35 Burst results for "Two Projects"

Blinken: 'Irreversible' Withdrawal Necessary to Lift Russia Sanctions

The Trish Regan Show

01:42 min | 7 months ago

Blinken: 'Irreversible' Withdrawal Necessary to Lift Russia Sanctions

"The world. Now, very interesting story as well out today. Antony Blinken our Secretary of State has said that he's actually willing to relieve the sanctions on Russia should Russia get with the program. In other words, if Russia were to drop all this tomorrow, we would say, okay, we can trade with you again. I don't know how I feel about that because I actually think there's no off ramp at this point. I think that Vladimir Putin has shown what he is capable of, anybody that supports Vladimir Putin is shown what they are capable of and you can not murder innocent civilians like that. Little children and expect to be able to walk away and have everything reinstituted just as it was before, it may be a little bit of a bargaining technique and they're trying to offer some kind of off ramp for him, but there really is. Let's be honest, no offer. If I also don't think he's willing to take it. At any point. I mean, in other words, he's gotten so far into this situation now. He doesn't know where else to turn other than to just keep killing people. Think of how wrong that is. This is why it's important that we stand up here. It's important Europe stands up, you know, again, I'll emphasize that I am a big believer in using sanctions to our advantage. But in order to make them work, everybody has to be on board, which means in the case of Europe right now, Europe has to be on board too. The idea that they are still purchasing for cash, by the way, for cash, any natural gas from Russia is just truly awful. And really speaks to how dependent they have become on Russia. The idea that they just just a couple of weeks ago canceled the Nord stream two project. It's unacceptable.

Russia Antony Blinken Vladimir Putin Europe
Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | 1 year ago

Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

"One of your interviewee is mentions that everyone's going through something. And I think people need to understand if you're meeting people on the street. We're talking with some of they've gone through stuff. Like I've gone through things. I'm sure lose Tristan you mentioned you've got through your own grief as well. And with American society, I think American society in general, I think there is there needs to be more conversation about going to therapy, talking about things that are not very comfortable and what are things that society should be saying. What should we be talking about and should be made more aware? Society. Yeah. You know, you know, we live in a culture where everything is so fast paced and we're so, you know, what are you feeling? You know what I mean? You got to get money. You know what I mean? Next thing, you know what I mean? It's so it's so bad because when we see some of our favorites, you know what I mean fall down and we say, wow, they were so kids saying signs of this early on, but we chose not to see that. You know what I mean? I see that person. And I always say, like you said earlier, we meet people. Everyone's gonna be dealing with something. And I think that in this world, everybody, you need to be kind. Point blank period. You have to leave the kindness and all that. So you know, I know it's a hard thing to do to do in the world, but you need to kind of, you know, you'll be on the right path and all that. And as far as the world of itself, then what conversations that we have the better. What I'm wearing this in front of the audience. Everybody stood up at the end. It just started hunting on one another. Why? Because it's that common thing that we go through as people. You know what I mean? You still be able to really talk about okay, yes, I want to do that challenge a theme. I'm like, how did I overcome that by doing XYZ? You know what I mean? And I didn't think I was like, you know, as a self that's crazy or, you know, like, you know, you're crazy if you ask for help. Everybody needs to help. Yeah, and it's definitely a very important, especially disorder. We're all going through something. So now, but as far as the artist's part, right? You are, we're dealing with our own issues. And then we put on top of that, our creativity. How do you do that? Specifically, this documentary, you said, okay, so I was asking other questions and then he led to something else. That has creativity sparking, right? And you're saying, okay, maybe I have something bigger than I thought. How do you deal with that in the sense because it is at the very difficult theme to talk about with people and you're not sure if they're going to be open to share. So how do you deal with that in your creative approach? Well, it's so interesting that you say that because while I was interviewing them, you know, my grief was still fresh in my own. Correct. So while I was interviewing them, I'm like, geez, I'm still unpacking myself and here I am receiving things from other people. And I'm like, I have to take a couple I have to take about a week or so apart from each interview because I'm like, you know, all I talk about some heavy stuff and then now I gotta edit it while I'm editing my short film and it was like, it was filled with stuff made emotional roller coaster for me, but it was that theme to what I knew single handedly that it was in divine order that I was doing the right thing with this project. You know what I mean? And I think for me, the biggest thing was just like sitting back and knowing that Michael okay. This is bigger than me. You know what I mean? My project is bigger than me. It's documentary is bigger than me. And to be able to teach with it in people to see it and feel something, that's what it is. That's what it's about. Right. And it's not something that you're doing. Do you have to sort of detach yourself from your own feelings or maybe you got more into that in order to be able to finish this documentary? I'm curious, I'm a curious person. So I definitely leaned into myself a little bit more about why does the person feel that way or can we go back, you know, the technology and see what happened to our specific time and all that. Yeah, it's just intuitive and me to just like, you know, lead with my body and the heart. Definitely. And I think that's what we have, right? I left at the end. So creativity is our voices just making stuff that it's important to us and that we want to share. So as far as that, we got to bring back something a little lighter. So you said you were doing your film and the documentary at the same time. A lot of filmmakers out there are season filmmakers but there are others that are starting out like I mentioned. So in that sense, tell us more about the process with that. You're doing two projects at the same time, but one of them came out before. And now you have something that you're working. What is the process as far as the production part of it? About at least what you encounter. Yeah, you know, so I'm very grateful for my short film team because when I sat down with each and every one of them, you know, they, you know, what my vision was, single handedly, you know what I mean? So grateful for that. Now, when I was in the editing room by myself for my documentary, it was just me, I didn't have anyone to turn to our go to look too. So it was kind of like it was kind of like a home therapy session in itself. And, you know, you walk through this project and I know that I've mentioned that, you know, we did with the 5 stages of three, you know, bargaining and like acceptance and the value that depression and all those other ones. And the people were talking, but I didn't set up the questions. Like, okay, let's talk about arguing, you know what I mean? Those things just like naturally just like the conversation. And as I was piecing together, this documentary, I was like, huh. Here we are. Talking about the acceptance of something, or the denial of something. And so, you know, my process was very, you know, blindness on and, you know, just getting very articulate about what it is that we want to share when we talk about green. And as far as your festival run so that you completed those two films, as far as being on the festival and screening your stuff, what was your process? The what you do in anything prior to the pandemic as far as that screening your film places and now how has that differ from what you're doing now with the documentary because it might be a little different, right? Yeah, no, it's definitely different nowadays. So the film now the documentary is precious news. So it's definitely been a submitted to customers right now. So it hasn't had its own chance to shine this yet. But the part is the short film pain that's done like an extraordinary job being out since 2019 and being part of your festival in Chicago filmmakers and stony island arts bank and, you know, I get to teach with it and my students get to see it and watch it and we talk about process making and, you know, real health business it's like each, you know, the mediums that I teach on is just I'm thankful for it. You were talking to us about your also a T-shirt. And you also, you work with these you say middle school or elementary school kids? So I work with court theater and we teach our students on the south side of Chicago and also work with tape, which is, you know, Chicago partners, education team, and we work on a west side of Chicago. Well, with middle school students. And I know this right now we're talking about how it is to juggle work and life. And then still try to do creative stuff. I think this would say something about filmmakers that they really get. It gets to them that they have to work more than doing creative stuff. And unfortunately, how do you juggle that? Because I know, you know, like you said, we have to make a living, you know? Yeah. But we also need to be creative in order to help our minds in order to help that creativity. So in your experience, how have you dealt with that within the years? Well, you know, tied before this whole pandemic thing happened. You know, it needs to be a key holder at a store called the tag bar, you know, have to wear like, you know, suits and jackets, people love and all that. And when, you know, this thing happening, you know, I couldn't be in front of people anymore. I had to hop into my teaching bag. Really, and it really just brought out the best in me because my life is, you know, built around passionate purpose, you know what I mean? And when those two things are ignited in me, it's like, okay, I can get paid for actually teaching what I know. You know what I mean? And also teaching to children that, you know, who are curious about, you know, about filmmaking and health stories get told and all that. So to have all the insight and knowledge, you know, lose, listen, I'm not gonna go too crazy. You know, all these gifts. Right, but you have to put it out there, especially for the younger generation, right? Yeah, you definitely got to put it out there because, you know, what we do as artists is. Generosity, you know what I mean? It's a public service, what we do. Sometimes we don't see the millions of jewels and sometimes we do. You know what I mean? But you get the stories out there and sell it. And the most audacity right, right? I mean, I think it is great because just to be able to get back, like you said, we have to be nice, you know? That is really what we should all follow all the time kindness. Regardless of anything, that's the first thing that comes in. And to be able to give that back like you said you're working short films, you're working on documentaries

Scranton Tristan Chicago Pennsylvania Filmmaking Independent Film American Society Michael Okay Stony Island Depression
"two projects" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"two projects" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"By the way, I had a little brain meltdown. The podcast where it took me a second again. Do you hear that, Jim? Do you notice that I first I've said this 1000 times for some reason, the podcast where they come to mind right away. So if you're going to violate the government, someone's religious rites Big all rights, right? You have to meet two criteria. The government It has to be a compelling government interest number one, and it has to be done via the least restrictive means you need to memorize that plant that in your act is gonna come up over and over and over again. It's come up in the little sisters of the poor case with the abortion drugs, it comes up over and over again. Can the government make the little sisters of the poor pay for a border efficient drugs? Can the government if you have a sincerely held religious belief against this vaccine, for some reason, can the government make you do it? Say your religious rights don't matter here. The answer is according to refer to Yes, if it meets these two projects, So let's talk about the first product. Does the government have a compelling interest in stopping the spread of coronavirus? The answer? There is, yes, obviously. Of course it does. But it's not an or question It's an end question. There's a difference. What's part two? Can the government override your religious objection to a vaccine? If it has a compelling interest. Yes, but is it doing it in the least restrictive way to pass? In other words that infringes on your rights? The least and the answer here is most definitely no. It's just a national blanket mandate. It's the most restrictive way you work in a company is 100 or more people get in. That's not the least restrictive folks. I don't see in any reasonable judge reasonable judge. There are a lot of liberal judges. Any reasonable, unbiased judge will be able to say, Oh, yeah, that was the least restrictive way to do it. Joe Biden thought about in the middle of a parking him. Hey, how about a national mandate? Good idea, Joe like that's not the least restrictive way. You don't have to be a lawyer. Esquire to figure that out. It doesn't meet that to prom tests, not even close. Now to be clear that's on a religious objection. Has to be sincerely health. Okay, so I think they got issues there. So we've gone through two. They got a separation of powers issue. There is no law mandating a vaccine. Japan just made it up. Going to say, Oh, they deferred to the regulatory and she's really deferred for something this broaden impactful. Here's one more. We also talked about the religious exemption here. Also, these regulations, this OSHA regulation he's proposing Biden. Everybody get a vaccine mandate or oh, she's going to show up at your workplace. Does that pass the arbitrary and capricious test again? Kato was a great piece on this today, Senator Mike Lee said it over. It's very good. Of course not. This was totally arbitrary and capricious. All you need is any basic immunologist to go into court and say, Hey, my client here took an antibodies test. He look at Look, He has as much antibodies as this guy who's vaccinated. So show me what your scientific evidence is that my client who he feels is being harmed by having to take on the risk is vaccine. Show me why this guy should do it. And this guy can't Totally arbitrary, totally arbitrary. You can't just make up a law and say, Oh, this applies to 80% of companies 100 million Americans when you can't just do that totally arbitrary. It's going to be all you need is one person to show harm. That this law was not applied in an unbiased You know, uh, you know, in a non capricious manner. All you need is one Here's the last thing the reason. I think they're gonna have a ton of trouble with this. This was good. You know, I left. Somebody sounded podcast money, a little upset about that. I got some audio coming up later, too. So on all of this stuff. How? Joe Byron Scott, Joe Joe, Uh, Joe Biden's gone full tyrant. Now open the robe. We're looking at him. I gotta take the worst flash forever..

Joe Biden Joe Byron Scott Jim 1000 times Joe 80% Joe Joe 100 million two two projects first product today Mike Lee Biden Senator first one person two criteria Japan Kato
"two projects" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"two projects" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"With us, Jonathan. Let's talk a little bit more about the pterodactyls and get on to some other areas that will take phone calls as well. Are we still getting reports of these birds flying all over the place? I think we are, aren't we? Yes, we definitely actually we're getting reports from, uh, quite a few countries. As a matter of fact, Australia is another one. We're getting it from the United States. We're getting it from Mexico. Uh, and a few other places, Africa as well. What did the Smithsonian Institute admit? They destroyed something. What was it? Yes. Um, well, the Smithsonian Institute have have taken stuff out to the ocean and and dumped them Archeological things, which took archaeologists a lot of work to find. Lot of hard labor and and priceless things. I would guess priceless things. As a matter of fact, when I was on your show with some other time, George. We just happened to mention it in passing, and I had several people contact me that they had firsthand firsthand witnessing of this happening. Interesting. Perhaps I should share it now. Please. An email came in from one of your listeners and I've kept his email. I'll just read part of it, he says. I can corroborate the statement regarding the dumping artifact because of the conversation with the Gulf War vet. That said he personally dumped dozens of artifacts into the ocean during that same time, and some look like tablets and then another listener said on a tugboat captain. You can Google my name and learning mile that I'm legit, literally written the book on Tug boating and I can confirm That the dumping of that effect is 100% correct. For just under three years. I worked out of the Philly naval yard at the subcontractor with a low level security clearance on two projects, and I gained first hand knowledge of the practice. We sank a tremendous amount of materials. I keep detailed work logs to make sure details. I remembered and then he gave me his contact details and the name of the tugboat company and then it's address. You have a firsthand what do they say? What are they hiding? Well, the Smithsonian was was established by a gentleman who wanted to disseminate truth to everybody. But then infiltrators came in who had an agenda. And they started taking things off display that were contrary to their theory and putting them in basements. And eventually they had so much they just dump them somewhere. And, uh, For example, human skeletons that can be 12 ft and heart. The documents that they have Prove that the destruction of tens of thousands, not just 2000, but tens of thousands of human skills, skeletons of giants found in America have been collected and dumped. And the evidence for this was presented in court sometime ago and the Smithsonian Institute. Actually it took somebody to court was for for smuggling their reputation. But eventually it came out that they were forced to let go of The evidence that they were hiding. And this evidence now has become, um public domain. Now, let me ask you also about something that you've looked at explosive Discovery. Of some kind of artifact in Israel that is under wraps that you say could start a war. What is that? Yes, This is the work of the governor. I knew it. I knew it. So it's not in a church in Ethiopia is No, it's not. In fact, all the different places where people have speculators. It might be. It's not any of them. It's in Israel in Jerusalem, about 20 ft under the streets in a coat Tell me more. All right now the Ark of the Covenant. Was, uh, I Golden box. Actually, it was a wooden blocks counters in gold. And inside that it had the 10 Commandments written on tables of stone. And then once a year blood blood of an animal sacrifice, which was known to be prophetic, once again of the coming messiah. In his sacrifice. This was sprinkled by by the Hebrews on the body, Hebrew High priest rather on the lid of the the box. Which was known as the Mercy Seat. And the teaching was that the creator would have mercy on those who accepted his his atonement on their behalf and the Jewish people for the Hebrew people for about 1400 years kept observing this and it was in the first Temple, The Temple of Solomon. And then when the Babylonian attacked Jerusalem, 5 86 BC and came to destroy the city and the temple and to bring captive into Babylon, the the Hebrew people. The Prophet Jeremiah and the temple priests. I had a special system ready for this In case it ever happened. There were two pillars in front of the temple and these pillars I had mechanical system that could lower the floor behind inside the temple into a tunnel so that the object inside the temple could be lowered down and then moved through the tunnel to a cave. Below the streets of Jerusalem and this, uh, object. The ark of the Covenant was so holy so sacred that they didn't dare do anything else but hide it and when the second temple was built Upon their return from Babylon. Uh, they didn't know where it was. It was forgotten where it was. And so it for all this time for from you say from About 504 100 D C right through to 9 1992. It had been lost. It was lost for about 2000 years Now it is found, but it's so explosive. What happened after this was the fact that The Israeli government asked for confirmation that the that the vessels of Solomon's temple Solomon's riches had been found because not only the table of show bread But the seven brunch, limp stand and the altar of incense and a huge giants sword and several other things that we have been placed in the temple with the Ark of the covenant. They were all buried together by the temple priests when Babylon attacked Jerusalem. And they were all lost. Replicas were made of some of these things, and we could even end up in Ethiopia. Another replica ended up somewhere else, but that was not the original thing. And anyway, the the search for this went on. And on January the 6th 1992. It was Located and the Israeli government asked the discoverer to, uh, provide something out of the cave where all these were and to submit to them this item so that they would know that the rest of the things were there because they were all buried together. So out came a high priest with a homey grounds on the top of it, and this was examined by experts who declared that it was genuine. The patina that had built up on it covered overly the writing, which identified what it was used for, and it was placed in the Hebrew Museum, just outside Jerusalem, and they have a sign and I photographed assignment. I was there one time that this is the most exciting discovery. Uh, To date because it is from Solomon's Temple and the only thing that has been submitted for public view of Solomon's. There was always a myth, Jonathan that if somebody got close to the ark of the covenant or opened it up, they could die. Which was correct. Kind of Let me believe that maybe there was some kind of electronic involved or something. Well, the Hebrew books of the Old Testament stated that it was a symbol of the throne of the creator himself..

