35 Burst results for "Two Meter"

The Problem With Track & Field World Records

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:45 min | 4 months ago

The Problem With Track & Field World Records

"What goes into a world record. Obviously it has to be an incredible performance. Everything has to come together just right. They don't happen very often. When bob beamon broke the world's record in the long jump in nineteen sixty eight. See my previous episode about that. The conditions were perfect. He had the maximum allowable. Tailwind it was at a high altitude in mexico city. He had perfect form and he put together his best jump ever at just the right time since the advent of competitive athletics nine thousand nine hundred twelve. The international association of athletic federation's has been keeping world records in every event. There's been a progression of world records. As people of incrementally bested previous performances. Most world records are only broken by less than one percent. The greatest single increase in a world record was the aforementioned bob beamon jump which beat the previous world record by six point five percent so that is sort of the world record of world records. Each event has a very different progression in how frequent and how recent world records get set. And this gets into the real heart of what i wanna talk about. You should expect to see world records being broken at a slower and slower rate over time as humans. Approach the limit of human performance should become harder and harder to break records. Records will require more luck and more people who have the perfect physique in the very peak of their careers. But this isn't quite what happened in some events there hasn't been a new world record set in over thirty years. You're shulte set the world record in the men's discus in one thousand nine hundred eighty six at seventy four point zero eight meters to put that into perspective. The gold medalist in the two thousand nineteen world championships had a distance of sixty seven point. Five nine meters a full six point five meters or twenty one feet short of the world record the men's hammer throw was also said in nineteen eighty-six yuri set up of the soviet union through the hammer. Eighty six point seven meters. The two thousand nineteen world champion through it. Only eighty point five meters that six point two meters less than the world record. The oldest existing world record in track and field is the women's eight hundred meters. Your meal acrostic viola of czechoslovakia set a world's record finishing the eight hundred in one minute. Fifty three point two eight seconds. That's almost five seconds. Faster than the two thousand nineteen world champion. You might have noticed something that all these really old records have in common. They're all held by athletes from former communist countries. If you're thinking that these records might be tainted by performance enhancing drugs. You aren't alone.

Bob Beamon International Association Of A Mexico City Athletics Yuri Soviet Union Czechoslovakia
Project Sealab 1 Summary Report - Part 1

Scuba Shack Radio

07:56 min | 4 months ago

Project Sealab 1 Summary Report - Part 1

"Way back in the nineteen sixties when i was growing up most of us were intently focused on the space race in one thousand nine hundred sixty four. The united states was making the transition from the mercury program to the gemini program and there really wasn't allowed manned spaceflight going on that year but there was another amazing exploration going on in interspace natwest project lab. One well i didn't know a great deal about c. lab until i started doing some research for the segment. I did hear on the show about scott carpenter. I did read. Ben held hells worst book about c. lab and that gave me a really good understanding of the magnitude of the entire c. Lab project both one two and three. And as i was doing more research i came across a report from the office of navel research. And it's the project sea labs summary report so today. I wanna start two part series on this report in part one today. I'll take you through the report up until the c. Lab one habitat is placed in position and then in part to a couple of weeks from now will review the mission some of the findings and conclusions by the project sea labs. Some report is subtitled. An experimental eleven day undersea saturation dive at one. Hundred and ninety three feet and report is dated june fourteenth nineteen sixty five for anyone looking for the report you might want to search on n r report. Ac are one zero eight. It's not that long to sixty two pages now. The copy. I got had a stamp on the cover. Then indicated. hard copies of the report would cost three dollars while microfiche would be seventy five cents and the copy was also stamped. Archived copy of this report are ha o.'neil from the office of navel research. Gif bond captain united states navy from the united states naval medical research. Laboratory are eland. Fear lieutenant commander. Us n. office of navel research and t odum of the mind defense laboratory in the preface pen by rear admiral. Leighton he says project sea lab one was the navy's first step into space. He also states that this report is being published by the navy so that all may share the information it is interesting to note that the background section of the report the authors do reference the work being done by captain shot cousteau and mr edwin a link and that was on their man in the sea concept they they stated indeed. The navy seems to be left at the post by the well-publicized efforts of captain cousteau and mr link. So it sounds like there's a little bit of sour grapes. Their report goes on to describe a december nineteen sixty three conference with the navy's bureau of ships where they obtained support for a c. lab now at that conference. They decided that the mine defense laboratory would build a habitat needed to select a location and they had five critique criteria for the selection one was the prospect of good weather too was good visibility. Three was a level bottom for was moderate water. Temperatures at depth and five was the general features of ocean graphic and marine biology biological interest. Now the site that they selected was argus island off of bermuda by march of nineteen sixty four all the appropriate approvals were obtained and they were often running and the operations were supposed to be conducted in the summer of one thousand nine hundred sixty four now. The mine defense laboratory selected an old experimental minesweeping float. Now the report has quite a few pictures and illustrations in it. Unfortunately the pictures are really not that great because of this. Pdf being produced either from a microphone. Show old old dot copiers but the stations are pretty good. Particularly the architectural drawings of c. lab won both the plan view and the cross section views by marched by may nineteen sixty four. C. lab was ready for sea trials off panama city. Florida on may twenty second nineteen sixty four. It was towed out to sea and sank uncontrolled and flooded over half full of seawater. Fortunately there were no injuries. The habitat was lifted. Towed back dried out and ready for another try on may twenty six this time with success. The previous incident was attributed to a misunderstanding of line handling waters by july. They were in bermuda and ready to sink. C. lab on july fourteenth. They again had issues because of the three to five foot swells and the yard patrol boat that they were using just wasn't powerful enough like chief brody said in jaws. I think you're gonna need a bigger boat. Well in this case. It was a crane that they took from bermuda. The reach the report details the adventure of getting c. lab on the bottom but they finally did an after getting everything hooked up and twenty four hour checkout on monday july twentieth. One thousand nine hundred sixty four at seventeen thirty five. That's five thirty five pm for you. Civilians c. lab one was manned by robert e. less anderson robert a barth sanders w manning and robert e thompson. Now what were the conditions like on c. lab interesting. The report says see lab proper dry inhabitable atmosphere satisfactory temperatures. Seventy eight degrees chilly. Water supply water not available heaters operable. Tv monitor not hooked up properly. Hot water heaters not operating refrigerator not operating co two scrubbers satisfactory. Electro writer. Satisfactory calibrated microphones not functioning. Crass burgo two meters satisfactory lights satisfactory. So you can see. There was still a lot of things that needed to be repaired. So i had to do was fixed everything that wasn't working and then complete their mission so in part to this series i'll take you through the mission the findings and conclusions from project sea lab some report of nineteen sixty five americas first journey into interspace. And that will be next time here on scuba shack

Sealab Project Sealab 1 Office Of Navel Research Natwest Project Lab Navy Project Sea Labs United States Naval Medical Re Scott Carpenter Mr Edwin Captain Cousteau Mr Link Argus Island Bermuda United States Navy Cousteau United States Leighton BEN Neil
Victoria takes a deep breath and opens up!

Coronacast

04:58 min | 9 months ago

Victoria takes a deep breath and opens up!

"I'm health reported Teigen Tyler Physician and Journalists Dr Norman Swan on this really important for all pride. Victorians. Chief see the twenty seventh of October. Yes. Finally yesterday in Victoria. The Prima Donna Andrews announced the revised roadmap towards bacteria covid normal and it was a real relief for Victorians and the rest of the nation Norman what sort of the highlights of what Dan Andrews said yesterday because it's the comprehensiveness of the opening up, there is no daily dallying now retail hospitality getting back to work. Yes. There are restrictions on indoor numbers and outdoor numbers. But if you live in New South Wales, you're used to that and that will take a while to loosen up but everything just gets going and later on today the numbers in households will become clearer because that is a high risk environment. But if recycle is anything to go by, you won't really notice it too much and it will loosen up with time zones. There aren't any significant outbreaks. Milestone in starting. To have zero cases and the last time, the state had zero cases when on the ninth of June one hundred and forty days ago. So obviously, there's still probably GONNA be filtering through in the next few days but really, really hot. The. Really hot work that they've been doing paying off you know Sommese. Still be virus in Victoria and you will see the odd cluster popping up as indeed they do new South Wales, but eventually, it will get down to almost zero spread. So it's it's fantastic news. But the premiums, right it's constant vigilance is what's required covered normal does not be normal covered normal means social distancing means not getting together to large numbers too. Early it needs ring really careful at home in means continuing to wear masks outside so. Lucky. That they've got mandated masks. New South doesn't yet. You know hair salons can do services when the clients wearing face covering corona cast listeners will remember that we covered the story in a few weeks ago a few months ago I can't remember now but the flat tackle that's right. The in united. States swear to positive here salon workers did not pass the virus onto their clients by wearing masks insisting that their clients wear masks. So it's really important. So these things will protect US moving forward. One of the things that really stood out to me went any Landrus is talking about what the new normal looks like is how much the rest of the country can learn from this because in places that aren't. Victoria and you South Wales. It's been quite a long time since it's been a lot of virus circulating in the community that we know about at least and I know from my own experience living in Queensland that I think there's a lot of complacency that's crept in and it's probably a good time to just refocusing guy this isn't normal life. We still got a kate how God's up try and it could come in to come in on a ship from overseas. You've already seen problems in western. Australia nobody is particularly safe the risk of spread by open borders and I was extremely low, but it does mean we've all got to be careful moving forward. At some point, international borders are going to have to open up we're going to have to learn what covered normal actually means now new South Wales are ready to move in. You saw the football matches you. It doesn't feel to abnormals in in in in New South Wales, and that's the real feeling in Victoria but I think those two states are better prepared for this. Than the other states and we've got to open up the borders and people just will have to be more careful definitely in Australia where in a much better position than other parts of the world where covered normally is no in knee normal live, and in the states, this disease control have expanded their definition of what a close contact means in terms of someone's ability. To spread the virus if they had this definition by the way, these definitions are fairly arbitrary based on evidence. That's not necessarily very solid. So they had a similar a criterion to us which right at the beginning of the pandemic was sh- you might remember which is he going to be within a couple of meters of somebody for fifteen minutes to have a significant. Chance of passing this on and what we know now is the aerosol spread the lows that's be contravened indoor environments but no the redefined were close contact is if you just think about that as the means of spread and there's no question that a lot of spread is through contact and what they've found is that in fact, you can be in close contact with somebody. Over a twenty, four hour period repeatedly. So it's not just a fifteen minute window. It's actually multiple occasions and it comes from correctional facilities where they've shown that tired the infection was probably cumulative infection over a period of time. So it's no longer fifteen minutes. It's still two meters in the case of the United States, but it can be over twenty four hour period not just one fifteen minute window. So multiple short episodes of content

New South Wales United States Victoria Dr Norman Swan Australia Donna Andrews Corona Sommese Dan Andrews Landrus Football Queensland
10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

TED Talks Daily

05:18 min | 10 months ago

10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

"Ten years is a long time for US humans on Earth. Ten turns around the Sun. When I was on the Ted. Stage a decade ago I, talked about planetary boundaries that keep our planet in a state that allowed humanity to prosper. The main point is that once you transgress won the risks, start multiplying the planetary boundaries are all deeply connected but climate alongside bio-diversity, our core boundaries they impact on all others. Back then we really thought we had more time. The warning lights were on absolutely, but no unstoppable change had been triggered. Since mytalk, we have increasing evidence that we are rapidly moving away from the safe operating space for humanity on earth, climate has reached a global crisis point. We have now had ten years of record breaking climate extremes, fires blazing, Australia set area California, and the Amazon floods in China Bangladesh and India. During heatwaves across the entire northern, hemisphere we risk crossing tipping points that shift the planet from being our best resilient friend dampening are impacts to start working against US amplifying the heat. For the first time, we are forced to consider the real risk of destabilizing the entire planet. Our children can see this they are walking out of school to demand action looking with disbelief at our inability to deviate away for potentially catastrophic risks. The next ten years to twenty thirty must see the most profound transformation. The world has ever known. This is our mission. This is the countdown. When my scientific colleagues summarized about a decade ago for the first time, the state of knowledge on climate tipping points just one place had strong evidence that it was on a sears downward spiral. Arctic Sea ice. Other tipping points were long way off fifty four hundred turns around the Sun. Just. Last year, we revisited these systems in I got the shock of my career. We are only a few decades away from an Arctic without since summer in. Permafrost is now thawing at dramatic. Scales Greenland is losing trillions of tons of ice and may be approaching a tipping point. The great force of the North are burning with plumes of smoke, the size of Europe. Atlantic Ocean circulation is slowing the Amazon rainforest is weakening and may start emitting carbon within fifteen years. Half of the Coral Great Guy Wreath has died west Antarctica may have crossed the tipping point already today, and now the most solid of glaciers on earth east Antarctica parts of it are becoming unstable. Nine out of the fifteen big biophysical systems that regulate climate are now on the move showing worrying signs of decline in potentially approaching tipping points. Tipping Points Bring Three threats I sea level rise, we can already expect up to one meter this century. This will endanger the homes of two, hundred million people. But when we add the melting is from Antarctica and greenland into the equation, this might lead to a two meter rise. But it won't stop there. It will keep on getting worse. Second if our carbon stores like permafrost enforced flipped to belching carbon, then this makes the job of stabilizing temperatures so much harder and third these systems are all linked like dominoes. If you cross one tipping point, you lurch closer to others. Let's stop for a moment and look at where we are. The foundation of our civilization is a stable climate and the rich diversity of life everything I mean everything is based on this civilization has thrived and a goldilocks zone not too hot not too cold. This is what we have had for ten thousand years since we left the last ice age. Let's zoom out a little here three million years. Temperatures have never broken through the two degree Celsius limit. Earth has self regulated within a very narrow range of plus two degrees in a warm into glacial minus four degrees. Defy. Sage. Now we are following path that would take us to a three to four degree world. In just three generations, we would be rewinding the climate clock, not one, million, not two million, but five to ten million years we are drifting towards hothouse earth. For. Each one degree rise one billion people will be forced to live in conditions that we today largely consider uninhabitable. This is not a climate emergency. It is a planetary emergency. My fear is not that Earth will fall over a cliff on the first of January twenty thirty. My fear is that we press unstoppable buttons in the Earth System.

