo canyon facility is safe to operate and that regulations put in place after the leak should prevent a similar incident from happening again, for NPR news. I'm lily dramatically. Lori Lightfoot is to be sworn in today as the mayor of Chicago. She's the first black woman and openly, gay person elected to the position, a major challenge will be money Lightfoot says the shortfall in the next city budget may be worse than the seven hundred million dollars estimated by the outgoing administration. I'm Nora raum, NPR news in Washington. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from delta, delta flies to three hundred cities around the world. That's three hundred cities where people singing, the car poorly, delta doesn't fly just bring people together they show. We're not that far apart. Delta, keep climbing.

President Trump NPR Pennsylvania Nora raum Alabama Don gonyea president rape US Los Angeles delta Washington DMV Joe Biden Lori Lightfoot Montoursville Bernie Sanders
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sacramento. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Nora raum. President Trump travels to Pennsylvania today for a campaign rally in estate expected to be one of the hardest fought battlegrounds of the twenty twenty election NPR's, Don gonyea has this report. President Trump will be campaigning in the small town of Montoursville in the north central part of the state. The rally inside the hangar of a local airport will be his six in Pennsylvania since his election campaign event also comes on the day before a special congressional election in the district, and the president hopes to boost the Republican and that contest, Pennsylvania. Meanwhile, already looms large in next year's presidential contest, twenty twenty Democrats have been making early visits. Joe Biden held a big rally in Philadelphia over the weekend. Trump carried the state by less than one percent last time, the first Pennsylvania win for GOP nominee since nineteen Eighty-eight, Don gonyea. And be our news. Hundreds of demonstrators marched on the Alabama capital in Montgomery yesterday to protest, a new law that outlaws most abortions. It would make it a felony to perform an abortion, even in cases of rape, and incest, for months, Senator, and democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders says the law is an example of a right wing extremist effort to deny women, the right to control their own bodies, apparently the Alabama legislature and governor actually believe that it is appropriate to force a woman to have the baby of her rapist, President Trump wait in an abortion on Twitter Saturday night, without mentioning the Alabama law. Specifically, he said he would support abortion in cases of rape incest, or if the life of the mother was at stake. Voting is over in India, six week long election, but vote counting won't begin until Thursday. And the Lauren Freya reports from Mumbai, exit polls predict victory for prime minister Narendra Modi's, Hindu, nationalist party polls by four leading Indian TV channels project, the Bhartiya, Janata Party and its allies will have enough seats in parliament to govern opposition leaders called the exit polls, mere gossip and urged the public to wait for a fischel results due Thursday, voter turnout. Tallies are out showing nearly sixty five percent of eligible voters cast ballots that slightly lower than the last election in two thousand fourteen five years ago, moody, ran on a promise of jobs, but unemployment is at a four decade high. This time he played up the country's majority Hindu faith and the threat of terrorism from neighboring Pakistan Lauren fryer. NPR news Mumbai voters in Switzerland, approved tighter gun controls yesterday to bring laws in line with changes to European Union rules, the law requires regular. Training on the use of firearms and special waivers to own some semi automatic weapons. This is NPR news. Meteorologists are predicting some severe weather across portions of the southern plains today, including wind hail, and heavy rain. There might be tornadoes in Oklahoma. Several school districts have already canceled classes. Investigators say the twenty fifteen blowout at a natural gas well near Los Angeles resulted from safety failures by southern California gas company. The rupture of the utilities, Eliseo Kenyan facility led to the largest known methane gas leak in US history for member station. K Q, E D lily Jamali has more. The report concludes so cow gas did not investigate dozens of ruptures that occurred before the blow out, and that the utility companies should have been able to stop the leak that followed sooner the leak caused by corroded pipe lasted almost four months sickening and displacing. Thousands of residents in the Los Angeles community of Puerto ranch. Matt Pachuco has lived there for twelve years. Other health problems. Yes. They're ongoing and people are still getting sick to hookah wants the facility shutdown, so cow, gas maintains the Eliseo canyon facility is safe to operate and that regulations put in place after the leak should prevent a similar incident from happening again, for NPR news. I'm lily dramatically. Lori Lightfoot is to be sworn in today as the mayor of Chicago. She's the first black woman and openly, gay person elected to the physician, a major challenge will be money Lightfoot says the shortfall in the next city budget, maybe worse than the seven hundred million dollars estimated by the outgoing administration. I'm Nora raum. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR.