Jonathan George United States Smithsonian Institute Ethiopia 12 ft America Africa Jerusalem Mexico 100% tens of thousands Israel Babylon two pillars January the 6th 1992 Jeremiah two projects second temple Australia
"two projects" Discussed on Your Personal Brand

Your Personal Brand

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"two projects" Discussed on Your Personal Brand

"Can figure out like what needs to happen instead of taking weeks to get each one of these projects done. Maybe even months quite frankly. Because i've one project where i've been trying to do a sorta with everything else so i'm just giving you the recommendations and i'm not perfect doing this but i do have a project that started in february or march and there's no deadline to it and that's probably part of the problem but it's still done. It's still not out there so again. It's how i can get. I have these all. These different ideas have different opportunities of different people. I'm working with the podcast. These things so these two projects. I think it's very important for me. One has a very hard deadline when it has to be done. So i'm going to basically focus on those and what that means is i'm going to be back in two weeks with the next podcast episode. So i'm basically right at the one year anniversary. This is episode one of seven a little better than two episodes a week every week and that was the plan. And i'm just going to live by the recommendations that give other people. And i'm going to focus on these two projects and i should be able to get one don in four to six days and i should be able to get the other one done in three to five days. And that's what i'm going to push myself to do but i'm going to have to focus to do that because the volume of work. That's there once. I get into a pattern and i figure out sequence then i can sort of go through and create to daily cadence to figure out how to get it done the most efficiently as possible whereas if i only had a few hours a day or five hours a day versus twelve to fourteen and the blessing right now this time of year. It's just a lot of outdoor work involved in this but the weather looks like it's going to favorable for the most part. It's another reason why i'm just taking this break when you have something that you want to get done you have something new that you're trying to learn something new that you're trying to launch. Don't underestimate the power of focus being busy. All the time is not really the badge of honor that a lot of us tend to think that it is. Someone needs to get done. That could change your business could take you to the next level figure out how to delegate or delay everything else that could distract you and go get it done..

twelve february four march three six days five days two projects two weeks fourteen one project episode one each one One one year anniversary five hours a day one two episodes a week hours a day once
"two projects" Discussed on Southern California Real Estate Report

Southern California Real Estate Report

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"two projects" Discussed on Southern California Real Estate Report

"The current military can be housed the train going from north to south. And things like that. Those are usually big projects that have multiple over budget issues and everything else whereas the sports arena is a core deal. The sports arena desperately needs to be redone. It'll bring in better music acts which will benefit the city. Everything would be better with the new sports sports arena is. It's a joke for a city this high or this large. Excuse me so so. It's something that definitely needs. Needs improvement. And i think the housing would be more more. You would have more people benefiting from that housing locally than you would from the larger navy project obviously although over time people would benefit but for the right now probably point. Lomas the best deal. But here's the thing. There's huge pushback on blocking the views of the bay for that project because of the height limitations on it. So you're never gonna make everyone happy at the end of the day bright and it is a picking and choosing but i think at the end of the day and really the reason. Why we're talking about this podcast. Is that the dynamics of san diego. Were changing rapidly and much like other big cities in california. We're now facing those same decisions of you know there's obviously demand for better housing and for better transportation and to bring our city like you said into the future. What's the city gonna look like thirty years from now and this is kinda vision that people are having which you know at the end of the day. We'll see you never really know but the housing is needed and both of these projects. Bring a unique and useful. You know public works type project. You don't type benefit to the people you know and the navy for the economics of the city that the city needs the navy and we should be a good be a good city to work with them and on the other side. I think that the city needs to know for for a city the size of san diego. We basically have one sports team and people say oh. This doesn't matter and it's like it doesn't matter but the economics of that actually helped drive things so it does. It does help it helps to attract jobs. It helps you attract employers when when large companies are looking to cities to expand. They're also looking at the quality of life factors and those are things that are quality of life that are factored in. You know so. San diego is expensive but higher quality of life and things like that those those are all things that help and i just think it drives economics in ways that maybe you don't see so so it'll be interesting so these two projects will keep an eye on. This is becoming obviously contentious issue. It's going to be something that we're probably gonna hear a lot about. I think the point loma one is going to be driven a lot. You know a lot more than the navy one. I think the navy one. They'll quietly work with whoever you're going to work with. And when they feel like presenting it they'll present it. I don't think there's a big push for that. Like there is for point. Loma point lomas already appoint private developers and they're going to want to get rolling on it so that's going to be an interesting one to follow at the sports arena. So thanks for listening today and let us know your thoughts if you have anything lead nahra on our on our side and And thanks for listening this. Been the southern california real estate report..

california today san diego San diego both two projects southern california nahra loma one Loma point lomas thirty years
"two projects" Discussed on #QualityMatters

#QualityMatters

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"two projects" Discussed on #QualityMatters

"This part of the support step. He had listed there us learning from the evaluation to improve the quality of the next round of planning. Yeah so if you end up spending a third of the time when your project planning it rather than actually doing the work and checking it. Probably a little bit of balance that planning process should not be quite so in-depth and so that something we've run into and so it has led to problems with properly planning projects because it takes too much time. Guess what people aren't gonna do it. We're like water. We're going to find the path of least resistance. Okay so what i'm looking at here is like okay. Well project comes in for this type of project for that type of project. What's the standard said documentation that we need to complete fill out. So do we need a Again chart to track the process. Do we need to list out all of the requirements and goals or whatever. It is so we're working to better standardize are planning process because no two projects are ever the same and i can testify that he is working on this because i had never heard of again still not totally familiar with what it is but on this day that we are recording which will not be the same day that you guys hear it. He called me into his office and said hey look what i did. I made a gantt chart to and you know i was like wow looks really cool for you clarify. The reason i was so excited is because. I personally prefer not to use microsoft project when i can avoid it. It's more overkilled in some of the projects. We work with so. I was able to recreate it in microsoft. Excel okay which is kind of you. Know if conditional formattings funneled tricks any case. It's kind of geeking out about it Because it's so much easier to manage the project. So if you guys appreciate the geeky this in coolness of that let him know because cj copy off he did not get the appreciation for me that he would've liked to gun but this was part of it so my replanning is in itself a process And one of my expected outputs. Is that planning. our production. Processes is quick in easy and it has not always been quick. sometimes it takes a little longer. So that's what we're going through is like okay. Well if we run to this type project here are the standard tools. We have available to ourselves to run. The plan with here. Are the prescribed checks and measures to reevaluate. If we're hitting the deadlines and accomplishing our goals. And so my number one criteria is to make it as quick and easy as possible. And so what. I've realized for us means we're doing consultation or document information development which is like consultation light then. We're going to have one set of tools. If we're doing an internal audit which you know god only knows how many internal audits we've done that processes fantastic works wonderful. We know what we're doing. Yeah we set of tools over there. Well let me rephrase that we know what we're doing all the time our internal processes. Yes yes this is just to save us time and effort. How can we achieve the same outcomes with fewer inputs So then you know if you take a look at the quality management software. We're going to have a big upcoming release for software. So that kyle. I have to change the date. Oh so. I can't tell folks when yet had to change state but we're gonna have a big release know when the new date is. I don't have it yet. i'm waiting we. We've got to sit down and reevaluate our plan. Okay so but we're going to have to work at it..

microsoft Excel two projects kyle one set one time much third
"two projects" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"two projects" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Meds 10 30. From the Texas newsroom. I'm Lauren Douglas. US. Yet. Another Texan is facing charges in connection with the January 6th riot at the U. S. Capitol, according to the FBI law Enforcement arrested Alpine residents Sean David Watson last week. Watson is known across the Big Bend region as an outspoken supporter of former President Donald Trump. Marfa Public Radio's Travis Bubenik has more. Watson turned himself into local police on Wednesday following a warrant for his arrest being issued. He's facing two counts for quote, knowingly and willingly joining the mob and violently entering the capital. Back in February, Watson admitted to taking part in the capital mob and an interview with local TV news station CBS seven. No, I don't regret any of it. I'm actually proud of what I'm doing. Am, I feel like I'm fighting for my country. I'm a veteran. So Watson was expected to be released on bond. After an initial court appearance Friday. He joins the more than three dozen Texans arrested in connection with the Capitol attack this year. Travis Spook Vinick in Marfa. The Biden administration is taking steps to repair damage caused by Trump Arab border Wall construction. Katya raise the Mallory Falk has more on Friday's announcement. The Department of Homeland Security says it will start with two projects first in the Rio Grande Valley. The agency will fix breaches in the levee system that protects the region from flooding during extreme weather events. He just says Border wall construction quote blue large holes in the flood barrier system and Hidalgo County officials have raised alarms about the potential for dangerous flooding, especially during hurricane season..

Lauren Douglas Wednesday Sean David Watson Friday Marfa Travis Bubenik Rio Grande Valley FBI Big Bend last week Texas February Katya US U. S. Capitol Watson two projects Marfa Public Radio Hidalgo County this year
"two projects" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"two projects" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And if you're an active or retired federal employees, you can now get here going No cost to you act now. The current group that we have is the Bell Cara Group and or X Minerals is one of the founding companies are group is quite well known for the discovery of the large lot precios of silver deposit in Mexico, for which I was the chief geologist of the time. We have two projects in Mexico. Currently one is a joint venture with Pan American silver. It's called the Sandra Project. It's a silver project with a silver resource of 33 million ounces. Second project is called Cornetto, and it's a Silver gold project with the world's largest silver mining company. Personnel project that I'm most fascinated with. Right now. It's our joint venture with Pan American silver. It's one where we have discovered part of a much larger system that is analogous to the left a diary a giant deposit, which is about 75, kilometers east of Sandra Project, their power line corridors. There are communications roots, really all of the infrastructure that you would want. Or establishing good mining project. The mapping and geochemical sampling that is being done today will lead to a diamond drilling program for the first quarter of 2021. Mexico's the number one silver producing nation in the world. So if you want to find giant silver deposits, this is the place to go. I wanted to feel like myself again. So I made some changes, Better diet or exercise and CBD..

Mexico Bell Cara Group X Minerals 33 million ounces two projects one Second project today first quarter of 2021 Sandra about 75, kilometers Sandra Project Cornetto Pan American Project
"two projects" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"two projects" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Stop releasing everybody that we're catching like we were doing under the previous administration right now. Most people not all but most people that get caught are releasing the United States and that's why we're seeing a huge surge of On a company Children coming ages 789 years old, traveling by themselves. Yeah. If we don't get a handle on this, this country won't be worth living in. No, I'm not a racist or a bigot. I'm not cold hearted. But at some point you've got to have some rules. Regulations guidelines. Parameters, you know, during that whole five minute dissertation. The giggle queen didn't say anything about Oh, yeah, After we commissioned a panel to form a study to file a report after I make all the phone calls after I called the Mexican president. Um yeah, After all of that, we're going to roll back the Biden Harris open border policy. You want to know why people are coming in droves? It's because we've got a president that's inviting them. That's why and the answer, like every good Democrat just throw money at it, which would be fine with me as long as it was their own money, But it's not. It's yours and mine. Fallen been broke. Paul, how you doing? Hello, Pop. All right, let's go to Jim. Jim, How are you doing? I'm doing fine, Rick. Thank you for having me on. Just think. Just think. Good analogy for all this is it. If your house was on fire, and you call 911 to the fire department said, Please come and put my fire out. They said, Well, we're gonna take the occasion this fire to change our building Coach you know about my house is on fire. Well, I know, but if we change building codes, then nobody else will have a fight. Everything will be great. It's the same kind of thing. We have this problem, but they won't do anything about it, or they won't do as you say, just throw money at it. Well, that's all that's hold. The Democrats know how to do when they campaign. What are they campaign on giving the people stuff stuff out of the public Treasury? The Democrats only No. One line of operation and that's to buy votes. Well, why should it be any different once they get in elected office? It's the same thing. They don't know how to do anything of substance. It's symbolism over substance in your tax dollar. That's what it is. And if I sound a little jazzed about this today, I am because I've you know, I've been reading quite a bit of a Zafar is government studies. Once Biden took office, everything stopped. I mean everything. And then you hire or appoint, Um Kamala Harris, which was so unpopular, she couldn't even win her own primary in our own home state. A zip. She's some kind of expert. She hasn't even been to the border yet and she cites. Well, I We've got some covert concerns. Well, we're in Texas. We've got some covert concerns. That's why we'd like you to stop the influx of all these people where it's estimated that 25% of them have covered It's okay for us to be exposed, but not hers. That makes sense. Jim. Yes, it does. Just It's frustrating the whole thing. Amen. Brother. I'm right there with you. I appreciate the call very, very much. Let's go to J. B in Temple, Texas. JB, How you doing? Oh, man, I'm blessed. I'm blessed. Everything around me seems to be going downhill, but I'm in good shape. Hey, I'm talking to my nephew were kind of business partners. But he's also a Water contractor utility contract you're in. One of his biggest customers is DHS, he said. Man up until a few months ago, it was a good deal because they paid good but his liaison just counting and said, Hey, you better finish this up down here. He's working in South Texas got two big jobs, and he said, Because you're probably fixed, not get paid if you don't get finished. And then he told me something that you guys might find ironic. He said. We just did two projects. His part of it was about $700,000, he said. But the facilities are completely empty except for the employees because they're called a detention center on his liaison. Told him, he says, Yeah, they new regime says it's a bad look to put people in a detention center. It's easier. Just a cinema owner way or give my hotel Oh, I thought you guys might find that interesting that Z fact. I believe that 100%. You know, leave it to a Democrat to keep doing renovation or improvement or enhancement to places they're not going to use because the optics don't work for them Instead, again, throw taxpayer money at him. Putting up put him up in a hotel. Better yet, just well, we're going to take an extra long lunch hour. I hope nobody runs away. I mean, this is so, JB. Very good call. I appreciate it. Aren't you sick of this? I mean, this ought to be the easiest thing for this country defects, illegal immigration. Get everybody uses it exploits it as a cottage industry. I'm Rick Roberts News talkie 20 w B A P Did.

