32 Burst results for "Two Million Years"

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:54 min | Last month

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

"Now, we have contributing correspondent and gibbons. She wrote this week about the likely earliest human footprints on the Arabian Peninsula high an hi Sarah how old or how early are these footprints but that's a good question. They threw a whole package of dating methods at them and came up with in the Ballpark of twenty, one, thousand, two, hundred, and ten, thousand years old. Now the dates are not absolute. There's some questions about them, but that's a pretty good ballpark. How does this age compare to previous hints or clues that humans modern humans early modern humans were on the Arabian Peninsula. Here's the. We know that early hominids members of human family have been migrating out of Africa for two million years because we find fossils of our ancestors in the public of Georgia we find them in. Asia. We find them in Eurasia place, but we don't know how they got out and the most logical route is they had to walk through Rabia because they couldn't fly. They couldn't paddleboats a at that point the one landmass in the way between Africa where humans arose originally, our ancestors arose and Eurasia is through Arabia. So we know they had to go through there, but there's a huge gap there are. No tools older than three hundred to five, hundred, thousand years, and what is there is not definitive. The only fossil have a member of the human family from Arabia is a finger bone that is about eighty eight, thousand years old. So the mystery is, where's the evidence of members of the human family marching through Arabia, and then the second part of that is modern humans specifically, our ancestors Homo sapiens arose probably in Africa, because we see fossils in the ballpark of one, hundred, eight, thousand, three, hundred, thousand years of Proto early Homo, sapiens arising and Africa, and then we find more of these sort. Of Early Homo Sapiens in Greece dating possibly back to as early as two hundred and ten thousand. So we know that they got out right now we're just trying to find evidence. Is there something that going on in the Arabian Peninsula that either people didn't want to hang out there for very long or that erased a lot of evidence. Reagan. Peninsula, has covered with desert's it's very dry today the food desert where they found these fossils is parched arid but there were periods in the past where the planet was cooler and wetter, and during those times hundred, twenty, five, thousand years ago it was. One of them, it was green radio was covered with tens of thousands of lakes. They were grasslands between them. If you think about these early human ancestors, it's not a separate continent or a separate place for them to go to its Afro Arabia, right? Yeah. So it's an extension of Africa if the client is good and they're following large game, how were they able to find these footprints? This is a very large area and it's a few remnants of human passing through. Yes. So this team will have by Michael, Leah and it's an international team of Saudi Arabians in a number of people on. Has Been doing a search of scouring the deserts of. Arabia. For the last decade, they start with satellite imagery which helps them see parched ancient lake beds which have sort of characteristic white halio souls often these ancient sediments that stand out in the satellites and then go down to ground truth what they see on the satellites, an airplane shots they go in on foot in jeeps, and in this case they saw this ancient. Lake better rolling out as white sediment. It had just been recently exposed by Rosen and they found the footprints of the animals which was amazing and as I looked closer to one hundreds of footprints, it was four hundred mostly animals but they did identify a small number. It was seven that seemed to be human footprints. So they knew right away they were very excited about that that this was something that was important how Can you tell that they're human footprints and not some other upright walking relative? There's not a whole science of studying human footprints ever since the first ones are found in la totally in Tanzania and Kenya there've been a number of footprints that have been studied people use three D morphometric dimensional analysis with computational imaging or can really look at the depth and they could model how much weight would have been needed to make. That footprint, the length of the foot, the stride between the steps, and then they've done studies living people in their footprints in Africa to sort of test out those ideas and Lo, and behold when they do that to these footprints, they seem to come up with somebody kind of humor that was taller and maybe a little lighter weight more like a modern human of Homo sapiens and say an Andrew Tall so based on that. They say, Oh, these probably were made by Homo sapiens although we cannot rule out that nanotubes might have been there to is there anything else can tell about these people by looking at these marks I think if they get more, they can start to tell about their social structure footprint studies in Africa. I've got quite complicated where you could see the direction that they're going in the payson different members of social groups you can. To see what they are the packs of humans look like you know, what size are they how many are in these groups? What are they doing a lot of the way in this case, they're not spending a lotta time. They're just sort of walking through. This is a bantering group. What is really really cool. Though is that footprint site these are a snapshot of a single moment in time a single day most of the. Time when you have an archaeological site in a layer soil that you get the fossils of the tools and the dates, all that took place. This fan is usually hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of years. So if you find an animal bone near a prominent human early Human Boehner tool, you don't necessarily know fear there at the same time as parch with footprints like these these were lay down in the same day maybe. A couple of days and they dried out and then got caught up in preserved. So we know they were all there at the same time. So you get this really cool day in the life look at the and of the animals they were with, which is really cool in this case and lots of animals. Yes. Almost four hundred footprints of animals including very interesting. A wild asses which I don't think we're carrying burdens but. That's kind of neat and they were elephants and the thing that's interesting about the elephants as their popular disappeared for the Middle East, just in Africa. Thanks for three hundred years ago and here they are in hundred twenty, thousand in Arabia and the camps they also Campbell's it's kind of interesting that such large animals with Aaron. It begs the question were these humans following them where they attracted them. Going back to the, we talked about it being about one, hundred, twenty, thousand years old. There's some question about the date but if that were cracked, is there anything particularly Gordon about this time human history about what we know about migrations that we could link these prince two? Yes. So what is really interesting is that genetic evidence says that everybody outside of Africa. Came from migrations that happened in the last fifty to eighty thousand years. So this state predates that we happen to know that early Homo Sapiens were in the Middle East pretty quickly after this or at the same time they're fossils in caves. At school and cough so that our early sort of product Homo sapiens. So we know humans are at sorta suggests that because we don't have DNA that dates back this early these were failed migrations. These were members of the human family that went out they weren't shelled migrations for them they lived, but they did not contribute to the gene pool of letting people today that's one hypothesis but it also shows that there's more complex story of groups of humans migrating out of Africa constantly whenever the weather excitement is right that it's three to nothing that they can get water follow animals to meet and trek. Africa. They can cross the desert. It looks like humans were doing that whenever they could and so how do they contribute tour ancestry today a really interesting question and how many different kinds of hominids out there. Thank you so much an thank you. Sir,

Africa Arabian Peninsula Arabia Middle East Afro Arabia Gibbons Asia Cough Rabia Sarah Eurasia Saudi Arabians Reagan Georgia Tanzania
Overcoming Fear

Now For Tomorrow with Deepak Chopra

05:59 min | Last month

Overcoming Fear

"Hello. I'm Deepak Chopra and this is now for tomorrow. A collection actions you can do now during this time of disruption and crisis. To. Make. Tomorrow, better. Than today I want to take a moment to help things -iety in a time of crisis. The current pandemic of the covid nineteen. Has brought in its wake a different pandemic of anxiety and uncertainty. Sigmund Freud said that things -iety is like an unwelcome guest that refuses to leave. You are forced to adapt to its presence. How do people usually adapt to feel Psychologically. The do most important with are denied and distraction. By knowing your anxiety or doing something that takes your mind off it. You might find temporary relief. But is this something more permanent and effective? Can you get this unwelcome guests to leave? Yes, you can. The secret is to make conscious choices that goes feel to shrink away because you no longer needed. Fear is a holdover from early evolution rooted in the fight or flight response. It lies in wait. Ready to spring into action as it did for Hamad ancestors. Over two million years ago. But for the last ten, thousand years. The higher or conscious breed has evolved. And with it came infinite resources of thought. Feeling. Creativity and choice making. We were set free from primal fear. All we have to do is choose the bottom of consciousness. which is the bottom of inner wisdom. This is a theme I would be returning to over and over. Because the true secret making tomorrow better than today. is to, choose to, wake up. To make the right choices you need to be conscious of what fear is doing to. Fear is a form of stress. And you can choose to release that stress. That's where today's homework gums. You need nothing this homework except yourself. And comfortable place to lie down. Once, you're lying down comfortably on the carpet or a Yoga Mat. I'll offer an effective and very simple yoga pose known as Shabas. Where you simply lie still. REAP. And consciously relax. Lying on your back. Place your feet eighteen inches apart with your arms at your side bombs up. Close. Your eyes. Settle into the position. And breed naturally. Put your attention on your bread feeling your jest rise and fall. On the out bet, let your lungs deflate with this guy. EASILY BREATHING Then exile with the CY. Feel yourself becoming deeply relaxed. And continue for five to ten minutes. Now think into this relaxed feeling. To, exit the bows. Don't just get up quickly or go into activity. Easily turn and stretch has if you will waking up in the morning. Open, and close your hands. Then Open your eyes and get up without moving quickly into activity. You are relaxed and in control. Remember this feeling. Later in the day, if fear anxiety comes back tap into this feeling of es and relaxation. Let's broaden the discussion a little bit. Modern Life makes room for many words but very few in what's. A stock fact in Morton life is that more money power status position don't bring inert fulfillment. In fulfillment is found along a different path. In the ancient wisdom traditions of India life presented to butts. The birth of pleasure and the but the wisdom. Every wisdom tradition east and West is based on waking up, which means in practice getting over your unconscious behavior and adopting conscious behavior instead. You're already doing that in our discussion of how fuel works. You are waking up to discover that fear doesn't have to be in charge. You might not think of this as. Budget. Tips. Every moment of inner wisdom is simply a moment of becoming more conscious and aware. I encourage all of you to try Shabas now. Taking five to ten minutes to read out stress and breeding relaxed. May Not seem like much. But such small steps will help you reassert control over your personal reality lessening the grip of fear and uncertainty.