President Trump NPR Pennsylvania Nora raum president Don gonyea Alabama Washington Los Angeles Mumbai Lori Lightfoot Montoursville Joe Biden rape moody Janata Party
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"'cause you need to be vitamins to create energy out of food, and you can never truly get enough of all eight b vitamins, even from the best food. They proven us. But and people over fifty multivitamins help prevent disease. I mean, you don't normally develop a disease when you five or thirty if you're eating right? And you're getting exercise taking care of your stress you getting enough sleep. You don't normally develop a disease, but once you hit your fifties. Diseases become more and more common, and that's multivitamins become incredibly important. So in this study from nineteen ninety nine twenty years ago people between fifty five ninety five take a multivitamin was preventing a heart attack and July two thousand nine ten years ago. It's a study of almost seventy eight thousand people in Washington DC in Washington to state of Washington. I almost said she in Washington state, seventy eight thousand people between fifty to seventy six if you took a multivitamin when you were older it reduced your risk of dying from heart disease by sixteen percent. And if it had. Sufficient vitamin E in it like the invite performance multi it reduce your risk of dying from disease by twenty eight percent. So now many as later the year two thousand fourteen five years ago. It's American journal clinical nutrition day studied day day released a study for Nakara Lynch institute at showed simply taking a multi-vitamin over time protected women from heart attacks, it was over thirty thousand women between the ages of forty nine to eighty three when you typically suffer with a heart attack. You don't only get a heart attack when you're forty. So how can you prevent a heart attack would've vitamin when you're forty one? You don't get him. Anyway, that's ridiculous. But when you're over fifty that's when you start to get heart attacks when you're in your sixties and seventies..

Washington Nakara Lynch institute American journal nineteen ninety nine twenty ye two thousand fourteen five yea two thousand nine ten years twenty eight percent sixteen percent
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

06:23 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And opinions you hear on talkradio six eighty WCBS wcbMcom are not necessarily those of the owners, banishment, employers and advertisers off WCBS him. But they should be. Quick update on the big stories of the day. Coming up at thirty minutes past the hour to see what's going on in my backyard on radio six. Five hundred twenty five minutes after the hour was Sean if I were talking about this incredible story Jacqueline Smith. Allegedly murdered by a panhandler while we find out. That is not the case. According to Baltimore PD. It was her husband key Smith and her step daughter Valeria Smith. Who apparently allegedly murdered their wife and stepmother, and then blamed it on a panhandler key Smith is Franken pointed out just moments ago did did the Jaclyn Smith no of his background. He robbed three banks with armed at the time with a deadly weapon. He did twelve years in prison. He married her in July of two thousand fourteen five years ago. And all of a sudden now, of course. And then. This whole thing was concocted. Why was concocted to kill her? And then in blame a panhandler. And it's just very very very sad story. Now, this this idea and we've seen it. We've got a number of people that are saying that this has made people even more fearful of Baltimore and of the homeless we had a lot of people winning in. We've got the presidency of healthcare for the homeless. Kevin Linden would saying this claim was made. And then suddenly he was outright fear of vulnerable people on the street Oprah even tweeted that she would not roll down her window. She was driving through. I got news for you. There shouldn't be any just total object fear of of homeless or you driving through Baltimore should be fearful in and of itself. Okay. Roll down your window at any intersection for anyone unless it's a police officer as direct you to do that. And we got the squeegee kids. We've got some of the panhandlers. You are mentally wasn't the Dan this particular case, we got people getting shot left and right in western in east Baltimore and now to to pretend Frank is if the it's the panhandlers that are causing abject fear. I'm sorry. I'm not buying that. Again. I just think that in anybody driving through, you know, certainly a lot of people won't even drive through Baltimore. Let alone stop at intersections enroll down their windows. I think the point here is, you know, the lot of these panhandlers. Are basically, you know, people who have fallen on hard times others as we've always talked about in the past may have some mental problems. Whatever it is. They're not in the best of straits. But this story just it. It's so sad in a way because you they concocted a good Samaritan. Story. It's a it's just unbelievable. I mean, you really have to almost think criminally or have a criminal mind. You know, the start, you know. Making a Rouge out of a good Samaritan role that he's wife was supposedly playing at the time like giving money to a panhandler begging with a you know to a panhandler with the baby supposedly. I mean there had to be a lot of thinking going on in. This guy's mind. You wonder just hell hell criminal. He