Jim Rick Kamala Harris 100% Paul Texas J. B South Texas 25% JB Biden United States today DHS five minute Democrats 911 Democrat two projects about $700,000
Mia Neal Talks Ma Rainey's Black Bottom

Look Behind The Look

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Mia Neal Talks Ma Rainey's Black Bottom

"Thank you so much for joining me today on. Look behind the look. I am a huge congratulations are in order. You are in the middle of a world wind right now. You have been nominated for an oscar. And it's historic and i'm so impressed in just happy about all of the success that you've been experiencing and i know that that you are in a whirlwind. So what what. What has it been like. Has it just been unexpected. You of course. Of course. yeah it's been The part about it is that is so unexpected. Like when you work behind the scenes you just don't it just doesn't cross your mind that you're working on a project this is about to do so you know. There's no is nothing that can predict what the project is gonna go so i don't think that anyone on it knew that this where we were all headed you know so that part is surprising and i think it makes you you know. Just have gratitude on a whole 'nother level right. Yes but the second project that you've been involved in. That's been like so hugh i mean. Uncut gems was my favorite movie of the year. Just one year before so you must be. You must be able to pick the project. How did you come to this project. Or how do you pick your projects. Well so an roth. I work with a lot brought me onto this friday. Okay george st war. And i yeah and so this particular project with denzel producing with you know it just by ola chadwick. I don't know why didn't cross. I certainly did win. The thought myself but definitely them right like as we watch the performance as we will show you know this is spectacular and the transformation on viola. And how far. She's willing to go with it In washington her bill that character even in biddings That was something. So i definitely knew that we were working on something special but i know where it was going to go.

Oscar Ola Chadwick Hugh Denzel Viola Washington
Hurricanes score 3 quick goals, top Predators 4-1

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Hurricanes score 3 quick goals, top Predators 4-1

"There are hurricanes scored three times in an eight minute span to beat the predators for one Warren Foegele opened the scoring late in the first period before Andrei Svechnikov invits intro checked out in the first five and a half minutes of the second project says they couldn't afford a third straight loss if you want to be one of the best teams only gonna come every single night so even a like we did the last couple it's important to get back on track make sure plan our game especially this late in the season after Erik Haula netted a short handed goal midway through the third period Sebastian aho iced it with a power play score with two thirty eight remaining Peter morale as it made nineteen saves for Carolina improving to three oh one one since returning from a thumb injury that sidelined him for more than two months the hurricanes lightning remain tied for first in the central division I'm Dave Ferrie

Warren Foegele Andrei Svechnikov Erik Haula Sebastian Aho Peter Morale Carolina Hurricanes Dave Ferrie
"two projects" Discussed on Why Watch That Radio

Why Watch That Radio

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"two projects" Discussed on Why Watch That Radio

"To when episode where we talked about it wrath. I thought that the action was okay if we continue that fine. I'll accept the storylines fine episode to like. What am i. Excuse me like. I said if they have their butts kicked they better not be joking or i don't take any of the seriously not at all of sticks of gone gone. So why am i watching this then. An episode three. Got it back together. Appropriately wasn't perfect note. Also here's the thing if you're joking one seen get your bucket okay and then you go see someone who was experimented on your calling the tuskegee experiment. How does that work totally. It doesn't to me. It's always when it comes to marvel. We've got to appeal to this segment. Now we gotta do this segment. Oats serious earwax Let's do with joke here. let's now now. The shifting tones don't work it's like it was put together in a lab so out procreate though so what i would say is. I really thought that the second episode was a dud. A complete dud Episode three though. I was like i don't mind watching the some people buying up a certain villain and a certain person who's in hiding. She ain't happy. How do gotta help me. I have to say my rightfully. So yes but she did. I have to say that. 'cause i'm gonna walk this dance very very tenderly. I think you really hit it on the head. Hit it on the head with that. I really think that the falcon and the winter soldier agree with you. That the title is misleading. You know i. I if you have the falcon and the winter soldier ira. We do expect that. I expected as an audience but i have to say that i have such hot again. High regard for what the russo's did to the marvel universe. I mean very high regard so much so that what they did especially with those first two projects that they worked on to me shifted the entire universe so much so he knows that they did because they let them do the last two They let them in dipped it. It really is hard to watch this being in the hands of someone else when there was such a strong opinion and strong establishment of we knew who bucky was in captain america first venture But we really got a strong establishment of the winter soldier with the winter soldier. So now that we're going back to the avengers i'm sorry. Back to the first avenger the the bucky storyline. I'm finding myself really scraping to care. Like describe just trying to find will nuggets and when arch villains who completely shift get a whole movie is in a club dancing like like but not for reason dancing just like i'm dancing that to me. Is that funny. It's not you know. And and some people are like no. Don't don't i. Bested ten twelve years. he lot of Injected with a serum and mind controlled to tell like nook that ended with that i to. That's what you're to be hanging out like up story seriously. Or he bought take away the torture and everything else. Just let them be a regular old superhero captain. America in the show is serious. Well now we haven't talked about that. I have a hard time talking about those two characters. And i'm not because it i. It's very hard to watch. It's fair remarked. Watch so i'm not. I won't be talking about the new captain america and his because you get myself in trouble. Yeah because the question is does it work. But he's serious. At least i'll give that peeing joke with him. He's like okay. You don't wanna work with me. Stand on my way at but then can we take that seriously. Well we are definitely looking forward to seeing if there's any kind of resolve or any kind of momentum now the word and street is episode bores post to be something to watch so we'll see when we get there. What do we talk about. A season finale. And you were able to catch the full season of resident alien on sci-fi now whenever ten winning whenever we say sifi we always have to go. Yes it's a channel it's an actual they have actual on scifi relax. It's already been renewed for It's already been renewed for season two and you can tell us if sci-fi worth the the venture you know because we don't go to sifi a lot. It's not like you get this plethora of stuff. Yes i you know you seem to finish it. Yeah i think last scifi show. I watched multiple was krypton thinking about and all of that. That was the last one and now we're here and i've really enjoyed it from the beginning when i reviewed it and i finished it and i've got sick that they did a really job. I've got to give it to them. They did a really good job of developing because in the beginning. Especially i was like okay. We do have an alien who crash lands on earth. What's his mission really. And he hides himself in a certain way he becomes a human takes over. somebody's identity. How could he do this. And how does he relate to the humans. Will he be spotted. So that's really one of the questions and island tutic is just perfect. I mean just perfect and I would say. I don't even know what to say. Perfect perfection in this alien. Hey is i mean he says it. It's it's just hilarious like you'll talk to them and he does not talk but then you hear what he's thinking too and there was one line that he said it was so funny just in his head because somebody was coming after him and he was kind of like wait a minute it is hand so it's just stuff like that so much fun but i thought that outside of him. I really didn't want to see the other people so much that it bad it was established so compelling did across the season we a lot of those other people in a way that made a lot more sense so by the end. I bit mind so much if he wasn't on the screen so i thought that was a feat his relationship with one the little kids in this town. It's it's almost beautiful. Even though it's a antagonistic relationship is beautiful to watch grow so.

earth second episode two characters one line first two projects ten twelve years first venture sifi season two Episode three one of resident alien bucky episode three first one marvel two a minute krypton
"two projects" Discussed on MAKE SPACE — A Home Design Show by Never Skip Brunch

MAKE SPACE — A Home Design Show by Never Skip Brunch

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"two projects" Discussed on MAKE SPACE — A Home Design Show by Never Skip Brunch

"Finding a peace in your actual handsome should be pretty easy right now because right like we're all aware of what is not working in our houses. Well that's perfect then because you're doing Apiece you already have. And i am running around all over the place finding new which is an adventure had to drive all over houston because houston's like a driving city where people don't love driving so that works out well for you. If i could outsource one thing in my life right now it would be a driver. I would have someone. Drive me place totally. Be your driver. It'd be so bad you move. You're andy reid driver. cats okay. Next up is paint so last season. I only painted one piece of furniture. I feel like you painted everything. I'm like sitting here and i'm like did i paint anything. I- payment just like details. Oh yeah i want. i did fifty two projects. I'm slightly vermont. Remembering right now. I did have bed frame. It does and then. I did like a storage tray inside the.

houston fifty two projects one piece of furniture reid one thing
$215M in BP oil spill money to restore Louisiana marshes

Red Eye Radio

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

$215M in BP oil spill money to restore Louisiana marshes

"Louisiana will get nearly $215 billion in BP oil spill money for two projects planned to restore more than 4600 acres of Mars and other habitat in the New Orleans area, according to Louisiana's governor John Bell Edwards. The money is from BP is $8.8 billion Settlement for natural resource is damage caused by an oil well blowout. It's a bit more than 100 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and killed 11 oil platform workers, But

Louisiana John Bell Edwards New Orleans Mexico
Chadwick Boseman Mural Unveiled at Downtown Disney

Lewis and Logan

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Chadwick Boseman Mural Unveiled at Downtown Disney

"Mural of Chadwick Boseman. King Chad Mural shows the late Marvel star giving a young child who's wearing a black panther mask and a hospital gown. The Wakanda salute artist Nicholas Smith said Creating the mural was a full circle moment as his last two projects as a Disney Imagineer were working on the Children's Hospital project and Avengers campus. Bozeman died last month following a battle with colon cancer. Mariah Carey is opening up about her childhood. In a new interview with

King Chad Mural Disney Imagineer Mariah Carey Chadwick Boseman Colon Cancer Children's Hospital Nicholas Smith Bozeman Avengers
Chadwick Boseman Mural Unveiled at Downtown Disney

The Breakfast Club

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Chadwick Boseman Mural Unveiled at Downtown Disney

"Disneyland's downtown Disney Shopping District in California is now displaying a mural of Chadwick Boseman, the king. Chad mural shows the late Marvel star giving a young child who's wearing a black panther mask and a hospital gown. The Wakanda salute artist Nicholas Smith said Creating the mural was a full circle moment as his last two projects as a Disney Imagineer. We're working on the Children's Hospital Project and Avengers campus. Bozeman died last month following a battle with colon cancer.

Chad Mural Chadwick Boseman Disney Children's Hospital Colon Cancer Avengers Nicholas Smith Disneyland Bozeman California
"two projects" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"two projects" Discussed on KOMO

"And Olympia 68 in Seattle at 3 36. The shocking death of Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman on Friday has Hollywood still reeling, and it turns out that so many of the people who were just working with him had no idea that he was that sick. ABC is Jason Nathan said. Joining us on the co Moh news line, and that's really rather surprising Jason and it says something about how he was heroic off screen. I was absolutely shocked at that I had. I mean, none of us had any idea that he was even sick or close to death, So that was a surprise there. But when the news came out on Friday, I had to imagine that you know he's been dealing with this for four years in that time and given the timeline, we're not exactly sure how many movies filmed, but it might have been up to 10 projects that he film. I had to imagine that some people knew because in order to fill The movie. Usually you have to get insurance. Your stars have to be insured and go through medical dams to make sure that everything is okay. So I figured like Spike Lee just directed him into five blood that came out this year on Netflix. I figured he must know but know. He put out a statement saying that when we film the five Bloods in Thailand, it was hot Jungles, Mountains, and Chadwick was there with us all the way. I never, ever suspected that anything was wrong. No one knew he was going through treatment or chemotherapy. And then when it came to Black Panther, Ryan Coogler, who's the director of that and working on the second project, the sequel? I figured he probably would know something since they're working on this big movie together, Not only the first one in 2018, but this upcoming one. But he didn't know a CZ. Well, he said that Chad deeply valued his privacy, and I wasn't privy to the details of his illness. But he goes on to say that because Chadwick Boseman was the caretaker, a leader, a man of faith, dignity and pride, he shielded his collaborators from his suffering, and he lived a beautiful life to be able to film. All these movies, especially the Spike Lee won in Thailand in the jungles. Going through. What he was going through is just amazing to think of, and I just watched that last week. And now, in hindsight, there isn't even any sign of him being ill. No, there's a if you look back over the coverage of the weekend, and there was a ABC News special last night as well. In some pictures, you can tell he looks dinner. But that's about it. And you would think for an actor who goes from role the role, especially playing really people, as he has done so often, and Thurgood Marshall and Jackie Robinson and James Brown actors all the time go up and down and wait for playing different roles, so nobody would have thought anything of it. And the fact that he spent a lot of his time working with kids who have cancer, going to hospitals and seeing them writing them letters doing all those kinds of things we now know. Maybe that's a little bit of what drove him to do that. But he was also a very good guy who probably would have given back no matter what he picked such heroic roles, too. I mean, that's the thing about him. He was a hero for all of us. Did he pick the role to do the roles? Choose him? I mean, it's tough to say, because the first major break came in playing Jackie Robinson and 42. He'd done some other things before that. But that was the first real his step out under the leading stage of Hollywood and then to follow that with James Brown in which he was just so fantastic and get on up. I mean, you know, his true talent is on display just in the dancing alone how he was able, how anybody is able to do James Brown's moves, But for him to do himself perfectly is is truly amazing. And then Thurgood Marshall is well, but it was really black Panther. That was the movie that we knew him at that point, But that's the movie If you're looking at True box office a list stars in Hollywood. He is among the topper was among the top, and it's still so hard to say that in past tense because there was so much coming in the future from him, I guarantee there would have been Oscar nominations if not wins. He was one of the biggest stars of the era right now, and to lose him like this, So suddenly, it's just, you know, I can think of a few people in my time covering this business one this year with Kobe Bryant for sure. That was a shock Prince was a shock a cz well, robin Williams. That was a huge surprise. And and Chadwick Boseman is in that category. A bee sees Jason Nathan's and thank you, Jason. Alright, take 3 40 time to check on the coat at the Kamo Sports Desk. With BILL Sports. Thousands have signed a petition asking to resume high school fall sports in Washington State. The petition released today by a group calling itself S a W student athletes of Washington. Calling on Governor Insley on the Washington.

Chadwick Boseman James Brown Jason Nathan Spike Lee Thurgood Marshall Hollywood Bloods Jackie Robinson Seattle Thailand ABC Kamo Sports Desk ABC News Moh Ryan Coogler Washington BILL Sports Governor Insley Netflix robin Williams
"two projects" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"two projects" Discussed on WTVN

"W TV END I Heart Radio's new podcast Crimen Alia explores the intersection of history and true crime. Criminal activities linger in the margins of history and lady poisoners offer up some of the most compelling tales were the perpetrators or sympathetic characters. We're going to find out belly it would turn out was also a fellow poisoner. Listen to criminal Alia on the I heart radio or wherever you get your podcasts summer in Columbus, and you hate the pain. Well, do what your neighbor batty did. She called Rhino Shield. What motivated me to call was two projects that we had at our house. The summers would come and go and I finally just said, we got to get these two things painted. It was terrible and it needs to be done. And then when we got involved with rhinos, it's Rhino shield, and it's not pain. It's better colors matched up very well with our health, and they were in and out. You know, no math. It'll look great, very pleased. Columbus get the 25 year guaranteed protection of Rhino Shield for 10% off the regular price called Rhino Shield. The professional people that will come out and do the painting done is well worth the investment. Here's over. Jim Williams, this offer's limited. So call me at 80 80 Rhino 41. That's 80. Rhino 41, Don't pay. Don't vinyl go right. Don't find Rhino's never paint your house again. Warning. This product contains.