Antarctica Amazon Earth System India United States Arctic Sea Europe Greenland Australia California China Bangladesh
The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

BrainStuff

03:47 min | 10 months ago

The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

"Brain stuff Lauren Vogel. Bam here. mammoths, mastodons and Sabertooth hats weren't the only giants roaming ancient America. The Pleistocene was a global epoch kicked off two point six, million years ago. It lasted right up. Until Earth's most recent ice age ended about eleven thousand, seven, hundred years before the present day. When you live in a cold environment, being big has its advantages. Large animals tend to conserve body heat more easily than smaller ones. This is one of the major reasons why colossal mammals were so widespread during the frigid pleistocene. CASTA Roy was very much a product of its time. The largest rodent in Pleistocene north. America, this very big beaver grew to more than seven feet long from tail to stout that's over two meters and could have weighed as much as two hundred and twenty pounds or a hundred kilos or more. Rivaling the American black bear in size casta royalties utterly dwarfed the Beavers that lived today modern Eurasian, and American beaver species clock in just around three feet long a bit less than a meter and way somewhere between twenty nine, seventy, seven pounds. That's about thirteen to thirty five kilos. Proportionately castaways had a narrower tail and shorter legs albeit with bigger hind feet than its extant relatives. We also know that it didn't eat the same foods. What he plans are a crucial part of every living beavers diet. The critters use chisel like incisors that's their front teeth to gnaw through bark and take down trees. But. Even though castaways incisors grew to be a whopping six inches or fifteen centimeters long the teeth had dollar edges by comparison. Dental differences would have made it a lot harder for Castro to eat tree bark and indeed it looks like this was not really on their menu. Using isotopic signatures and castaways teeth from Ohio and the Yukon a twenty nineteen study found that the giant beaver mostly eight softer aquatic plants. The findings say a lot about the Rodin's ecological niche and why it might have died out. For starters, castaways probably didn't build dams. Unusual. About that the earliest known beavers appeared during the easing. A which lasted between about fifty, six, thirty, four, million years ago. New evidence suggests that the wood harvesting specialists came along much later perhaps around twenty million years ago. In all likelihood, these bark fanciers used would as a food source before any of them started constructing dams. Since as fed on aquatic plants, its survival would have depended on wetland habitats. The animal was highly successful for a time cast Roy these fossils representing at least two distinct species have been documented in the Great Plains the Great Lakes, the American South Alaska and numerous Canadian provinces. Unfortunately for the mega sized beaver north. America. became warmer and drier after the last ice age ended wetlands grew scarcer as a result. Today's beavers used their logging skills to reshape the land around them so that it meets their needs with some well placed would in the nearest stream, a determined beaver engineer brand-new Pons. Yet if Castro Reuters didn't harvest would or build dams, it couldn't followed suit. So theoretically decline in natural wetlands left the giant beaver more susceptible to extinction. Last of these creatures perished around ten thousand years ago.

Casta Roy America Lauren Vogel Sabertooth Castro Reuters Great Lakes Castro Ohio Engineer Pons Yukon South Alaska Great Plains
Armor on Butterfly Wings Protects Against Heavy Rain, Study Finds

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

02:41 min | 1 year ago

Armor on Butterfly Wings Protects Against Heavy Rain, Study Finds

"Apparently Butterfly Wings are built like armor to protect them against heavy rain a June study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzed how water repellent properties on the butterfly's wings protect them against Raines impacts quoting dot org. The research showed how micro-scale bumps combined with a scale layer of wax shatter and spread these drops to protect fragile surfaces from physical damage and hyperthermic risk. Previous studies have looked at water hitting insects and plants at low impacts of noted, the liquids cleaning properties, but in nature, raindrops can fall at rates of up to ten meters per second. So this research examined how raindrops falling at high speeds interact with super hydrophobic natural surfaces and quotes. Senior Authors, Soon Juan young associate professor of Biological Environmental Engineering College of Agriculture and Life Sciences pointed out that raindrops are one of the biggest risks for butterflies getting hit by a raindrop for butterfly is like getting hit by a bowling ball for a human. For the study, the researchers placed the insects as well as samples of leaves and feathers on a table and released droplets of water from two meters above they recorded the experiment at several thousand frames per second so that they could watch back in ultra slow at which time they discovered that when the water hit the surface, it rippled and spread on the Nanos scale wax layer while the micro-scale bumps created holes in the droplet quoting again, consider the micro bumps as needles young said, if one dropped a balloon onto these needles, he said, then this balloon would break into smaller pieces. So the same thing happens as the raindrop hits and spreads end quotes. Not. Only does this reduce the impact force, but it also lowers the heat transfer from the cold drop, which enables the insects muscles to retain enough warmth to fly. Instead, he's like this aren't just interesting to learn more about butterflies and feel at ease knowing that they're relatively okay during big storms like today's but also these types of studies can inform consumer products. So called bio mimicry products in this field have already led to water resistant sprays for clothes and shoes, as well as the de Icing coatings for airplanes. There is so much weird and cool stuff from animals and. Nature. So thinking about how we can adapt some of it for humans is extra fascinating to me is all the other day that someone had redesigned the umbrella to open and close upside down so that you theoretically don't get as much water all over you. But what if we can coat on with some of this manno scale wax and micro bumps so that they repel water I mean that would be pretty cool.

Proceedings Of The National Ac Biological Environmental Engin Raines Associate Professor Bowling Juan
Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

Travel with Rick Steves

05:29 min | 1 year ago

Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

"Start with Stephen mcfeely he operates being be on Ireland's dingle peninsula in just before the pandemic head Stephen an interest in the hotel Oberland in October and Switzerland that's where he's had to ride out the first few months of the global lockdown good and. My goodness. My Irish friend is learning Spitzer dykes. Good here in the Alps where I've been for four months. Now in splendid isolation, my plan originally was just to come for February and March, but I've I'm still here right well, what does the vibe in Switzerland right now there's a positive vibe. The society is reopening. Tourism travel has started again just no we're on the same level as it was before we had two weekends where there was crazy crowds here huge big crowds from all over Switzerland everybody who was here was from Switzerland or had to be from Switzerland. They weren't necessarily all Swiss because there's lots of international people living in Geneva and Derek and whatnot but everybody from within the barger of Switzerland over with crowds, and then it just died and Monday to. Friday went back to being really really quiet. Okay. Well, this is sort of the very beginnings of the rekindling of tourism I would imagine it'll be people traveling with within their own countries first, and then traveling within Europe, and then finally international travel and transatlantic travel. Yes. That's exactly what we're seeing. The borders here have just reopened. So we're expecting Germans and some Austrians and maybe some French to come now also, I don't anticipate huge numbers like that would have been heretofore. One. Very noticeable thing in the Valley of course, there's no American visitors. As you know, the valley also is very popular with. Chinese travelers Indians many people from Dubai and Saudi Arabia would come here and they're not here this year. So there's a noticeable difference there. So the people getting the real cultural change would be the French speaking. Swiss. German speaking part of his Switzerland and not even leaving their own country exactly. Fifty percent of our guests. Last week were French speaking Swiss and it was the first time I've ever actually met those people and I would say to them. Are you French Swiss would say no, no, we are. All MOM and so I I learned something new immediately the K. The identify as swirl. They were saying exactly what you just said they said it's like we are in a different country it's very dramatic here it's different toossion either those on the do shut down it was really cool. They were very excited to see a different part of their own country. So that was wonderful. Now Stephen you own a hotel in Ireland in Dingle Peninsula and now you own a hotel in Switzerland in Loudoun valley two of my favorite places as a businessman working in both these countries how do you compare the support getting from the government and how the two governments are dealing with this crisis? Well, the difference is. Very. Big. I'm still on team. Ireland. So I want to be positive about my own country, but there's not a lot of support coming. Heretofore in Switzerland for example, within two weeks of the crisis occurring. The. Swiss Federal Council which is the Swiss government offered ten percent of the previous year's turnover and So that's quite a considerable amount of money and they offered that as a loan which was repayable over seven years. Zero percent interest. So they're not looking to profit from it and in Ireland we really struggled to get some assistance. And we got ten thousand euros of overdraft line of credit and but repayable at seven and a half percent interest in Switzerland. We got three hundred thousand. So it's quite a big difference there no-interest at all. No interest at all. Of course, Switzerland may have much stronger and deeper reservists than Ireland, but they were able to immediately come up with assistance very little bureaucracy paperwork, and they immediately got to help us in Ireland. The experience was just simply much different to the government really weren't as proactive for as immediate as were here in Switzerland. The roots here what's around her a lot less strict as well There is a two meter rule here, but I haven't seen anybody wearing masks very much, which is kinda shocking for me because I know in Ireland the whole north of is people should be wearing masks. People definitely are observing social distance. One of my friends said to me that the two meter rule has actually brought Swiss people closer together so. That is so insightful to the Swiss society. It's more difficult thing. It's more difficult thing for Irish people or Italian people are Spanish. Two meters distance than it would be for this people or maybe the. Scandinavians. I can see by home people are wondering. Is the Irish pub culture ever going to come back the way it was with social distancing whereas in. Switzerland. Here for me like I'm I'm in the Alps I'm surrounded by fresh air and. Of of lovely space and it's been a wonderful place to be stranded, I don't even want to complain about it because although I I was stranded here for four months. It was the perfect place I felt very safe. I might have felt different if I was in the middle of Zurich or something or Geneva but I felt very safe. I'd in the Alps and it is lovely and peaceful and quiet, and of course, that's what people are coming here for anyway

Switzerland Ireland Alps Stephen Mcfeely French Swiss Dingle Peninsula Swiss Society Swiss Federal Council Spitzer Europe Geneva Swiss Government Dubai Zurich Saudi Arabia Derek Loudoun Valley
Back to business

Monocle 24: The Menu

03:30 min | 1 year ago

Back to business

"Pups, boss cafes restaurants have been allowed to open their doors here in England. But how difficult do the social distancing measures may get to have a profitable business, and what does the future of the hospitality sector look like well joining me in the studio? He's Adam Hollyman restaurant, consultant and phone. Gerow Code Hospitality Adam Welcome back to Midori, House Studio, one just Fyi you on the first studio cast. I'm having here for about four months. I hope you've been well. As I mentioned many places opened last week St. go to see many restaurants in many boss. Thanks for having me back Marcus and it's good to be back in Madari. House off decision on time. Yes, I, did pop around quite a few restaurants in central law. Saturday and Sunday about four restaurants to see what was going on in oversee support the industry that I work with and it was. It was Nice, because as I've mentioned to. If you people throughout this week, they were not too many alien to the restaurant, so yes, there were some tables spaced further apart than they normally would be in some restaurants, the waiters. Waiters were wearing mosques than in others. You had your temperature checked. And you also sanitize your hands, but otherwise it actually felt very normal pre cova times when you dined out and I think not such a great thing for the industry, and for the consumer that when you go and have dinner or lunch, and is meant to be a nice enjoy experience that it is because I think a lot of people were quite nervous as to how it would fail to a restaurant three months down. The line is the worst stove no. I mean obviously it's great that restaurants bars. Pubs have been able to open those familiar week now I think though the lockdown was probably in a way. Dare I say the easy bit for our industry. It's now the tough bit because you know. We've seen over the pulse week. That was an initial buzz especially in central London with some restaurants. You know they were busy, but sadly. Of, speaking to quite a few people this week is the businesses still very very slow and is going to be a real uphill battle for the rest of the year to get people into restaurants is the main issue getting people into restaurants all? The social distancing measures that you simply can't have very many people in these places. The social distancing measures they have impacted that, but I think the great thing from the government guidance that they issues. The hospital businesses was that it was just it was just guidance, and it's a very good thing that they've let restaurants choose how they should operate the environments and the dining rooms. That could have been far worse if they'd stipulated that you could only have X. number of. Of people per site with the tables had to be a certain distance in the fact is now one to plot as opposed to two meters, so yes, the social distancing it doesn't help because overseas had to take covers out, but for me I. Think the really big thing and a very good phrase. The other day Fogo fear of going out is that we've got to really try and. Persuade the nation that it is now safe to go out and have a drink. Have some lunch have some dinner? Because at the moment, a lot of people still don't want to go out twinned with the fact that you know especially in places like central London has no tourism will very very little tourism. A lot of the offices is still standing empty because people are working from home, so there's no events. There's no business lunches the being expensed so. So. The West End in the city is still very very quiet.

London House Studio Adam Hollyman Midori England Consultant Marcus Madari
Britons will be able to holiday in France, Spain and Italy from NEXT WEEK

The Leader

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Britons will be able to holiday in France, Spain and Italy from NEXT WEEK

"The UK could get foreign holidays back to selected destinations, but travel John the Simon Calder, his not impressed. And Bournemouth beach they partied in thirty degree heat like social distancing didn't exist. Be Two meters, or what with mitigation? It's like the Mediterranean, said the weather to remind us of what we're missing out on. At least for now it's report. The government's being busy signing up deals with countries like Spain and Italy that a let British people travel there without having to go through quarantine. Perhaps as soon as July fourth, it could be a lifeline, an industry that feared it could lose up to twenty billion pounds, but travel John Simon calder. His not convinced joins me now this as the so-called air bridges, just a rumor. What do we actually know about what's happening? We know that this is an extraordinary episode in government by League. It's now I think eight weeks since dominic. Cummings came back from his to <hes> Dharam and saw that the judgment was in some disarray and unpopularity over the number of. Deaths and decided that. It was time for an eye catching <hes> policy and he decided that quarantine would be the right way to go, even though of course at that stage, the rate in the UK, thank goodness was declining and only international medical is. There's no point. In current in on a blanket basis. When you're in decline and Sarah lots the other countries around the world, and set the around Europe, since we've just had neak after leak after leak, and some of them almost comedic say that we got the Communist announcement on the tenth of May and then immediately we got to kind of the CAN. It's actually an official government announcement. Saying well, of course, this doesn't apply to France and then that was quietly withdrawn. And then we have on this morning and I make it six days to July millions of <hes> policymakers and hundreds of thousands of the travel industry work workers simply do not know if foreign holidays will take place this summer. It is an extraordinary state of affairs and. All I know is what I'm hearing from various rumors in the industry, some of them when employees some of them pure guesswork, but not. Is that on Monday the? Department of. Transport will announce. A list of. Eight or ten destinations that you can travel to probably starting on the fourth of July, and probably the Foreign Office will change of guards against Auburn. Essential Travel, but we know that from older lakes we have been given a very very difficult guidance, so the countries that are on this list include places like France Spain. Italy! Greece, all popular tourist destinations for dealing anymore actually go Simon de think that the fears over Luna virus abated so much that people will willingly Kevin Aeroplane and head off to a tourist hotspot. Far Safer Agree Thailand in the zoos of Portugal which has nil rate at the moment sauce safer than you would in them, and while the government's insists that policy is informed by the science. The scientists aren't spoken to say this is the most Balmy thing. We've ever heard of the best way to get the rates down in the UK a get. The prevalence in the UK is for millions of people to go on holiday veto, less dangerous places, and so the government's move. Who's actually had counterproductive? Silently will increase the number of cases inside the gifts in the UK, but since it's a political stunt rather than serious policy. That's just I was gonNA say seeing consequences it was. Pretty foreseeable or anybody, he sorted through. There will serve NEPEAN and I. It will be much minister people going abroad. I, think trump ripley. <hes> the majority of people thinking just leave it so twenty twenty. And the still a very substantial minority who would love to go abroad and are simply. Profoundly frustrated at the way that the government has had will eight weeks decided to bring this dominate. Cummings decided to bring in and. We still apparently going to see a weekend of frantic phone calls between different governments you. You really couldn't make it up, it is. Often covering travel for a thousand years and have never ever seen. Government causing so much grievous. To the industry, most time traveled to skits only. It's <hes> did a great holidays. Fantastic value make lots of money creates loss of jobs and the government. Let's. Let's say Bieber at the moment. The government is <hes>. If sex out to to as much damage as possible to the UK traveler district, it's difficult. See how they could have done any more than I do now it's. It's it's. Shameful but secondly just tragic for the people in the travel industry <hes> desperately trying to rebuild and say jobs and assigned thing for the people who will die they county councillor in more responsible for tourism tells me. He's really worried that it will call us home because people will stay out they'll. Take, an infection oval the boldly government. Decisions during this crisis, this is. Probably the most damage