Deepak Chopra Sigmund Freud Shabas Hamad India Morton West
The Evolutionary History Of Penguins Is Far From Black And White

Environment: NPR

02:23 min | 2 months ago

The Evolutionary History Of Penguins Is Far From Black And White

"The image of a penguin might bring to mind an endless march across windswept ice. The reality of penguins is a bit different says Grant Ballard of point blue conservation science was actually see species of Pangolin. Really, love, it's only two species. Many others live in warmer waters. So we're could conceivably dealing with something like minus seven degrees or even colder than out. Then, show, but lobby goes mainland has encountered temperatures that are up around one hundred degrees Fahrenheit. So how'd it penguins evolve with such different lifestyles and new study and the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has some answers we've been able to resolve. Several. Longstanding questions about penguin evolution in particular way penguins originated. Hurry Bowie of UC Berkeley as an author on that study. He says there's been a long debate about where the first penguins evolved was it Antarctica or farther north in New Zealand as others have suggested, well armed with genetic evidence from a species of modern day penguins his team has an answer which turned out to be along the coast of Australia and New Zealand the nearby islands of the South Pacific. They say that happened around twenty two million years ago from there, the penguin served on a circular current at the bottom of the world there is a clockwise current. And so they use this current colonized like. The region Juliana of the Catholic. University. Of Chile is a CO author. She says, eleven million years ago that current revved up and penguins used it to slingshot themselves throughout the Southern Hemisphere. That's right. slingshot. The researchers also observed genetic adaptations. Some penguins picked up along the way like the ability to drink seawater also changes in how some species use oxygen allowing them to dive deep that doesn't mean. Penguins will be quick to adapt to modern day climate change. Here's Valley. Again, this adaptation to being able to occurring freezing cold waters in tropical waters occurred over a period of twenty million years, and this doesn't mean that penguins are going to be able to keep up with oceans warming today. If there is one thing, the paper makes clear. It's that the evolution of penguins for from black and

Penguins National Academy Of Sciences Bowie Grant Ballard Pangolin Chile New Zealand Southern Hemisphere Berkeley South Pacific Australia
Carnivore Diet Myths Debunked

Ben Greenfield Fitness

07:17 min | 3 months ago

Carnivore Diet Myths Debunked

"Is up guys welcome to this solo cast episode think you'd have been Greenfield for the questions which I will be answering in Solo casts episode. As many of you may know I've written the book, the Cardboard Code Rushing the video. You can see there behind me, this podcast will be released the first week of August twenty twenty one the second edition of my book is now live. So if you enjoy information check out the book dot, Carnivore Code Dot Com if you guys are new to this you. Haven't heard me talk to Ben. About the Carnivore Diet to previous podcasts on the Carnivore Diet you may WanNa check out in addition to this. So I was on Ben's podcast in March of Twenty nineteen and then last year or earlier this year when the first edition of the came out, I did the first solo cast on Ben's episode on Ben's show in which I answered some reader questions, not the Carnivore Code and after Ben read the book, He me a list of questions that he had about. The were code and that is what I will be diving into more specifically today on this solo casts episode. As many of you know Ben is a student of this stuff about chemistry. So some of these questions are pretty detailed try and break them down as clearly as I can. There's a lot of good nuance here that I think bring guys a lot of value. If you are more interested in ain't virata your Ordina, I'll give you three minutes summary Now for dive into some of these finer points the. Carnivore Diet is is an idea of an animal based I in contradistinction to plant based sides of today, the feces that I advance in my book the Carnivore Code are twofold in broad terms. The first is the animal foods specifically red meat and ruminant animals have been incorrectly vilified the last seventy years mostly at the by the result or as a result of incorrectly done science based on observational epidemiology. We have answer keys to thank for that. In many ways I've done a great podcast on my show with Natasha. Wrote Big Fat surprise in which we breakdown many of the myths surrounding saturated fat. So I probably will not get into saturated fat in this episode today. But if you want to know why we have such a bad misunderstanding, saturated fat listened to that episode on my podcast, we go into the details of saturated fat why it's actually very healthy for humans approach to get into it a little bit. Today with steering acid later but that is a big big misconception. There are many other misconceptions regarding read me that will cause cancer that will cause heart disease that it was shorten your life. Some of those will address today they are all addressed in my book, but they are all false none of them are supported by real interventional science actual experiments. They are false claims made based on observation deeming allergy. That has been widely misinterpreted and is inherently flawed Ben and I have talked about this in the past on previous shows. So referred of those. So the first of the book, a Carnivore Co is that Red Meat Animal Foods knows detail organ meets, which I want to talk about a lot today are critically important in the human diet. The part of every humans diet if we wish to be healthy and optimal and they should not be shunned based on incorrect science embrace the red meat especially. And know that you need those meeting Oregon's in order to thrive Ben I know is becoming more and more a fan of organ meats. He many nose to tail meals in the past together with the great. Great. Enjoyment in there are many amazing stories of that and let him tell you at some point in the future. The second thesis of the book is the plant foods exist on a toxin spectrum plants are rooted in the ground. They have no defenses other than the toxins they have evolved. This is not really conjecture botanical science. In the Condor Code I discussed multiple studies showing there are thousands and thousands of plant toxins that are present in plants and these can be harming. It's my golden writing. This book is not commit everyone to stop eating all plants. It's to empower you to realize to fold as saying here now that red meat and animal foods are the most nutritious foods on the planet that I mean containing the most bioavailable sources of all the nutrients humans need to thrive and number two that if you're not kicking as much fun as you want, you may be you may be well served by considering the plan foods you're eating on A. Spectrum which also outlined in the book and eliminating the plants that are most toxic that may be harming you in a variety of ways plans make defense chemicals. This is undeniable and again again all out in the book, it's a very comprehensive book over six hundred fifty references, and that is a broad strokes outlook on the way that I think humans really should be eating the first part. Of the book is about evolution we talk about the human brain is talking about the human brain in book at that point, and I talk about how it's gotten very big very quickly over the last two, million years primarily as a result of humans eating meat hunting I'm going to answer some questions been had in regard to this that in this podcast in secondarily I, talk about the fact. that. When we began agriculture are health when south very quickly and there's very good evidence that this is the really the massive change in the nutritional density of our foods accompanied that as we were hunting less and I will talk about that specifically in this podcast because Ben asked a question about that second part of the book is mostly about plant toxins I breakdown individual types of land toxins. I about polyphenyls why I think we've got this all wrong Benon I may respectfully disagree here but I I do make out what I believe is a very strong case for the book and I would love more discussion with this in the future I talk about oxalate electons solicits and I talk about all kinds of things like that. That are harming US isothiocyanates, which I will talk about today. which are things like fourteen in goal trian. and. How these plant compounds can affect for Mona balance that can affect nutrient absorption. They can affect our gut and really wreak havoc in lot of us if we are not aware of how present in our diet they are, how we might detoxify them in house. Some of US might be more specifically sensitive to them than and they can be causing us great harm and suffering the third part of the book is about to bunking. MITTS in the book. I. Talk About. I. Bunk. With me at that assurance, your life that causes cancer that causes heart disease and that you need fiber to poops all that is in the book I won't get into all of that today I could never do that would be a six hour podcast restaurants in there and in the fourth and final part of the book I outline very clear perspective very clear a model for how to eat a diet outlined five tiers. Of the Carnivore Diet, which gives the reader a sense of how to do this that works best for you and they some of them include plants a tier one for Diet includes plants I call it carnivore ish, but it gives you a toxicology spectrum and the foods that I believe are least toxic are included. They are able to be included on a carnivore ish type diet. Ben Himself has often said that he's eating carnivores. Words in his mouth I think that he would agree with this that he's thinking about making the majority of his Diet Animal Foods and organ meats, and then eating the foods, the plant foods that agree with him the most and thinking about the toxicity spectrum of those plants.

Ben Himself Red Meat Animal Foods United States Cancer Heart Disease Greenfield Oregon A. Spectrum Natasha
Reacting to the Nintendo Direct Mini