Rhino Crimen Alia batty Columbus Jim Williams
A New Album Turns The Sound Of Endangered Birds Into Electronic Music

Environment: NPR

05:19 min | 2 years ago

A New Album Turns The Sound Of Endangered Birds Into Electronic Music

"An international collective of electronic deejays and composers is taking their beats out of the dance club, and into jungles and forests. It's all to help save nature's greatest singers. Birds Catalina Maria. Johnson has the story of a guide to the Birdsong Project Robin. Perkins is a thirty three road DJ composer producer originally from glass of England. He goes by the name A. Spanish for the. Perkins produced his first project in Twenty fifteen a guy to the Birdsong of South America. The whole project was born of this idea of taking the songs of endangered birds and challenging musicians to make a piece of music from and so trying to marry these worlds of activism, all conservation Goodson and joining us. Perkins invited artists from each of the endangered or threatened birds homelands to build their own solves around the Birdsong. The beautiful thing about electronic music is that it opens up this whole toolbox of things that you can vies do right so you can take a sample of a bird song and do five million things to it. You can turn into an instrument itself. You can reverse it. You can have effects. You can sample. Ed Perkins has just finished the second project. A guy to the Birdsong of Mexico Central, America and the Caribbean. One of the musicians who responded to his call is Nicaraguan Sonic artist that on behavioral. She chose the Turquoise Proud Maat Maat or Guatemala. rankle to me was a very clear choice as a child I would see this bird freely flying around and meeting his partner, the travel in pairs most of the time in my backyard for sunsets. Beautiful mystical moment every day. What about wrangle is threatened by loss of habitat primarily due to deforestation, it's also Nicaragua's national bird. This bird represents a lot of symbolic in my area of the world's, because it represents freedom and these Central American countries have been striving for political social economic freedom for a long time. The idea of freedom was also part of the impetus for Al Ovando choice. Ovando is a member of the renowned Gutty for collective, that also includes musicians from what the my love on us and Nicaragua for the collective's contribution to the album Ovando chose the endangered black cat. Like the guava uncle, the black cat birds freedom is threatened by loss of habitat. Obando feels his people have a special kinship with the catbird and struggle for survival, like you've just imagining US coming all the way from the coast of West Africa into the Caribbean, ending up in believes that still continuing the struggle and trying to be part of what the world is today. Ovando also happens to be a devoted burger. He even convinced the. The band to add a technical writer to its contracts when the musicians perform at festivals, so we know what we should just add it on and just put just for fun. You know some of us in the collective avid burgers, and if it here's anybody at the festival. Who'd like to burning? We would love to go birding with them married. They would know some places some hot spots. In Oh, we could check out some birds. As with the first scalpels, all of the profits from the new release will support organizations in each region. One of them is birds, Caribbean. It's executive director Lisa. Sorenson explains how the recording not only help her efforts, but may also yield extended benefits helping to develop sites in the Caribbean that need infrastructure for example, there might be a beautiful place to go see birds, but there's no trail. There's no interpretive sign edge there to tell you about what you're seeing. So we're envisioning funding from this project will help us advance building the supply and building the demand for sustainable burden nature tourism. That's project founder. Robin Perkins wish to yeah. Hopefully people will come away from the album. Feeling inspired and feeling the need to listen against the Birdsong around them to do something to protect the natural spaces that we need to survive proceeds from a guide to the Birdsong of Mexico Central America, and the Caribbean will also benefit nonprofits in Costa Rica and Mexico.

Ed Perkins Caribbean Al Ovando Ovando Mexico Nicaragua Robin Perkins South America Maat Maat Catalina Maria Johnson United States Goodson Producer England Founder Obando Sorenson Writer Executive Director
Making music in isolation: Indigenous artist creates new work during pandemic

Unreserved

08:25 min | 2 years ago

Making music in isolation: Indigenous artist creates new work during pandemic

"Of all what happened to you back in February so I ended up having a stress. Inducing takes a lot of work to be an independent artists to be an independent artists in the US. You know doing the level of visibility and lack of opportunities so you know I manage myself. I produce an engineer my own music so it just takes a lot of work to do what I do and for the first time in my life I hit a limit physically and ended up having a I ever stress induced seizure of my life and I. I got taken by ambulance to a hospital on the side of Chicago. Close to where. I'm based and ended up having one of the worst experiences of medical racism I've ever faced in my life as a native person so The hospital had assumed I was. I was on hard drugs. Pcp in that's what had caused the seizure and caused my state Even though relatives were there telling them otherwise you know they just assume the worst. They saw my Ceremony Scars Khotan do some piercing ceremonies. They saw some some of the ceremony scars on my body and had assumed it was self mutilation and then I had come to in the hospital and I was intimated in. I wasn't supposed to be conscious but I ended up coming to out of the sedatives and I panicked and freaked out. I felt like I was suffocating. And they mark me with combative disorder strapped me into bed with locked restraints for a couple of days and so I went in for a seizure and when I came to a couple of days later and came out of it I actually ended up having to stay in the hospital for a whole week to undo the damage that they had done to my muscles in my body from shooting with so many sedatives and from strapping the into a bed. Like I felt like in look like I got ran over by truck so so yeah it was just. It was a really Violent experience for me. I came out of that. Just just a couple of weeks before the pandemic kit. So you know I was kind of kind of a sense of recovery already. And then we all got thrown into a tailspin after that And how did you process that that you put that into your music? Yeah you know. It's it was the only thing I knew how to do so. My music journey started when I was a very young boy and I started playing music and writing songs to heal and process my world and process my experiences. And and so you know to this day. I'm still doing that so I came out of that We're just a lot of trauma even spiritual emotional physical. I'd never really suffered before all at once and it was a little overwhelming and so I did what I what I knew how to do and I turned to my music. I'm working on a project right now album that I'm dedicating to my mother. It's called INA. Which is the LAKOTA word for mother? a lot of songs were were born out of that experience but also what was born out of that. Experience is my first ever flute album. I'm also going to release this month. It's called the along wet too. Which is the Makoto phrasing for Spring Song so I composed four songs after that experience? Because you know I'm not fluent in my language Khotan learning and so I really only speak English and English. Just doesn't capture. Sometimes what I fail and on I found when I just put it all into on native flute. Which is one of the instruments. I play because I also produced music. I but I've never really put out an an album as just a musician purely music. And so I. I kind of turned to that because it was the only thing I could do to express you know a lot of what I was experiencing so I went outside and recorded these songs outside just before the pandemic and just before we went into lockdown and recorded a liar. The songs on my home reservation outside of the House that I grew up in so I'm looking forward to release in those two project soon here and like I said they were born out of that experience. Music has always been a tool for me to heal tool for me to process and very fortunate to be able to share that process and that healing with people through music. So when you say that you used music to process the experience what kinds of And the flute which is really beautiful. How what kinds of lyrics did you find yourself writing in? What kind of You know genre. Did you play in for this album? Yes so So the the album that I'm dedicating my mother. Ina is going to be everything from hip pop to some acoustic hip hop because I also play. You know several acoustic instruments but the the food album along wet to is. Actually the music is just purely native flu. And I'll give you an example. One of the songs on there is a call calling your spirit back song and that was rooted out of a a Just A LAKOTA. Teaching we have of calling your spirit back. You know. It's a daily practice but especially if you go through something traumatic. We're taught to call your spirit back because your spirit can leave you. Even infraction are pieces and so when I came out of the hospital I really felt like my spirit left me and so I felt like I needed to do more than just call my spare back in the traditional sense. I felt like I needed to write a song to do that. And never have I ever had a song just being my head and it was in its entirety. And that's how this song came to me. I picked up my foot as soon as I got home. I stepped outside and What you hear on the album is what came out the first time I it and that's never happened before you know usually have to work on songs. Sometimes I'll tweak songs for months sometimes years but this song was already there You know and that will give you an example of the type of songs that are on this album but I also am recording the stories of how the songs were born in English. So sort of what I'm doing here. I kind of shared the experience that that that birthday song so with each song. I'm going to also show the story of where it came from and doing that I. It's kind of a LAKOTA thing too. In a lot of indigenous cultures. They kind of share the story where the song came from before they share it so I hope to do that with some of my upcoming project says well because I think the stories I also just as important as the music so really you haven't slowed down at all since recovery. It's like no no not at all. I think I just had to get creative. And how how I kept going you know. Fortunately I am doing my passion. I'm doing what I love. And I'm very blessed to do what I love. Even if it is stressful and a lot of work but every day I wake up and get to play music and make a living off of music. I feel like I'm living my gene. You know And you're not just working on on your own music. You're also sort of rippling out this. This idea of community many others and Indian countries while as yourself are feeling these These effects. What specifically are you doing to help communities through this pandemic Definitely so I'm a part of this Collective this this artists collective of Young indigenous artists around my age We're called the dream warriors and we actually formed just out of necessity in need We were looking for management for young indigenous artists. Just like a you know some sort of network support system for us to find gigs and kind of create a support system for each other and we. We couldn't really find one that already existed so we just banded together as as peers as relatives and and and created a artists collective. So we really use this collective as A vehicle to create support systems for native artists. That weren't there for us and one of the ways. We've been able to do that in this. Pandemic is a webinars. So we we we so far have done to webinars where we ended up raising over several thousand dollars in these webinars to disperse to native families in need and we put out a call and we had over hundreds of native families across the reservations. We come from and also communities beyond the communities we come from requesting assistance financial need and. I don't know if y'all are paying attention to the news and stats coming out of the states but native communities are being left out of a lot of the statistics and the numbers being recorded about. How this pandemic affecting community so we're left out of a lot of funding as well so it was really great to be able to use our collective energy and our art to to to do these webinars to generate thousands of dollars worth of funding to disperse to hundreds of families in need and we also had Donors match some of the funding. So this was. This is only the beginning for in this sort of This new creative way of of helping communities and using what we love to do that. That's amazing thank you for being such a wonderful bright light in your community. Thank you Rosanne. I appreciate it frank. Wall is Chang who Lakota rapper from the Rosebud. Indian RESERVATION IN SOUTH DAKOTA IS. New Album will be out later this summer.

United States Engineer Chicago South Dakota INA Rosanne Rosebud Wall Chang
"two projects" Discussed on The Trash Tapes

The Trash Tapes

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"two projects" Discussed on The Trash Tapes

"Of overwhelming. I'M GONNA GIVE YOU. I'm GonNa give you a bit of a breakdown. Because usually on the trash types. We usually go through context. Because I kind of feel like sometimes in most trashy movies the backstory for these are far more interesting than the actual movie itself and So we're going to go bit here. So Spooky is a nineteen eighty-six American independent horror film directed by Brandon Faulkner and Thomas Doran which was with additional footage directed by Eugene Joseph. Now there's going to be a story involving now okay now. The film was given a limited the release in nineteen eighty-seven but then it became really popular. And this is where it grew. It's called following when it started to air on cable. Tv Multiple Times almost on a rotation to one thousand nine hundred thousand nine hundred ninety one. This is why it became so successful because it was constantly forced down people's throats on TV eight in the end credits credit road at NC any directed by credits roll up. Well there is a story for that. Okay okay so let me just break this down for you. So the two directors original directors Brendan Faulkner and Thomas. During were first time directors right but they have basically done a lot of stuff they were doing of indie horror movies and stuff. We're talking over the top exploitation stuff but they never got their projects fully completed so this is a summary of the guys expertise so they made a sort of a show reel item show centered around studios and stuff like to get something going for different movie altogether twisted souls right when happened basically one of the those financier that got involved name my colle- and he looked at some of the show real stuff and looked at a project. Never got out of a footage from a movie that never got out call hell spawn so already. I'm excited right. There's no movie called Hell Spawn. That never got made properly and Michael Lee said I like these guys. I'm going to give them something so. They backed this movie. So they saw filming. They filming the movie in About One. Thousand nine hundred. They started filming with finances docking on his links to other studios twisted souls. Which is what is happening was a very different movie altogether and you can kind of see. That's because the idea of the script on. I think I have a quote here. Basically the whole point in the movie was going to be a subversion of the haunted house trump. Where he because he they were able to find a really really exciting location. Like this sort of house to house by the way. This'll looks awesome outside the house. Look old all army house. Yeah interesting fact that this house was a twenty four room. Colonial House was abode by one of the American founding. Fathers John J apparently so he. Apparently of this is a history house. This history ready of itself. One of the Dusty far off antastic. I wouldn't be surprised here so this is a history house. They're able to have access to this history house they look into the House and realize it's twenty four rooms and so he stole himself right. The directors literally said and I quote. There is a monster every two pages when he wrote it. They bought it out a script in two weeks which you can kind of tell it's going to be a little bit like evil. Dead is going to be a little bit like that but with the different monster in every single room. Yeah I got the fives. Un was the name speaking in the voice of a pull Daniels guy the background. Yeah and going in my next week. I'm going to summon something else a pretty much ridiculous theme park ride vibe. Doesn't it with the DEA monsters it definitely feels like it feels like you should be seeing a car somewhere.

Colonial House Eugene Joseph Thomas Doran Brandon Faulkner Brendan Faulkner NC DEA Un Michael Lee Daniels John J
Collaborating to Cure Dementia

Sounds of Science

08:35 min | 2 years ago

Collaborating to Cure Dementia

"Many of us will have to deal with dementia at some point in our lives whether as a patient or caregiver this terrible range of conditions affects five to eight percent of the sixty and older population at any given time. According to the World Health Organization the Dementia Consortium of Private Charity Partnership that Charles River joined last year is one of the organizations leading promising research on dementia treatments in order to discuss this condition and the research to treat it. I am joined by Sarah Almond Associate Director of integrated biology. Welcome Sarah Hi. Can you explain the purpose and organization of the DEMENTIA CONSORTIUM DEMENTIA Is SETUP BOY A? K. or outside research she k. Is a charity that focuses on. Alzheimer's disease it brings together. Active research is Pharma partners. Sarah's including Chelsea River in order to bring forward novel treatments dementia including outlines disease outside reset she. Kabc this research is invited to come forward with ideas for novel targets in Europe. Degeneration Your Inflammation Way. Them work with them to put together. What packages the funded by the partners? Anti Kate to prosecute he's talk and hopefully lead to novel treatments for Dementia. What do you think of the way? They've set up their organization. I think this is a great way to stop the organization because it brings together such a broad range of experience From academic researchers may have spent years really understanding the biology of targets to pharmaceutical companies. That know how to bring targets three two treatments actually effective in the clinic and also is a CRI where we have a broad range of so biology and chemistry capability so we cannot provide the word packages also have extremely experienced. Research is catchy. Help develop the molecules to treat these young coupled with the charitable input of the Vale Uk. He Project managed but also do so much to bring forward research in this area. Yeah absolutely cut covering all the bases. So what is Charles Rivers role in this group? You mentioned a little bit and you go into a little more detail. Charleston is WANNA to Communist with capabilities and drug discovery expertise. We provide strategic input into plans to de risk these targets and how to generate tool molecule suitable testing the hypothesis. We went with Alzheimer's Research K. And the principal investigator to proposals together. That income dreams that executed by then the appeal and US working closely together. They may do the basics. Hogging island allergy and we bring medicinal chemistry or HD CAPABILITIES. That actually will enable us to find a joke against that tailgate. We meet with the foul partners to finalize plans. And then once funded. We actually execute the work. Okay awesome I understand that a couple of research projects from the consortium have already been green lit Can you explain those proposals? She'll you're correct to Russia in progress of the two targets. One is fine as the Scott appears to link to Tau Accumulation ear inflammation. We aren't sure whether we need to be selective over a closely related kind as the. Pi is looking at whether ACHSAF. You've reduced this target. That doesn't indeed impact Taufel are. They should be China in Vivo. Mostly of onto molecule and vacation and which is a specific type of dementia or Alzheimer's. Or is that just a general Assignments towel face but particularly Alzheimer's disease at the eventual Gulf one is to the impact of the tour the killer produce on time phosphorylation. In an in Vivo model than the second project is two gene mutation I l s from tempo dementia the courses of pathogenic Rene to be produced. And we're aiming to block the expo this RNA. By targeting his with the protein takes out the Chris into the cell. When this new mix and Rene is exploited toxic repeat protein produced which then up today so responses and Kohl's neurodegenerative disease so the talk if allegations. This is actually already fairly strong. So we'll focus on producing told molecule capable of testing the hypothesis drug ability in Viva. And this is quite interesting that uses Zebra Fish Assay which is as a Pi Out Annika's scrap. The compounds can reduce the interaction between the protein. And the mutant. Aren a over So vice projects Charles River going to rub in Asia screen and then performed medicinal chemistry. Touchy try and get the molecules to kind of test with the viable targets. So how exactly is the consortium supporting this work on on these two proposals? So the consortium consists of Pharma Partners K. And they weren't. She formed kind of equal partners within that and they provide funding the project so they've also provided their expertise in kind of defining the key risks that we need to address in our plans and also technically hurt entice for example as I was research to see progress against small Stein's out payroll Consult here as a whole. I understand our work on dementia has increased substantially over the last year or. So is this because of a higher demand for treatment or is it more promising research avenues. Or is it both. I think by This been advances in understanding of neurons. Lemay tion in particular so this is triggered research projects. But also there's a shift away from the amyloid focused approaches for outside disease due to a lack of clinical success but equally dementia is still highly prevalent in and loss of US. Know people that'd be personally affected by this August. Just it's very hard Eric Tree but not one which people are going to give them. What is the importance of collaboration for researching these neurological diseases? They understand that. Probably the REAL STRENGTH OF THE CONSORTIUM. I think just touches found that there are Kiama nays area The SIS for those lost focus hasn't been successful in the clinic so it's clear that novel therapeutic approaches and needed and this takes time so rarely. We need different people to work together. Different functions work together so farmer actually reduce what they do in house and choose to those complex in return. Viva studies take years to fully establish in Zeros and so when academic academia follow charities and see arose all have complementary skill sets the they they research can be three to benefit the patient in the minimum time possible. Is it also a matter of the fact that CNN diseases are so complicated? And there's so many different factors going into the Mike. No one can be an expert in enough of the different areas of research to really do absolves ex exactly not. Yeah you know. And and so just by the nature of scientific institution you may get more time to focus on specific disease mechanisms. That PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY. Just doesn't have the kind of time to dedicate starved to really building that level understanding but they may have a much broader range of complex models. That can actually help advance. This yet come has been unfortunately so we can you tell me about the psychiatry consortium which I guess is kind of an offshoot of the dementia consortium. Yeah it's it's basically has the same structures dimensions. Timonen is formed in consultation with a K. Who a kind of had a stake in his on. Psychiatry example schizophrenia or autism and this is obscene medicines discovery cats who are not for profit and are there the cats ponant which was set innovate UK to support innovation and use by UK business? So the psychiatry console is one of the indicates which is accelerating drug discovery and psychiatric

