35 Burst results for "Two Hundred Years"

The Positives and Negatives of Investing Your Money in gold

Optimal Finance Daily

04:50 min | 5 d ago

The Positives and Negatives of Investing Your Money in gold

"The positives and negatives of investing your money in gold by Robert Farrington of the college investor Dot Com. Do you remember all the hype around gold in the not. So distant past from two thousand, seven to two thousand eleven. The value of an ounce of gold went from about five hundred dollars to eighteen hundred dollars. If you would have purchased gold in two, thousand seven, you would have nearly quadrupled your investment in just five years. Now, that is one heck of an investment. Around this time I also pronounced that you shouldn't buy gold and it received a lot of criticism in more recent years. Gold has settled back down to around thirteen hundred dollars and sometimes slightly less than that. So hopefully, you took my advice, but the question still remains in the back of people's minds. Would it be wise to invest in gold right now? At, its current price gold is worth five hundred dollars less than its previous high. So one would think that an increase in value could be on the horizon. Here's what you really need to know about the pros and cons of investing in gold. Pros of investing in gold. In my opinion, there are three major pros when it comes to gold investment one, it's equality hedge against a down market to it will still have value of paper currency inflates and three. There is an apparent upside to its value versus years. One Gold is a quality hedge against a down market. As we all saw in two thousand seven when the stock market took a dive everyone began putting their faith in gold instead with the higher demand in gold and with a limited supply. The price of gold went up massively within the next couple of years we may witness another steep downmarket, which may again increase the value of gold. Two Gold we'll still have. Value Paper currency inflates. Local currencies constantly fluctuate against foreign currencies. It's the way of the world policies are in place to hold currency steady, but they're not always foolproof once a currency begins to make a downward spiral it can be very difficult to stop severe inflation, which of course, decreases our purchasing power. Is often the more solid option for currency since there's a finite amount of this precious metal if you have gold, then you're likely to hold on to more of your overall worth than someone that is put all of their faith in the banks and paper currency. Three, there is an apparent upside to the value of gold. As I stated before gold was once at eighteen hundred dollars but now rests at value of less than thirteen hundred. If there's a slight blip in our economy that sends fear through the nation, then gold could easily spike back to eighteen hundred mark. It no longer seems far fetched because after all the value has already been there before. Cons of investing in gold. I used to be a huge advocate of gold and silver investing but my opinions on this investment technique have changed largely because of these cons. One Gold has a terrible historical return. If you went back two hundred years and put ten thousand dollars in gold ten, thousand in bonds and ten thousand stocks, which of these investments would come out on top. Well, if you're smart, you would probably not choose gold to be the top investment but the astonishing part about this is how poorly it actually performed versus the stocks and bonds. Here are the values of your investments after two hundred. Years. Old Twenty six thousand dollars bonds eight million dollars stocks five point six, billion dollars. Based on the historical returns gold is a lousy investment. To Gold is worthless if things get really bad. As a pro, we stated that gold is a great hedge against the dollar inflating, which causes us to lose our purchasing power. This is true. But what if the currency becomes absolutely worthless and we all have to resort to trading goods to survive what value is gold at that point? Well, let's see me certainly can't eat gold. So it is of little value for that purpose and you really can't make anything easily out of gold either. So there really isn't any value they're pretty much at this point your gold nuggets in bars are only as valuable as Iraq because he might be able to throw it at something and kill it. Three gold only earns you money when you sell it. The biggest con of investing in gold in my opinion. Oh and Warren Buffett's is that it produces you absolutely nothing when you own it. If you want to grow truly wealthy than you want to buy an asset that produces a passive income while you own it so that you can then by other assets that make you even more wealthy. Warren started doing this as a boy. When he bought a hunk of land, he knew the land would increase in value but the truly great part is investment was that he could earn an income each year from the local farmer that wanted to rent his land after a few years of Rental Income Warren Kundun reinvest his money into even more land and do this over and over again, this method allowed him to buy assets that gained in value, but also gave him income while he owned them.