Nintendo Voice Chat

08:59 min | 7 months ago

Reacting to the Nintendo Direct Mini

"We recorded yesterday's episode and then the direct just dropped out of nowhere on Thursday morning which is responsible very typical. Yeah it's not. It's not very typical though right because like usually Nintendo the day before will at least tweet out like. Hey there's a direct coming tomorrow or you know like hey there's a direct coming in two days but this is kind of unprecedented for them to just be like okay here. It is and it's it's odd because right you know. Usually they count on that to like bring in a bunch of people to watch that that premier live. I honestly thought it was really strange this morning to wake up and see like. Oh Nintendo just dropped thirty news games. Once as you. I see you could probably tell that. I'm a little annoyed because usually back as you can hear Zach Ryan joining us also chiming in right now. Is Brian Alto? But we're also joined because Casey is busy today by Seth Macy Long Distance. So while Brian what are you going to say I was GONNA say I meant typical in that. Nbc recorded yesterday and news broke after when you listen to the regular episode of NBC. This week you'll also hear a say hilarious things like I can't believe there's no borderlands on switch that's crazy why would there not be borderlands on switch and then literally less than twenty four hours later borderlands was switched? So you'll get that We are digging into this L. Let's just jump in. We're going to be going down our roundup article which you can find. You can actually go to this random article on. I dot Com to see all of the announcements as well as a poll. That's asking you. What your favorite reveal was from the tender direct so you can check that out but let's start at the top With the Smash Bros announcement which was kind of like a little bit of a half announcement right. They announced that the first fighter in the second fighter pass is going to be an arms character arriving in June and revealed in June. But we don't know which character yet and they need more time for which I bet it's a punch man a better man as the character that us. I was thinking fist girl. What else what about the other one might be showing perils? My was. They're leaving it open because it's going to be one of those things like like the Kupa lanes where every skin is a different character. Probably GONNA be the same arms fighters or something but I mean everybody was clamoring for more arms news so it makes sense that this would come be nice. People like people like the day like the like really like aren't arm team. This is a character like A. I'm not really like it's not a character. I'm disappointed to see Smash Bros and it's what I kind of thought that they were going to do in the first fighter pass anyway. It's it's certainly leads me to believe that. They're they're really still thinking about making arms a franchise. You know what I mean like. They said that like well development is still happening on arms to while they didn't say arm sue but they did hint that they're working on a sequel to arms legs. Chocking thank you so that was kind of shocking to me because I feel that game kind of came and went so fast it sold well and I think it like stuck around for a little bit but this this does. This news feels few years too late. I'm with you guys on that like I think if they had announced this character Few months after the launch it would have made a little bit more sense but I was going to be sorry. I was the protein shakes. I assumed that are there. Anonymous character was going to be the best game. I was surprised when the same kind of seems like a no brainer to put it like in the first round but it seems very weird to put it here in this third round of characters so the good thing is like they're they're coinciding with the allowing players to play the entire game for free for a little while. Which is I think. A smart move. It's basically a free switch game that you can download immediately and I think you know a Free First Party. Switch game Temporarily air quotes. But I think that's pretty awesome. Even if I didn't super get into that game us Mr Smash Redman Right now but like I'm not like overly crazier excited about the idea of like arms character but I am excited about the prospect of what an arms character as a smash. Bros fighter would be like. I think that character could be really fun to play. Yeah like I think that that it would be a a a nice medium distance character. You know like a lot of like good good. Reach a lot of great recovery probably. Yeah I interested as a fighting cared. I'm interested in it as a fighting game. I just think it's a weird move in terms of like their overall oeuvre at this point but because I I kind of assumed that nintendo would would do arms and see the reception and then just like okay. Well we tried that. Once we're bacteria we had small technical issues there but we're back to talk now about Zena bed Conoco's definitive addition We got a release date for this. May Twenty ninth. They also just like showed off a bunch of the game. This was sort of the headliner. aside from polk Amman. I think it's thing they spent the most time on this. Yup I've I've said my piece about Zena Blade chronicles on this show. I'M GONNA JUST YOU. Y'All go ahead and talk about this game. I'm good who is played it because I missed it back in the day. I also missed it back in the day. I played it. Okay your first one Brian. Yeah Yeah are you like did. Did you like what you saw here in terms of re master and definitive edition? Whatever they want. I mean this is like while I probably won't dive into this. This is obviously gigantic news. For people who love this game This is a highly beloved game that will take hundreds of hours finish and putting that on switches. Never bad news Personally it's not something. I'm really intrigued about but every time I've sort of been like oh who's even excited about this. Millions of people are like us and so I will just say I am happy for all of you who are happy for this game even though it's not for me personally Good luck and Godspeed. I hope you enjoy your fun time with the video game coming this year but I will say I'm really am excited that we just have another mainline. Switch Game. Release date this year. Like that's exciting to me But beyond that. I'm excited because when I was asking about if I should start seeing a blade chronicles two million years ago. The thing from people as you should really play the first one I but it's also not worth going. It's like it's more trouble than it's worth to go back to it because it's kind of an aged game so seeing this as like looking pretty much just as good as chronicles to now makes me want to be like. Oh Yeah I I can actually play this. Which is which is really exciting. Yeah I think the graphically like the overhaul looks gorgeous. The character models look really really good. The environments look really good. I think that the one thing that I really liked about chronicles to the ten hours that I spent with it was like it's just insane to see that expansive sort of open world those kinds of areas on the switch. No game does it anywhere near that good except for maybe breath of the wild so. Brian said I think it's really cool for fans of Zeno Blade. I'm stoked that they're get a chance to free. Play this one of the most exciting announcements for a lot of people at least gen our calm according to our poll was Two K Games announced their K. Announced that a bunch of there are coming so we're getting the bioshock collection which is a shock. One two and infinite. We're getting borderlands legendary collection and we're getting X. come to the X. Come to collection but that's really just like it in it's steel see Vats THREE SERIES. That are fantastic. All coming to switch and like on also on May Twenty Ninth. So this is like really. That's really cool thing. That's once that's like huge support from two K ma. My only concern here is that I hope that the bioshock collection that they're putting out for switch has been retooled since it was released for xbox and ps four there was awesome right really serious issues with that collection in even now like my friend just replayed through Bioshock two and she had like a bunch of glitches in issues and stuff in in the bioshock collection. So I'm hoping that that it's been ironed out before or will be ironed out before it comes to the

Brian Alto Nintendo Smash Bros Zach Ryan Mr Smash Redman NBC First Party Polk Amman Bros Casey Zeno Blade Seth Macy Vats
Counting a star's birthday candels

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

01:39 min | 8 months ago

Counting a star's birthday candels

"There are many ways to count the candles on the star's birthday cake to star clusters that are in the western evening sky at this time of year provides two examples messy eight thirty four is in the constellation Perseus it's about halfway up the sky in the west northwest at nightfall well to the upper right of Venus the evening star and messy eight thirty six is higher in the sky in a raga it's to the left of the yellow orange star capella M. thirty six is the younger of the two clusters less than twenty five million years old one way astronomers came up with that number is by measuring lithium in a specially small cool stars stars begin life with just a smattering of lithium and it's quickly destroyed by the stars nuclear reactions more massive stars burn through their lithium faster than less massive stars so by measuring the amount of the element in stars of different weights they can come up with an estimate of a clusters H. in this case about twenty two million years astronomers you stars at the opposite end of the eight scale to measure the age of M. thirty four they used quite towards the small dead cores of once normal stars stars of different masses burn out at different times with heavier stars going first and they leave white dwarfs that have different mixtures of chemical elements for the white dwarfs in M. thirty four indicate an age of about two hundred twenty five million years a good match to the other techniques used to count the stars birthday candles we have much more

Asteroid dust may have triggered massive explosion of life on Earth 466 million years ago

BBC World Service

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Asteroid dust may have triggered massive explosion of life on Earth 466 million years ago

"The team of scientists at Lund university in Sweden says the break up of a massive asteroid between Mars and Jupiter almost half a billion years ago created a cloud of space dust that cool down earth the cooling effect sparked an explosion in primitive animal life most of which was still in the oceans the ice age lasted for about two million years which gave lifeforms time to adapt BBC

Lund University Sweden BBC Two Million Years Billion Years
Earth's Magnetic Field Initiates Pole Flip Many Millennia Before The Switch

60-Second Science

02:31 min | 1 year ago

Earth's Magnetic Field Initiates Pole Flip Many Millennia Before The Switch

"North North and South Pole is far from fixed in fact the field is quite active sometimes weakens and even reverses causing earth polarity to switch reversals. Don't happen very often though only about every one hundred thousand two million years that's part of why this phenomenon has largely remained a mystery for scientists scientists however a recent study may help researchers better understand how long and how complicated. Earth's magnetic field reversals really are. You're the last polarity reversal took place some seven hundred seventy thousand years ago and a new study researchers use a lava flow records along with sedimentary an Antarctic ice core data to examine that event they found that the reversal took about as long as many scientists previously believed it did just a few thousand years but the researchers also examined the period prior to that final reversal process and they discovered that a lot was happening with earth. I know field thousands of years beforehand. There's clear evidence from the volcanic rocks of a major excursion happening at about seven hundred ninety five five thousand years ago. Brad Singer do scientists at the University of Wisconsin Madison who led the study that was followed by another excursion which is the unexpected ended finding of this study at about seven hundred eighty four thousand the two excursions that we've discovered in the lava record in our seed in some of the sedimentary records are a sign that the Dynamo was beginning to undergo the reversal process twenty thousand years earlier than the final reversal took place so our arguments would be that the rehearsal gristle process is complicated long lived and it gets underway gets initiated well before the final reversal takes place all this activity deep prior to the final reversal vital for our grasp of the process. The ultimate goal here is we want to understand what drives reversals what HAPP- what really happens in the Dynamo. Oh and if you just start and look at this short period right around the reversal you're missing all this unusual behavior that happens in thousands of years prior prior to that we need to know of singers findings hold true for magnetic field reversals in general alterations in the field will mess with critical human systems as such as the GPS satellites that help us navigate fortunately whenever the next reversal happens. It looks like we'll have plenty of time to prepare. Thanks for listening

South Pole Brad Singer University Of Wisconsin Seven Hundred Ninety Five Five One Hundred Thousand Two Milli Seven Hundred Seventy Thousand Twenty Thousand Years Thousand Years
Simbakubwa Kutokaafrika

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Simbakubwa Kutokaafrika

"Is it possible that there are big prehistoric animals that paleontologists have never discovered of course it is done. The distant past is poorly known and. Paleontologists find fossil evidence for new large animals all the time in two thousand nineteen to American researchers reported discovering the fossil remains of carnivorous mammal larger than a modern lion and even larger than. The prehistoric Sabertooth Tiger it live twenty two million years ago in what's now Africa really. Were they find it. They found it in a museum drawer at the Nairobi National Museum in Kenya how museum drawer it's not as strange. As you might think decades ago a team of paleontologists dug up fossils of its jaw portions of its skull and some other parts of its skeleton but the team was looking for fossils of prehistoric apes so they. Just catalogued it started and forgot it so the modern researchers most of fun something interesting about the fossils that the earlier team didn't they did. They found that the fossil creature was a mammal but not closely related to any modern. Modern Group of mammals it was a member of an extinct group called the hyena dance for forty million years after the extinction of the dinosaurs. They were the dominant group of Mammalian predators in Africa. They all died out when their environment changed the scientists named the Creature Simba Kuba Kotoka Africa since there were apes in Africa back then it's possible that this giant Predator with Canine teeth as big as bananas may have dined.