Government UK John Simon Calder Cummings France Italy Spain Simon De Bournemouth Essential Travel Mediterranean Foreign Office Europe Dominic Official Auburn Sarah Portugal Dharam
Britons will be able to holiday in France, Spain and Italy from NEXT WEEK

The Leader

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Britons will be able to holiday in France, Spain and Italy from NEXT WEEK

"The UK could get foreign holidays back to selected destinations, but travel John the Simon Calder, his not impressed. And Bournemouth beach they partied in thirty degree heat like social distancing didn't exist. Be Two meters, or what with mitigation? It's like the Mediterranean, said the weather to remind us of what we're missing out on. At least for now it's report. The government's being busy signing up deals with countries like Spain and Italy that a let British people travel there without having to go through quarantine. Perhaps as soon as July fourth, it could be a lifeline, an industry that feared it could lose up to twenty billion pounds, but travel John Simon calder. His not convinced joins me now this as the so-called air bridges, just a rumor. What do we actually know about what's happening? We know that this is an extraordinary episode in government by League. It's now I think eight weeks since dominic. Cummings came back from his to <hes> Dharam and saw that the judgment was in some disarray and unpopularity over the number of. Deaths and decided that. It was time for an eye catching <hes> policy and he decided that quarantine would be the right way to go, even though of course at that stage, the rate in the UK, thank goodness was declining and only international medical is. There's no point. In current in on a blanket basis. When you're in decline and Sarah lots the other countries around the world, and set the around Europe, since we've just had neak after leak after leak, and some of them almost comedic say that we got the Communist announcement on the tenth of May and then immediately we got to kind of the CAN. It's actually an official government announcement. Saying well, of course, this doesn't apply to France and then that was quietly withdrawn. And then we have on this morning and I make it six days to July millions of <hes> policymakers and hundreds of thousands of the travel industry work workers simply do not know if foreign holidays will take place this summer. It is an extraordinary state of affairs and. All I know is what I'm hearing from various rumors in the industry, some of them when employees some of them pure guesswork, but not. Is that on Monday the? Department of. Transport will announce. A list of. Eight or ten destinations that you can travel to probably starting on the fourth of July, and probably the Foreign Office will change of guards against Auburn. Essential Travel, but we know that from older lakes we have been given a very very difficult guidance, so the countries that are on this list include places like France Spain. Italy! Greece, all popular tourist destinations for dealing anymore actually go Simon de think that the fears over Luna virus abated so much that people will willingly Kevin Aeroplane and head off to a tourist hotspot. Far Safer Agree Thailand in the zoos of Portugal which has nil rate at the moment sauce safer than you would in them, and while the government's insists that policy is informed by the science. The scientists aren't spoken to say this is the most Balmy thing. We've ever heard of the best way to get the rates down in the UK a get. The prevalence in the UK is for millions of people to go on holiday veto, less dangerous places, and so the government's move. Who's actually had counterproductive? Silently will increase the number of cases inside the gifts in the UK, but since it's a political stunt rather than serious policy. That's just I was gonNA say seeing consequences it was. Pretty foreseeable or anybody, he sorted through. There will serve NEPEAN and I. It will be much minister people going abroad. I, think trump ripley. <hes> the majority of people thinking just leave it so twenty twenty. And the still a very substantial minority who would love to go abroad and are simply. Profoundly frustrated at the way that the government has had will eight weeks decided to bring this dominate. Cummings decided to bring in and. We still apparently going to see a weekend of frantic phone calls between different governments you. You really couldn't make it up, it is. Often covering travel for a thousand years and have never ever seen. Government causing so much grievous. To the industry, most time traveled to skits only. It's <hes> did a great holidays. Fantastic value make lots of money creates loss of jobs and the government. Let's. Let's say Bieber at the moment. The government is <hes>. If sex out to to as much damage as possible to the UK traveler district, it's difficult. See how they could have done any more than I do now it's. It's it's. Shameful but secondly just tragic for the people in the travel industry <hes> desperately trying to rebuild and say jobs and assigned thing for the people who will die they county councillor in more responsible for tourism tells me. He's really worried that it will call us home because people will stay out they'll. Take, an infection oval the boldly government. Decisions during this crisis, this is. Probably the most damage

Government UK John Simon Calder Cummings France Italy Spain Simon De Bournemouth Essential Travel Mediterranean Foreign Office Europe Dominic Official Auburn Sarah Portugal Dharam
Pubs, restaurants in England to reopen as virus toll eases

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Pubs, restaurants in England to reopen as virus toll eases

"Millions of people in Britain will be able to go to the pub this is a movie theater gotta have caught on the tent a religious service starting July poll in a major loosening of coronavirus lockdown restrictions prime minister Boris Johnson has announced in the house of Commons that's a swathe of businesses can we open I'm places of worship whole services to the singing a major route of virus transmission remains bound under the applause from lawmakers he says social distancing rules will be relaxed from sixty eight to three given the significant fall in the prevalence of the virus we can change the two metre social distancing row from the fourth of July people that should take all the measures to reduce transmission of the virus such as wearing a mosque in enclosed spaces Charles the last month London

Britain Boris Johnson Charles London Prime Minister
"two meter" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"He granted <Speech_Female> permission to ski <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> this was <Speech_Female> fourteen days before <Speech_Female> the developer I <Speech_Female> think in this case of Richard <Speech_Female> Desmond gave <Speech_Female> the Conservative Party <Speech_Female> twelve thousand pounds, <Speech_Female> and the USA. <Speech_Female> Questions about the <Speech_Female> timing because it meant <Speech_Female> developer Tennessee's <Speech_Female> save money on it, <Speech_Female> but the reason <Speech_Female> it's back in the news <Speech_Female> today. What <Speech_Female> he's being that's <Speech_Female> more Keatley <Speech_Female> is because he was summoned <Speech_Female> for an agent question <Speech_Female> on this by Labor, <Speech_Female> and he <Speech_Female> didn't attend himself. <Speech_Female> He sent a <Speech_Female> genius minister <Speech_Female> now. <Speech_Female> Downing Street here defended <Speech_Female> him if <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> that anyone has <Speech_Female> served the <Speech_Female> Commons and <Speech_Female> perhaps uncooked <Speech_Female> to go back <Speech_Female> in the days, and it was <Speech_Female> David Cameron and Jules. <Speech_Female> Boone is often <Speech_Female> you do send <Speech_Female> someone else this. <Speech_Female> You're on a sticky <Speech_Female> wicket, but <Speech_Female> These <Speech_Female> personal charges <Speech_Female> against Rubber Jenrette <Speech_Female> not official charges, <Speech_Female> but allegations <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and I think at the moment <Speech_Female> is a story. <Speech_Female> Move Parts <Speech_Female> empty coming <Speech_Female> out, so I suspect <Speech_Female> it's not the last <Speech_Female> we're going to have, and <Speech_Female> there's GonNa be more <Speech_Female> pressure for perhaps <Speech_Female> not the dispatch books. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> But just generally <Speech_Female> to get moved <Speech_Female> response more <Speech_Female> comprehensive <Speech_Female> on rubber <Speech_Female> generics, motivations, <Speech_Female> and you <Speech_Male> know why. He <SpeakerChange> thinks he has done <Speech_Male> nothing wrong here <Speech_Male> as stories to <Speech_Male> say the safest place, <Speech_Male> any minister <Speech_Male> crisis respectable <Speech_Male> house comments. <Speech_Male> Because when you're out, <Speech_Male> the spectrum sounds <Speech_Male> were actually <Speech_Male> in control of a situation. <Speech_Male> You can respond <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you can take charge <Speech_Male> of situations. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There are countless examples <Speech_Male> of when ministers <Speech_Male> of turned up the Collins <Speech_Male> Avenue for <Speech_Male> Dr Position, <Speech_Male> and then <Speech_Male> actually because the opposition <Speech_Male> of the wrong questions, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> all a <Speech_Male> tendency to <Speech_Male> be rather long winded. <Speech_Male> Abortion <Speech_Male> question <Speech_Male> the other day. <Speech_Male> The minister actually <Speech_Male> comes away in a stronger position <Speech_Male> and they went in so <Speech_Male> i. generally <Speech_Male> think is a mistake <Speech_Male> from this is to avoid <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Female> dispatch box in a <Speech_Female> crisis, and <Speech_Female> we have to end this <Speech_Female> pocus, but just <Speech_Female> going back to our first conversation <Speech_Male> topic. We just <Speech_Female> had a poll <Speech_Female> by YouGov email <Speech_Female> to us on <Speech_Female> the T. me to <Speech_Female> rural and <Speech_Female> the public want to keep <Speech_Female> it according to the <Speech_Female> poll, Fifty <Speech_Female> eight percent support <Speech_Female> which I think <Speech_Female> is again back to this <Speech_Female> thing, which she often <Speech_Female> images to Conservative <Speech_Female> Party and businesses <Speech_Female> wanting one thing, <Speech_Female> but public <Speech_Female> cushion <Speech_Female> still very <Speech_Male> high <SpeakerChange> over the pace <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of locked anything. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you James Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you, Katie. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The Spectator <Speech_Female> magazine combined <Speech_Female> incisive <Speech_Female> political commentary <Speech_Female> with books ought <Speech_Female> surveys of unrivalled <Speech_Female> authority <Speech_Female> stock up <Speech_Female> on your summer reading <Speech_Female> with a twelve week subscription <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> print and online <Speech_Female> for just while <Speech_Female> pounds, <Speech_Female> plus will <Speech_Female> send you a copy of <Speech_Female> spectator columnist <Speech_Female> Lionel Shriver's <Speech_Female> book, the <Speech_Female> motion of the body, three <Speech_Female> space, absolutely <Speech_Female> free <Speech_Female> gay to <Speech_Female> spectator dot co UK forward slash Lionel.

Lionel Shriver developer Conservative Party Tennessee Rubber Jenrette David Cameron USA. Richard Desmond Dr Position Collins UK official Boone Jules.
"two meter" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Is this idea that even in September? People might still be in this limbo of not now. Senator in school and I think is the danger for the government is that? Is the novelty of lockdowns put? It mildly has worn off, and so people are beginning to get scratchy, and as the economic situation gets worse as you said, people will get scratches just a nature now one of the things that might help the government's decision making in in the coming weeks months is the effectiveness of their new tracking traces them. New Data released today shows. Shows that in in the first week of operation around thirty one thousand people were contacted. That still means that around a third of people. The hacker on of ours would not contacted by the tracking system James this was always going to be one of the most difficult elements of the government's sort of corona virus infrastructure. How do you think the and trace system is faring? So these stats? Are Beaten like that they're not. They're not fail, but they're not. They're not the world-beating system the. Came Up. There's always service issue with the APP which is meant to go alongside you even if it only meant you the Cherry on the cake, that's not up and running it. Eaten encouraging me to the point of view about Um from this distance, is it? You'll not finding massive cultural resistance to passing on the details of your contacts, and there's a reasonable number of east has been turned round twenty four hours, but still think that if tracking try to notice that a long way off being a silver bullet that will take the country out of this crisis. Yeah, we got some initials. Stats today released by the Department of how so from that one, thousand, seven hundred and nine hundred four precise. Contacts who identified over the period in question, eighty five percent or reach advised to self isolate that's according to. Figures and then when I think when it came to actually tested positive for coronavirus, providing details of contacts in the first place sixty seven percent. Of the size of was eight, thousand, one, hundred and seventeen, so sixty seven percent of that did provide contacts or were able to be reached to get those so I think it gives you. A sense is obviously working to a degree. It's operational might be a way to put it, but you say had died as we hear a lot about from Boris Johnson. These days died harding. WHO's in charge of the test and trace program? Saying she has office at its not gold standard yet, but will improve so. She think in the I think if you look at the day that test and trace launch party also because APP has not been anywhere near Eh, I do think the expectations quite low, probably not help the fat Boris Johnson said it's can well beaten, but most were just happy with operational APP for not doing that while on global charts at the moment, so let's. Just going steady I, do think these figures on the horror show they could be but guests. There is obviously sub. Mitch Guy and Katie Rob Generate the housing secretary has been in a little bit of trouble recently. Can you just explain to listeners of what the controversy has has been about? Yes, so this is a story. It's been putting away for a while now and came to behead today so the Community Secretary Robert Generic. They've been questions. Ost about his involvement in a one. One of the property scheme..

Boris Johnson secretary Senator James Robert Generic harding Mitch Guy Katie Rob
"two meter" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"And welcome to Coffee House shots. The spectators daily politics focused I'm Gus Carter, and with me to discuss the days events are James. Foresight and Katie Bells Tory backbench. And now even some ministers have been complaining in private, and in fact, increasingly publicly about the so called to me to rule saying that it's having a negative effect on businesses within their constituencies and the British economy as a whole, James. How long do you think the two meter can last? So the tumors rule has become kind of center I think of Tory discontent of Tory ministers and MP's unhappy about the pace of lockdown. Easy to rulers become the issue now I want to me today, and it was just pointing out in every is being conducted by businesses in that constituency particularly in the hospitality sector. He basically say. With, a to rule my businesses unbearable with the one meter a chance, so if one is W. H., O. Standard. Wise. The UK go plays into two meters. What's the problem? The difficulty here for Boris Johnson? Is. The government has basically argued for out. Say of being guided by besides I'm that they're bad defense in any public in the Public Inquirer that is bound to come will be look. Maybe they won't. Decisions were taken, but they were the decisions that were recommended by the government scientific advisers. It is quite clear at right now for government, scientific advisors do not want to give up to me to rule they basically, the number of infections in the UK is still too high. Any listen to Patrick Chris with you. Last night was basically heard them saying. Don't get excited to people. This is still a long way to go. They will be very reluctant to cut down from two meter to one meter and say bory face with very difficult choices, some point which is, is he going to break with the scientists and say right I'm cutting it from two meters to one meter, or is it going GonNa stick to his position of being guided by the signs and say we'll have to stay with it even though that will undoubtedly be blamed for job losses Katie. WHO'S GONNA BLINK? Blink first I. Think the he look at the various amyx in the Tory policies that we had the chance to yesterday dressing MP's at the nine hundred twenty committee in various stages, and some comments I mean picked up today in the media and and take two CEO. The chance to to go thinking the exact wording is actually pretty similar to what I said at prime minister's questions, which is up as infection rates. Go down. It becomes less risky to. Be. Start close to to a person, not up-close. Have perhaps a meter on t meet. Is I think behind the scenes?.

Patrick Chris James Katie Bells government UK Gus Carter Boris Johnson Public Inquirer prime minister W. H. CEO
Is It Safe to Swim During the COVID-19 Outbreak?

BrainStuff

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Is It Safe to Swim During the COVID-19 Outbreak?