Warren Buffett Robert Farrington Iraq
Voting Mechanisms And AI

Data Skeptic

04:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Voting Mechanisms And AI

"Steven Hi I'm professor RTP OF MATHEMATICS AT USC University of Southern California Excellent, and tell me a little bit about your general interest within mathematics. Before we get into the particular paper, I wanted to talk to you about a few different topics generally speaking probability probability generally construed its relation to computer science in particular theoretical computer science. Would we wind up somewhere near what is it Polynot mealtime? Generators. I don't know about a number. Generous. Followed meal time things more specifically clavo problem that can't be solved in polynomial time, and then you WANNA approximated solution in USA. How well can approximate? How can I prove that? This is the best. You can do things like that under the general category of hardness of approximation suppose why knowing lot of those cases you have one benefit may be many but benefiting a lot of problems. Like that is you can tell if a solution is valid or you have some function you're trying to optimize for I. Don't know if the same is true in voting. Is there a global way that we'd all agree that the outcomes are good or the processes? Good. Maybe that's a good way to get into your topic designing stable elections. Exactly. I mean there's a lot of A. Link to Wikipedia Pedia page somewhere it's a table and it has a list of desirable properties voting methods and there's at least maybe ten or twenty cents properties and it's impossible to have all the desirable properties no matter which voting method you have there's always gonna be some that has some that a dozen but the one property that myself and many other people who focus is how can the voting method be protected from corruption and that could be mostly what people in this community of worked on is looking at random vote corruption. So everybody cast their vote and then Tyson with some small probability they will randomly. Change some votes, and then the question is which method best preserves the election's outcome. So that's the quantity that you want to say maximize. You want to maximize the probability that the voting method preserves the outcome. When you compare the original outcome to the outcome after the votes have been corrupted one quantity, you can try to maximize very interesting. I definitely want to come back and talk more about corruption but you've got me intrigued with those properties and I know there's many of them may be I don't WanNA put your memory test, but could you talk about one or two and maybe discuss you know a Controversy around them or why they're important that sort of thing. Yes. There's a bunch one desirable property of voting method is that it doesn't succumb to the spoiler effect as we know, the Electoral College does. So how can we think about this spoiler effect the main let's change the names to some ancient name. So we don't have to deal with political of discussion in the moment, but let's say we ran election whatever two hundred whatever years ago, and there's George Washington running, and there's also a clone of George Washington running as candidates and I some third candidate on the. Fact factor means the fact that two of these clone George Washington running while people who originally if there just one George Washington, they'll just vote for that first one but two of them you'd imagine you know the original George Washington Supporters A. Vote First Josh Attendance on my vote for Evil George Washington or whatever you call the second one. So the fact that the original supporters of the person gets split between the two separate candidates we know an electoral college that means that it decreases the chance of either one of them winning, and for example, I think a last election cycle Bloomberg said, I'm not gonNA run as an independent because of this effect, you can steal votes away from someone in a sense and it can. Ruin the chance of say some candidate that may be you kind of support or something. So that's a desirable property of voting method that some of them have and some of them don't doesn't have the spoiler effect. That's that's what you are. There mechanisms than the can eliminate things like that. How do we build something like that into voting framework one voting method that avoids this it's become popular to certain people you know on the perfect voting with, but it's called instant runoff voting so. Different than what we're used to thinking about your vote is no longer just your favorite candidate. It's like a ranked list of candidates like for example on. Once going back two hundred years or something maybe your first choice most preferred candidates George Washington may be your second most preferred candidate is out in. Alexandria. Hamilton third most preferred candidate Harriet Tubman or something I don't know every single person makes list of preferred candidates and they all get submitted into whatever the election methods, which is song way of taking all those votes and just saying, okay, here's the winner and so one I think mentioned already one. Popular ranked choice voting method is called instant runoff voting on I believe it's used in Australia might even be used this coming election cycle in I'm not entirely sure but anyway so the important thing is this voting method does not have these spoiler effect