Dementia Dementia Consortium Dementia Consortium Of Private Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Charles River United States Rene Sarah Hi Sarah Almond Associate Director Of Integrat World Health Organization Europe Chelsea River Charleston Neurodegenerative Disease Vale Uk Russia Charles Rivers
Navigating the Numbers

a16z

07:31 min | 2 years ago

Navigating the Numbers

"Especially in the early days of a startup. They'll just trying to do cash accounting and that's just literally how much cash it had the beginning of the period. How much do I have the cash at the end of the month? And that's not the same thing as what a piano Show because you're pl paints the picture of how your business did in a particular period of time measurement whether that's quarterly yearly or the cash statement then reconciles that with. What did you actually collect? And then everything that happens on. That cashless statement then ends up on your balance sheet and the reason why it's important to be able to present it in that fashion. It's called generally accepted accounting principles so gap accounting is because that's how everyone understands that. The comparisons are apples to apples when you look across companies so when you are trying to figure out how a business is doing. What are the financials that you look at? Typically the early investing. You don't emphasize financial metrics of that much. Because usually there is an immature market. I tend to focus much more on. Kpi type metrics users daily to monthly users engagement and things along those lines and then the financials tend to emerge over time. Yeah I would say I care most about to very high level topics that the later stage the first is. Can you demonstrate that you can have very persistent growth? And then secondly how profitable will you be when you reach scale? But I spend less time for later. Sage high-growth companies staring at their balance sheet than I do. Kpi's income statements and cash flow in the main thing. I look for the balance. Sheet is the comparison for how much traction they have on the income statement and the cash flow documents relative to the amount that's been invested in the company. So for me. The most important balance sheet metric early is how much capital is. The company deployed to get to where they're going. So how do you guys know when a business is truly profitable? You know I do think you go to the unit economics and really understand them but this is often a lot of art as well as a science. Some of the most frustrating interaction I've had with companies are where they're presenting that their unit economics work but the business isn't working and so I had one where okay we're capitol efficient. The unit economics are working. We acquire users. They're profitable in three months and the company was hemorrhaging cash. It turns out the unit economics actually working the cash flow statement was the arbiter of truth and the analysis that the company had done unit economics is wrong. Yeah I agree. I think lifetime value is one of those traps. People fall into you. Know they're assuming. Oh you know. Our customers are going to stay with us for five years three years so we've got plenty of time to do the pay back but that's the key driver to whether or not you're unique on work. There's nothing that's less consistent in the market than how lifetime value to cost of acquisition of the customer. Ltv GAC is defined. What I always council companies and I like to see is very transparent calculations of what goes in to. Ltv Side Macaque Saad so the LTV decak metric that I like to look at is for the. Ltv The lifetime value side. I always use gross profit not revenue in an I like to use a shorter duration and founders typically like to use so. I like to use three years often. Founders present five years and the point I make on that is that five years is too uncertain a long period of time whereas three years is much more visible use actual retention statistics that you've experienced in the past two project. Those three years the thing that I really try to emphasize founders when they talk about these kinds of metrics is look this is not about necessarily showing investors. This is how you have to run your business. What am I spending on marketing? What am I spending on my rnd? And how much is spending on Gina? And and is that the level of investment that actually making in my company. So you need to be as honest with yourself as possible as to what all these things cost you in what you're really generating in terms of revenue. Because if you can't be honest with yourself you can't run your business. What are some of the other really common mistakes or things that founders do in presenting numbers that you'd want to help them correct? He'd like to see them do differently. You know one. Tell me where business probably struggling is when they come up with northstar metrics KPI's and then when they come back to report on a quarter later they've changed and then they come back a quarter later and they've changed again and what I found a little bit of pattern recognition is when the KPI's change all the time it's largely because they're not working and the company's trying to navigate through it for me you pick your metric report on it and ideally your understanding of the business improves over time as your metric in your models are either validated or invalidated. That leads this interesting question. I think of the psychology. And how you look at your numbers. So how do you manage your own psychology? So that the numbers are a tool. Not this obsession. Where it's like my obsession. Is I wanNA reach my KPI. So I'm going to keep adjusting my KPI. So I do you know the reason. They so defined the three financial statements is. It's kind of truth seeking and trying to fool your investors or for lack of better word or you're bored. I don't want to let them know how bad things are by. Not Telling the truth to your key constituents. You often run the risk of not telling the truth to yourself and so I've had a couple founders. Where sometimes they fall prey to it themselves where they believe their own machination nation and then the board investors can't help them based on the truth. What do the best founders do especially in challenging moments like win the finances and the numbers? Maybe aren't going your way or you know that you do have to tell a difficult truth. They typically knowledge it they take it adds. The truth isn't what I wanted it to be. So now what can I do to change the business to improve the truth? The only thing I would add to that that I've observed from some of the best founders of later stage companies is. They're very careful not to drown themselves in. Kpi's so you can actually inundate yourself KPI's but the very best ones take out of very few handful of metrics that they think are the most important drivers of their business and if they see those divert from where they would like them to be they dig it in from there. So for example Ali from data bricks always focuses on the productivity of sales rep because he believes that indicates health the business in many different ways. So how well is the sales organization actually functioning? What are the market dynamics? What's competition how is the product performing? And you do get a real forest for the trees. I have companies that will present you fifty pages of metrics based on the last quarter and you'd just drown versus. What in here is really important. What are the key? Ones are the one or two that matter the same for every company or does it depend on the nature of the company and the stage that they're at. I think to some degree some of them are the same for instance retention should matter to any business model spent money to acquire your customer base. How long are you hanging onto them find? They are consistent by type of business so workplace. Metrics typically have a lot in common with each other. But they're very very different than ECOMMERCE metrics. The key commerce metrics typically center around the efficiency of customer acquisition and LTV Macaque. A lot of marketplaces. I work with. Don't spend a penny on customer acquisition. So it's got organic distribution or something like that so comparing across models can be challenging comparing within models can be very helpful

Sage Gina Northstar ALI
Viz Agencies: CLEVERFRANKE and Interactive Things

Data Stories

09:14 min | 2 years ago

Viz Agencies: CLEVERFRANKE and Interactive Things

"Saw the sovereign in. Let's get started so we have a special topic today. We decided to make even a two episode feature maybe even more episodes to come because actually this huge blind spot so whenever we review our trailer board with episode. We realized sometimes. Oh we've been so many but we never talked to somebody from field X. or from that area and it's been like this really with for years. Small to medium data visualization agencies. Which is insane because some of the best data is obviously comes from these types of companies and we talked to a lot of practitioners and researchers and whatnot but never really people. Running data visualization studios. Huge Blind. Spot happens but now we're catching up quick and we're inviting to even guests today and and we record another episode with two guests and this will be the next month so hopefully we're back to a good ratio of data agency folks and going and I'm personally super interested. I'VE KNOWN THE FOLKS. We'll talk to you for many many years. In fact I realized last year at encode conference that a lot of these agencies have been around for ten years longer and so it's really now fastening to hear of their long-term Perspective on how the field has evolved. How the field has changed if there is even a viable business and making high end. Crafted data visualization. Or if we will all be unemployed soon so curious to learn more about all this so as I said we have two guests the first one is Thomas. Clever I Thomas High Thomas Highmore. It's I echo. Thanks for joining us. And we have Benjamin Vita Benjamin Haven. Hi Maurice Ionescu great to have you on so Thomas. Maybe I could you briefly introduce yourself and your company and then Benjamin can take. Oh yeah absolutely so as you said. I'm Thomas Flavor or clever co-founder of Flavor Franca or clever Frankie. Most people call us these days. We're data design and Technology Company and we create anything from one of data visualizations to data driven products and tools. As we like to call it we have. We have our headquarters here in the Netherlands and we have another office in Chicago and Dubai. Yeah how many people are working for you right now around thirty two. I think if I'm correct thirty two now great Benjamin Harvard. You all right. I'm an interaction designer with sort of like a focus on information Shirley station and interface design from the beginning and then back in two thousand eight. I started writing a blog on data virtualization whereas publish my work and my research. It's also how we met I think. Also that's how I stumbled over an earlier and like a year later. I co founded interactive things which fairly similar to clever Frankie is a designer development studio with a focus on data driven products. We are a team of seventeen people. We're sort of like a slightly weird beast as we are five equal partners in the company. I think today's like my main focus is leading the company as the managing director. I have a few teaching assignments at universities on data visualization and and sort of organizing database. Sirak meet up here in sick right. So Benjamin there maybe just two people get a sense of okay. What type of product elected do or what? What's your approach is there? Maybe one quintessential project where you could say okay. This is really quintessential almost inactive things project where you could say. That's that's really good example of the type of work we do and we like to. Yeah that's you know like picking your favorite child right. So I think the project that sort of comes to mind is is actually two one two projects and that's education inequalities and education progress so these two websites that we have built for UNESCO and they are sister products in a way even though they're seven years apart so education inequalities already seven years old now and education progress was just released. The first was an exploratory tool our allies in disparities in quality of education and to second is Dan an explanatory publication summarizing the key facts and trends and so in a way they present to coins of the data. Visually say are two sides of the data. Visualization Coin Servic exploration for discovery and explanation for understanding and besides being interesting from data visualization perspective. I think the project also rank very high in our in our view because of the purpose they both advance to sustainable development goal for forward which I think is an important aspect so inclusive and equitable quality of Education. For All the second is the client. Unesco has been a long term and very very committed clients to the success of each of their project and then in terms of craft brew bows challenged in design. Antidevelopment went we work on these projects. And and typically we've seen iskoe. We are allowed to pursue a very iterative process instead of Servic fixed scope waterfall type of process. And I think sort of these Su- yes bex or for aspects purpose client crafting process are important to us and I think they are. Well reflected in those two projects. Great Tell us how about you is a similar example like Ben set. That's always very hard and I think if you look back over over the years that we've been running the business. There's always some quintessential project some lighthouse projects that I think really define you as a company to take a next step in where you are if I have to choose then. I think the the Mobility Index website that we created for the Chicago Metropolitan Agency of Planning is is one of my personal favorites really because it brings together a lot of lot of things dear to my heart. Dear to our companies hearts in the sense that it's it's a mix of experimental data viz with an important message behind it. The CMAP approached us because they had written a new mobility plan or a new urban planning plan so to speak for the city of Chicago which was pretty much. The first comprehensive urban planning plan since Daniel Burman Burnham which was about one hundred years ago and really outlined around economy mobility and liveability where the city should be heading and also the challenges that they face so mobility is a very important topic to the city of Chicago. Think Twenty five percent of the workforce is somehow tied to freight transportation. All those type of things and you know the the investment that needs to be done in the infrastructure there is about thirteen trillion dollars To really convey that message they asked us. Can you can concise. Can you digest plan of six hundred sixty pages into one interactive websites? And of course we said yes remembering that on the way there on the plane. I was reading through that plan and thinking. I'm not sure how we're going to do it. But it was really it was. It's a really nice project in in how we did a lot of editorial stuff on on understanding the plan and thinking how can we explain this plan to you know anybody down in the street but also to business policy makers journalists politicians and? There's a whole editorial sort of structure that you know. There's a bird's eye view over Chicago. And then as you dive into the topics you'd literally dive down into street level. There's different types of visualizations from charts to. We were using new technologies at the time. This twenty fourteen so yeah a lot of a lot of boxes that are ticked in that project and I think you know looking back. I just realized when I heard Ben talk that that was the first time that we set foot in Chicago and here. We are six seven years later right here. We have the office in Chicago so really. It's also the moment in time. I fell in love with that city

Chicago Thomas High Thomas Highmore Benjamin Benjamin Vita Benjamin Haven Frankie BEN Benjamin Harvard Thomas Flavor Unesco Mobility Index Maurice Ionescu Chicago Metropolitan Agency Of Cmap Shirley Station Managing Director Daniel Burman Burnham Netherlands Antidevelopment DAN
"two projects" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"two projects" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Another one's going to take an awfully long time this is car radio hi I'm Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans America's largest mortgage lender let's talk credit card debt for a minute if you feel you're carrying too much of it you're not alone the average household in the U. S. carries over eight thousand dollars in credit card debt ready for some good news with a cash out refinance from quicken loans you can quickly and easily put some of the equity in your home to good use by paying off a lot of that high interest credit card debt a great way to take cash out is with our thirty year fixed rate mortgage the rate today in our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point nine nine percent APR four point two three percent call us today at eight hundred quicken to learn how taking cash out with a thirty year fixed mortgage might be the right solution for you and for a record ten years in a row JD power has rate quicken loans highest in the nation in customer satisfaction for primary mortgage origination call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocket mortgage dot com projects are awarded for nation visit JD power dot com rates subject to change a two percent B. or C. this discounted rate call for cost information conditions equal housing lender license in all fifty states and MLS number thirty thirty we're from Pella windows and doors I recommend pelicans we had worked and lived on two projects for us now and both are handled professionally because their their people a company trying to know the product so they can help you I don't know anything about you know what the right window or door is but they do and the results are spectacular and here's the really good news you get springs best financing offers zero percent APR for sixty months or two fifty off qualifying windows and five hundred off for qualifying door Pella northwest says all the Puget Sound area just look them up search Palin northwest and don't compromise on the home you love restrictions apply see store for details hi it's Jamie progressives number one number two employee leave a message at the Hey Jimmy it's me Jamie this.