"Hey, brain steph lauren bomb here. With summer fast approaching here in the northern hemisphere and government easing corona virus lockdowns. Many people are longing for days by the pool, but social distancing recommendation still remain, so is swimming in public pools or lounging on the deck especially if they're packed with strangers, safe these centers for Disease Control, and prevention or CDC, says quote. There is no evidence that covid nineteen can spread through the water used in pools, hot tubs, or water playgrounds, additionally proper operation of these aquatic venues and disinfection. Disinfection of the water with chlorine or bromine should inactivate the virus that means that the normal correct use of and disinfection of these spaces should kill the corona virus that causes covid nineteen, and that goes whether it's a chlorine or a saltwater pool, which is great news, but swimming in the pool isn't the whole story when it comes to diving into summer fun. Public pools are public spaces, so social distancing practices are still necessary. So what does a safe public pool look like? Hopefully the pool or aquatic venue you visit, we'll be following CDC guidelines for these types of settings. These recommendations include frequent cleaning and disinfecting of surfaces, maintaining good ventilation of indoor areas, spacing, the seating and standing areas, so that visitors can stay six feet or two meters, apart, marking lanes areas in the pool, and limiting or discouraging the use of shared items like goggles and kick boards, signing or regular announcements by staff, reminding visitors about safe. Safe. Practices is a good indication that the public pool or water venue is a cove nineteen safety a priority. This holds true for apartment, complexes, city, pools, and water theme parks alike, for example, although six flags Whitewater in Marietta, Georgia near this podcast homebase remains closed as of this recording, the park has created and shared. It's health and safety reopening plan which had developed in coordination with epidemiologists. The plan includes requiring guests and T members. Members wear masks and temperature checks for both groups, when and if your local pools do open heading to the pool, just like visiting any other space indoors or outdoors requires the practice of safe behaviors for starters, anyone who's shown symptoms of Covid nineteen tested positive for Covid, nineteen or been exposed to someone with covid

Covid CDC Six Flags Whitewater Disease Control Marietta Georgia
How workers are fighting for their rights in a dangerous gig economy

The Big Story

09:09 min | 1 year ago

How workers are fighting for their rights in a dangerous gig economy

"I was doing my grocery shopping at ten thirty last night and by doing my shopping. I mean I was picking things out on an APP that somebody else would get for me at the grocery store the next day and delivered to my front door and if for some reason I couldn't get a spot on that APP INSTA- cart and I guess we'd probably have ordered delivery for dinner using another APP that relies on another person to pick things up at the scary world and bring them to me. Yes I feel guilty about that but not enough to stop using these APPS and doubt that I'm alone in that right now we're relying on workers and the GIG economy more than ever and their job is far more dangerous than ever and most of them. Don't get hero pay or have job security or benefits. Some of them will have been fighting hard to change that and some of them have even one including a group here in Canada. The provinces Labor Board has ruled out food door couriers more closely resemble employees rather than independent contractors creating a groundbreaking precedent for others in the GIG economy. So today will tell you their story and we'll also tell you what happened right after that historic victory and we will do that as soon as. Clare. Who is just back from vacation gives us an update on covid. Nineteen this weekend Clare. Welcome back where did you go? Hey Yeah I took a few days off last week but didn't go anywhere. Obviously the furthest I went was to the park down the street. I am just glad that you came back. And before you update us. Can you explain to listeners? When will hear your updates now? Because we're changing that alphabet. Yeah will you know? I think we're kind of over the initial shock of Covid nineteen down the world and we've been hearing the phrase new normal lot so there will be fewer news updates at the top of the show from now on basically a couple times a week will update you on anything big happening with COVID. Nineteen in Canada. So yes you'll still get the news you need but maybe not every day and of course if God forbid a second wave hits and things do go downhill we will then be right here going down that hill with you every day and speaking of a second wave Clare. Let me guest as your report. Today involves some idiots in Toronto. Who were doing their best to make that happen this weekend. Yeah well that was what everyone was talking about this weekend. Because it was nice and warm out in Toronto and people wanted to go out so there were these huge crowds at Trinity Bell Woods Park on Saturday. Thousands of people were there with practically no physical distancing the city of Toronto. Call this dangerous behavior saying that. This threatened to undo all the work done over the past ten weeks so on Sunday. The World Law enforcement officers in the park and making sure that people were keeping that two meter distance. This is happening. As the number of cases of Covid nineteen is actually going up in Ontario and perhaps coincidentally two weeks after Mother's Day in Alberta the cities of Calgary and burks joining the rest of the province in allowing bars restaurants and hair salons to open today and there will be more restrictions lifted for those cities in particular on June first and in Quebec their concerns about an upcoming heat wave a minimum of thirty degrees Celsius for three days. Starting tomorrow the concern is people in long term care homes who don't have air conditioning. A long term care homes as we know have been hit the hardest throughout throughout this pandemic in Canada especially in Quebec so the Quebec Council for the protection of patients says. It's ready to go to court on this one as of Sunday evening. Eighty four thousand six hundred and ninety nine cases of covid nineteen in Canada with six thousand five hundred and fifteen deaths. I'm Jordan Youth Rawlings and this is the big story. Sarah much heads. Ida is the work and wealth reporter for the Toronto Star. She frequent guest on this podcast and now she has a podcast as well. Her new show is hustle. It's about the David versus Goliath battle. For Workers Rights in the GIG economy and episode two drops today Hazara high. You told us about this podcast when we had you on a couple of months ago and you've been putting the whole thing together. I guess well. The landscape has been shifting dramatically. So why don't you just kind of take us way back to the beginning and tell me about the GIG economy and food aura in particular When you first began this project which is a little over a year ago. Yeah that's right. It's sort of the May year anniversary of reporting on this story and there is really being so many twists and turns over over the course of the year. Some of which we sort of new would come a big battle at the Labor board an effort to try and unionize food aura careers. And then some that were just totally unanticipated. Obviously picked the pandemic being the major one there. So it's been a. It's been a really interesting. Year of following wet was really a unique kind of first attempt to change working conditions for workers in the GIG economy. Which I think is a word that we're all familiar with and we're so used to using APPs to get an uber left or order a meal to our doorstep but you know often. We don't interrogate what is happening behind the scenes. And so that was sort of the inspiration for taking a deeper dive into what the realities of this kind of work are like a new followed a group of food or careers for a year. Just tell me about them. I mean who are they? How did they meet? What are they like? Yeah so Fidora careers are really a diverse group of workers in the city. You know we've all probably seen them on their bikes with a big pink Fedora. Bag on the back or food or a jacket But they're not just cyclists. They're also drivers who go around the city delivering meals and I think a lot of people kind of assume that Workers doing this kind of job are often like young college students especially downtown a lot of the folks that you'll see on their bikes are are younger people but the reality is that the workforce when. I started meeting. Carriers was so much more diverse. You know a lot of drivers who are working in more suburban areas. Are you know New Acadians? Were supporting their families and haven't been able to find work in in their field. You know it's people who really do this as a full-time job is their career. Really They've been doing it for years And I think that the kind of overwhelming feeling that I sort of got from from talking to careers over. The course of the past year were just the fears and concerns around the protections on the job and a sense that this is a job that has really kind of fallen through the cracks that disentitlement workers from a lot of supports that many people take for granted. I think most fundamentally is a job where many express expressed just feeling like. There was a lack of respect and and one career Chris Williams who was involved in the Union drive. Kind of summed up why careers started organizing and trying to change that the broader issues around health and safety wages and dignity. And all those kind of stem from this other issue which is Fidora's misclassification of their couriers calling them. Independent contractors instead of employees or dependent contractors and that misclassification allowed them to avoid taking any responsibility for carriers. You talked about that kind of the goals of forming a union and one of them with dignity. Why is that so important? It's the hardest issue to define by in some ways. It's the most important careers have value. And I think it's the most important because that's personally by the way I think it's the most important because I think it's the one that justifies everything else like. That's why wages are important in many ways for me is because it's hard to live a dignified existence if your wages are two or uncertain if you don't know whether you'll make your daily quoted today or not and obviously health and safety connects to dignity because it's hard to be now when you're wearing constantly about your health you know it takes a toll it takes an effect. I want to explore that a little bit more but I I find the idea that we can talk about. These jobs is having fallen through the cracks kind of crazy. 'cause can you give me a sense of the scale of the GIG economy and Canada because it's everywhere right? Yeah anything I think

Canada Toronto Covid Provinces Labor Board Workers Rights Clare Trinity Bell Woods Park David Rawlings World Law Fidora Labor Board Sarah Calgary Quebec Council IDA Reporter BAG Quebec
COVID-19 Threatens Indigenous People Of The Amazon

Weekend Edition Sunday

02:06 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 Threatens Indigenous People Of The Amazon

"Covert nineteen is devastating Brazil it's already killed more than twenty two thousand Brazilians and is NPR's Philip Reeves reports there's a particular concern about its impact in the Amazon rain forest there's a huge fish that swims the rivers of the rain forest it's called the cool this fish is more than two meters long which means it's handy for anyone explaining social distancing to people in the Amazon welcome one Jesus body ages if you're waiting on the line stay one or two cool apart advises the announcer is also visit the huge why did you call that a public service broadcasters on community radio in a place called some capital to cash whether it's a small river towns surrounded by forest he can play with so I could run the feeders that's the same message in one of some capitals sixteen local languages nine out of ten people in the area are indigenous which would have made of bush prizes for the job sage is were discovered in ninety six fabulous empire the municipal health section first the way to the next day six yes my master kilos also wish to keep this strictly scared municipal officials local people was scared too if it ended up costing somewhere but yeah there was a lot of panic dresses Anthony Bonilla did it from the bin he would try it out that's the source this virus doesn't fool around he says could nineteen has now killed at least seventeen people in some Gabrielle nearly six hundred or infected including villages in indigenous forest reserve it's in Brazil's far northwest by huge river no negative that's the same river the last time NPR traveled supplies are shipped in from the nearest big city that city is minnows five hundred and fifty miles away when covered nineteen hit me now is it caused havoc victims were buried in mass graves the health system collapsed people in some company L. suspect that's where the virus came from

Brazil NPR Philip Reeves Anthony Bonilla Gabrielle Amazon Bush
As restrictions ease, here's how to avoid the virus

Coronacast

06:29 min | 1 year ago

As restrictions ease, here's how to avoid the virus

"Non Physician and Journalist Author Norman Swan the eleventh of May so we're starting to as Beck into somewhat normal life which is pretty nice so we thought start corona custody by talking about a few ticks to stay safe and healthy while we're getting back out there and mixing more than we have been doing over. The past. Few months saw Norman. What sort of things should we be keeping in mind as we start mixing with more people again in a funny way? The lockdown was not funny but the lockdown has probably allowed us to forget some of the things so I think as a bit of a mental imagery. Here we should take ourselves back. If you can remember marsh can you remember March? I cannot remember marks the beginning of this before we went to really serious lockdown wasn't serious as New Zealand. What were we doing well what we were doing. And let's go back to that. Social distancing means that you keep your distance about two meters from other people. If you've got a face mask and you want to wear in public. You should feel free to do so. That's an act of protecting other people where you might be symptomatic and you're preventing spread to others with virus at low levels in Australia. It's going to be a huge difference but it might make some. You've really got to hand sanitize all the time. Just because we're at low levels does not mean to say it cannot flare up again so we are hand sanitizing. Every time we touch a surface we do not. We do not know where that's been or WHO's touched. Who's coughed on it? When we're at the supermarket hopefully the supermarket sanitizing are trolleys baskets before we pick them up and at home your washing and at work your washing with soap and water. Soap is really good for killing the virus so those basic things and not forgetting to sneeze into your sleeve if you sneeze into a paper handkerchief. You Discard the paper handkerchief. You take another but you wash your hands or sanitize your hands afterwards. So we've really got to stay as obsessive compulsive as we can just because we can go out again just because restaurants and cafes may start to be opened or we can go back to work does not mean to say we can hug shake hands get back to where we wear prior to February march of this year where we will do all that. Close quarter stuff that's gone for the foreseeable future. There's been some kind of ease about being at high. You haven't had to think about these sorts of things very much and I realized when I was looking at the sorts of things that we're going to be allowed to do in the coming weeks. It was exciting on one hand but it was also a exciting juicing. Because we've got to stop making those decisions for ourselves. The onus is really back on us to be taken care of everyone in the decisions that we make individually. That's right so when you're sitting at home nobody's coming into Chicago now. You may well have relaxed on Han and hygiene even though it's essential to have at home even without covered nineteen going around so yes absolutely. We've got to go back to that and actually be more vigilant than we wear. It's not a time for relaxation. It's a time for actually increased vigilance as we get out and the other deal to starting to emerge is if you develop a cough cold loss of taste aches and pains fatigue any weird symptom that you've not experienced before feels like the flu but even if it doesn't you're not sure what it is you get tested. It should not take you much at all in terms of suspicion to be tested. So it's really changing that culture that we've had in Australia in the past of soldiering on if you feeling seek don't sold your on going get tested. Don't go to work. Don't send your kids to school if you if you think. There's a coffin cold at home. Get tested we've got months and months of vigilance to go to allow us to marriage back into a semblance of a normal economy and if we do all that it all happened much faster. Prime Minister stated you know by July but if nothing much happens it may well all happened much faster than but it only happened much faster than that if we do it. The government won't do it for us. We've actually got a question about testing from the audience laces asking about Sentinel testing. She wants to know more about how. This virus is extremely contagious. She saying the sentinel testing is designed to pick up positive cases in a symptomatic people. And then you can lockdown that community to contain it. But she's asking if there's a lot of the virus in the community that we don't know about why haven't our numbers escalated? Let me just go piece by piece through releases question question? This virus is contagious extremely contagious. It's got the ability to be even more contagious than the statistics suggest. So on average of there are no controls around. We're not doing social distancing on average somebody with the virus can affect two or three other people in New York City where it was more densely populated and there are quite densely populated parts of Australia. They reckon it could even up to five point seven not nearly six people from one person being infected so high. Because it's got that huge potential to spread. When you've got social distancing it drops right back much far below that so this sort of sentinel testing is where you do random surveys in the community to see if you got people walking around with the virus who don't know it because fifty percent of the spread is symptomatic and that's partly to know how much virus that might be unexpected virus circulating. And whether or not you might have clusters urging it just gives you an idea of virus that you might be missing. A very good question is if they're so little. There's a lot of artists in the community. We don't know about why haven't earned numbers escalated is probably not a lot of virus in the community but it doesn't take very much to start a fire so we've seen if you like a viral fire in the abattoir. The Cedar Abbatoir Meat Works and Works in Victoria. We've seen a fire in the residential aged Care Center in New South Wales. And we'll see more more of these spot fires if you like in Australia. Central testing might just find that in a particular suburb than we want. This virus can circulate and a community. For maybe six weeks in a cohort of say people who are not getting very many symptoms are mixing with each other and then suddenly breaks out because they go and visit the grandma GRANDPA or go to work and they sprayed it at work. And that's what happened in Seattle in Washington state and it's happened elsewhere as well. You just get low levels of the virus spreading within a community but it spreads quite quickly and then you don't notice it until people are affected to become symptomatic.