Africa Nairobi National Museum Kenya Twenty Two Million Years Forty Million Years
Paleontologist finds mini dinosaur in western New Mexico

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Paleontologist finds mini dinosaur in western New Mexico

"From New Mexico wants only about three feet tall. But it could still bite your head off live only a playful snip, scientists have found the early remains a cousin of the Toronto source. Wrecks of pip squeak that only reached the height of toddler compared to its giant relative one of the paleontologist says this particular dinosaur lived about ninety two million years ago, which would make it older than the T Rex in weighed about ninety pounds again, which is nothing compared to the nine ton king of all dinosaurs. Let me try this the Susteren is Hazel. Yeah. That one it isn't the first or even the smallest of the tyrannosaurs family. But it provides the best example of how this family of modest sized Daigneault's evolved into the towering horror of movies and

Giant Panda Diets

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Giant Panda Diets

"I'm hungry. But I can't decide what to eat. Nothing. Sounds good. Does that ever happen to you yell? I know the feeling dying giant pandas have it easy. They just Bambu for breakfast, lunch and dinner and don't give food another thought not these days, but they used to eat all kinds of things you mean millions of years ago right now, scientists found out that as recently as five thousand years ago giant pandas had a much more diverse diet than they do today. It was a surprising fine. Since like, you said we previously thought it's been over two million years since their diet was any different. The researchers looked at copes in the bodies of modern pandas and fossils of ancient pandas to come up with this new date isotopes are atoms of an element that have different numbers of neutrons, heavy isotopes are those with more neutrons than average. And light isotopes are those with fewer neutrons than average foods have different levels of light or heavy isotopes that then get incorporated into the bones hair nails and teeth of the animal that eats them. And by measuring the ratios of heavy to light isotopes in these animals. Scientists can get an idea of the kinds of foods. They eat modern day pandas have a very low heavy to light ratio because of their bamboo only diet, but pans from five thousand years ago had ratios similar to other herbivores implying that like other herbivores they ate of a riot of plants oil either salad. This moment of science comes from Indiana University on the web at a moment of science dot org. Where you can also view videos and sign up for podcasts. I'm Don glass. And I'm yeah. Cassandra?

Don Glass Cassandra Indiana University Five Thousand Years Two Million Years
All The Other Hominins Are Extinct

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

All The Other Hominins Are Extinct

"Lot of human beings almost sapiens. And I close relatives are called hominids all hominids except us or extinct. They include homo erectus that populated Asia starting one point eight million years ago, homo habemus that appeared about two million years ago in Africa, homo fluorescein, says a tiny three and a half foot tall homonyn that live on floors island in Indonesia than the end of those who appeared more than four hundred thousand years ago in Eurasia and others how come only homo sapiens. Survived yale. Well, many ideas have been suggested about that done in two thousand eighteen to anthropologist mater review of recent data on the geographical dispersal of hominids and found that their analysis supported the theory that homo sapiens, is special because of its ability to adapt to a wider range of environments than any of the others. Former them their analysis of the distribution of known fossils showed that the other species probably had more restricted environmental ranges, although early hominids spread widely into Europe and Asia, their fossils are mostly found in areas that were tropical forests at the time homo. Flora sciences was restricted to one island the knee and earth all spread more widely and hunted large game on the northern Eurasian. Steppes Sylvan home associates spread to wider range of environments than these. Yes. Homa sapiens. Inhabited these areas and many others, including extreme environments like desert's, the Arctic and high altitudes like the Tabet in plateau where fossils of other hominids haven't been found. The researchers called our ancestors generalists specialists because they specialized at being able to adapt to living almost anywhere. More from Indiana University. I'm Don, I NIA Cassandra.

Asia Steppes Sylvan Floors Island Flora Sciences Mater Yale Indonesia Indiana University Eurasia DON Europe Arctic Africa Four Hundred Thousand Years Eight Million Years Two Million Years
Beating Procrastination, Sand Science (w/ Vince Beiser)

Curiosity Daily

07:26 min | 1 year ago

Beating Procrastination, Sand Science (w/ Vince Beiser)

"Today. You'll learn a trick for actually using your vacation days, even when you're super busy and the science behind white darkness is actually faster than the speed of light will also learn about the hidden science of sand in a clip from the most popular interview eve done in the last year. Let's satisfy some curiosity in you manage to get away from the office this summer because it's healthy to take a vacation from work. Don't feel like you missed your chance though, because we've got some advice from a time management. Coach might help you use up those days and stay sane at work. I like it. Yes. I feel like I need to take this advice. I feel like you do too. Ashley not that. I don't like seeing you around the office. In two thousand seventeen fifty two percent of American workers with paid vacation days left, some of them unused that added up to a whopping seven hundred and five million unused vacation days overall or two million years, which is about how long it's been since humans appeared on earth and working too much has been linked with heart problems, mental health issues and a decrease in work quality in general. But a recent study by glass door found that worries about job security are the main reasons people don't take vacations, so what can you do in an article for Harvard Business Review business owner and time management? Coach. Elizabeth grace Saunders advocates something that's brilliant in its simplicity micro vacations. That's when you get out of the office, but you use a day or less vacation time. And even just one day comes with a lot of benefits you won't have to find a replacement to handle your work, you won't come back to a mountain of emails, and you can do a micro vacation once every couple of weeks. Nobody said you can only go on one big vacation every year. Year you might want to avoid taking a Monday micro vacations since a lot of people send important emails on Mondays. And you don't wanna come back to his billions messages in your inbox. But how does the three day weekends out? Take off a Friday once in a while. And another big thing is that micro vacations can be free. You don't have to spend time making a vacation itinerary or spend money on plane tickets if your job allows it you could even take a half day to take a long lunch with a friend or catch a met navy movie. You've been wanting to see whatever you do. Don't lose your vacation days. You need a vacation. Trust us. The best employees is take the most vacation days. That's true. You keep saying that to be. I don't understand why. Oh, I'm not gonna say anything. Sinned is one of the most important materials in human civilization and were running out of it. If you don't believe me, that's okay. We've got an expert who might be able to convince you we recently had the chance to talk to Vince buys her author of the world in a grain the story of sand. And how it transformed civilization? Here's what he told us. So we consume more sand than any other natural resource in the world except for water and air. That's how important it is. I mean, I say in the book, it's the literal foundation of modern civilization. And that's that's no exaggeration. Because as you say, it's I mean, you toss off concrete and glass, but really if you stop and think about concrete and glass, that's basically what our cities are completely made of every shopping mall apartment block every building in the modern world that gets built is made out of concrete, and that's an enormous amount. So we use about all in. We are using about fifty billion tons. Of sand every year that's about that's enough to cover the entire state of California about two inches deep every single year. That's quite a bit. That's quite a bit. I've got a giant world map on my wall imbed room and right in the middle. So you know, what's there? It's africa. And right in the northern part Africa. There's a big old desert. So how can there be a shortage? If the Sahara exists that's a really good question. The answer is because that desert sand is basically useless to us, and the reason for that is it the greens or the wrong shape. So desert sand has been eroded by wind over thousands or millions of years tumbling, and tumbling and tumbling and tumbling and that has made those grains, kind of rounded as opposed to the kind of sand that you find in river beds or lake beds. Flood plains even the bottom of the ocean. That sand tends to be more more angular. It's got a lot more angles and corners to it. So it locks together the way the. You needed to form a stable structure? So the thing that we use San by far the most thing that we stand for the most is concrete and to make concrete you need those same greens to lock together and desert sand just is to round to do that. It's like the difference between trying to build something out of a stack of marbles as opposed to building something out of a stack of little tiny bricks, so all that desert sand, totally useless. He's nudie curiosity. You might not know that when we first launched our podcast a weekly show where we interviewed scientists and authors from around the world will back by popular demand. We've been producing brand new feature length podcast interviews for our supporters on our patriotic page before we get to our last story. I want to give a special shout out to some of our patrons. Thank you Genevieve Moffitt Cambronne and day used Banco for supporting our show on patriot. We really appreciate it. If you love our show and you want to support curiosity daily than visit patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com all spelled out any amount helps and we try to give back. Offering cool incentives like bonus episodes, uncut interviews and fun conversations on dischord one more time. That's patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. Eight one to no it's faster than the speed of light the speed of dark. No, really. It's a thing. That's how fun little physics lesson. And we'll preface this by saying, please don't get mad at us. We promise it's true. Even if it's kind of hard to wrap your head around. Yes. This is the second time we run this article. And we got a lot of emails about it before. And I have done my due diligence. This is absolutely for. Sure. True. All right. Here's how it works. Even though nothing can move faster than the speed of light shadows can still move faster than the speed of light a mentioned, you have a light that's powerful enough to reach the planet Jupiter. Okay. Got that. Now, imagine that it casts to be mccone that's broad enough to cover the entire diameter of the planet. When you pass your finger over that light, the shadow will cross the entire diameter of the planet. That's a distance of more than eighty six thousand miles. The speed of light is one hundred eighty six thousand miles per second. So if it takes less than half a second to move your hand that distance. Then that shadow will have broken the speed of light. Remember how he said that nothing can move faster than the speed of light. Well, that's the key shadows are nothing. A shadow is a not thing shadows are the absence of something specifically photons or particles of light since there's nothing that's actually traveling the distance thing that's moving is an area. Where photons aren't there's no information that's being transmitted faster than light only a blockage or lack of information. That means you're interplanetary shadow puppet. Show doesn't break any physical was which means we're right? And we hope you're not upset with us for this brain teaser. But we promise it's true another way to think about it is that the shadow only has the illusion of moving is actually the region that has light and has no light that is changing. Right. So it's not physically moving across the planet. Right. It just looks like it is right. You love this article. But you kind of hate it too. Oh, yeah. The love hate relationship.