"two projects" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"two projects" Discussed on KGO 810

"To some of life's greatest mysteries from your guide spirits and angels let's talk about the second project you're asking for help from the listeners what is that judge James Lawlor dirge it okay for me to share a little more about that the life review process sure that's been a big focus and I think it's important in our understanding of karma so what I was saying was that you know this this life preview that we do at the you know as we make our transition it's something where we look at our life and we do a personal evaluation and we kind of feel what goes on during that evaluation so can be an extremely emotional process I've actually clients in hypnosis go back and revisit that pass that life review so in those moments when we do that we feel the whole lifetime of emotions at our core so even somebody who's turned off their emotions in this lifetime they feel at all they really get at our deep deep love all they feel everything and so those emotions that we experienced during that's the life review are the driving force when that individual or spirit begins the next step which is choosing their next existence or existence of this this we've kind of been talking about so in kind of an over simplified way of describing part of this process of might be like going to a screening room watching several movies of potential future lives on other words once you experience that you look at these other lives and go which one would be right for me right and if you don't pick the life in your next life as the most prosperous life or you know the one that's the best life for most fun you select the one that's going to help you the most on your evolutionary half that sort of based on that life reviews so I may not be an enjoyable life and for an example of this is something I've been working on quite a bit so I'll talk about all that but for example say someone's here to learn about giving so they could watch their life review they go all man I really messed up I didn't do it I wasn't giving I wasn't you know helping people in in choosing the next life they might pass up the life where they could be like a super rich entrepreneur with lots of money to donate and instead agreed to a life of being impoverished single mother with five kids who can barely make ends meet then you know maybe sometimes having to go without dinner to making sure that her kids don't go hungry that kind of thing and so you might ask bowl why not be the rich guy why not be the entrepreneur but with the free will element that spirit or soul might say well if I get to be that rich Gannon hole on all my money and never learn my lesson where to find the single mother I've got a much greater six chance of success to learn that lesson so you know because she's not going on as your kids go hungry so I guess what I'm saying is that your life free view instead of karma sort of inflicted by the universe what happens is what kind of choosing our own karma based on the life review were Jews in our next life and so it's not the universe making that decision and we're doing that on a lot of times because we're saying I didn't get my lessons so hit me harder next time make it make it even even tougher and then the other thing is you know based on what the guys are saying they say we have like thousands of existences maybe hundreds of life on this planet and so if you select a difficult one has that impoverished mother but you successfully learn your lesson then that challenging life is absolutely worth it it's a success they they look at it and go this was perfect because you moved up you evolved all right now let's get into that second project because you need some help from our listeners I do I am asking for anyone who knew a woman named pearl door us to contact me who is Doris okay so and I would say the other thing that besides well first off for Laura Doris lived from nineteen oh six to nineteen ninety she's a very gifted spiritual teacher who lived in the mount Shasta area at least during the nineteen seventies I know that people would come to see her to learn about spirituality maybe to get readings she's also the author of a book about spirituality called step by step we climb okay and so the reason that I'm also looking for information about a close acquaintance of hers and I believe the name of the queen's was Richard but I'm not sure about the name and he was a friend of pearls who have enjoyed her spiritual teachings he tended to be kind of a loner and I believe he was a skilled craftsman perhaps carpenter woodworker so parole Doris is this the sort of the spiritual person Richard or and that may not be the right name is like somebody who is a follower or somebody who is a close friend of pearl why do you want information on her well in the last few years so I'm going to give you a condensed version of all this there is a medium who I was talking to identified one of my guide as a woman named pearl Doris and one of your guides that was one of my guys yes one of my main guides and so I did some research and found that pearl was actually a real person like I said living near mount Shasta and didn't pass until nineteen ninety so sometimes I like to have confirmations about names and identities of guides and things like that you know and at least in my personal work so I was went to talk to another a woman who is a medium and as soon as I walked in the door she basically said pearls here you know from four even sat down and so I just got some confirmation there and I know from I've talked to like through clients to spirit guides and they can be energies who have actually walked this planet as human beings in the past so and it's also could be somebody that we spent that past life with in other words we we knew that person earlier on so I started to wonder will who is this person and you know I've I've kinda doing research but I would love to have a first hand account from somebody who maybe study with her knew her friend or something and since you passed in nineteen ninety there's this very likely that there's people who did know her and can talk about her a little bit and when I do past life regressions with clients I also like to include a recent life in case someone wants to do research and maybe find their past life self in this case I'm doing something similar with pearl Doris and her friend and the house possibly name Richard is that in my research I am putting out were there so that I can get to know a bit more about her through these first hand accounts and so it's kind of an unusual situation here because she has a family or anything do you know I don't know about that I do I do know that she had quite a few followers somebody's bound to know her or know of her for sure right she has she's on the internet to it exactly yes that I might be able to you know there might be some way to verify some of the first hand information true spirit communications or vice versa so it could be kind of an interesting situation I mean how often that is you she you contacting you through spirit guides for one possibly me or through mediums if it's through me people might feel like well it's this is a biased information you know this is his his own stuff you know that he's coming up with were as if it came through a medium then that might be a different way right to be objective well there's no question that the based on what I've been able to find on the internet about her that the she was very very spiritual wasn't sure and though do you think she could get jobs she's got some unique secrets for you possibly I just I'm kind of curious to as to how we get matched with our guide to affect question quite a bit but it sounds like for us we have a lot in common because we both kind of help people on their spiritual path and we both have written spiritual books so it may exist would be fascinating I think to find a little bit more about her what did you learn James about the other side through all this work through hypnotherapy through spirit guides what is your assessment what the other side as well it's really that's the thing about it is our spirit sorry you know if you want to call it our energy your higher self it's completely immortal so we don't die in any way shape or form we just keep growing and evolving they're sort of this an eight part of us that wants to continue to evolve and so when we cross over it's by no means the end it's really in a sense the beginning I remember one of the guides same if you guys knew how many times you did this this would be no big deal for you at all it's just like we're always crossing over because we have all these different experiences on different dimensions and when I say different dimensions enough for some people that maybe sounds too far out you know but we might have places where our spirit is just experiencing what it's like to recieve unconditional love for example or to just be in a complete state of peace or bliss and that might be one of your existence is it's really more about spirit form we're gonna take calls next hour with Jim Schwartz about the other side and if you want to share some of your stories are just the general questions for him jump aboard how long does it takes two will put somebody under with hypnosis that's usually pretty fast the first time it's maybe about fifteen minutes it's it's not a long process and it's when I do the spiritual work that can be longer and a little more involved because you just kinda have to get the person into a place where they feel safe and they feel very comfortable and they have a very strong connection with spirit but actually after the first time I do with call instant inductions and so that really takes all about fifteen seconds to tell you the truth that sense so yeah what's your take on reincarnation James well it's weird I absolutely believe in that and but we can choose that main we may not reincarnate to come to this planet although a lot of the stew I think what happens is our spirit her energies love things about this planet you know the nature and you know the the fact that it's a life planet in the energy in being human and everything is something that we want to experience but we can reincarnate and go to other planes are other dimensions or other realms.

James Lawlor
"two projects" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

12:25 min | 2 years ago

"two projects" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Life's greatest mysteries from your guide spirits and angels let's talk about the second project you're asking for help from the listeners what is that judge James Lawlor dirt it okay for me to share a little more about that the life review process sure that's been a big focus and I think it's important in our understanding of karma so what I was saying was that you know this this life preview that we do at the you know as we make her transition it's something where we look at our life and we do a personal evaluation and we kind of feel what goes on during that evaluation so can be an extremely emotional process have actually clients in hypnosis go back and revisit that pass that life review so in those moments when we do that we feel the whole lifetime of emotions at our core so even somebody who's turned off their emotions in this lifetime they feel at all they really get at our deep deep love all they feel everything and so those emotions that we experienced during that's the life review are the driving force when that individual or spirit begins the next step which is choosing their next existence or existence of this this we've kind of been talking about so in kind of an over simplified way of describing part of this process of might be like going to a screening room watching is several movies of potential future lives on other words once you experience that you look at these other lives and go which one would be right for me right and if you don't pick the life in your next life is the most prosperous life or you know the one that's the best life remote front you select the one that's going to help you the most on your evolutionary half that sort of based on that life reviews so I may not be an enjoyable life and for an example of this is something I've been working on quite a bit so I'll talk about all of that but for example say someone's here to learn about giving and they could watch their life review they go all man I really messed up I didn't do it I wasn't giving I wasn't you know helping people in in choosing the next life they might pass up the life where they could be like a super rich entrepreneur with lots of money to donate and instead agreed to a life of being impoverished single mother with five kids who can barely make ends meet and I know maybe sometimes having to go without dinner to making sure that her kids don't go hungry that kind of thing and so you might ask bowl why not be the rich guy wine be the entrepreneur but with the free will element that spirit or soul might say well if I get to be that rich guy who learned all my money and never learn my lesson where to find the single mother I've got a much greater six chance of success to learn that lesson so you know because she's not going on as your kids go hungry so I guess what I'm saying is that your life free view instead of karma sort of inflicted by the universe what happens is what kind of choosing our own karma based on the life review with pictures in our next life and so it's not the universe making that decision and we're doing that a lot of times because we're saying I didn't get my lessons so hit me harder next time make it make it even even tougher and then the other thing is you know based on what the guys are saying they say we have like thousands of existences maybe hundreds of life on this planet and so if you select a difficult one as that impoverished mother but you successfully learn your lesson then that challenging life is absolutely worth it it's a success they they look at it and go this was perfect because you moved up you evolved all right now let's get into that second project as you need some help from our listeners I do I am asking for anyone who knew a woman named pearl door to contact me who is Doris okay so and I would say the other thing that besides well personal pearl Laura Doris lived from nineteen oh six to nineteen ninety she's a very gifted spiritual teacher who lived in the mount Shasta area at least during the nineteen seventies I know that people would come to see her to learn about spirituality maybe to get readings she's also the author of a book about spirituality called step by step we climb okay and so the reason that I'm also looking for information about a close acquaintance of hers and I believe the name of the queen's was Richard but I'm not sure about the name and he was a friend of pearls who have enjoyed her spiritual teachings he tended to be kind of a loner and I believe he was a skilled craftsman perhaps carpenter woodworker so parole Doris is this the sort of the spiritual person Richard or and that may not be the right name is like a somebody who is a follower or somebody who is a close friend of pearl why do you want information on her well in the last few years so I'm going to give you a condensed version of all this there is a a medium who I was talking to identified one of my guide as a woman named purple Doris and one of your guides that was one of my guys yes one of my main guides and so I did some research and found that pearl was actually a real person like I said living near mount Shasta and didn't pass until nineteen ninety so sometimes I like to have confirmations about names and identities of guides and things like that you know and at least in my personal work so I was went to talk to another a woman who is a medium and as soon as I walked in the door she basically said pearl fear you know before I even sat down and so Lloyd got some confirmation there and I know from I've talked to like through clients to spirit guides and they can be energies who have actually walked this planet as human beings in the past so and it's also could be somebody that we spent that past life with in other words we we knew that person earlier on so I started to wonder will who is this person and you know I've I've kind of doing research but I would love to have a first hand account from somebody who maybe study with her knew her friend or something and since you passed in nineteen ninety there's it's very likely that there's people who didn't know her and can talk about her a little bit and when I do past life regressions with clients I also like to include a recent life in case someone wants to do research and they behind their past life self in this case I'm doing something similar with pearl Doris and her friend and the nose possibly name Richard is that in my research I am putting out were there so that I can get to know a bit more about her through these first hand accounts and so it's kind of an unusual situation here because she has a family or anything you know I don't know about that I do I do know that she had quite a few followers somebody's bound to know her or know of her for sure right she has she's on the internet to it exactly yes and I might be able to you know there might be some way to verify some of the first hand information true spirit communications or vice versa so it could be kind of an interesting situation I mean how often that is you she you contacting you through spirit guides for one possibly me or through medians if it's through me people might feel like well it's this is a biased information you know this is his his own stuff you know that he's coming up with were as if it came through a medium then that might be a different way to be objective well there's no question that the based on what I've been able to find on the internet about her that the she was very very spiritual wasn't sure and though do you think she could get jobs she's got some unique secrets for you possibly I just I'm kind of curious to as to how we get matched with our guide I asked that question quite a bit but it sounds like for us we have a lot in common because we both kind of help people on their spiritual path and we both have written spiritual books so in my it just would be fascinating I think to find a little bit more about her what did you learn James about the other side through all this work through hypnotherapy through spirit guides what is your assessment what the other side as well it's really about the thing about it is our spirit sorry you know if you want to call it our energy your higher self it's completely immortal so we don't die in any way shape or form we just keep growing and evolving they're sort of this an eight part of us that wants to continue to evolve and so when we cross over it's by no means the end it's really in a sense the beginning I remember one of the guides saying if you guys knew how many times you did this this would be no big deal for you at all it's it's like rose crossing over because we have all these different experiences on different dimensions and when I say different dimensions you know for some people that maybe sounds too far out you know but we might have places where our spirit is just experiencing what it's like to recieve unconditional love for example or to just be in a complete state of peace or bliss and that might be one of your existence is it's really more about spirit form we're gonna take calls next hour with Jim Schwartz about the other side and if you want to share some of your stories are just the general questions for him jump aboard how long does it takes two will put somebody under with hypnosis I'm not it's usually pretty fast the first time it's maybe about fifteen minutes it's it's not a long process and it when I do the spiritual work that can be longer a little more involved because you just kinda have to get the person into a place where they feel safe and they feel very comfortable and they have a very strong connection with spirit but actually after the first time I do with call instant and I tions and so that really takes all about fifteen seconds to tell you the truth that sense so yeah what's your take on reincarnation gyms well it's weird I absolutely believe in that and but we can choose that main we may not reincarnate to come to this planet although a lot of us do I think what happens is our spirit her energies love things about this planet you know the nature and you know the the fact that it's a life planet in the energy in being human and everything is something that we want to experience but we can reincarnate and go to other planes are other dimensions or other realms and sometimes we just take time out from the earth plane but based on what the guides tell ME it's we're constantly reincarnated constantly yes like and and it's it's interesting because I've asked the guides you know I mean are you talking like thousands of times and they're like if you guys knew you'd be just amazed if you have any idea how many times and places that you you go into that have you tried to communicate with pearl doors through a medium it to death a little bit I add yeah a little bit but that's where I kind of want to expand this project what do you think she will offer you I think as one of my guys I think she's probably come to me because the I can the way I look at it when we work with clients it's kind of a channeling experience and so we're getting information from our guides and she probably wanted so much to help people with their spiritual growth through the floor with their healing that it didn't stop when she left.