Australia Norman Swan Beck Marsh New Zealand Cough Chicago Seattle Prime Minister Care Center FLU New York City Victoria Washington New South Wales
Could We Be Entering an Era of Commercialized Space Exploration?

BrainStuff

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Could We Be Entering an Era of Commercialized Space Exploration?

"I S A great deal to Nasr's defunct Space Shuttle Program Green Lit by then president Richard M Nixon in nineteen seventy two. This initiative gave the world its first reusable spacecraft from nineteen eighty one to two thousand eleven NASA astronauts into orbit on American made shuttles. These were often used to transport portions of the ISS during its construction on July Twenty first twenty eleven. The space shuttle. Eric came to an end. As the Atlanta's orbiter returned from its final mission with the program just continued. I S bound astronauts grew dependent on Russian Soyuz rockets. Then the law of Supply and demand took over for nearly a decade. No other rockets were capable of sending people to the ISS. All astronauts bound for that station had to be launched out of Kazakhstan Baikonour cosmodrome which is spaceport least to the Russian government and by April of two thousand twenty. The Russians were charging eighty six million dollars to include foreign astronauts in their Soyuz missions. Another Soyuz rocket launch is scheduled for October. And Breitenstein says NASA is currently negotiations to book a seat. Nevertheless it's hoped that the SPACEX x crew dragon will end the spaceflight monopoly. Rydin Stein explained. We want the russian-american relationship in space exploration to remain strong. We see a day. When Russian cosmonauts can launch on American rockets American astronauts can launch on Russian rockets by now space x the International Space Station? Have a fair bit of history. Using unmanned crafts the company has delivered supplies to the orbiting laboratory since two thousand twelve. The crew dragon aced dress rehearsal and March of two thousand nineteen when it left. Merritt island on the nose of a spacex Falcon nine rocket and autonomously docked with the International Space Station. Five days after its departure the crew track and returned to Earth splashing down in the Atlantic Ocean. Some one hundred and forty three miles or two hundred thirty kilometers a Florida's eastern coastline. But that trip only passengers were in earth shaped plush toy and a dummy named Ripley AB- named after Sigourney Weaver's character Ellen Ripley from the alien movie franchise a flight later. This month will be the first time that live. Astronauts will be on board space x crew mission director. Benjamin Reed said at the May First Conference Dragon will be fully autonomous. Expectation is that can carry the crew safely to the station and bring them home without direct intervention even so hurley and Bankin are set to take control for a short period before the crew dragon. Docs they'll be able to guide the vessel using touch screens or physical switches. Both options are available for certain portions of the journey while aboard cruise expected to test out such components as the maneuvering thrusters and in my own. Mental Control System. And then there's the spacesuits one piece outfits designed by SPACEX to supply the astronauts with oxygen provide the appropriate temperature and maintain pressure spacesuits plug into the crew dragons chairs when their wares. Sit down read. Said suits also have an integrated communication system so that the crew can communicate through their helmets. Neither Bank nor Hurley are strangers to low earth orbit. Lincoln's logged more than seven hundred eight hours in space and Hurley a member of NASA's last shuttle era crew back in two thousand eleven but every mission presents its own unique challenges like the rest of the world NASA space x and these two astronauts had to make adjustments during the krona virus taking extra precautions. So what does that mean? Both SPACEX and NASA have implemented social distancing protocols like keeping work desk six feet or two meters apart at their respective control rooms. Meanwhile the cruise getting a wide. Berth contact with them by any other team. Members has been minimized and many training sessions have been done. Virtually and the safety of is S. crew the astronauts will observe a preflight quarantine for May sixteenth until the launch on May twenty seventh. Right now. There are three space fares two Americans and a Russian living and working aboard the International Space Station. The length of Benjamin's and Harley stay at the facility will be determined at a later date it could last anywhere from five to thirty days when the time to head home arrives the crew tracking should undock Disley and deliver. Its human charges to Florida by way of the Atlantic. There's a long proud tradition of civilians gathering near the Kennedy Space Center to witness rocket launches. Unfortunately NASA is discouraging people from following suit this time lest they spread or contract Cova nineteen. But you can tune in and watch launch online for just the fifth time in history NASA astronauts will be test flying a new type of spacecraft should bankin an early complete their mission objectives. We may yet see a golden age of space tourism and innovation with private industry taking on development roles long adopted by governments Breitenstein. Said this really is the next major step. In commercializing low earth orbit and having a really vital low earth orbit economy in which NASA is one of many customers.

Nasa Spacex International Space Station ISS Kennedy Space Center Hurley Florida Benjamin Reed Russian Government Richard M Nixon Kazakhstan Nasr Atlantic Ocean Eric Atlanta Rydin Stein President Trump Merritt Island
Car-Free Streets Will Soon Be the Norm

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:43 min | 1 year ago

Car-Free Streets Will Soon Be the Norm

"That we get down and get more than enough of each other doing the together so let's dive in some stories that you've found. Let's start with to connect to stories. European cities are planning to keep cars off streets even as the lock downs begin to lift. Who's acting on this then? So this is a story. That of course is developing over the couple last couple of weeks We certainly have spoken here before about Milan that they had introduced study abroad program. Which basically is taking some of the temporary measures that they have implemented city to reclaim some of The space that was traditionally used for cars to a cycle lanes or sidewalks and put those in place permanently about other cities are following our Brussels and Paris. To cities that are traditionally are very car. Centric now we know that the Paris Mayor Mayor Anne Hidalgo has been trying for some time to reduce car usage in the city and it seems like having people locked at home has proved to be the right opportunity to change of that And then this hundred mile club Wh what was this about? This is coming from the United States particularly the cities of Portland. New York both in different kind of programs that now are put together have committed to a one hundred miles of open streets for residents. Now we know that famously. American cities do not tend to be the most pedestrian friendly And even cycle friendly in the world and this is as well the same the same thinking Some of the measures that had been introduced due to social distancing rule so that people could use their one of exercise a day in sidewalks while keeping the two meters apart Or six feet apart as the government mandates now being put into permanent status so this is in the two cities allowing to have more space for bicycles for pedestrians and wider pavements. Which can only mean have good thing now and you guys censor in London your lot. More people are using their feet Gabar. The Hundred Mile Club. Don't confuse it with the mile high club finally demolition of parts of Lacrima. What's happening here? Yes so lack madder. The Los Angeles Museum has been for awhile since two thousand thirteen We've known that The Portal Prize winner. Peter Satori has been in charge of this redevelopment Aww New wing for Lacrima. Now they cited of course structural damages to a four buildings within like knows Campus to restructure desk and now it's facing position because they're using the lockdown to go ahead with these plans that have not been supported since the beginning.

Paris Lacrima Mayor Anne Hidalgo Hundred Mile Club Milan Los Angeles Museum Peter Satori United States Brussels New York Portland WH London
Germans go back to church, but no singing allowed

BBC World Service

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Germans go back to church, but no singing allowed

"Religious services have resumed in Germany under strict conditions as the country continues to ease its coronavirus restrictions worshippers attending churches synagogues and mosques are being limited to ensure they stay at least two meters apart is among a number of rules introduced to try to curb the spread of infections as Damien Maginnis explains some church that already started services today but others are trying to figure out how they can go along with these new rules because for example in some churches the talking about having to go in one entrance on leave from another door another exit thinking is not allowed because it's sold that to loud singing forceful singing is is quite a dangerous way to spread the infection on the also numbers are going to be restricted to people entering

Germany Damien Maginnis
"two meter" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

11:35 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on Embedded

"Taste or do whatever and less when his third party code and components. We've already covered this. It was already in the lyrics to all right anyway. Yeah securities hard securities hard because there's so many ways to do wrong and because so many ways to do it wrong are the things that we do right as engineers really me taking things easy to manufacture. I see what you're saying. Pink being conscientious to your co workers into the rest of the company and and the things we do to take shortcuts because time is so limited often and there's all intentional backdoors we put in. Speak for for yourself but it's more for me. It's sometimes the time it's like yes. You should absolutely do perky encryption per the system and you should keep track of it and you should be able to turn off only one system and you should be able to if one system hacked to not affect any others. Yeah the manufacturing databases just hideous. When you I mean? Sometimes it is totally doing that but most of my clients are. Are you going to say how about we just put in one key for the first thousand. And how am I going to say no to that. They're they're trying to build a thousand units. They've only got budget for twelve. It's it's a balance it's and that's why we do threat modeling. How often do you do threat? Modeling now. Never have clients that I've done a couple in the last few jobs were wasn't that wasn't my part of the job but to me. What you just did is is where I would start with modeling? You take the list you go through you talk about your product you talk about who might attack it you talk about what steps you need to do to prevent it and the same kind of thing you do with the hazard analysis for safety critical device. Yeah so you list of things. That could go wrong you give them a severity and you listen mitigations. Are you start to think about medications nations and then you sort them by severity and ease of fixing or the mitigation. Yeah usually you score the mitigation for like how easy it is and then you subtract and then you've sort by what's left over and do the do the most severe ones do the easiest silly right I mean. This is all estimation. There's things are gonNA miss. So there's a whole nother top ten list for Internet of things Wasp It's basically the same stuff but different order. They do talk about default settings in devices. Yes and how you should probably not do that I came across some cameras recently. Some web cameras and And there are pretty expensive and they respect to make sure that they had no traffic to parts unknown so they were really quite expensive and they had the stupidest password and stupidest username and it was easy to change change and I went out and I looked online to just a check and there were I mean people had identified the huge huge numbers of cameras. You could get to just default route name and password. Yeah in some some sense. You know. It's good that those people are out there because those the easy things to attack and people go for ignoring you. Yeah I mean there's it there's there's a strategy of the kinds of people who attack things right throws the sophisticated people are going to go through offer to reverse engineering the trying to get the firm around reading it understanding it finding ways to attack and then producing whole whole exploit and then using the people who are just kind of along for the ride going to these websites and finding this is how you get into this product and then going and doing it. So there's fewer of the people who are spending the time to really understand and generate the experts exploits compared to the people who are it just using the exploits that have been published summer. Yeah absolutely because it's easy to use the experts and that's the problem right once once somebody it only takes one person who's gone through the effort to produce maybe one hundred thousand people and darkness. I wonder how this is kind of like how many golf balls are in the State of Kentucky. I wonder trick question. Kentucky does not exist assist wonder the population of experienced and security researchers experienced security researchers researchers with a willingness to be black hat in the population of call them script kitties and the population of software. Engineers I mean is it. Ah How many people are we. Defending against is it ten. Is it one hundred thousand. I don't know I don't even even know the scale. That's probably hundreds of thousands of script. Kitties are on that order. Probably thousands or less of Idaho zero and not. Everybody wants to do anything bad. Ho Camera thing. I mean you could pan tilt so you you could change the stuff but most people just didn't really care where they were just doing it to like look at parking lots in and well Sir F- location really bad. It totally can be. It can be seen Batman which one was the dark knight all the cameras. That was is very bad for the joker jerkers writes. It was certainly an invasion of privacy. And I don't think you can do what they do on the cop shows shows but you can now with your networks random. Yeah Watch twitched database. You use for training on that one. I I will post at the top ten that that we just went through. I did want to point out that there are tools that you can use to try to attack your stuff to and I don't have any off hand. Oh Sir and and attack your software find all the inputs. Send all kinds of random input. Fuzzy it's called. There's there's ways to harden your your stuff without just sitting and thinking you know kind of automated automated tests to find find ways in into to exercise your API's and things that can be quite useful. Yeah so the. They have a tab legally defined exploits to write yourself embedded for more embedded a device for more analysis tools and it goes through the hardware stuff but there are also some software links and he goes beyond GDP and IDA which is one of the a big decompile others enlists things you can try and if if there's any chance your audience I don't know if their customers is going to use these things you should absolutely try them too. I'm sure that your boss will let you. And by the way could you record that conversation because they also have a book. the describes A lot of the stuff and how to to think about it and and how to manage identity and whatnot so there'll be lots of links and all I can say is no. You're not going to solve this today. But maybe it's one of those things that if you could just get a little better this week in a little better next week than twenty five years we'll have good security you or if you just realized how big a problem is. Maybe you like most of us. Don't fully understand all of this stuff that's a step forward to. Oh yeah danger will Robinson and being able to talk about it. It's not just security scary. It's I can make the security better in in these ways for this reason in this amount of time and we should do it because it will otherwise cost us that amount of money and that's a as manager. That's much easier choice all right so I guess that's it. Thank you Christopher for blabbing with of me bloviating. Thank you for listening. Thank you to our patrons for supporting us. We don't know why you do but we're really glad I mean it's really nice to say to have somebody say yeah. What you do is interesting enough an important Martin enough that I am willing to kick in a few bucks a month to encourage you to continue doing so i? It's just weird sort of validation. Also it pays as for a lot of stuff which is awesome and finally thank you to our corporate patron I- WWL into working laps ups so now have Winnie the Pooh Oh right he stuck in the door to rabbits. It's cave in. Rabbit is hanging his washing on his feet. Chris Scott Stuck there for your Christopher Robin's in the front so he took hold old poos front paws and rabbit took hold of Christopher Robin an all rabbit's friends and Relations Cold Rob Rabbit and they all pulled together and for a long time. Pu Only said Ow an oh and then all of a sudden he said pop just just as if a corker coming out of a bottle and Christopher Robin and rabbit and all rabbit's friends and relations went head over heels heels backwards and on top of them came Winnie the Pooh so thin. Not of thanks to his friends. He went on with his walk in the forest which started like get year ago humming proudly to himself but Christopher Robin looked after him lovingly and said selling all bear emitted is an independently produced. Radio show that focuses on the many aspects of engineering it is a production of logical against against an embedded software consulting company in California. If there are advertisements in the show we did not put them there and do not receive money from them at this this time. Our sponsors are logical elegance and listeners like you..