George Washington Usc University Of Southern Cal Alexandria Steven Professor Harriet Tubman Australia Tyson Usa. Hamilton Bloomberg Josh Attendance
Growing Food And Community: Urban Farming Institute, Boston

Cultivating Place

06:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Growing Food And Community: Urban Farming Institute, Boston

"Describe how you came to be President and CEO of the Urban Farming Institute and how long You have been there before we get into its history and mission. Well, I was actually the first employed. There was a grant that the board had put together to to get the first director in that, and that was me and. I don't know it certainly was not actually because of my gardening abilities. So that came accurate to friends of mine that were on the board they were looking for someone that for all intensive purposes was a jack-of-all-trades I think could do fundraising marketing presentations, little bit of everything, and that was me, and so that is what this particular job did need So that's actually how I came on board. In the beginning and what year was that March, Fourth of two thousand fourteen, right so give us the history of urban farming institute. Where is it? Why is it urban farming institute? Really an admission then the mission today is really the same is to develop and promote urban farming to engage individuals neighbors in growing food and building a healthier community, but also within that mission is to teach. Adults to become urban farmers. So that's really a key component of our mission as well, and we do that by running a full fought farm operation in in the in the urban farming institute. So where is that exactly and what do the physical facilities and and site? Consists of and look like. The Urban Farming Institute is growing on approximately six farm sites in there really micro farm sites in Boston we're talking about ten twelve, thirteen, thousand square feet so so we do very intensive farming and there's a certain skill set that that must be learned to do this type of farming. You've got to do all crop rotation each year irrigation systems are a little bit different. It's a different entity when you're doing this inside a city we also two years ago in April two, thousand, eighteen with wonderful partners historic Boston Inc we were able to restore. A beautiful farm site, it was a farm. Two hundred years ago it was three hundred, thirty, acre farm, in Boston. So back in the day. So the original house dates back to seventeen, eighty, six, the barn. Dates back to eighteen, thirty seven. So we were able to. Completely restore this wonderful facility. It has become our headquarters and has basically we call it the hub of urban farming. In Boston and Boston itself the city has been wonderful to us many of the thought leaders of our organization and this goes back to two thousand eleven two, thousand ten worked with the city of Boston to develop a program to basically legalize urban farming in Boston for us. It's called article eighty nine, and now people can legally far. We were the test case. The city of Boston allow us to work on Similan to see you know this urban farming thing real can it really be done and since then we've had a wonderful relationship are farm. The garrison trotter farm was actually the first legal farm under article eighty nine. So our board, our staff is extremely diverse. The majority people of Color on as well as our board and we're all working on a mission to build a healthier community to create economic opportunity becoming becoming far entrepreneurs. To provide training so that folks leave us are able to work in other food related businesses and then just creating a culture throughout our city a culture of eating a healthy manner. And also in our area as we, we often lack a key supermarkets. So this is another way through our farm stands that we can really feed folks really good nutritious food no chemicals no pesticides all done freshly. So. As these neighborhoods became residential as the city grew and developed out, it was a zoning issue that would have made. A business of farming Rog illegal. Okay. I'm with you tell us any history you can of how the original board formed around this idea that they saw as a gap in these these neighborhoods well, it all actually, there wasn't distinct starting point here the story we often tell one of our board members who Had a wonderful business called city fresh foods. was always concerned about a folks eating a healthy meal and having healthy vegetables and good food, and how can we get get that two people? So they do a lot of work with. Kind of meals on wheels, food elders of Institutional meals, etc, and the bottom line was as he was walking to work one day in Roxbury. He was actually going through many vacant lots on his way to work and the idea went through his head. Why do I have to order MIC Salad Greens from California Why can't why can't I just use these vacant lots in actually grow food for the business. You know and and clean up the lots and it's a better thing for the environment and that's kind of that's a piece of the impetus that started all of this and so he and many other thought leaders certainly got together and you know work with our state legislature etc and that's how article eighty nine came about and again as I said. The city was able to Allow us at that time to work on a couple of vacant lots just to see if this experiment would work and yes.