Africa Harvard Business Review Ashley Sahara Business Owner California Elizabeth Grace Saunders Genevieve Moffitt Cambronne Vince Banco Two Thousand Seventeen Fifty T Fifty Billion Tons Two Million Years Two Inches Three Day One Day
"two million years" Discussed on WBAI

WBAI

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on WBAI

"Think the media got it all wrong as to the real thrust of that letter. Einstein did not mean to say that. Well, God is nothing, but a fairytale no steeper than that. And then we'll see if you things about gene therapy, which is in the news. The Chinese have more or less reprimand Uday scientists in China who did this unauthorized experiment on humans and children were born with genetically modified genes. This is the first time it's been done and is causing tremendous amount of controversy. So we'll say few things about germline, gene therapy. And so Matty, gene therapy. And then we'll answer a few emails that I get one persistent Email concerns flying saucers and UFO's the United States government recently released, of course, a batch of all files showing that. Well, yes, there are strange things happening in the skies are pilots have been buzzed by some kind of object that zigzags travels faster than any known object. And Hayes not supposed to be that way. There's no none of our weapons can do this. And so some people say is a cover up, it's aliens after all. So we'll see a few things about that. Well, our lead story today concerns global warming, and well, what set off some of the mass extinctions of the past the skeptics of global warming say that carbon dioxide is actually good for us. I mean after all plants take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen so plants thrive in a greenhouse where we have lots of carbon dioxide. So what's wrong with having a lush tropical like environment? Well, plenty here's a new report coming out of science magazine. Scientists have done a computer simulation of what might have caused a mass extinction. Two hundred fifty two million years ago. It was one of the greatest mass extinctions in the history of planet earth. Now, we all know that the dinosaurs got wiped out about sixty five million years ago when a commoner meteor slammed into Mexico, but what created the dinosaurs? So the dinosaurs were destroyed by Commodore meteor what catastrophic event set into motion the dinosaur. Evolution. Well, it was this mass extinction. Two hundred fifty two million years ago. Between the Permian and the tree acid era. Something happened which wiped out previous life forms, including the chiller bites ushering in the age of dinosaurs. So in other words, dinosaurs were book ended book ended by something that's set into motion the dinosaur revolution two hundred fifty two million years ago. And then something book ended them and wipe them out sixty five million years ago. Well, here's a new theory. It turns out that two hundred fifty two million years ago, geologist know, that there were gigantic volcanic eruptions on the planet earth, releasing copious amounts of carbon dioxide because that's what comes out of all candidate eruptions, sulfur carbon dioxide noxious gases and with all this carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Well, see rise took place twenty degree rise in the temperature of the oceans, which wiped out many life forms, but more important. The oceans began to lose their oxygen content. And so large aquatic animals could no longer survive. And of course, the food chain depends upon life in the oceans, and so with the loss of oxygen content in the oceans with the rise in temperature by twenty degrees, computer, simulations show that well on the order of ninety six percent of all sealife died as a consequence and seventy percent of land animals also died that is of course, catastrophic that is one of the greatest mass extinctions in the history of the planet earth, and we think it was caused by global warming. And that is with tremendous amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Sea rise took place temperatures rose twenty degrees. And in addition, the oxygen content of the oceans plummeted killing off many sealife to depends upon oxygen. And of course, land animals, depend upon sealife. The report concludes by saying that we could be headed for something not as catastrophic is that but similar that by mid century. We're talking about a gigantic disruption in the ecology of the planet earth because of global warming not on the scale of what happened, of course, two hundred fifty two million years ago, but the United Nations last month. Issued. This rather gloomy report. It was co authored by ninety scientists with six thousand scientists peer reviewing the report talking about what's going to happen between twenty thirty and twenty fifty two at the rate. We're going we're talking about another one and a half degree rise in temperature,.

Einstein China United States Hayes Uday Matty United Nations Mexico geologist two hundred fifty two million Two hundred fifty two million sixty five million years twenty degrees ninety six percent seventy percent twenty degree
Underwear choice takes a toll on sperm counts

The Answer Programming

09:36 min | 2 years ago

Underwear choice takes a toll on sperm counts

"I drink a glass of water just to surprise my liver like that one. And then here's saying from cave man to man cave and just two million years. Hey, that's evolution for you. Oh, I like this one t-shirt says I survived the sixties twice once in the sixty in the nineteen sixties. And now, I'm in my sixties. Okay. Well, that's a good thing. You survived it twice. Okay. And then here's a spoof product. I thought I'd combined our weekly hair today segment with our funny bone pharmacy. So here's the world's first hair comb with a credit limit. It's called what else credit comb, and I got describe this here since we are on radio and TV, but it's a picture of credit card with the teeth that are cut out of the top of the card. So the the plastic of the credit card has. It's like the edge of a comb. So they're saying that space is way too tight and today's crowded wallets for single purpose anything's, that's why we added value and haircare functionality to the standard credit card with a dual purpose credit comb. You can charge your purchases and still keep that welcomed. Look both at the same time. Okay. Maybe it could you could also charge your hair with some static electricity. That will give you a real charge. If you will and speaking of hair, the castration cure for baldness. There's no known cure for male pattern baldness, which will leave you with testes intact. As baldness relies upon the male, testicular hormone testosterone. Well, castration is the only answer the side effects of castration, however, include loss of body hair other than your head a false, set voice, a tendency to obesity, insomnia, a weak bladder and poor eyesight. So not such. A good trade off. I think I'll risk having that chrome dome. Thank you. Okay. All right. And we still have a few minutes before our guest, rob Martin. So let's go into some fast facts for you nine hundred ten calories. That's the average number of weekly calories. People consume from free food at work. Wow. Almost a thousand calories a week. Thank you about it. Folks. That's over a pound of fat a month or one pound of body fat has about thirty five hundred calories. So here consuming more than a pound of extra body fat, or you know, extra calories that can result in a twelve pounds a year just from that free food at work in the lunchroom. So be aware of that. Here's the downside of protein muscle food. You know, it's known as muscle food, and we needed it's essential. We can't live without protein. But middle aged guys might wanna think twice about how much they eat this from the American Heart Association. New study published in the journal fellow thousand. Thousand men ages forty to sixty for twenty two years and found that those who consume the most protein at a high a slightly increased risk of heart failure. Now, the source of the protein Matt animal protein was associated with a forty three percent higher risk while dairy bumped up to forty nine percent, however, eating plant protein was associated only with a seventy percent elevated risk now, the only this is interesting. The only protein sources not linked to an increased risk of heart failure actually to animal protein sources it was fish and eggs interesting. I remember new Jacqueline for over thirty years. And that you know, he didn't eat any meat, but he did eat egg whites, and he ate fish every night for dinner. So when he lived to ninety six all right? Okay. Are anti anti tap culmination of tech and tip is no are anti tech. Tip of the week comes from a comment that someone made on Twitter and said apple has released thirteen hundred excuse me, three hundred new emojis. Even ancient Egyptians were like guys. You know, we have words now. Right. Petroglyphs are ancient scrolling or scrawling pictures from Egypt's entombs. That's funny. Anyway, emojis isn't that an oxymoron, I mean? They don't really convey all the nuances and inflections in emotions, which is why they're called emojis that you could otherwise communicate with words either spoken or written. So don't cop out pick up the phone or pay a visit to your friend or whoever you're trying to communicate with. Okay, all right and one more item. And we'll have our guest in just a brief moment or two. Adding a little green will make you healthier indoors. Great way to bring the outdoors inside. You know face it, even here in Hawaii where we broadcast from where he spend most of our lives and doors average person sometimes up to ninety percent and seventy percent of us have work in an office as far as our careers. So it's good good idea to bring some nature into your office. Make sure you're not the only one living. Excuse me. Make sure you're not the only living thing in the space that you're in so bring another living thing since as a plant inside. I always have an orchid blending orchid in my living room and really adds to ambiance to gives me a nice feeling. So, but you know, whatever your favorite plant tour flowers, and that's a good tip of the week. Okay. All right. We'll be back after this brief message or two and we'll be back with more information for your health. We're gonna talk about some of the things that can keep you healthy to fight the ultimate disease aging talk to health expert, rob Martin who contends that aging is the master disease. We'll talk about how to conquer it. And some things you can do to defeat it, right? After this as Dr off continues. I'm David snow here on doctor health radio.

Rob Martin American Heart Association Testosterone Egypt Obesity Emojis Twitter David Snow Jacqueline Matt Hawaii Apple Insomnia Seventy Percent Thirty Five Hundred Calories Nine Hundred Ten Calories Forty Three Percent Forty Nine Percent
Box Office: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Heads for Huge Labor Day Weekend

Sean Hannity

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Box Office: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Heads for Huge Labor Day Weekend

"House still making. Bank at the box office another, lucrative weekend for crazy rich Asians told me that you're like principally Asia that's ridiculous entrepot higher the. Romantic comedy tops for, the weekend box office for the third time in. A row with an estimated twenty two. Million dollars in second place Thought to have been extinct. Over two million years wrong the shark flick the Meg with ten and a, half million mission impossible fallout was third then the Nazi war crime. Film operation finale in its, debut Adolf Eichmann the architect of the final solution. The computer. Screen mysteries, searching rounds out the top five FOX's Pat O'Neil the numbers will be updated later to include labour day

United States President Trump Tyson Canada Tyson Foods FOX Adolf Eichmann Isis Afghanistan Colorado River Bloomberg Abu Saad Steve Rappoport Mexico Pat O'neil Ellison Barbara Congress California
"two million years" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on Science Talk