Christopher Robin Kentucky IDA golf Idaho Rob Rabbit jerkers California Chris Scott Robinson Martin
"two meter" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on Embedded

"I'm Writing Normal Code My. Let's say I'm the gooey person jobs directly code. I'm not it's not. It's not foremost in my mind that I should be thinking about security like Mike. Okay if somebody interacts with the input panel in the right way they can do a buffer overflow and gain control system. It's not top of mind. Can you imagine refrigerator typing in your OPCO. But it's not top of mind. You're you're working on the feature you're working on whereas with from update. It's kind of like yeah. This is the main this is the main vector through which somebody could take over my system and that needs needs to be like job number one and it's not just security job not for the job. It's not just They can replace your code with their own. which is you know that can be bad but they might as well have rewritten the system? They can the the hard thing is the thing that blackout would want to do. is to take your code and Deacon pilot so so that they can read it more easily and that also often means they find your buffer overflows or whatever overflights but also they. You can look at libraries and so you don't just get all op codes in an horribly written. See in a D compiler you also get function 'cause there oh look here's a string copy. Look here's men copier and more libraries. He used easy to see getting. I mean that's getting the firmware and finding attack points rather than replacing the former. But then you replace the firmware with what you have and and since it's so close to what they had it does exactly what you want and they can't tell extra plus a little extra yeah I totally refer updates. It's it's just so hard and if you can buy a solution you should be thinking about that. It's something that is just getting hurt her all time. Yeah so next on. My list is securing sensitive information. Do not hard code secrets. Passwords username tokens private or similar blur variants into firmware. Release Images. Have you ever done that. I don't believe so hard coded a key into you. Know Oh no not not into production released now. The manufacturing softer I have hard coded passwords and felt very bad about that felt very very guilty but the problem here is the so. How are you going to secure sensitive information you can send it out to a spy flash? You can send it to file system. So usually there's device send it too expensive little part that all it does is this that or USOC has what's called a secure enclave on it which are sequestered little memory spaces where you put these kinds of things that can't be read out except in certain ways or KP right out at all the right only and when you're doing a authentication challenge you say okay? Here's my thing and returns. You'd you'd the result of the cryptographic operation stuff like that I've done authentication systems for consumables. And we had a little extra device and Dan had the key in it. It was not readable. Theoretically A and there was another one in the consumable and they had a little transaction. In those those those chips both had the keys in them sufficient keys to to to your cryptographic authentication operation. But they were not in our our software anywhere and so those had to get rid of a certain place they had to exist in some software on some database but it was in a computer on premises cage with breath access controls and we still got hacked. That that at that job was did everything right until till somebody figured something out. Never quite sure what they figured out but we kept adding on layers of things to try to prevent prevent it. I think what probably happened is to somehow the key cut out either. At one point we gotta shipment of the chips from the company and they were defective effective. And you could do a lot of things with D. cryptographic chip you were supposed to be able to pass the blown fuses. So that was a little odd so something like that happens and then once he gets out. It's very challenging because you might have thousands of units in on the field for thousands and thousands of consumable devices with the old key in the Mon- shelves and you can't provoke. You can't change it so that that can be a real challenge but that that kind of operation we have keys stored. That's not just for extra devices it's performer. UPDATES right for communicating with with your cloud service and saying this is a legitimate device. Protecting those is rather difficult. And that's that's more of a challenge because I'm not sure are true can really hide the some things like for somethings there has to be a key and flash right and you can take it easy to change. Something goes wrong but I mean making per device keys so that you can't yeah so so that when you hack one and device you don't get control over all of them but then that means you have to have a database of all devices and what their current keys on it doesn't work for certain situations and the consumer one you can't do you can't ship a different version of the consumable for every device device mastered I. I mean the only advice a a a wasp suggests is if at all possible. Sensitive data in clear text should be ephemeral ephemeral by nature and reside in volatile memory and by that they do not mean the global memory. Because that's not really I mean it is volatile but it's not they don't mean keyword anyway grew ram that is reused often not just ram. Yeah people make mistakes with that too and forget to. I think there was a with like one of the password managers in which is a difficult job. It's got a big target on it too. They had the master pastor master password stored in Ram and they were they had intended. I think declared clear at right after us but it just hung around. It's hard to know what computers do 'cause I stick things in caches they stuff migrates. Yeah but that's different than embedded because I mean there's applies but those are you know when you're dealing with Lenox full operating systems. There's all kinds of other considerations. Let's see the next one. I have is identity. Management User accounts should not be static. You should be able to change your passwords and internal. I'm not gonNA worry about that one for. It people the next one is embedded frameworks in sea-based hardening things like tool chains and libraries Frameworks other people's Code Embedded Lennox systems with busy box and and Jakko and build roots and things with executed balls that are so out of date. Therapy one hundred advisers against them but it's it's hard to update the Lennox shipped for that one version of peace Ip TCP IP that existed for for so long had so many bugs but it was in you know thousands of different products because it was super Cheap and everybody used it I'm sure there are libraries. Now that are being passed around the OEM. I'm GONNA use that because I use it in my last project and it made sense and so the more monoculture we get the easier it is to attack because you can just focus focus on the attack on one spot embedded so many of those libraries are just kind of small company produce things that don't have a lot of people working on unknown. They're not probably thinking about security. Some of them started in the late nineties mid nineties the eighties. Even are these old legacy code bases. Just hang around. Because hey it's embedded never changed Bob's toss it's great and then somebody sticks TCP IP stack on it from who knows where super easy exploit if somebody bothers to spend the time and when we say exploit here we're talking about all the things we've already said we're looking for buffer for overload runs. We're looking for a dependency injection. We're looking for common points failure. Okay so use of debugged coded interfaces says well I mean yeah. It's always nice to remove all of the pre production code before you go to market but then hiring anybody in the field called. Is that a back door. Yes yes it is all those things that make things easier to debunk. They make things either easier to manufacture. Awesome make it easier to hack right because I mean that's what you're doing right here you're here you're opening your device specifically so you can modify the deepest parts of an easy way okay. You've opened the deepest parts of it and easy way. So yeah it's balanced and it's really hard. And you have manufacturing fracturing folks yelling at you because something's too hard to provision in the factory right and somebody somebody makes a decision somewhere to make it easier consulting someone and suddenly family of I had a Siham that once refused to blow the security fuses on aboard. I mean they're supposed to every system and what does do those made it so you couldn't j. tag read out the code and they or just like no because then I wouldn't be able to read help the code. No there they they were like. Oh no because then it can't be updated and when you send US new firmware we won't be able to update it and we're like but said yeah. Yeah yeah that is the idea. We are aware of that. Please only ten at a time. It was just I hope. They flatly refused. They were like we will not do this. And I mean I imagine. They've had bad experiences where they blew three thousand fuses and the their client said. Oh we need to update this firmware. And it's your fault. You shouldn't have done that ahead of time. It's yes I I understand why that happens. But if you're chip comes with security mechanisms you should use them and you should figure out how to make them usable in a fashion that makes sense financially for your product and it goes back to the threat model right. Who's going to attack this? Why Hey what are the repercussions and how much is it going to cost us? Some of that doesn't occur until you've become a success. Yeah Yeah it's like you might be thinking. Oh I'M GONNA sell tendencies we find it takes off and you saw a thousand and maybe twenty thousand maybe a hundred thousand now all of a sudden you get on. Somebody's radar as that's that's a big footprint. Let's see let's see how this works and he can start with. Let's see how this works two. Oh my God this is so cool to look. I can just shut everybody's off Oregon. Mind a lot of bitcoin with this. So we're almost done with the top ten for embedded applications Transport security level transport layer security charity T. L. S. mostly for networks. That's mostly for networks. But it's it's a thing to consider every time you are putting the things outside your system whether it's Spi bus or an Ethernet or Bluetooth the security there has to be considered because it's it's a weak point all of your doors and windows are weak points in your house okay. Just data collection usage storage and With with respect to privacy yes I don't think that really belongs in the security. It's important is security. But it's I mean that's database security. And they're talking about Lee numbers and how that can be terrible and I agree. I guessed the point here is just to limit the amount of data you store. Don't store your customers bank account and credit card information on thermostat.

Ram OPCO USOC Deacon Mike Oregon Dan Lennox Lenox Lee T. L. S. Bob
"two meter" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

12:54 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on Embedded

"Open Open Open. Something Open Web Application Security Project that you could look that up yourself anyway. The first thing on the embedded application security list is buffer and stack overflow protection. And it's it's using things like aspirin tough Scana astir copying star cat the ability to corrupt memory. And make it do what you want is bad and we talked about the stack. That is one way to to to do it. You can do things from the heap other members. You can do things from Global memory if you if you major injure oh I'm not gonna I'm not GonNa hurt the hundred byte buffer on the stack. That's ridiculous. Who would do that? I'M GONNA put a static here so it it goes into the global. BSS memory. Yeah you can and still do stuff. The thing about these exploits is they. They're all the same class of things or some of the hardest bugs to find exactly exactly overflows memory over rights. I mean these are all things that people who've been working on this this kind of software engineering for a long time. I've seen over and over and they're very very hard to find sometimes even when you know it's your program itself it's causing the corruption. Not some outside actor so it can be very hard to defend defend against something that you can't even really detect runtime. Oh yeah easily. A even. Even if you've got a complete dump it can be a core dump or you're watching it and it could be some maddening. What's happening because once this stuff starts happening? All the state gets corrupted everywhere. And if you were modifying your buffer offer but you buffer didn't modify every point you might still get good return address but now it's variables are messed up because it's variables were put on the stock. It just as you were mentioning globals too. That's a great. That's a great exploit because you don't know where the compiler in the Lincoln we're going to necessarily put things you may see stuff in the file listed a certain way. But it's it's free to rearrange things so when you look at the map file and I've had to do this with memory. Corruption bugs in the past lasts. Like all right. I'm doing graphics. Why is there what is dated? It's coming in here. Whose overriding my name? My Oh I variable. That's getting creamed right. So what's the how do I find out what that data is because it just looks like data while you look at the map. Is this one the heart the great buffer artery for this first right before the graphics. You know this graphics linked lists that I have and that's causing a crash now. Why is the heart rate buffer it? You know it's overrunning. Its thing and it's something from another component of your embedded system entirely. Somebody else works on not even in your files not even in your directory in a different module the map just at the Lincoln decided. Let's put this next to this at fits Nice And so stuff yeah. Those corruptions can come from anywhere so with these exploits. It's like yeah you may have done a good job. But the guy down the hall do a good job with their component which happens to be a contiguous in memory with your your data beer fault at all. But you're the one running the arbitrary code out of your buffer. Anyone knows hockey and took us about this. I I didn't do a great job to at the beginning talking with her because I was just like. Well it's kind the same as debugging but in system. You don't really know yeah well. It's Hers Engineering Right. Yeah but so. Many of these things I have I mean I've never used a buffer overflow for for debugging something but have had to identify buffer overflows so it is something. I'm used to from an engineering perspective. The second one the list is injection prevention. Which is best represented rented by little bobby tables and X. K. C. D. Comics where somebody intentionally does something you've exposed a command to the outside world that you didn't intend to and so something you get a command into your command processor through weird means so like like in the bobby tables example somehow somebody's typing sequel into a field? That just happens is to get executed. Because you didn't detect that that was just regular text. Not Sequel. You should execute. I saw. I saw a good example of this where they were executing a command so they they were. It was kind of sort of like our hello world example broken down instead of Hello Christopher it would you would instead have a commander wanted to run may be always output but file always data to file early less or more. You know you you pipe to those but you instead as you know file pipe more you instead say My my reader file and it would do the same thing format for you but if you have it run commands so that you can you know look at the results of commands in the same format. It will run any command as as an engineer. Might be like Oh okay so my reader will run. ps or some some function. And because. I'm me I'm like okay. You'll run. PS DASH the F.. I don't care what it'll it'll. It'll do the premise. But I'm only going to let them run one. Come in because you know that's that's safe. Yeah but then somebody Jio semi-colon in it and then they'll run entirely different command as you because your comment. Because that's what you said it up to do. It's about looking at what people sending send you an actually looking for tax unlike buffer overflow which is something something happens to the best of us. injection dependent injections usually are intended to be malicious. Yes that isn't to say that I haven't shot myself in the foot by failing to look at whether or not I'm getting floats or heck sore into jurors. That's another way of looking at sanitizing. Your data so that's a pretty good one because you can like little bobby tables if you haven't seen the excavating the thing is somebody names. Their child like Robert Drop Table All users colon colon whatever. SQL Oh query S Q command in the middle of the child's name and then the child goes to school and the school cannot function because they've put that in their database and bobby and then a command and and then delete all users And so we call him little puppy tables and yeah you. It isn't even always on purpose. Why can't name have semi-colons in them crite just because that would break so many things on it's all about sanitizing your inputs which you know with the polycom example would be the network attack right it could be buffer overflow but it could also be by looking at their protocol and sending various malformed commands? Can you disrupt the system and sometimes not just how I want to hack into this run arbitrary code. Sometimes it's all service tech right if you find something to crashes it if you for example wrote an implementation of PF for core router company and you happen to discover that if you you accidentally accidentally miss one of the one of the packet formats new always crash. The juniper hours whose fault is the WHO's juniper's fault those universal. What's your phone? I mean they should they should sanitizer input. Yeah but but I mean that's a big deal right I mean that. That's it's if you find a packet that can crash a router. It's pretty easy to get a pack to router right so he can do all kinds of damage with that takedown systems and then just keep sending them. What's their recourse? They're not going to get a firmware update real quick so yeah that kind of thing is can be very insidious but this is about when I think about engineering and debugging this is. I mean your coworkers can definitely do this this to you by accident by data that you don't expect and so is about designing API's that makes sense and then checking to make sure untrusted users are using your API correctly. Well or making sure your. API CAN'T BE HOUSTON militias way which is harder. But it can. Because I don't really want to check to make sure that all boolean variables input are either zero or one hundred and what your devices. It depends on what your devices. And who's WHO's calling your functions that that goes back threat modeling right. If you're making if you're making a size monitor that you can access remotely probably not a big target right so oh you can be a little more relaxed on on these things but if you're making an internet connected toaster oven and you don't want a house on fire. They can be turned to a thermal dot net. Yeah you should be paying more attention to Renault. Industrial controls roles are things that government actors typed like to hack into so that was that was injections injection and prevention is the thing you should be looking for the next one is from updates and cryptographic signature. Yes this this is this is this is. This is the two meter exhaust port of your device. I mean I can totally hit want breath. I'm actually this. Isn't the two meter exhaust. That's hard boat. This is this is like I don't know I don't have a good analogy. It's it's the open front door that you can't can't adequately lock so this is this is I mean if you have a user upgradeable firmware or remotely upgradeable. firmware at. This is really hard. It really is because you're delivering the code right. If you want to run arbitrary code the easiest way in is on the truck that delivers the code. How did you break into the bank? Well you see I addressed open the vault and took all the money uh-huh sometimes that's easier. Yeah okay so from where updates how much we can talk talk about that. That's a whole four show. I think the thing that I want to mention here is again back to this. Is is something I have dealt with as an engineer not I mean from update the I put them together and I send them out. But I have had to heck's Eh firmware updates I have had to rico decompile parts of them in order to look for things to see if that bug was fixed. Even though it it was supposed to have been fixed in this release and nobody's quite sure which got compiled I have had to look at the CRYPTO. On in it to make sure it was applied correctly to try to unapplied to try to open it with the wrong crypto. Just to make sure I've had to you know I always have to open it. With the right Crypto to make sure there are so many things we do in debugging the yeah you have to think about this and doing it wrong in debugging often leads to it being an attack point in production And the firmware thing. It's a different class of problem because.