is. But why what's the motivation? Well, it's not like Jacqueline Smith was independently wealthy here. Brother who lives in Hamburg, grace. Marcel tras van he said that he told police he long suspected Keith Smith in his sister's death because his story about the supposed panhandlers. Didn't add up all of the brother could figure it out. What took the police so long three months to figure it out. All you had to do or as run a background check on day, one of the of the of the husband and of the step daughter. And when you get a hit on the husband went to prison for twelve years for three. Time armed Bank robbery. There's your there's your mediate suspect right there. So maybe they eventually came around to that. I don't know what took three months to the truck this guy down. Apparently, they were on them at some point. And then as they were watching him, and he was getting closer and closer to the Mexican border. That's when they decided to to move in and make the arrests. Would we still don't know what was the motivation for this? That's that's the big question. I mean, we we haven't heard at least, you know, even though the Jaclyn Smith's brothers said that he suspected the Smith all along. But we haven't heard anything about what he what their marriage was like during those five years that they were married. Churchgoers according to one of the local church. I mean, this guy this this story could be made into a movie five twenty eight and I wanna tell you about our good buddy Vinnie steal, his success stories should be made a movie it's just incredible two hundred and fifty homes can be sold in one year by Vinnie and his remarks community team. I mean, you'd think about it. That's that's almost a home every other day. It really is even better than that. So it is they have an incredible track record because of this debate database of five to six thousand buyers in waiting people are waiting to see your home before it hits the open market. And that's the reason why Vinnie consultant faster for more money and with a written guarantee. He knows he knows he's going to sell your home for the price that you want enduring the term that you want otherwise it will buy it from you and pay you in cash, it's all put in writing, in fact, Gordon, Kavanagh's home within a few days of putting Gordon's home on the market. He had multiple offers one of which that he negotiated for one hundred. And one percent of the list price. That's not unusual either for many because on average he Nazi sellers about five percent more money. That's right about fifteen thousand dollars more in your pocket, then somebody else's so call today if you have a property for sale for ten seven nine three sixteen sixteen and schedule your no obligation appoint five twenty nine time for WCBS traffic,.

Baltimore Jacqueline Smith Jaclyn Smith Valeria Smith Vinnie steal Keith Smith Sean Gordon Kevin Linden robbery Hamburg Dan officer consultant Frank Franken Kavanagh three months twelve years
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:12 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Great deals in January of two thousand fourteen five years in a couple of weeks ago five years plus ago, leg ABRAHAM LINCOLN four scores seven years ago five five years in a couple of weeks ago. I did a five part series of beyond the norm segments which had been past tense had been behind the pay wall. I did these five segments five in a row. Just basically replicating a presentation I didn't Seattle shortly before that to explain what happened and why they lost Amtrak ninety why we all lost AM ten ninety which was doing well for us. And so after I did that I came into the studio kind of replicated for everybody became five. Beyond the norm segments. January twenty through January twenty four th just five in a row. Hey, kind of like, you know, kind of like Benedict Donal, Bing, Bing, Bing, Bing, Bing, Bing, boom right under the toilet. These thing going Bing, Bing, Bing, Bing Bing, right under the anyway. So, but but they're now right there on our front page of our website. I have asked our because we're a special time now. Right. When special time, so I have asked David and he has done it. So if you work right now and and into the future, you can go anytime to normangoldman dot com, our website and you'll see right there on the front page right in the middle impossible. Miss those exact five segments. We pulled them out of the beyond the norm archives and made them available to everybody commercial free. And so if you're beyond the norm, I sort of half apologized, but I think you understand I want everybody to hear this. And if you're beyond the norm, and you haven't heard it by all means go and listen because I think the and by the way looked that. I'd forgotten how long? Each segments about twenty minutes. It's about one hundred minutes of audio. It's a lot of information. But you'll know how the radio industry works when you're done. So if you really really really wanna understand why it is that we have to shut this thing down and turn off the lights because we've run out of money, and because there's no money to be made please give a listen to those five segments. You can listen anytime, I strongly strongly recommend doom in order. I did him in order. You gotta listen to him in order or else is going to sound really weird do one to their setup in order. So please listen in order. They're all you can listen to the middle of the night. If he can't go to sleep, this'll keep you. This will