"Most people have been thinking about the imagination as like ideas in your head like you were saying, you know, if you can cocked some wonderful scenario in your mind's eye, your imaginative. But really, if you think about the. Aleutian of imagination. It must have been that we were doing our first improvisational and imaginative work with the body. It would have been before language. It would have been before concepts. And so this leads you to think about dance, for example. And one of our earliest maybe artistic creations might have been tribal dancing. A lot of times people think about the cave paintings of the upper paleolithic and that's great. But that's, you know, maybe forty fifty thousand years ago. Dancing probably goes back way before that, possibly even to the place early Pleistocene periods. So that could be two million. We'll let the the sirens coming. This is an issue we deal with in New York a lot. When. Chicago, it's exactly and it's okay. So so two million years ago we're talking pre homo sapiens. Yeah, a other homo or even maybe a different genus, but still that that impulse, the dancing, the imagination, the improvisation, is there already. Yeah. I think that if you look at homo erectus for example, you've got a social creature that was probably similar to early homo sapiens in terms of small band families, nuclear families, small band groups, thirty fifty people, and there were ways in which they would have demonstrated to their competitors that they were a group to be reckoned with. And we think anthropologist suggested dance originally was a way of demonstrating to your opponents, hey, together, you know, this group can get you can do these moves together. We. West side story. Exactly. That's right because you can't. You're not just saying, we're, we're a good fighting team. You're showing them that you can be together on the step. Now how did that stuff you evolve at head to be like certain kind of movements, and then you're improvising and adding sequences, you know, within sequences and this I think is exciting because human beings can do this thing that we call in train -ment, which is if I start clapping my hands together, you know like this that you can quickly fall in with me and we can have a whole room clapping to some, you know, blues or soul music. But other animals can't do this and they're very bad at it. And it suggests that there may be sort of brain prerequisites to this kind of all getting together and synchronizing and simulating each other. And I think the origins of imagination go back into that kind of embodied simulation system. I can copy what you're doing. You can copy what I'm doing. Other. Mammals can do that too. But once you start adding things like social complexity and language, now the simulation start getting better and better. So even the play among kids gets much more sophisticated than the kind of play the you get in animals in in our closest relatives in primates who get rough and tumble play, and you know, you juveniles will wrestling charter. But once you get a simple system like language in, once you get kind of a long safe childhood, like you have in homo sapiens. Now you get people, you know, playing cops and robbers in, you know, the Cowboys and Indians in this kind of stuff. Well, early, you know, rarely, Elizabeth versions. Yeah. Yeah. You don't play probably don't play cops and robbers. Roberson countless and India's anymore and Pelley Olympic version, of course, right for different. I've, I think I've had a couple of experiences usually playing sports where I physically did something that I didn't know I knew how to do. Yeah. And I think sports and music. And what else is where you're gonna find this kind of thing. Those are great examples, sports and music. So when you improvise in music or in sports or really like we're doing now in forming sentences were using the sort of rules of grammar and semantics and syntax. But we've appropriated those rules into this kind of embodied cognition. So I don't have to like think, am I apply the rule correctly? When I say this to you, I just do it through practice and habituation, and this is true in jazz. Improvisation to what you've done is you've mastered certain scales and certain chords, and it's true in sports as well. But then you have to apply them in real time..

Pleistocene New York Chicago Cowboys India Roberson Elizabeth forty fifty thousand years two million years
"two million years" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on Science Friday

"The need for sort of stricter guidelines clear regulations to set up for potential human exploration because if you know once humans land on you know if humans go to mars which you know spacex says it wants to do nasa says it wants to do by the twenty thirties you know we're probably going to bring our microbes with us and what we found from life on earth is that earth microbes are really good at colonizing new environments and so there's this worry that we might contaminate mars with our own life and then foul up the search for you know is there actual martian life out there or maybe there was billions of years ago so it's important to do that before all these these other rockets not state actors get into space i i want to turn to your your next story here and this is really interesting so a group of monkeys that seems to have entered the stone age tells about this yeah so you know on this island called he got her own off the coast of panama there'd been kind of this rumor that there were monkeys there that use stone tools some scientists at this massoni and reese tropical research institute in panama had heard about it and they finally went and investigated last year they set up some camera traps and what they found kind of blew their minds these monkeys capuchin monkeys ciba's cappuccinos their little sort of cat sized animals with white faces and long tails and they were actually taking large stones stones almost half the size of their body weight and smashing them down onto flat rocks and and logs and using that to crack open coconuts and other kinds of nuts hermit crabs snails and get tasty morsels inside so this is a stone tool it's like a hammer and anvil that they're using to access food and that's exciting because this is only the fourth nonhuman primates species it's ever been observed with this kind of behavior using a stone tool and it could help scientists understand you know what causes a species to start picking up stones and using them as tools and also why our own set ancestors might have entered the stoneage more than two million years ago but it's just these monkeys in this one place other monkeys aren't doing this yeah that's the really weird thing is that the you know so this island is pretty big it's full of forests and it's inhabited with monkeys and they're similar islands nearby that have the same species of monkey and yet the only only one group of cappuccinos was showing this behavior and actually the scientists tried leaving out some experimental rocks in other parts of the island to see if the monkeys might pick them up and start using them and the monkeys totally ignored them like they were not interested unless it was this one particular group and so that's a really strange thing because you would think that if this is an evolutionary advantageous behavior and that helps them to sort of get at more food and get more resources than the the behavior with spread especially because these captions are really fast learners they're very smart and so it actually sets up a really interesting scientific question allowing them to compare you know why does one group adopt this while another group doesn't it's so interesting sarah kaplan the science reporter at the washington post joins us from washington today thank you so much for bringing us these stories yeah thank you after the break we're going to talk about john wesley powell who was a nineteenth century explorer who developed early ideas about climate science.

two million years
"two million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Medicine just put out a report saying that we need to be better about planetary protection and when most people here planetary protection they probably think of like stopping catastrophic asteroid impact or preventing an alien invasion but what this report was really focused on is protecting other planets specifically mars but you know just the rest of the solar system as we explore it making sure that we don't accidentally contaminated with earthly microbes you know and especially as private industry gets into the space space exploration game they emphasize the need for sort of stricter guidelines and clear regulations to set up for potential human exploration because if you know once humans land on humans go to mars which you know spacex says it wants to do nasa says it wants to do it by the twenty thirties you know we're probably going to bring our microbes with us and what we found from life on earth is the earth microbes are really good at colonizing new environments and so there's this worry that we might contaminate mars with our own life and then foul up the search for you know is there actual martian life out there or maybe there was billions of years ago so yes so it's important to do that before all these these other rockets not state actors get into space i want to turn to your your next story here and this is really interesting so a group of monkeys that seems to have entered the stone age tells about this yeah so you know on this island called he got her own off the coast of panama there'd been kind of this rumor that there were monkeys there that use stone tools some scientists at the smithsonian reese tropical research institute in panama hell heard about it and they finally went and investigated last year they set up some camera traps and what they found kind of blew their minds these monkeys capuchin monkeys ciba's cappuccinos there little of cat sized animals with white faces and long tails and they were actually taking large stone stones almost half the size of their body weight and smashing them down onto flat rocks and and logs and using that to crack open coconuts and other kinds of nuts hermit crabs snails and get the tasty morsels inside so this is a stone tool it's like a hammer and anvil that they're using to access food and that's exciting because this is only the fourth nonhuman primates species that's ever been observed with this kind of behavior using a stone tool and it could help scientists understand what causes a species to start picking up stones and using them as tools and also why our own set ancestors might have entered the stone age more than two million years ago but it's just these monkeys in this one place other monkeys are doing this yeah that's the really weird thing is that the you know so this island is pretty big it's full of forests and it's inhabited with monkeys and they're similar islands nearby that have the same species of monkey and yet the only only one group of cappuccinos was showing this behavior and actually the scientists tried leaving out some experimental rocks in other parts of the island to see if the monkeys might pick them up and start using them and the monkeys totally ignored them like they were not interested unless it was this one particular group and so that's a really strange thing because you would think that if this is an evolutionary advantageous behavior and that helps them to sort of get at more food and get more resources than the the behavior with spread especially because these captions are really fast learners they're very smart it's it actually sets up a really interesting scientific question allowing them to compare you know why does one group adopt while another group doesn't it's so interesting sarah kaplan science reporter at the washington post he joined us from washington today thank you so much for bringing us these stories yeah thank you after the break we're going to talk about john wesley powell who was a nineteenth century explore who developed early ideas about climate science.

two million years
"two million years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The timing of the enceladus discovery and also a couple of weeks ago there were more results reported from the curiosity rover on mars finding also very large complex organic molecules and it's interesting because the national academies of science engineering and medicine just put out a report saying that we need to be better about planetary protection and when most people here plan sherry protection they probably think of stopping a catastrophic asteroid impact or preventing an alien invasion but what this report was really focused on is protecting other planets specifically mars but you know just the rest of the solar system as we explore it making sure that we don't accidentally contaminated with earthly microbes you know especially as private industry gets into the space space exploration game they emphasized the need for sort of stricter guidelines and clear regulations to set up for potential human exploration because if you know once humans land on humans go to mars which you know spacex says it wants to do nasa says he wants to do by the twenty thirties you know we're probably going to bring our microbes with us and what we found from life on earth is that earth microbes are really good at colonizing new environments and so there's this worry that we might contaminate mars with our own life and then foul up the search for you know is there actual martian life out there or maybe there was billions of years ago so yes so it's important to do that before all these these other rockets not state actors get into space i i want to turn to your your next door here and this is really interesting so a group of monkeys that seems to have entered the stone age tell us about this yeah so you know on this island called he got her own off the coast of panama there'd been kind of this rumor that there were monkeys there that use stone tools some scientists at this massoni and reese tropical research institute in panama had heard about it and they finally went and investigated last year they set and camera traps and what they found kind of blew their minds these monkeys capetian monkeys ciba's cappuccinos there little sort of cat sized animals with white faces and long tails and they were actually taking large stone stones almost half the size of their body weight and smashing them down onto flat rocks and and logs and using that to crack open coconuts and other kinds of nuts hermit crabs snails and get up tasty morsels inside so this is a stone tool it's like a hammer and anvil that they're using to access food and that's exciting because this is only the fourth nonhuman primates species that's ever been observed with this kind of behavior using a stone tool and it could help scientists understand what causes a species to start picking up stones and using them as tools and also why our own set ancestors might have entered the stone age more than two million years ago but but it's just these monkeys in this one place other monkeys aren't doing this yeah that's the really weird thing is that the you know so this island is pretty big it's full of forests and its habit with monkeys and they're similar islands nearby that have the same species of monkey and yet the only only one group of cappuccinos was showing this behavior and actually the scientists tried leaving out some experimental rocks in other parts of the island to see if the monkeys might pick them up and start using them and the monkeys totally ignored them when they were not interested unless it was this one particular group and so that's a really strange thing because you would think that if this is an evolutionary advantageous behavior and that it helps them to sort of get more food and get more resources than the the behavior with spread especially because these captions are really fast learners they're very smart it actually sets up a really interesting scientific question allowing them to compare you know why does one group adopt while another group doesn't it's so interesting sarah kaplan science reporter at the washington post you joined us from washington today thank you so much for bringing us these stories yeah thank you after the break we're gonna talk about john wesley powell who was a nineteenth century explore who developed early ideas about climate science.