Lincoln aspirin Scana hockey polycom bobby rico juniper K. C. Robert Renault HOUSTON
"two meter" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

12:20 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on Embedded

"And it worked a little different than I expected it I'M GONNA put the Post that I liked in the Shona so if if we don't make sense feel free to go there and look at it but the idea is you have a buffer of some fixed length and it may be in the stack so main calls this other function which read something from the command line and puts it in this buffer or from the network or from any any external source any external source if you use some sort of string handling that doesn't take account the length of your buffer. You can in copy too much information into your buffer say your buffer is a hundred characters normally somebody types in you so you have a hello world and you want it to type in their name so they type in their name and it says Hello Christopher and then exits but that Christopher part was in a buffer that was one hundred characters long. Nobody's name is over one hundred characters. Why would we bother if you haven't felt that logic at some point I don't know so many times commands never going to be longer than thirty five characters? This numbers never going to need more than twelve digits. Anyway there's a fixed buffer size. Which is you know four times more than you thought you needed? So why would it break. And then you you copy from some other source from the Internet from the command line from user however and you just copy into this buffer it sits on the stack and as you overflow the buffer as you go from which it allows you to do because this is the bug that somebody's written they're not checking the input link do using Surkhet instead of stir end cat. They're using copy instead of stern copy. Yes Okay and when you called this function that said get in print out their her name you you put something on the stack called Return Pointer and it tells you where to go after you're done tells you where to return to and as you overfull your buffer you get access to that pointer you can override right it and if you think about that as soon as you can over as soon as you get to the point where you can make it jump to who any address you can make it. Run your coat you because because instead of instead instead of putting in a hundred bites of my name I wrote this tiny little program that loaded other programs at the command line you. Hypothetically that's going a little bit too far. I think this point. Let's just say it. Does something simpler loading other programs through requirement. Okay I wrote this tiny little program to instead print out the password data password data shirt they print out some form of memory. Something you you want hidden and so I now take this function pointer. It's supposed to re re this return pointer and I pointed to the beginning of my buffer and now executes my buffer and and you know string hoppy doesn't care what's in the buffer unless you have a null terminator two. Let's back up a little bit. Because we talked about stacking. Can we didn't say anything about how this works. Okay so the stack is a kind of memory In your in your program pretty much every every resist operating system on your code has what's called a stack as a section of memory. It's usually invisible to you. Yeah and all of your anything within a function that's a variable gets pushed onto the stack and the stack it. It's called a stack for a reason. You put stuff on it and grows in one indirection as you stack things onto it and stacks grow downward in memory so if you if you stack starts starts it address one hundred one thousand and you push a hundred hex bytes on it now. The stack pointer moves down to nine hundred right so as you as you put more things onto the stack grows downward but when you copy buffers offers they go the other direction because addresses increment so you put items on the stack in it downward fashion until it runs out but items themselves selves get ridden in in increasing address order as you might expect a raise written increasing and the stack is also used to store or state between when you call functions. So it's not. Just here's your variables. It's also here's the registers that has they were before for. Here's some set of registers as they were before I call this function so I can get them back when I return to function. One of those register says here's the function to go back to when you're done on so if I'm in Maine and I call print f four. I call print off the C runtime says. Oh you're about to call let me gather some stuff up. So that I mean the compiler does somebody back to the compiler you said prime time whatever the not Java what is a run time yeah but it's not a virtual machine sits the infrastructure to make things work anyway it pushes the state onto the stack and one of those things is the return pointer. I already said that but now I'm kerfluffle because I don't know where I was. Put the variables tables on inputs the return pointer on right. So you're calling prentice right before you called printed pushes this stuff on the stack. One of the things is. How do I get back to me okay so apprenticed finishes and when imprinted when you call return at return? That's when all that stuff gets popped back off the stack and it repopulates those registers where he was supposed to go including the return address in the calls return address jumps to that. Don't shoot so what you're describing. Is You have the stack you get this name variable which gets pushed onto the stack. which is one hundred bytes? Long somebody writes two hundred bytes to it and it goes off the top of the stack including the a place where the return address was written. So there's kind of a chicken and egg problem. There haven't quite worked out but well insurance has to be here. Erin I so yeah. The return address happens. Okay now right and then you call print or stir copy and it reverts. Yeah so that that works and one of the tricks here. Is You have to figure out how long that buffer is. Yeah well but that's actually perfect perfect right now because if you just write some bogus thing in there you'll get faults as soon as as soon as you've overflowed the buffer you'll get a fault or crash right right and then you depending on how good your system is a real embedded system might will. Oh probably just trundle along happily not if you trash return pointer if you trash something valid happily trundle trying to long randomly. I said valid somewhere within the buffer. But it's not going to fall. You might get the interrupt that you try to run from memory that is invalid right. Great tried to execute an invalid. Instruction maybe you caught that. And maybe you didn't but stuff like writing to a writing zero so for example that's often not caught must have done special things or have special hardware that king catch like. I don't think I think you need like the MP on the CORTEX THEM MM-HMM for to map out the zero page But we're getting off. Yeah I'm not sure. But that's a separate discussion okay. So now we've sort of discussed the overflow and the reason people use this is because it's pretty pretty easy to use you. Just send it bunch of buffers you descended a bunch of characters and if it fails then okay now after figure out where it it fails and once. I know where it fails. I can figure out how to adjust the pointer the where I wanted to. I can send ascended code that Owen to execute and then I can execute that code so that is bad right. I mean as soon as somebody can execute code on your system bad. And whether it's command line or in our polycom if we could do that over a generic Internet well that that requires several other steps but yes I mean. That's that's the golden ticket here. Then you can drop on anybody's polycom if you can if you can just send send something to a phone and say okay. I'm going to execute code now. I also want you to make me a party to this conversation. Yeah that's buffer overflow. That's one of the big ones and it's probably the one that we talked about and it gets more complicated because well we said the chief reasons why this is exploitable as people forget to use like stern cat and things with an NTN in there says number of items and it. It doesn't copy any further than then fuse. The ones without end it can copy indefinitely and then thus be your lover overflow as people get wise to that and started doing the right things the ways to to find buffer overflows cod more and more complicated and so now there's like I don't have a good example but it's like cascading. How skating levels of bugs like okay? I sent this packet. which put this in this state which means it was ready to accept blah? And you know or there's a bug in the Java Java script Jit compiler you know it's all sorts of very much more subtle things than than merely. Oh this person forgot to copy during properly so these these buffer overflow exploit still exists. Even when people are being conscientious. That's what I'm trying to say but mostly it's because of multiple failures and if we could get our systems assumes to require multiple failures than in the get harder to find because of that yeah multiple failures just means it's more expensive for someone to hack your device than it is for them to build their own and that's part of threat. Modeling is figuring out where you're okay point. There's the whole I don't look at an orange. I don't Wanna I see my face on wire on the cover of wired to get sued for billions of dollars Yeah there's there's different layers in this Patrick Kane kill somebody so we have to be very careful or this is a children's toy in the worst thing that can happen is someone makes it say foul words which then goes up on the Internet and we're embarrassed okay. That's embarrassing but really they could have just faked that video. Whatever okay so that it actually is number one on the O.? Wasp embedded application security top ten best practices list Wasp is we talked about that with Rick they look for making For Security and Best Practices they actually have a lot of information resistant for I don't know it's like Oh and a.

Christopher Wasp Patrick Kane Maine prentice polycom THEM NTN Erin Owen Rick
"two meter" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

12:38 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on Embedded

"Hello and welcome to embedded I am here with Christopher White. This time is just going to us. We're going to talk about more for more security but in in a sort of different away before we get to that. Because of our show with Jacob Martinez about digital nest the the place that gives access to technology to young adults. We are so fortunate that a generous imbedded listener has decided to do a matching grant. That means that if you donate one dollar to digital nest they get two dollars which is pretty cool. So I'd like to ask you to consider donating to digital nest. The website is give dot digital nest dot org slash embedded. FM and of course that will be in the show notes. He if you have any questions feel free to email me and I am really excited needed that emitted listeners are going to help other people just need. Now let's get back to the show December. I don't care for it. It's been raining and he doesn't care for that. These things may be linked we she. She just moved Australia then. It would be July that I'd be unhappy Earth well given that we are unlikely to be deep snowbirds anti snowbirds. I think we should distinguish. Oh okay you told me out so I have no idea org. I was talking to Chris. Wellens over at into working labs who are corporate patron right now. We were talking about Rick Authors Show and she asked about the details of how security risks get exploited out. We often talk about how important security is and there are. These top ten vulnerabilities in all of that but how do you go from buffer overflows and exposed pins two systems that are hacked. How do you bypass the license since check in? VX works so you can install their tools from your company. Needs them in their licensing is broken. Anyway yeah I thought we was. It is it is it really is but I thought we would put on our gray and black hats and think about security three. We are not experts in this. So my goal here is to think about it as you would. If we're if we have a design how do you would you. Why are you even worried about buffer overflows as a working from ranch near how? How do you protect against these things? Or how do they work so you can protect against them. How do they they work? I mean it's fine like buffer overflow. I looked at before the show because I know that a buffer overflow can lead to a security the problem but I hadn't really thought about how and so we're going to talk a little bit about that but it's it's all things the physical security. And just how do you go beyond security is hard to will the. Here's what we mean. Okay so we restart. I think we should start as though we were full disclosure. I'm not a security expert. I actually haven't really doc much with this except well I did some authentication stuff but I was sort of a different area. So I'm at least going to be bloviating bloviating that means to just talk without reference to actual facts. I'm I'm going to be speculating to the best of my ability. Thank you yeah I mean if we were having a meeting where we were designing a product. We need to use our our heads. And I'm sure somebody out there will tell us what you forgot X Y and Z. And maybe we'll talk about those later. That's fine or this is wrong. Whatever they'll still prochazka with okay? So let's start with if you had a device. Let's say they made a baby yoga and we're GONNA taken apart. Okay baby baby you're a robot. Okay and we were GONNA take it apart of course without hurting the puppet part because how could you and look at how it was made what what would be your first steps. And that's not a great example because I don't try to exploit a baby yoder robot. That's reverse engineering nearing something I can do with the baby yoder robot cause harm. Okay I mean this is part of it is thinking about threat modeling. Okay so so I guess I just go for the polycom on some sort of interesting. It has to be something connected to me. Ah Don't you think Sherry. Let's I mean because if you don't then then you're only vectors or physical and the only harms our limit to its its area Ervin Funds. I I say polly kind because so often when there's an interview and somebody says how would you design this. They point to the fun. Because it's the only thing of the room room booker But it's a reasonable thing so if we wanted to hack into a voice over. Ip Speaker phone in order to eavesdrop on Super Company greats. Okay now now how would you do it. Okay well I I'd want to have one. Yes and there's two important things I would want to understand one of which is slightly easier than the other But I would. I would want to understand how it communicates over the network so I want a good understanding of its its network protocol. How calls we set up? How data is is transferred? What those packets look like? So I'd want to observe that with some calls maybe using wire shark and other. TCP Dump and things things like that to get a sense of that to eavesdrop on it. Yeah eavesdrop on all that easy and it has to. It has to expose that. You can't hide right. Those kinds of messages can use us to secure a well. But let's I mean this. Is the path the security hole before jess. Let's assume for a moment that not all the traffic is encrypted from From phone to phone and whether it is or not This is the first thing you look at. You look for the open doors before trying locks right and then the harder it would be you for most things I think like buffer overflow attacks the sort of thing where the first thing you're going to attempt so the first tobacco up a little bit first thing that I would attempt would be to present messages to it that it handles a buggy way so sending any packets or packets with data in that I can exploit some sort of buffer overflow problem But I think in order ready to make that work you kind of need to understand the firmer too right. I mean that is definitely an easier path than just trying all live the possible package the architecture right because if you're going to do a buffer overflow attack a presumably you want to run your own code on so you need to know what the architecture is and then be able to write code for that and so that's actually where I would start is with the question of how would you design it If I want to reverse engineer something I start with okay. What am I looking for? If I have whether it's a baby a robot or a polycom it's how would I do it then you open it up and you look for the things that you expect and then look for the things that you don't you didn't expect and try to figure out what their purposes like. What sort of things well? Well let's say let's say with the polycom on that is on a secure network. I would expect it to have some sort of e prom or flash that is probably spy attached. I would expect it to have Some sort of buffering system and if it hasn't LCD. I would expect some sort groove display buffer probably external to the chip S-ram. Look I mean things. I would look for because it's Ethernet assume ably I would expect to to maybe have an operating system. Maybe not these are pretty cheap not definitely definitely has but that would give me the classic processor. Which would then let me look around the board for what I think the processor might be until I would then take pictures of all the chips and try to figure out what all the chips do? Is this one just an audio decoder or is this actually something else to seems to hardware focused. I is that your post tax. Something another. You've ever done it. That would be my approach because as you said you want to get to the firmware and and the way the easiest way to to to get control of the firmware is to do something like a buffer overflow attack which. I promise we will find soon but to do that. You have to understand what the chip is and you need to have some expectations of what it's doing. Yeah but some of that stuff to me like get bogged down in Codex and stuff. It's not really applicable at the problem. Seems like you'd WanNa focus on where the for more historic how it gets compared to the processor you don't but if I figured it was running. VX works they give me a different surface circa sure. And if I figure out is using this form of Lipsey or that form of Lipsey that gives me a different way to peek in. Maybe I can now look at the Kotal closer so it's a reverse engineering stark with. Yeah without even trying to attack anything for me. It is And then I would also look at you know the things I would use in manufacturing. I love a command line props over cereal. It's just do and so I would look for one and most of those are pretty easy to debugged if you can figure out the bod rate. That's the hardest. It is part. Yeah but that's assuming I mean that's that's kind of the exploration stage Brazil. You're headed toward. I want to remote exploit because it's not I mean it's it's less interesting to to attack things that you have right in front of you. Oh absolutely because I mean if you wanNA break something. A Hammer is much easier than the goal is is definitely a remote attack but if I find out that they do in fact have by flash and they keep their own certificates on it right. I'm almost was there almost not while you're almost done to do what the tickets are going to protect. I guess their communication path. Ah I mean this is all how is it designed it. Does it protect the communication pass to their server and their server uses the same certificates for every polygon on out there. That don't do that Then then yeah that's that's bad. Okay so I've been promising buffer for overflow impre. It's only been five minutes. I think the whole time. So let's talk about about that because one of the primary ways to.

polycom VX Jacob Martinez Christopher White Sherry Australia Kotal Rick Authors Chris Ervin Funds Super Company
"two meter" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"The two meter ham band for emergency capabilities and it's their latest greatest radio with the addition of Bluetooth for example you now have an immense pallets of radio shows and podcasts available from any smart former speaker up to fifty feet away or more you can also use your smart app as a remote control the CC radio three is now the almost everything radio audio quality for the spoken word sounds like the host sitting right next to you it's amazing and if you listen primarily to voice content the CZ radio three's arguably worth the price alone it runs on the included power cold quarters FOR D. size batteries the run for more than a hundred and seventy hours the new CZ radio three as limited availability so take advantage of the order and also get the new annual she green card catalog by calling one eight hundred five two two eight eight six three that's one eight hundred five two two eight eight six three or go online at C. Corrine dot com. gosh waking up over and over to P. is not okay but now you can reduce those night time bathroom trips with the ingredients in super beta prostate P. three advanced we're talking about less surges to P. at night less bathroom trips during the day and better bladder emptying it's like taking three prostate supplements in one you can try a full thirty day bottle of P. three advanced free just pay shipping and handling no strings attached no obligations and no commitments to buy this is a thirty day supply absolutely free call one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six super beta prostate is the best selling brand in major retailers like Walmart but for this no strings attached free bottle you must call now call one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six don't miss out on this unprecedented free offer call one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six. welcome back.