James Lawlor
"two projects" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

12:25 min | 2 years ago

"two projects" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"To some of life's greatest mysteries from your guide spirits and angels let's talk about the second project you're asking for help from the listeners what is that judge James Lawlor dirt it okay for me to share a little more about the the life review process sure that's been a big focus and I think it's important in our understanding of karma so what I was saying was that you know this this life preview that we do at the you know as we make our transition it's something where we look at our life and we do a personal evaluation and we kind of feel what goes on during that evaluation so can be an extremely emotional process I've actually clients in hypnosis go back and revisit that pass that life review so in those moments when we do that we feel the whole lifetime of emotions at our core so even somebody who's turned off their emotions in this lifetime they feel at all they really get a deep deep love all they feel everything and so those emotions that we experienced here in the us the life review are the driving force when that individual or spirit begins the next step which is choosing their next existence or existence of this as we have been talking about so in kind of an over simplified way of describing part of this process of might be like going to a screening room watching several movies of potential future lives on other words once you experience that you look at these other lives and go which one would be right for me right and if you don't pick the life in your next life is the most prosperous life or you know the one that's the best life for most fun you select the one that's going to help you the most on your evolutionary half that sort of based on that life reviews so I may not be an enjoyable life and for example this is something I've been working on quite a bit so to talk about all of that but for example say someone's here to learn about giving so they could watch their life review they go all man I really messed up I didn't do it I wasn't giving I wasn't you know helping people in in choosing the next life they might pass up the life for they could be like a super rich entrepreneur with lots of money to donate and instead agreed to a life of being impoverished single mother with five kids who can barely make ends meet and you know maybe sometimes having to go without dinner to making sure that her kids don't go hungry that kind of thing and so you might ask bowl why not be the rich guy wine be the entrepreneur but with the free will element that spirit or soul might say well if I get to be that rich guy hole and all my money and never learn my lesson where to find the single mother I've got a much greater chance of success to learn that lesson so you know because she's not going on as your kids go hungry so I guess what I'm saying is that your life free view instead of karma sort of inflicted by the universe what happens is what kind of choosing our own karma based on that life review were Jews in our next life and so it's not the universe making that decision and we're doing that a lot of times because we're saying I didn't get my lessons so hit me harder next time make it make it even even tougher and then the other thing is you know based on what the guys are saying they say we have like thousands of existences maybe hundreds of life on this planet and so if you select a difficult one as that impoverished mother but you successfully learn your lesson then that challenging life is absolutely worth it it's a success they they look at it and go this was perfect because you moved up you evolved all right now let's get into that second project because you need some help from our listeners I do I am asking for anyone who knew a woman named pearl door us to contact me who is Doris okay so and I would say the other thing that besides well first off her Laura Doris lived from nineteen oh six to nineteen ninety she's a very gifted spiritual teacher who lived in them out shaft area at least during the nineteen seventies I know that people would come to see her to learn about spirituality maybe to get readings she's also the author of a book about spirituality called step by step we climb okay and so the reason that I'm also looking for information about a close the queens of her and I believe the name of the queen's was Richard but I'm not sure about the name and he was a friend of pearls who have enjoyed her spiritual teachings he tended to be kind of a loner and I believe he was a skilled craftsman perhaps carpenter would workers so poor old Doris is this the sort of the spiritual person Richard or and that may not be the right name is like a somebody who is a follower or somebody who is a close friend of pearl why do you want information on her well in the last few years so I'm going to give you a condensed version of all this there is a medium who I was talking to identified one of my guide as a woman named pearl Doris and one your guide so that is one of my guys yes one of my main guides and so I did some research and found that coral is actually a real person like I said living near mount Shasta and didn't pass until nineteen ninety so sometimes I like to have confirmations about names and identities of guides and things like that you know and at least in my personal work so I was went to talk to another of woman who is a medium and as soon as I walked in the door she basically said pearls here in a home for even sat down and so got some confirmation there and I know from I've talked to like through clients to spirit guides and they can be energies who have actually walked this planet as human beings in the past so and it's also could be somebody that we spent that past life with in other words we we knew that person earlier on so I started to wonder will who is this person and you know I've I've kind of doing research but I would love to have a first hand account from somebody who maybe study with her or knew her friend or something and since she passed in nineteen ninety there's it's very likely that there's people who didn't know her and can talk about her a little bit and when I do past life regressions with clients I also like to include a recent life in case someone wants to do research and maybe find their past life self in this case I'm doing something similar with pearl Doris and her friend and do you know is possibly named Richard to sit in my research I am putting out were there so that I can get to know a bit more about her through these first hand accounts and so it's kind of an unusual situation here because she has a family or anything you know I don't know about that I do I do know that she had quite a few followers somebody's bound to know her or know of her for sure right she has she's on the internet tool exactly yes that I might be able to you know there might be some way to verify some of the first hand information true spirit communications or vice versa so it could be kind of an interesting situation I mean how often that is you she you contacting you your spirit guides or what possibly me or through medians if it's through me people might feel like well it's this is a biased information you know this is his his own stuff you know that he's coming up with were as if it came through medium then that might be a different way to be objective well there's no question that the based on what I've been able to find on the internet about her that the she was very very spiritual wasn't sure and though do you think she could get jobs she's got some unique secrets for you possibly I just I'm kind of curious to as to how we get matched with our guide to affect question quite a bit but it sounds like for us we have a lot in common because we both kind of help people on their spiritual path and we both have written spiritual books so it might it just would be fascinating I think to find a little bit more about her what did you learn James about the other side through all this work through hypnotherapy through spirit guides what is your assessment of what the other side as well it's really about the thing about it is our spirit sorry you know if you want to call it our energy your higher self it's completely immortal so we don't die in any way shape or form we just keep growing and evolving they're sort of this an eight part of us that wants to continue to evolve and so when we cross over it's by no means the end it's really in a sense the beginning I remember one of the guides scene if you guys knew how many times you did this this would be no big deal for you at all it's just like we're always crossing over because we have all these different experiences on different dimensions and when I say different dimensions enough for some people that maybe sounds too far out you know but we might have places where our spirit is just experiencing what it's like to recieve unconditional love for example or to just be in a complete state of peace or bliss and that might be one of your existence is it's really more about spirit form we're gonna take calls next hour with Jim Schwartz about the other side and if you want to share some of your stories are just the general questions for him jump aboard how long does it takes two will put somebody under with hypnosis that's usually pretty fast the first time it's maybe about fifteen minutes it's it's not a long process and it when I do the spiritual work that can be longer and a little more involved because you just kinda have to get the person into a place where they feel safe and they feel very comfortable and they have a very strong connection with spirit but actually after the first time I do with call instant inductions and so that really takes all about fifteen seconds to tell you the truth that sets the past yeah what's your take on reincarnation James well it's weird I absolutely believe in that and but we can choose at Maine we may not reincarnate to come to this planet although a lot of us do I think what happens is our spirit her energies love things about this planet you know the nature and you know the the fact that it's a life planet in the energy in being human and everything is something that we want to experience but we can reincarnate and go to other planes are other dimensions or other realms and sometimes we just take time out from the earth plane but based on what the guides tell only its we're constantly reincarnated constantly yes like and and it's it's interesting because I've asked the guys you know I mean are you talking like thousands of times and they're like if you guys knew you'd be just amazed if you have any idea how many times and places that you you go into that have you tried to communicate with pearl doors through a medium to death a little bit I add a little bit but that's where I kind of want to expand this project what do you think she will offer you I think as one of my guys I think she's probably come to me because the I a can the way I look at it when we work with clients it's kind of a channeling experience and so we're getting information from our guides and she probably wanted so much to help people with their spiritual growth through the floor with their healing that it didn't stop when.

James Lawlor
Peacock emerges from its shell

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Peacock emerges from its shell

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Bellany of the Hollywood reporter and Matt. NBC Uni Comcast has released Peacock doc which is their competitor. We talk often about the streaming wars. The Competition Warner media has is coming online. Disney has come. Online and Netflix has been online Amazon Apple. It's it's a jungle out. There and Lil Peacock is going to walk out into the jungle and its debut in April. We learned this week. It's going to have multiple tiers this being a comcast product. If you're a comcast subscriber you are going to be able. We'll get peacock premium for free with ads. Or if you pay five bucks you're going to be able to get it ad free for those of us who don't subscribe to comcast's ask cable. There is peacock premium for ten dollars and peacock with ads for five dollars right. So if you don't have comcast or Cox doc I guess you can pay the ten dollars per month for access to fifteen thousand hours of live and on demand content or if you don't WanNa pay the ten bucks per month you can pay five per month and watch the stuff with ads. And there's a lot of stuff I mean if you look at the things they've announced you know. In addition to shows like the office and Dan you know movies that are going to be hoarded from the NBC library. They're doing a lot of originals. That are going to debut here. There's everything from things like Punky GI brewster sequel show two projects with Dick Wolf. And Amy Poehler Norman. Lear a lot of interesting stuff is going to be here on peacock. Yeah it's it's not quite the you know all the sort of meat and potatoes down there middle stuff. I think certain people were expecting for example. The Norman Lear project has is called clean slate at stars. Laverne Cox. She is the daughter of a old school car. Wash owner who is so happy that his estranged child is coming back to Alabama after many years but then it turns out that the estranged son is now an estranged daughter Played by the fantastic Laverne Laverne Cox so. That sounds very like Norman Lear and that is going to be one of the offerings. There's also something about called expecting about a young woman who is Sir no longer. Quite as young as she used to be and decides she wants to have a baby with her gay best friend so and and then there's something about the advent of twitter. I mean there's there's quite a mix if if you're a law and order fan you're you're going to end up wanting to get this and you can get a free version called peacock free but you won't get access you'll only get about half of the programming coming off offered on the premium version An you know a delay on the on the current NBC shows. So you won't get everything but you can get a version of this us for for free with ads. So that's their strategy. I know there's been some skepticism about it. I I I gotta think though that a lot of people who are sort of overwhelmed by all the a bigger numbers they're paying we'll look that's cheaper than Disney You know it's it's an inexpensive introductory price. At least yeah and this is part of the whole comcast a strategy. You mean they are hoping to get to thirty thirty five million subscribers in five years less than the ninety or so the Disney is looking for but but keep in mind that comcast is still very much in the cable business and they've approached this very much as a cable provider who is launching a supplementary service service for the people that are cord cutters and don't subscribe to comcast's but also for the people that do and there's going to be an advertising component that it is very big on this service unlike dizzy and unlike apple and unlike netflix. So they're going to have dual revenue streams here and they believe that each subscriber to this service will give them about ten will give them about seven dollars in revenue and that's a decent return. Yeah we'll see how it does I you know they're. They're also buying from all different suppliers instead of supplying everything themselves. So they're they're going their own way and we'll see how it works out. Thank you matt thank you.

Comcast Laverne Laverne Cox Norman Lear Lil Peacock NBC Disney Netflix Amy Poehler Norman Hollywood Kim Masters Competition Warner Media Dick Wolf Matt Reporter Alabama Twitter DAN
Comcast's Peacock Aims to Undercut Streaming Rivals

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Comcast's Peacock Aims to Undercut Streaming Rivals

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Bellany of the Hollywood reporter and Matt. NBC Uni Comcast has released Peacock doc which is their competitor. We talk often about the streaming wars. The Competition Warner media has is coming online. Disney has come. Online and Netflix has been online Amazon Apple. It's it's a jungle out. There and Lil Peacock is going to walk out into the jungle and its debut in April. We learned this week. It's going to have multiple tiers this being a comcast product. If you're a comcast subscriber you are going to be able. We'll get peacock premium for free with ads. Or if you pay five bucks you're going to be able to get it ad free for those of us who don't subscribe to comcast's ask cable. There is peacock premium for ten dollars and peacock with ads for five dollars right. So if you don't have comcast or Cox doc I guess you can pay the ten dollars per month for access to fifteen thousand hours of live and on demand content or if you don't WanNa pay the ten bucks per month you can pay five per month and watch the stuff with ads. And there's a lot of stuff I mean if you look at the things they've announced you know. In addition to shows like the office and Dan you know movies that are going to be hoarded from the NBC library. They're doing a lot of originals. That are going to debut here. There's everything from things like Punky GI brewster sequel show two projects with Dick Wolf. And Amy Poehler Norman. Lear a lot of interesting stuff is going to be here on peacock. Yeah it's it's not quite the you know all the sort of meat and potatoes down there middle stuff. I think certain people were expecting for example. The Norman Lear project has is called clean slate at stars. Laverne Cox. She is the daughter of a old school car. Wash owner who is so happy that his estranged child is coming back to Alabama after many years but then it turns out that the estranged son is now an estranged daughter Played by the fantastic Laverne Laverne Cox so. That sounds very like Norman Lear and that is going to be one of the offerings. There's also something about called expecting about a young woman who is Sir no longer. Quite as young as she used to be and decides she wants to have a baby with her gay best friend so and and then there's something about the advent of twitter. I mean there's there's quite a mix if if you're a law and order fan you're you're going to end up wanting to get this and you can get a free version called peacock free but you won't get access you'll only get about half of the programming coming off offered on the premium version An you know a delay on the on the current NBC shows. So you won't get everything but you can get a version of this us for for free with ads. So that's their strategy. I know there's been some skepticism about it. I I I gotta think though that a lot of people who are sort of overwhelmed by all the a bigger numbers they're paying we'll look that's cheaper than Disney You know it's it's an inexpensive introductory price. At least yeah and this is part of the whole comcast a strategy. You mean they are hoping to get to thirty thirty five million subscribers in five years less than the ninety or so the Disney is looking for but but keep in mind that comcast is still very much in the cable business and they've approached this very much as a cable provider who is launching a supplementary service service for the people that are cord cutters and don't subscribe to comcast's but also for the people that do and there's going to be an advertising component that it is very big on this service unlike dizzy and unlike apple and unlike netflix. So they're going to have dual revenue streams here and they believe that each subscriber to this service will give them about ten will give them about seven dollars in revenue and that's a decent return. Yeah we'll see how it does I you know they're. They're also buying from all different suppliers instead of supplying everything themselves. So they're they're going their own way and we'll see how it works out. Thank you matt thank

Comcast Laverne Laverne Cox Norman Lear Lil Peacock NBC Disney Netflix Amy Poehler Norman Hollywood Kim Masters Competition Warner Media Dick Wolf Matt Reporter Alabama Twitter DAN
Peacock Emerges From Its Shell

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Peacock Emerges From Its Shell

"NBC Uni Comcast has released Peacock doc which is their competitor. We talk often about the streaming wars. The Competition Warner media has is coming online. Disney has come. Online and Netflix has been online Amazon Apple. It's it's a jungle out. There and Lil Peacock is going to walk out into the jungle and its debut in April. We learned this week. It's going to have multiple tiers this being a comcast product. If you're a comcast subscriber you are going to be able. We'll get peacock premium for free with ads. Or if you pay five bucks you're going to be able to get it ad free for those of us who don't subscribe to comcast's ask cable. There is peacock premium for ten dollars and peacock with ads for five dollars right. So if you don't have comcast or Cox doc I guess you can pay the ten dollars per month for access to fifteen thousand hours of live and on demand content or if you don't WanNa pay the ten bucks per month you can pay five per month and watch the stuff with ads. And there's a lot of stuff I mean if you look at the things they've announced you know. In addition to shows like the office and Dan you know movies that are going to be hoarded from the NBC library. They're doing a lot of originals. That are going to debut here. There's everything from things like Punky GI brewster sequel show two projects with Dick Wolf. And Amy Poehler Norman. Lear a lot of interesting stuff is going to be here on peacock. Yeah it's it's not quite the you know all the sort of meat and potatoes down there middle stuff. I think certain people were expecting for example. The Norman Lear project has is called clean slate at stars. Laverne Cox. She is the daughter of a old school car. Wash owner who is so happy that his estranged child is coming back to Alabama after many years but then it turns out that the estranged son is now an estranged daughter Played by the fantastic Laverne Laverne Cox so. That sounds very like Norman Lear and that is going to be one of the offerings. There's also something about called expecting about a young woman who is Sir no longer. Quite as young as she used to be and decides she wants to have a baby with her gay best friend so and and then there's something about the advent of twitter. I mean there's there's quite a mix if if you're a law and order fan you're you're going to end up wanting to get this and you can get a free version called peacock free but you won't get access you'll only get about half of the programming coming off offered on the premium version An you know a delay on the on the current NBC shows. So you won't get everything but you can get a version of this us for for free with ads. So that's their strategy. I know there's been some skepticism about it. I I I gotta think though that a lot of people who are sort of overwhelmed by all the a bigger numbers they're paying we'll look that's cheaper than Disney You know it's it's an inexpensive introductory price. At least yeah and this is part of the whole comcast a strategy. You mean they are hoping to get to thirty thirty five million subscribers in five years less than the ninety or so the Disney is looking for but but keep in mind that comcast is still very much in the cable business and they've approached this very much as a cable provider who is launching a supplementary service service for the people that are cord cutters and don't subscribe to comcast's but also for the people that do and there's going to be an advertising component that it is very big on this service unlike dizzy and unlike apple and unlike netflix. So they're going to have dual revenue streams here and they believe that each subscriber to this service will give them about ten will give them about seven dollars in revenue and that's a decent return. Yeah we'll see how it does I you know they're. They're also buying from all different suppliers instead of supplying everything themselves. So they're they're going their own way and we'll see how it works out. Thank you