definitely keep him going back to sleep. But I mean, final time on weekends or whatever. And you listen one segment now come back couple of days later whenever you slotted in. It's like podcasting. You know, that's the whole idea. Ari norm at normangoldman dot com. Norm at normangoldman dot com is our Email address. And boy have we been deluged with emails to. Thank you very much. I I'm going through him as best. I can Francis going through the just a very very sweet we've moved made a lot of bombs. We've made a lot of friends here over the years. So let's see if we can start to do a show because if you if you if you noticed I have been talking about branding imaging and positioning until you probably ready to throw up every time. I mentioned it. Well, branding imaging positioning were they were here before I came along. And they'll be here after I'm gone, right? It's like Benedict Donald in the Pentagon, if the Pentagon is smart would those generals, they'll tell Benedict, Donald listen, boy, we were here before you got here that will be here long after you're gone. So you're gonna have to start making some deals with those great deals wonderful deal. Anyway. Branding imaging and positioning. And I have branded image in position this show as teaching law civics politics. Right. Teaching law civics and politics often. They are three parts of the same discussion. And they all come together today all that branding imaging and positioning about about law civics and politics. They all come together here because there is a so-called acting attorney general he's a dude named Matt Whitaker right in my humble opinion. And in the opinion of many lawyers. He is there clearly illegally. There is no legal basis for this guy has no no strong legal basis. There's a week really kinda weak argument. But it's a weak argument. I won't bore you with it. But the consensus legal view is is that at a very minimum Matthew Whitaker being acting attorney general is highly suspect that there's a lot of legal counties. All right. I won't say it's illegal, but I will say definitely controversial perhaps suspect. So it's either that or to the point of like, he's just illegal. So he was put there, obviously by Benedict Donald to shutdown Russia gate and Moller or alternatively at least to spy on Muller and Russia gate and feed information back to Benedict now. So now, the Democrats, right? So so there's there's some politics for you. Now. The Democrats have thousands of there's there's some politics for you. So now, the Democrats have Matthew Whitaker set to show up tomorrow to testify, right? There's some civics forest. Right government inaction testimony before the House Judiciary committee. The House Judiciary committee. Tomorrow is supposed to hear testimony for Matthew Whitaker. The so called acting attorney general and Matthew Whitaker showing up voluntarily. He has not been served a subpoena. But the chair of the committee, Jerry. Nadler, democrat Democrats have ousted means all the Democrats, and they have majorities on all the communities. That's it's trickled down trickled down economics. That's what happens when you win a house of congress. This is a good thing. When you're the winner bad thing when you're a loser. So Jerry, Nadler democratic congressman from New York Jerry Nadler today was widely reported to have had a subpoena prepared a subpoena prepared to serve on Matt Whitaker. The idea being if Matt Whitaker suddenly changed his mind like tomorrow morning, saying, oh, I don't feel well because he doesn't want to testify. He knows he's going to get some very pointed questions about what he in Benedict Donald has have discussed about Mahler. So So Jerry, Nadler, the democratic chair of the judiciary committee who's going to preside over tomorrow's hearing where the so-called acting attorney general is showing up voluntarily the chair of the committee saying, well, let's add a subpoena on there and make it not so not so voluntary. And that's where things got a little haywire a week. We're. Democrats preparing to ramp up oversight of everything from President Trump's policies to his personal finances. You now have the acting attorney general Matt Whitaker who is issuing an ultimatum just a day before he's scheduled to appear and one of these hearings Whittaker telling the House Judiciary committee, essentially, I'm not testifying unless you guarantee inviting get subpoenaed moments ago, President Trump said he did not know of that threat, but he praised his acting AG. All right. There's Brooke Baldwin, and we thank CNN for that branding imaging and positioning, law civics and politics. Right. Okay. Here's the law of it. Why such a big deal about a subpoena as opposed to voluntary? I mean, I I if I was looking at this from a common sense perspective. I would say look you still getting the guy there. I mean, he's showing up. What's the problem? Right. Me Shona voluntarily. What's the issue? Why do you need a subpoena? Here's the here's the reason. Here's the reason. If Matthew Whitaker is there voluntarily and they ask him a question any number of questions that he does not want to answer. He says I'm not answering that question or I'm not answering those questions and they have nothing to try to compel him to answer. If they and by the way, yes, they can serve him right there at the hearing. Yes, they can it's been it's happened. Republicans did the Democrats as I recall not so long ago. So Matthew Whitaker could be served a subpoena like as he walks into the committee