Walmart C. Corrine thirty day seventy hours fifty feet two meter
"two meter" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"The two meter ham band for emergency capabilities and it's their latest greatest radio with the addition of Bluetooth for example you now have an immense pallets of radio shows and podcasts available from any smart former speaker up to fifty feet away or more you can also use your smart app as a remote control the Seishi radio three is now the almost everything radio audio quality for the spoken word sounds like the host sitting right next to you it's amazing and if you listen primarily to voice content the CZ radio three's arguably worth the price alone it runs on the included power cold quarters FOR D. size batteries that run for more than a hundred and seventy hours the new CZ radio three has limited availability so take advantage of the order it also get the new annual she green card catalog by calling one eight hundred five two two eight eight six three that's one eight hundred five two two eight eight six three or go online at C. Corrine dot com. gosh waking up over and over to P. is not okay but now you can reduce those nighttime bathroom trips with the ingredients in super beta prostate P. three advanced we're talking about less surges to P. at night less bathroom trips during the day and better bladder emptying it's like taking three prostate supplements in one you can try a full thirty day bottle of P. three advanced free just pay shipping and handling no strings attached no obligations and no commitments to buy this is a thirty day supply absolutely free call one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six super beta prostate is the best selling brand in major retailers like Walmart but for this no strings attached free bottle you must call now call one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six don't miss out on this unprecedented free offer call one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six. welcome back to coast.

Walmart C. Corrine thirty day seventy hours fifty feet two meter
"two meter" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"two meter" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Band the two meter ham band for emergency capabilities and it's their latest greatest radio with the addition of Bluetooth for example you now have an immense pallets of radio shows and podcasts available from any smart former speaker up to fifty feet away or more you can also use your smart app as a remote control the Seishi radio three is now the almost everything radio audio quality for the spoken word sounds like the host sitting right next to you it's amazing and if you listen primarily to voice content the CZ radio three's arguably worth the price alone it runs on the included power cold quarters for the size batteries the run for more than a hundred and seventy hours the new CZ radio three has limited availability so take advantage of the order and also get the new annual she green card catalog by calling one eight hundred five two two eight eight six three that's one eight hundred five two two eight eight six three or go online at C. Corrine dot com. gosh waking up over and over to P. is not okay but now you can reduce those nighttime bathroom trips with the ingredients in super beta prostate P. three advanced we're talking about less surges to P. at night less bathroom trips during the day and better bladder emptying it's like taking three prostate supplements in one you can try a full thirty day bottle of P. three advanced free just pay shipping and handling no strings attached no obligations and no commitments to buy this is a thirty day supply absolutely free call one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six super beta prostate is the best selling brand in major retailers like Walmart but for this no strings attached free bottle you must call now call one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six don't miss out on this unprecedented free offer call one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six one eight hundred three nine four four nine one six. welcome back to coast.

Walmart C. Corrine thirty day seventy hours fifty feet two meter
"two meter" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"two meter" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Lower two meters away from the place of the it's like people wanting that and it's funny because we we want the date the reception the recession we want they Hey I kind of want us to slow down maybe have time I felt a little bit right maybe I can't afford the new car hold off until things are good but things are okay I'm not gonna have a real issue you know unemployment's not gonna go to fifteen percent so I could be like two thousand eight we just want to slow down enough that we get this guy out here and then once he's got killed off will head again and I'll be fine you don't always get what you won't you may get the recession that you deserve that it is something to think about in saying all of that though when you talk to economist they'll tell you things like this I would say the first thing you should do is just not panic I know that's a little difficult but do the volatility has been great lately but if you look at the last two days were kind and near where we started the second thing is these are the types of things that play out over a few days if we're still in the same situation in a couple of days you may have to make some decisions yeah TV America Ameritrade JJ Kanada right there guy gets it smart to so you take a deep breath emotions can get **** all kinds of crazy things but it is funny it's like we're talking ourselves into something because based on the fact that we that's where we are in our political tribalism I'm not going to beat you with ideas I'm not I'm not going to beat you potentially with Wallace so now I want to be sure my third thing potentially as I hope we go in do arise like okay wow sure three two three five three twenty four twenty three that's events show is told where an Instagram feel free to Twitter and Instagram add us speaking of recession speaking of money speaking of expenses this I found to be crazy so they've got the twenty five like what it would cost for a two bedroom apartment lost the country how much that cost so if you want to live in a two bedroom whether it's Memphis or whether it's San Francisco what is that going to cost you and what is the medium income you'll need to afford said thanks so Memphis Hey under fourteen Bucks average two bedroom apartment you need an income about thirty four thousand dollars year right Phoenix twelve hundred fifty Bucks two bedroom annual income made about fifty three Jacksonville thirteen a box fifty four thousand right then you start getting into certain things restart look around because like okay okay what what what else we got going on here Dallas eighteen under fifty Bucks average two bedroom apartment that's what it's gonna cost you there but eighty thousand dollar income need about.

thirty four thousand dollars eighty thousand dollar fifteen percent two meters two days
"two meter" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

07:11 min | 2 years ago

"two meter" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Here. Jason lex. Don McLean is back. Thanks again to sunny for filling in last week. She so good. I I love the Sanni. My husband, Colin was very funny. He's like she is beautiful said. Yeah. Yeah. He hadn't seen her. If I go. Yes. And she's very talented. Oh, speaking of talent, Don McLean. Nice. Dawn mcclain. I don't get jealous. You the only woman for me. You're the only woman for me. Don was at a men's prison band. Just say no lex had your back because I kept forgetting to say abandoned men's prison lex had to keep reminding everyone that you weren't just walking willy nilly around a men's prison, lex keep going jas. It's abandoned and yes, you're right. It's a Bandon. Yeah. Okay. So set the table what the hell were you doing? Well, I'm on twin cities paranormal society, I'm a member of a paranormal team and some of us wanted to have a fun trip to this abandoned men's prison. They do. Yes. It's West Virginia penitentiary, it was shut down in one thousand nine hundred ninety five because it was seen as cruel and unusual the seltzer only five foot seven, and when you see that in person, it is just I can't believe that would put three prisoners in there. Yeah. So there's a toilet and a sink in. Then there are three. So they have a bunk. But then one guy because it was so overcrowded they'd have a guy on the floor and his head had to be up against the toilet. 'cause the tour guide told us you can't have your head near the back like where where the great is to the hallway because you could get stabbed in the head. So you have to sit with sleep with your next. Look, it's crazy. Am I found out that Castlerock on Hulu was all filmed there? It's Shawshank in Castle Rock seriously. Yes bills were yes. Yes. You have to look through some of my pictures jail door. Yep. We saw some of and everything. Yeah. So yeah. I had a great time. I mean, it was really fun. It was very productive as far as paranormal stuff goes were already getting. We're listening to our audio. And we've already got stuff I knew we were going to get all. Yeah. We have these K two meters which registers electromagnetic fields, which is those spike whenever things are around. It's basically something a contractor would use and go around and look for electric city and in the walls like, okay, where's the wiring? These will like it it'll answer. Yeah. She's not looking for studs. Well, maybe let's say make this move. And it'll go up and go to the reds. So that's how we know something is there, and in particular there was there's one cell that read this guy named red haunts. And he was the most notorious prisoner there. He had a lot of people killed in the prison. He killed people. And then he was killed. So he died in one thousand nine hundred eighty two his cell is very haunted in the minute. I stepped in there, my meter that goes off, and nobody else is just like bam hitting red seriously. You walked in. Do you like me, and it just went bam way up into the red girl handling some of that you want to some of that dawn accents. And then here's a funny moment in another area. That's it was all it's all caged in. It's called the Alamo because it was for the most violent of prisoners at even like had grading on top of it. In there. There's a shower. And so I was like I'm going to get in the shower and see what happens. And so it's like. In the shower, and I had my flashlight on the table in the minute. I walked in there. I'm like, hey, I'm in the shower. What do you think of that guys? Hey and immediately that flashlight went off and it was shining on me by itself. And then I'm like, oh you like me in the shower hot. And then it just started blinking. We have all that on tape. My gosh, you're teasing goes like Strobe ING, and I'm like, oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. One of the coolest thing is that our tour guide was a guard there. So he actually worked there when he was open. And he was telling stories about you know, people right in front of him getting stabbed. He was telling the story, and I already. Have this chuckling in the background on tape where somebody's laughing about it. He really, yeah. As he's telling you. Ghost laughing snickering in the background for about twenty seconds. And I know it's not. Like asking questions, we were very solemn during this time, nobody was laughing. Nobody none of us would have laughed at that. And so that's just one little itty bitty part. I haven't even gotten to the night-time stuff yet. During the day the tour. Okay. So you were there overnight you guys just tuned in don's telling us about her ghost adventures at the prison used in Hulu Castle Rock where was it again, West Virginia mounds Ville, West Virginia, it's called the West Virginia penitentiary, some people just call it mounds Ville, so you're there overnight. Yeah. So yeah. What did you? So what takes place overnight? Well, basically, we got another like a mini tour. We got to go into the data. We took a detour just with some other people. So we could get the layout of where we were going to go and sort of plan out. And then at night, we got another mini tour by a guy who he's another paranormal investigator, and he that's like his home base. That's where he gives the tourism. He's the tour guide. And so we got to go up. We got to go up into the psych ward. That's where a lot of stuff happens. Things have been thrown there. You know, you just get a lot of activity. This guy had a battery thrown out him. He has a sound like a gunshot up there on an EP. A lot of great voices come through. So my other team members are super excited. They've already gotten a bunch of stuff. They've gotten a little bit further listening to their evidence. There were four view. How does that work at night when you are the owners there's so much ground to cover? Good question. Let's gather do you separate when you're in the cell you lay down in one of the bunk. I I mean, I did. Yeah. I mean, we we have plans to separate. But once you get in there. It's a little. Yeah. I mean, I was like I want to be in here by myself red cell. So we separated into different cells in we were asking questions and seen what I mean. I got the most attention. I'll tell you that right now. My my.

Don McLean Jason lex West Virginia Hulu West Virginia penitentiary Castle Rock Bandon Colin Dawn mcclain Strobe ING Castlerock investigator twenty seconds two meters five foot
"two meter" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"two meter" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ecosystems in myanmar threatened by deforestation projects underway to use drones to plant millions of mangroves in coastal regions and that should help to restore populations of fish and guard against damage from hurricanes the social enterprise received funding from venture called the bridge built a challenge a year ago so twelve months on let's see how they're getting on arena federico is cofounder of bio carbon engineering which is the organization behind it all and to start with then irena i guess this is a project in two stages partly it's dropping seedpods from the drones to generate new manned grades but i i guess you need to use the jones to survey the area so you know you need today we buy carbon engineering developed a solution that works in two stages so the first stage is the mapping drawn and the mapping drone extracts the data about the environment and it's not just your normal aerial pictures taken but it's also different sensors so we could look different things like the biomass we can determine the best locations the plant and this map informs the plant in parton that is dan automatically downloaded into our plant in drone so that to make sure that go in plant in the best locations possible the most suitable seeds in the best time and then the planting drawn otemachi flies two meters of the ground and fires by degradable seat roy keiser say the main thing is it knows where they seedpods based on the surveys that a previous spaces squadron of drones have produced but the in terms.

myanmar jones roy keiser twelve months two meters
"two meter" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"two meter" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"I'm gonna throw francs box and their k two meters all these things are no different than a week before they they registered monitoring communicate back and we really need to be sensible about ourselves and we use those tools to learn up next keith an irri pennsylvania hello keith go ahead sir either arch suit thing stumble one you should bring your showed eerie pennsylvania further down the road second of all thank you all the time we know that yeah tommy though of this one when i was when i was a child how the garage sale at my whole house and someone don't either we you board don't balked bond a burning thing and then a couple of hours later my joints stiffened up with almost like we're mortars for arthritis you will be accurate and just wondering bye bye destroying one of these we'd you'd boards it might just asking for trouble are supposed to burn it karen if you're going to dispose it no no no listen cocky boy's dog pay will take him off your lap on okay okay that's that's the joke but it's true we will we will we will get the fourth mewin and and take care of them 'cause this is the deal um uh fourth are made on mason that are not going to burn people talking a lot of i'm not yeah you just they just don't burn they've they've just so hard to you can't you can't burn bricks right say is the same thing okay so um no nothing have to happen illicitly you did burn aboard it doesn't have to happen again what happens to us we we are such powerful beams it has nothing to do with the board has to do with our beliefs if we believe we're going to have some of these results from using a just a chunk of may cider would or cardboard we will we we talk about the idiot motor or talk about you know subconscious we we can programmer so i would say if you ever get any situation like that where you think the boards happy something to you i would try to find a way to undo it what i mean by that is i was do i would do cleansing i would do say gene i would look at myself and say what can i do to.

keith tommy mason the deal programmer two meters
"two meter" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"two meter" Discussed on WJR 760

"To save lives and today it's a very sad day for nevada it's a very sad day for las vegas uh but if anything good came out of this is that i saw humanity i saw a community come together i saw strangers helping strangers and saving lives as i do want to say thank you to the sheriff at two metre police uh to firefighters the doctors nurses and everybody who has worked entirely to save lives at this precise moment i know we're going to get through this inner city will be stronger thank you so much now we understand that the eric paddocks press conference was delayed and the so we switched over to las vegas and all that that's being talked about out there uh let's go back to the da's office las vegas now actually at this concert close to the stake and i've spoken to both of them this morning and they're pretty rattled they're pretty shaken up uh this was a horrific of them to say the least this is a class at gut wnd this is a a weapon in a man of mass destruction what i'm pleased so much about is how this doesn't involve politics in the sense of republican or democrat we are here all of us or nevada's and i'm very proud to be present with the other leaders here because we're working together to get through this want to thank sheriff lombardo for your leadership in leading us through this terrible terrible day thank you i will continue with more coverage of las vegas says uh we adjust on the fly her on the frank beckmann show right now quarter till the hour let's check wjr's traffic and weather first on the fives with mark mitchell wjr traffic first a little slow on.

las vegas eric paddocks nevada sheriff lombardo frank beckmann mark mitchell two metre
"two meter" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"two meter" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"After great disasters now at the site we had already man how it was living pets wishes well slide their would've been thousands of people buried i've lived in work to court affair and you can see this before after he doesn't the bleeding pettis northwest with within fell flesh for and after when we first night we could get so many high ranking officials and and the lead let me put into perspective for you what was taken imagine a two metre by two metre area full of confidence jewelry an incredible statue of that multiply that kind of over a thousand that's what was taken so we started work magically rector mohammed yes approach million said we must work at this one particular cam it's been attack by littered if we don't do anything they'll be back or side read but i think we find anything i thought of that are so stolen everything well we started to find the most incredible release look at the painting is just stunning we started finding engraved inscription and even the totals of the two minor titles like over see your of the army over here to treasuring you can have hope maybe just maybe we would find his name for the action ejection having their game last fraternity with their bowl and then when that disappeared yeah in the end of the two minor in fit right now here and hard work.

army pettis rector mohammed two metre