Comcast Laverne Laverne Cox Lil Peacock Norman Lear NBC Disney Netflix Amy Poehler Norman Competition Warner Media Dick Wolf Amazon Twitter Alabama DAN Apple
The Ghost Lights of Brown Mountain

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:22 min | 3 years ago

The Ghost Lights of Brown Mountain

"Brown mountain is a low line. Mine Ridge approximately one point five miles long in the Pisgah national forest near Morganson North Carolina. Since at least early early twentieth century mysterious eliminations known as the Brown Mountain Lights have been seen there perhaps more significantly as the fact that many of the people that let's see these lights vanish on October. Twenty eleven dozens of individuals claimed to have seen the lights that same night. Thirty people camping nearby went missing. Local law enforcement opened an investigation but to date. No conclusion regarding the missing campers have been reached back in one thousand nine hundred fifty two project blue book the Air Force's conservative effort to look into. UFO's launched an extensive study of Brown Mountain. Elton and concluded that the lights could not be explained but that there was no connection between the lights and the people that had vanished after seeing them but in eighteen fifty fifty two an incident occurred to substantiated. The legend a woman had disappeared in the local stock that the husband had killed her. The local community came together the other to search for the body when it became too dark to continue. The search strange lights appeared on Brown Mountain. Superstitions of the time led in some of the community to believe that the lights represented the spirit of the dead woman. Come back to haunt her husband. The search ended without finding the body. But but the next day it was determined that many of the searchers had disappeared. Another incident concerned plantation owner. who was hunting on Brown Mountain? When he didn't return by nightfall his slaves went out with lanterns and search and never returned? Local folklore contains dozens of accounts of the people see the lights and vanishes shortly thereafter by nineteen sixty the legend of Brown mountain lights and a number of disappearances was immortalized. A song by Scott Wiseman the legend of the Brown Mountain Lights in nineteen ninety. Nine Chris. Carter's x files episode. Field trip shuddered around the lectern Brown Mount back in one thousand nine hundred ninety two. US Geological Survey was conducted and it was determined that those that had seen the lights. We're actually seeing lights from a train or campers fires but shortly after the USGS study. There was a massive flood in the area. All power was knocked out. Train tracks washed away. The train was unable to traverse the area and during that entire period the lights of Brown mountain were visible and those in close proximity to or around. The mountain vanished. The Legend Lights Brown mountain unlike many rural regional channel stories and folklore have not faded with time no less than five musicians from the area including Sonny James and Roy. Orbison have kept the legend live in Song Television Weird or what ancient aliens and mystery hunters of focused on the lights of Brown. Now in two thousand fourteen the lights were the centerpiece of the movie. Alien Abduction in book form. It was Kathy Rights. Speaking in bones the lights can be seen from the Blue Ridge Parkway at milepost three ten and three a one and from the Brown mountain overlook along North Carolina Highway one eighty one. Near Jones Ridge North Carolina additionally good sightings of the lights have been reported from the top of Table Rock and Weisman's view view both located in the Louisville Gorge Wilderness. The best time of year to see them reportedly September in twenty twelve. The Brown Mountain Lights Symposium was held in nearby town of Morgantown at the Municipal Auditorium. The event was attended by thousands. So skeptics others. Who claimed to have seen the lights of all the reports of lights in the sky over the past centuries abductions impossible? UFO's it's none or as consistent and frequently reported and undeniable as the Brown Mountain Lights North Carolina

Brown Mountain Brown Mountain Lights Symposiu Seeing Lights Brown Mount North Carolina UFO Morganson North Carolina Mine Ridge Jones Ridge North Carolina Scott Wiseman Elton Morgantown Sonny James Usgs Air Force Carter Orbison Chris
Clean Energy's Ever-Changing Policy Risk

The Energy Gang

12:25 min | 3 years ago

Clean Energy's Ever-Changing Policy Risk

"In the summer of two thousand eight Britta von Essen took an internship with a major investment bank after wrapping up business school. It was considered at the time one of the top places to work it was with a company called Lehman Brothers and it was actually a fascinating summer. I was working in their global power group but focused on renewable energy and you know there was a lot going on at the time. Tax Equity was really ramping up. People were figuring out how the structuring was going to work with that. There are a couple. IPO's that were right on the horizon so it was a fascinating summer from renewables perspective and also what was going on at Leeman. It's been an unnerving week for US financial markets and now the potential collapse of Lehman Brothers once the fourth largest investment firm in the US at at that time. Lehman Brothers was the top investor in renewables it had bought big portfolios of wind and solar projects. It was a leading equity investor and it was helping take companies public it was an exciting time but as the summer war on market conditions worsened investors got nervous in things got grim for Leman analysts say the bank's future is in doubt out afterward reported a loss of nearly four billion dollars in the last quarter. Leman brothers is suffered heavy losses as a result of the US housing slump while I was there. It was just constant reassurance that that these cycles are normal and and you know financial markets go through this occasionally and everything was going behind of course it was not fine be one of the watershed days in financial markets histories. He was a manic manic Monday in the financial markets. The Dow tumbled more than five hundred points after two pillars of the street tumbled over the weekend leman brothers or one hundred and fifty eight-year-old firm filed for bankruptcy in the lead up to the Leeann bankruptcy in the fall. IPO's fell apart project financing dried up and cleantech companies beneath loans underwritten by the bank were suddenly exposed to risks. They didn't foresee. BRITTA had a front row seat to all of it. After leaving lemon she picked up and moved to Italy where she helped build wind and solar projects for a German developer soon after she witnessed yet another period of chaos the swift rollback of feed in tariffs the Italian market came to a screeching screeching halt. It did teach me a lot about developer resiliency the fundamental optimism that is required to be of renewable energy developer and and taking the long view on a lot of these projects so British took those lessons and apply them to the next chapter of her career. She now advises clean energy companies knees on how to manage risk so you've managed to witness the collapse of one of the biggest investment banks and one of the biggest European renewable energy markets back to back. That's quite an entrance into the industry well. I swear it's not me I'm not the not the driver and all of this but I think what it taught me was that things change and the markets move and those that are resilient and those that figure out how to work in the new paradigms that they're given are the ones who are successful so I've taken a huge amount of those lessons into my current job and into my current business where I'm basically advising folks how to roll with the ever changing markets that we see in wind and solar. I'm Stephen Lacey in this episode produced in partnership with Cohnresnick and cohnresnick capital talking talking with British Ivano sin about those ever changing market conditions today Britta's a managing director at cohnresnick capital over the last decade. She's seen all kinds of market risk mostly expiring or changing policies that create financial risk you know I it was the sixteen o three grant expiring then it was. ITC expiring PTC's stepping down. What are the safe harbor policies we we didn't even get the IT safe safe harbor policies until fairly recently. I think it's just a fundamental aspect of this industry. It's Salat about planning for the unexpected in British. Job is to help figure out how to get renewable energy deals done in the face of those challenges so I sat down with her to unpack some of those policy uncertainties and what they mean for renewables and I wanted to know how often does policy change derail projects so I have. You've worked on project many projects that were potentially derailed that we manage to work around various policy changes. I think change in tax law was a really interesting time where we had to figure out how to keep the investors active of an investing in two projects that would probably not be commissioned for another twelve months and how to get around the fact that there was a very likely change in tax law to be passed at that time and yet nobody knew exactly what that was going to look like. I think this PG bankruptcy recently and the California I think it was a be ten fifty four the wildfire response bill that has been high in the mind of a lot of California developers at the moment who were focused on contracts with sce NASD Johnnie and whether or not those credit ratings. We're GONNA take ahead that policy was passed and I think both of those organizations are are quite secure and short up and that was that was great news for California winging developers across the board with or without contracts well. Let's walk through some of the big drivers and uncertainties around them so you mentioned. PG Ag any I'd like to talk about PG and understand. What are you now looking for in a bankruptcy proceeding what kind of risks to contracts tracks are there currently what has been sorted out and what's still left to be sorted out that would impact renewable energy developers so I believe there is still still quite a bit of uncertainty as far as the potential for PG any to cancel contracts that are considered out out of market today so these would be some of the earlier vintage. PPA's there are several conversations and I know cohnresnick has been a part of several several of these about trying to restructure this through bilateral negotiations with pg any and kind of nipping in the bud lead and coming to a good solution for all parties but otherwise I think there is still a strong degree of uncertainty here there there are investors who are then making plays in this and trying to pick up these assets making a bet as to whether or not there will be restructuring of the contracts are not as as well as you know. It's an unfortunate situation but it's certainly a very active group of projects and sponsors that are figuring out working working through how to navigate that uncertainty. Let's go to tax equity. The solar investment tax credit is now facing the beginning of its step down schedule this is obviously going to impact the economics of project development but we have had some clarity on this step down unscheduled for for years now how is facing down the IDC GONNA change the way projects are financed and does it present any risks that were not there previously so you're right. There is a very clear step down schedule which I think has been helpful for folks trying to new forecasts what this looks like that being said given the safe harbor provision. I would venture that there is a generic assumption option from those who are procuring. PPA's at the moment that their assets that their projects will be safe harbored many of the major. I pee pees Jason. Strategic are making significant safe harbor place. They are you know doing this both for their own projects jags and under the assumption that there will be Ebony advantages over the next few years which I agree with. I think a lot of these developers that are procuring making this assumption are going to limit themselves to buyers of the assets that can then fulfill the safe harbor in order to meet the Economics Amax. What do you think the chances of an extension of the investment tax credit are. I know that the Solar Energy Industries Association has all of a sudden and put this back on their priorities list. They think maybe there's an opening to extend the federal tax credit. What do you think the chances of that arc given what you know so there's a couple a couple aspects of this that are important absolutely it would be beneficial to the industry right that being said we are months away from the step down last time this extension happened. I think we had a good twelve months of lead time so it allowed loud folks to plan at least partially accordingly in this case you would actually jam up probably some more some of the more major players who have made significant safe harbor plays that would have been capital that was not necessary to deploy a and potentially at pricing that is not beneficial to their assets so there are mixed mixed feelings throughout the industry about this. I think there is a decent chance I also think it's interesting giving kind of the economic markets at the moment and the potential for a downturn. Let's call it in the next twelve to eighteen months renewable such a critical component of job security and job growth in the US economy at the moment that especially if we're facing some type of downturn it may increase congressional and government support for some type of extension here. What about the storage tax credit. That's been floating around Congress for for a long time if there is this renewed push for potential solar. It see where does the storage. I T C fit in there would would it be something separate. Would it be wrapped together. And what do you think the chances of getting this thing finally pastor. I think the storage credit is actually much more critical critical than the than the solar one in the in the near term here I think with Alda we will continue to have murkiness around trying trying to loop storage into either wind or solar tax credits which is is just messy. It's hard for investors to get their heads around it. Just adds a lot of confusion and it also limits what you can do from adding storage onto existing renewable energy projects objects. I think throughout the energy community there is a consensus that storage is a critical component that needs to be deployed on a large scale will in order for renewables to continue on the growth. It is an in order to hit. Some of these are targets hundred percent in California boring. If for example you you have to have the storage component there otherwise you're facing you know a variety of issues on you know intermittent see or demand or any variety of aspects so. I am a little more bullish on the storage tax credit. I I think a standalone tax credit does a lot to simplify and streamline financing aspects for storage whether or not it connected to renewables and whether or not commissioned at the same time as the

Lehman Brothers Developer United States California IPO PPA Britta Solar Energy Industries Associ Britta Von Essen Leeman Pg Ag Leman PTC
Can Disney make VR relevant? (The 3:59, Ep. 510)

The 3:59

04:24 min | 4 years ago

Can Disney make VR relevant? (The 3:59, Ep. 510)

"The. Fifty nine chat, Ben talks Rueben. Disney is betting bigger on VR. Are also got the scoop that Disney has ordered a top secret VR project. This is after in the middle of showing off its first VR short film called cycles. The director of this one Jeff Gibson. I will be tapped to work on the second project. We think this is this a big deal that Disney is betting bigger on the are. I think that if VR is ever going to become a thing and entertainment, folks, like, Disney and. Warner brothers. All these guys need to jump on board and get excited about it. This is really the second. I know this is interesting that they are getting bigger on VR, but this is really their second project. So I think we have a long way to go. The other issue that I have with VR and entertainment as like, there's a chicken and egg issue here where Joan and her story talks about if there's must have entertainment than people will get the headsets. Yeah. I wonder if it's the other way around where why are people buying the headsets? It's been a couple of years. I think part of the dilemma is that some of this must see content is out there. But no one can really see it. I mean places like Sundance were Joan is is where cycles is airing. But you can't actually the general audience can actually see this stuff. Yeah. A lot of the best content. It's sort of like it's saved up for just like the industry interceptors. And no one else really can get experience of VR can actually be. So maybe the stuff will start to trickle down in a couple years. And it'll be. Easier to watch it Google cardboards been around for a while. I can't crash experience. It's true. But like why can't it be easier to just see this stuff rare? I I don't know. I think it's still going to stay news. That's at least my expectation. All right. Let's talk about robots are on Katie Colin spent the week interacting with robots CS. What did she find a lot of different robots? There's like a ping pong robot in skeleton robot would help people I don't know in warehouses pickup boxes share. But also people with disabilities potentially. What is augmenting your legs? There's the Lovett which is a cuddle robot. It's like if you're yeah. Compared by which I never really understood like the silly companion buds. But okay, Sony, right. It's a companion bought. Yes. Yeah. And then also like the weird seal that I think a Japanese company makes that you're supposed to them and feel better. I was at the RF that's a retail. Show a couple of weeks ago, and they also had a like an inventory robot. So it's this weird cylinder ical robot that goes up and down aisles at a store like a CVS check. What needs to be inventory in an apparent also help customers out there like go to this aisle? If you wanna get toothpaste, I think that's one of the more interesting aspects of Katie story is that it wasn't just robots moving around and doing things as robot's reacting tease. Sometimes even looking at like, your is understanding some level of human error actions. So it could better address your questions or better service companion like that like that for a little while. But it's no a lot of it seems to replace human interaction on my mind, and like people are already so stuffed into their phones that I do have a bit of a problem with the ping pong robot. It's like oh find a buddy to play. That's the thing that are probably places where companionship, that's an issue. There are lonely. They're alive only people out there. I get it. I know you've got a family all could. Yeah. For me. Yeah. Other kepi so fortunate. Okay. Okay. I hear you. All right. Lastly, the foldable phone hype is real Samsung is poised to release its foldable phones sometime this year are on just Cadeau court says though that the rumored galaxy eth- name as a real game a stupid name for flexible and foldable. All right. And you also said hype. So I'm going to press the button. All right. Well, read more about commentary. She talks about the different options that are out there. There's a galaxy of course. But then I don't know if they wanna copy, I no way, I don't think. So we'll see for full coverage because I've seen that chain. Ben, FOX, Ruben listening.

Disney Katie Colin Joan BEN Director Jeff Gibson Sundance Google Rueben Samsung Lovett Sony ETH Ruben FOX