room, whereas he sits down to the table or has he said, they're just slide it over. Here you go Mr. so-called acting attorney general you have been saved. The power of the subpoena is if they ask a question or any number of questions, and he says sorry, I ain't answering. They say you are under subpoena. You've got to answer. And if you don't answer you are now in contempt of congress, you're in contempt of a spinner, and let us understand what the visuals of this would be you would have a man claiming to be the attorney general of the United States who's supposed to be a role model for law students and kids who one day wannabe, lawyers and think of dream to be as a frame court Justice. He's supposed to be a role model. He supposed to be an example. He's the bleeping attorney general at least he thinks he is. And so we have the spectacle, the legal disgraceful spectacle of the so-called acting attorney general doing this week where Democrats preparing to ramp up over. Site of everything from President Trump's policies to his personal finances. You now have the acting attorney general Matt Whitaker who is issuing an ultimatum Jarrett is issuing that's not me. I wanted brook ball when you got to hear it from Brooke Baldwin at CNN issuing an ultimatum, the bleeping attorney general of the United States is issuing an ultimatum to congress saying don't you dare service a pain on the attorney general or I ain't gonna show up and so everybody should have faith in the legal system and the court system. This is an abomination all brought to you by one vote many consequences. And so allow me to remind you again without too much snark, and no scolding, I'm done scolding one vote many consequences. One vote many consequences from the supreme court to the acting attorney general to seizing children and their mother's arms at the border to all, you know, shut down the government of thirty five days. One vote many consequences. I hope we learn a lesson. All right. Let me finish up turn the rest of the hour. Over to you. We're Justice is served. The Norman Goldman show. Your voice matters. I want to do the same thing to natural gas natural.

acting attorney general Matt Whitaker Matthew Whitaker Bing Bing Bing Benedict Donald Jerry Nadler House Judiciary committee President Trump congress Brooke Baldwin attorney CNN Benedict President Benedict Donal Seattle Ari norm ABRAHAM LINCOLN David
"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"two thousand fourteen five years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He cuties Dan Brekke is with me. Now, he's been following every development closely. Hi, dan. Good morning. Dan, so much has happened this past week. We had some key filings. Come out over the holidays stemming from PG knees felony probation in the deadly San Bruno pipeline explosion in two thousand ten and the judge overseeing that probation asked. Attorney general heavier viscera to weigh in by December thirty first and what he was. Basically asking is did the utility commit a state level crime. So the federal judge in this case judge William also wanted to know if PG he was acting recklessly starting any of the fires in two thousand seventeen in two thousand eighteen including the campfire and view county, what were the legal consequences, and the attorney general's answer was anything from a misdemeanor charge for failing to maintain vegetation properly all the way up to murder. Now. The judge also asked PG need to weigh in on what role if any it played in the campfire. What did we learn from that the PG filing contain some new details about what happened the morning? The fire started, for instance, the role one of its supervisors played in spotting the fire when it was just a little quarter acre fire underneath a transmission line up there. But the filing also includes some more detailed inspection history of that line, including the fact that the last detailed inspect spec. Action that that transmission tower got was in two thousand fourteen five years ago. And finally before we let you go the CPU see the state's top regulator overseeing PG any coming out with some stunning proposals before the Christmas holiday on white. The future of this company might look like the CPI has been looking at the company's safety culture for several years. And in the midst of a lot of public clamor for big changes at PGA after the campfire, they say that they want to consider a wide range of of possibilities and those range from just basically kicking out the board of directors and appointing a new safety conscious board of directors to changing senior management to maybe switching the company over to a public utility. Instead, we're privately owned one none of which are easy tasks to be sure these Dan Brekke. Thank you so much. You're welcome early childhood education and childcare are expected to top governor elect Gavin Newsom. List of spending priorities. The LA times reports news then will ask for almost two billion dollars to pay for a host of programs that includes phasing in an expansion of prekindergarten meanwhile in San Diego customs and border protection says agents fired tear gas on a group of one hundred and fifty migrants trying to breach a border fence. The agency says it was targeting migrants throwing rocks at agents as kids were being passed over concertina wire support for the California report comes from.

PG Dan Brekke Attorney Gavin Newsom LA times California William San Diego murder two thousand fourteen five yea two billion dollars