two million years
"two million years" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on Probably Science

"The issue can make life game which would be more helpful beneficially situations so yeah it's it's a much more complex picture than the simple boo under presents or presence often pops up online so so then you go from that to start start investigating what specific outside factors can have an effect on on your brain and your happiness so for example your home environment sorry just interrupt to you what usa disagree with you the problem we working over skype was on the thing okay yes what did you find let's let's just go into that what did you find about because again this is a fairly complex picture about waltz what about people's home environments makes causes happiness or increases or reduces happiness yet once i have looked into this basic scientific aspects of they'd like is it happiness chemical is happy bit of the brain which i sort of to behind the could and i sort of knew that wouldn't really work but i wanted to look into it as if it didn't see what came out with because i was more complex idea you have fundamental of individual bitch the brain fall basic processes like memory like century processing auditory things like like language enters but something is abstract and almost objective is feeling of happiness of the mood is going to be more ver dispersed system is going to be more widespread throughout the brain's not different bit working together or no win that different times right so that's yeah so i knew that ready that newest thing this is a constant theme of the book as well sort of happy how much of this comes from the sort of more conscious and processing positive brain and how much if it comes for more instinctual and supplement just positive brain yet and then a themes on my facebook immediate bringing that different parts of the rain constantly working against each other reptile brain the brain we've had for like millions of years of ma back to dinosaur times if you want to push g that fell these are the fundamental brain which everyone every species to enhance and the the politics keep his ally even keep us running and keep it survive in an appearance subconscious instinctive level but human brains are became complex fumble conscious valley recently in the last two million years and that so that gives us all this great brain power we have these cognitive abilities but that sat on top of the old system which is still the gonna wait still books right do but that that's very rapid expansion of all these abilities twenty integrate with lower regions and the analogy like the users have you ever tried to install windows ten notified your laptop it doesn't really like it but it won't enjoy enjoy the arrangement is like i don't like you you don't like me but let's bring this done and that's on our heads a lot like the old systems and the new system's going what are you want to my way this is not it's not what we do and so on and so yeah so that was like a big part of that sorry so within that you sort of talk about a lot of y your home in your surrounding environment important is to do with your sense of familiarity and security and like i hadn't even things like some studies even suggest we could detect them recognized threatening stimuli foster in a familiar environment than in an unfamiliar one yet that was a big pile of that because the reason i look this homes other things is because i looked at happiness as being formal complex on justice in brain region in process and the well think people recognize that the whole cultural understanding of happiness seems to be quite new so what are the things happy facing that was home with hobbies and that's all that sort of them all those cliches in them and it seems like there is of because all homes meet a lot of biological requirements that we all food is we sleep on your stuff is there so it's by association sort of makes us happy but it's familiar into security which is another fundamental do need and home satisfied that this is my base i know this is safe you basically those positive not just about.

two million years
"two million years" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"You recall any of your first big wins or things that you considered big wins at the time and i'd love to just hear you describe what made the big win in other words the thinking behind it the funny thing is i can hardly remember my big wins i do remember my big losses we talk we can talk about those two yeah it's so it's so funny because you you know know i look at it and i said well i i guess i must've had a bunch of wins or successes because of you know how things of went in the businesses good and done well and all of that but like i think of my history and i really think of those mistakes and i think that's so great because it shows that that's a much better learning tool but okay so my big wins you know no i think about that that time i think no of the things i remember with the with the fun things a guy you know guys played rugby with parties and and those kinds of things i don't remember particularly big winning while i do remember some things you know i remember one time when we got the kodak count again i was a position it's okay here's a guy and he's analyzing the markets and then he has small team of people zanu allies in the markets and so i didn't have a long track record i didn't have institution and a you know sort of competing with the big institutions of the world jp morgan than everybody and am by the way we beat them while anyway which shows that the individuals powers within the individual but anyway i remember when we got the kodak account because at the time kodak was you know a big important client and them giving us that account was a big deal for us because it was kind of a stamp of institutional approval and it was i remember you know the money mattered to because we would know that we were a bit more financially secure so i remember that as a big win and i remember it so terrifically because we were asked to submit research information and we were just a small team of people and you know we stayed up all night with you know pizza beer all of that and i remember it so sweetly because it was the dream of making our mural happened and we and pulling together that's the meaningful relationships part i believe that i want meaningful work and meaningful relationships and so that was what that was about and we got the account and we want in that was a that was a big deal why did you guys win i think it's a combination of of being you know totally unconventional and having better processes than a hell of a lot of determination i think three things make up the successful life by large i you have to allegations goals big dreams then when you are headed toward those goals you're gonna have problems you're going to deal with reality you have to deal with those problems in that reality realistically learning from stakes writing down those principles in the like so that's the second part dealing with reality in a practical way where you learn about mistakes and then the third is terminated because if if you're going field goals and you're encountering your mistakes and you're learning and you do that with determination you're going to get better all the time you can't help but get better and you do that a long amount of time and you're going to far exceed your dreams nice successes far succeeded what i ever imagined in a one bid at a time just that process if you were to conversely look at intelligent people who are unhappy what do you think the primary causes of that unhappiness are i think it goes back to this notion of meaningful work meaningful relationships intelligence and happiness probably have no correlation with each other in studies the repeatedly been shown and money is very little correllated with happiness the highest correlation with happiness is community a my part of a community do i feel connections with other people that's been literally genetically programmed into us from jested between a million two million years ago before it was we were even mankind so that sense of meaningful relationships.

million two million years
"two million years" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Of computing and they're very perfect exponential it's a straight line or even another exponential on a logarithmic graph and this has been going on since the late nineteen th century and i have a whole mathematical explanation about why that happens we already passed the point where have enough hardware to emulate the brain the little board said actually have over one hundred times the computation needed to functionally emulate the brain already the software is more challenging issue but i make the case we're moving exponentially on that also and we're getting some of our insights by exponentially more information about the brains i make the case that we will achieve human levels of performance in every area that humans can now perform by twenty twenty nine and once a computer chiefs human levels of performance in an area very quickly as passed in i mean we saw that the computers could play an average game of go early last year and then within months soared past the best uman and then within days of that computer soared past that alpha goes zero and then i describe how we're going to merge with this technology in the twenty thirties medical that will connect on the cortex to the cloud basically to synthetic neo cortex and make ourselves smarter it'll be like what we did two million years ago and they got these big foreheads that was a dish in the court tech's we put it at the top of the hierarchy the neo cortex is a hierarchical structure and that additional neo cortex which we gotta with these big foreheads that was enabling factor for us to invent language.

two million years
"two million years" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"And sometimes we get so locked out we think social media locks us it locks us out and people look at the lives i think that we're think about you think about the life that you think anthony bourdain was living think about the life you think kate spade was living that you think maybe they were living because the money and the prestige and the power in the social circles in the fame think about the life that you think chris cornell was living anthony bourdain called it his dark genie and he said that his dark genie followed him throughout his life and that's when he would look in the mirror he would remember his daughter and he would see a life we're saving the regular it's the part of the brain that's two million years old it's one of the reasons why people numb with heroin alcohol whatever that is cocaine pot you numb the mig ula and the problem is when you numb that thing the frontal cortex in the front of your brain that controls your control center you shut that thing off in the middle of the two million euro brain takes over and that's why trauma from the past things that happened to us in the past even when we were kids that trauma can become drama as we get older and then sometimes it can overtake us and whatever was happening in his life it overtook him and let me just say this i know a lot of times people feel like when someone commits suicide that they are the most selfish people in the world and i i know that i used to feel that way too i dated a girl by the name of lord in dallas texas in a number of years after dating lauren took her life it made me look into suicide and learn more about suicide and why people commit suicide and why lauren and she took her life in the same way that k did in the same with that anthony did the exact same thing and that's where i learned about pain that's where i learned about despair that's where i learned about people see a light at the end of the tunnel and they hope is trained in the hope that train hits them and runs them over.

anthony bourdain kate spade chris cornell texas lauren heroin cocaine dallas two million years
"two million years" Discussed on Exponent

Exponent

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on Exponent

"That's totally true it never two million years that have ever occurred to me like i got gotta so much evolve of that specific why because the music industry was such the poster child for will get the internet destroying our business and and if you think about it and so issue how this works out if you think about this sort of time wind for infrastructure yes like immediately like all the newspapers were merely served daiwa again because in texas small industries gus with zero effort and everyone i saw that all all the bad decisions they banned they put on this continent minor vow to pay while it it didn't matter like the overwhelming economic forces your decision cost like given that the entire business model is predicated control distribution yeah they were screwed no matter what happened like there's no there's no like oracle that of could have come along and told newspaper executives in the 1990s will the what they should have done they were this is we tablet those last week like there's different kinds of innovation or changes that come along and sometimes you're just screwed and this was the case four newspapers without without question that article would have had a really nasty message actually i think it would have had a message bit there's nothing you can do it right lay down and and enjoy being run over by this freight train i'm afraid rhett were music news was kind of in this in between thing where it took a little longer to hit but when it hit it still hit kinda like a ton of brixton than you know where where everyone is doubtless party music was is trivial is is truly easy to do and the music industry this is the without was the cause of apple the reason why i tunes could even come along with the business mother did is because apple had tremendous leverage over the music business not because apple but because piracy piracy was apples leverage and this is a lesson i think i apple are there made this point before the apple warned all the wrong lessons from i tunes and why they consistently failed when it comes to negotiate with media companies since then because there they expect the media companies to do it apple tell them to do and they don't appreciate that the reason the music companies do our app.

daiwa rhett apple texas two million years
"two million years" Discussed on Exponent

Exponent

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on Exponent

"That's totally true it never two million years that have ever occurred to me like i got gotta so much evolve of that specific why because the music industry was such the poster child for will get the internet destroying our business and and if you think about it and so issue how this works out if you think about this sort of time wind for infrastructure yes like immediately like all the newspapers were merely served daiwa again because in texas small industries gus with zero effort and everyone i saw that all all the bad decisions they banned they put on this continent minor vow to pay while it it didn't matter like the overwhelming economic forces your decision cost like given that the entire business model is predicated control distribution yeah they were screwed no matter what happened like there's no there's no like oracle that of could have come along and told newspaper executives in the 1990s will the what they should have done they were this is we tablet those last week like there's different kinds of innovation or changes that come along and sometimes you're just screwed and this was the case four newspapers without without question that article would have had a really nasty message actually i think it would have had a message bit there's nothing you can do it right lay down and and enjoy being run over by this freight train i'm afraid rhett were music news was kind of in this in between thing where it took a little longer to hit but when it hit it still hit kinda like a ton of brixton than you know where where everyone is doubtless party music was is trivial is is truly easy to do and the music industry this is the without was the cause of apple the reason why i tunes could even come along with the business mother did is because apple had tremendous leverage over the music business not because apple but because piracy piracy was apples leverage and this is a lesson i think i apple are there made this point before the apple warned all the wrong lessons from i tunes and why they consistently failed when it comes to negotiate with media companies since then because there they expect the media companies to do it apple tell them to do and they don't appreciate that the reason the music companies do our app.

daiwa rhett apple texas two million years
"two million years" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Mrs in the desert of southern israel that are y'all been stable for about two million years and i'm thinking meal over two million years you can accumulate a lot of meteorite so i actually went there of the fao later that year uh in mid up with them again and we research some of these areas that are uh have very ancient uh uh uh pavement on the desert and hunting for meteorites we didn't find any um unfortunately and uh um you know i'm not quite sure why there should there should have been some there but uh it was a small team searching large area over short time so it may well be that there there but we just didn't find any 'cause the ones it you know are there were small uh the other is uh there were a number of uh uh issues with that particular location meteorites in your womb we find meteors are typically of black on the outside because they've gone through the app his fear new covered with his glassy fusion crust which is almost always black um the area we had searched in a southern israel actually had a number of dark rocks in it as well so in a yellow the meteorites if they were there would not have stood out is like like you know the beacons at you see when you're in an article smoothing across the bear ice hill i guess that is that the main reason why an arctic as such a great place to find meteorites is because it's these black rocks against whites now well that's certainly makes it easy you can see your rock i'm going to use metric units of because that's what i'm used to i'll try and remember to throw in inches and feet uh as i can there um so young we can find a black rock a couple centimeters across r about an inch across your from a great distance in and arctic on the ice um.

israel two million years
"two million years" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on WDRC

"The economy stupid and they had signs up in his campaign that said that if the economy going really really well this fall do you really think that americans are going to go to the polls and say let's pull out the folks who made this happen who change the lawn taxes who've accomplish all these things and let's gridlock the the government uh so that the trump the president won't get anything done and the center won't get anything done secondly if they could get a solid majority in the house and vote for impeachment they would still face the prospect of a trial in the senate which i think there are almost guaranteed the lose so do i think they'll try to impeach him absolutely the democrats have been talk and impeachment since november ninth 2016 do i think they'll actually get it done no not not not in a non two million years how can it no i hope not everything's going great well and then it's a thing in g lounges to answered loan of the questions when things are going great do people go to the polls and make major changes in who's in charge now i would hope not flaw american history is replete with examples that you know you you tend said and now i will tell you this in the first off your election that most presidents face their party has a chance to lose and seats and we know that when bill clinton came in and ninety two that the republicans in '94 gained a lot of seat so there's some history there that might suggest that that could happen but i'm going to suggest to you that americans who went through eight years of barack obama where the gdp grew at two percent a year who've now seen the gear we just finished which was growing at greater than three and a half percent and i think the year we're in right now is going to grow closer to four percent almost double what the eight years of obama were like i don't the people who are in that kind of economy are going to say that they want to go and try something else i appreciate the call let's go to uh john in kansas a john welcomed the first amendment friday what's on your mind cohen about the.

president the house senate bill clinton barack obama kansas first amendment cohen eight years two million years four percent two percent
"two million years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Just to describe this but that's really kind of a misnomer all that means is that you live long enough to have children or many chill right so some of the changes we now know those changes are changes in our genes and those changes by and large happened ran over all that fittest means is that you live long enough to have children or many children so some of the changes we now know those changes are changes in our genes and those changes by and large happened randomly there's two kinds of mechanism that change the genes of any species including our own one is just random mutation it's just things happen randomly genes change and most of those changes don't do anything some of them are not good changes in fact they make the individual less capable to survive in their environment but occasionally there's a change that's good they somehow makes you stronger or more capable of coping with the weather or with predators or what infections or with the diet source or whatever it is and it's those good changes that ultimately select out groups of species or individuals and species and they ultimately thrive better and become other species so that's really how evolution has occurred up until now john there is a theory there's a theory that the humankind was genetically altered by extraterrestrials that they came to this planet a long time ago whatever's species might have been here the genetically altered them and here we are possible what do you think i think that book i don't i don't believe a word of it i don't think there's any evidence for uh i think we have a whole any of evidence to show that we actually evolve we humans used to be part of the great apes or a member of the great and ultimately went through a lot of other pre human species and about two million years ago developed into the first humans that homo sapiens but the first human so i i think there's a lot of.

homo sapiens two million years
"two million years" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Of course comes up what is the right answer whwhat kinda dinner party guess what he will he be wonderful because he's interested in everything and he's curious about everything and you'd be probably hours at dinner and slightly exhausted at the end because if you knew anything about how the i saw a light waves he would grill you about it if you knew anything about scuba diving gear which he helped in van he would say okay how would you have the breathing apparatus would just be interested in everything and even though i said he was a vegetarian and he was he gave a lot of dinner parties sent we have his notebooks we have a shopping list who would not be one of those dinner companion said i'm i can't believe you're going to eat that is because he be though he did allow both the foul and seafood to be served as a stable leaving though even even though he's a vegetarian hernia water throughout this conversation yuban been referencing steve jobs you've of near the famously wrote a biography of of of steve jobs and what connects his do you see between leader at leonardo da vinci and steve jobs well you know steve's a wonderful uh advertisement who i here's of the misfits the rebels around pegging square hole i think steve jobs felt of himself as a rebel in an outsider he also felt he stood at the intersection of the humanities the arts engineering and science he was also boundlessly curious having dinner with steve jobs he was also vegetarian but having dinner with steve jobs was um sort of like with leonardo by the end of the dinner he's quest you know he's raised questions on everything from human migration you know two million years ago to exactly how a circuit board could look more beautiful if you did it a certain way am i sort of heaven affection for people who like to know different things about different fields and then with almost a fingertip feel can feel the patterns of nature you start seeing patterns sexy your own.

steve jobs two million years
"two million years" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"In psalm course comes up while he's the right answer where we're what kind of dinner party guess what he will he be wonderful kazys interested in everything and he's curious about everything and you'd be probably hours at dinner and slightly exhausted at the end because if you knew anything about how the i saw a light waves he would grill you about it if you knew anything about scuba diving gear which he helped and van he would say okay how would you have the breathing apparatus would just be interested in everything and even though i said he was a vegetarian and he was he gave a lot of dinner parties sent we have is no books we have a shopping list who would not be one of those dinner companion said i'm i can't believe you're going to eat that because he be you know he did allow both the foul and seafood to be served as a stable even though even even though he's a vegetarian hernia walter throughout this conversation yuban been referencing steve jobs you've of the famously wrote a biography of of steve jobs and and what connects his do you see between leader at leonardo da vinci and steve jobs well you know steve's a wonderful uh advertisement you i here's of the misfits the rebels around pegging square hull i think steve jobs felt of himself as a rebel in an outsider he also felt he stood at the intersection of the humanities the arts engineering and science he was also boundlessly curious having dinner with steve jobs he was also vegetarian but having dinner with steve jobs was sort of like with leonardo by the end of the dinner he's quest you know he's raised questions on everything from human migration you know two million years ago to exactly how a circuit board could look more beautiful if you did it a certain way um i sort of heaven affection for people who like to know different things about different fields and then with almost a fingertip feel can feel the patterns of nature you start seeing patterns you said senior.

steve jobs two million years
"two million years" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"two million years" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Area right one hundred thousand two hundred thousand years right to reach the surface of the sun yes what's crazies this once it escapes onset one photon escaped services sun it takes eight minutes to reach the earth surface his remember where eighty quite minutes away in jail light travels at the speed of light so it takes eight minutes but the sunlight that's hitting us whom we go outside is are are made up of photons that were created more than one point two million years ago this i can't even comprehend isn't that awesome that is really really cool so we've got all these ancient photons bouncing off his political back to the convicted zone right okay this is this is this area made up of these alternating areas of rising and cooling gas right is nasa once again breaks down a little easier it's boiling convection cells basically right it looks like a pot of boiling water i accept these are gas riesmann now there is only the only nisa okay chuck so we have the three parts of the sun we have the core the radiators zone in the convicted zone right yet now we've reached the atmosphere the sun actually has an atmosphere yes it does is it and that's made up of three parts is well correct the photos fear the kromah's fear and my favorite i think everyone's favourite the corona i like the krona with it can only be seen in an eclipse yeah chronic it's all the press it does to joshua in the photos fear we are as our we we are it is hot that is the lowest region in the atmosphere sun's atmosphere and that that is the region that you can actually see from earth less rican start to see things right in actually the photos fears what gives the sun it's kind of round crisp edged because as as as you travel outward.

chuck nasa eight minutes one hundred thousand two hundr two million years one photon