Urban Farming Institute Boston Boston Inc President And Ceo Director Roxbury California
Welcome to the USA

This Week in Travel

04:22 min | Last month

Welcome to the USA

"Hottest temperature perhaps ever recorded certainly the the best the highest verify temperature on the planet earth was this week in death valley in Furnace Creek. Where they got a temperature of one hundred and thirty degrees Fahrenheit or I think it was fifty four point one degrees, Celsius. Which is Crazy to hunt. Every. So often they have these these heat waves that come through valley, and so there was always a news team there and they try to fry an egg in a frying pan. Just. Left out in the Sun. And I just before we got on I was watching CNN try to do this and it actually didn't really work. They had like a black frying pan and they cracked an egg and like some of the white parts of the egg started to cook and that was it. Needs to get harder than I think. Maybe we we cook we cook eggs on the honor of cars in the outback Australia. Come on. That's the whole. On the WHO'D I believe that I absolutely believe that that is something that that would be done in the outback and lift game devali come on. In. Don't. Live up to your name. Here's the question. Gary. Is EVERY TIME You know a record like this sat I mean it's like, okay, that's interesting. But is there a larger context? You get half the people out there? Who will say, Hey, look it's global warming. It's hotter than it's ever been. Or is it just that every? So often the earth rotates a certain way in a cloud goes a certain direction or a butterfly flaps, its friggin wings or whatever, and it's just happens to be really hot I mean. Is this one of those things that happens in everybody has to make thing out of it will one way or the other. I think you look at average temperatures if you wanNA global warming just so you know we talk about this being the hottest temperature. As far as I could tell, the hottest temperature ever recorded was in death valley and one hundred and thirty, four back in one thousand, nine, hundred, thirteen. So I can't quite figure out why everybody's reporting. This is the highest temperature ever and then even sometimes in that article saying since. Like, you can't be ever. In the same article let yeah. Yeah, that's that's why we used to have something called journalism was actually check out those facts but I think just things that you've always been into journalism even where the person writing the headline is not the person writing the story. Right, there's a reason. It's because the temperature is was not really well verified in. There was a lot of doubt because it was nine thirteen and there were other temperatures in the region that kind of put it in doubt and there were other high temperatures. Like there was one in Libya from like over one hundred years ago and another one from. Iran that were both called into question. Because of the readings and the Russian judge. Exactly. Like there, there are all these records for the oldest human and the tallest human. Sure. And if you go back in time, there are people that claim Oh there were nine feet tall and they live to be two hundred years old and then you check up on, it's like bowel not really and I think a lot of it is that that we just have better. Ability to measure the stuff now, and so this temperature is if if if it's not the highest, it's certainly the highest that they can verify to a great deal of certain. Some curious that hundred and thirty degree day. What was the low for the day on? Fifteen. Oh, probably, much lower than that because death valley is so arid. Yeah. So here, for instance, we're doing of really close to one hundred degrees. Our lows are going to be probably in the sixties. It's extreme. Yes. That's pretty typical for us because we just don't have the humidity and death valley even a little less humid than we are. Yeah I've actually experienced temperatures close to this twice. In Australia. In Ethiopia in the depression, which is a lot like death valley, and then once in Australia I was. visited. Who in the middle of the summer and it was close to fifty degrees. Celsius it was. Right he'd it wasn't bad if you're in the shade and had a fan on.

Death Valley Australia CNN Ethiopia Gary Furnace Creek Libya Iran
Where did they go

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:23 min | 2 months ago

Where did they go

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries. I'm your host kid chrome by popular demand I'm revisiting the issue of vanishing 's. Where did they go the roanoke colonists Amelia. EARHART would a Percy Fawcett vanishing in search for the city of Z. can anything truly vanished in this world, the great vanishing people and things Amelia. EARHART disappeared over the Pacific. There's no doubt that she crash landed or ditched her plane. And of course the question remains why she captured by the Japanese did she and and. Her navigator starved to death on a remote island, but she didn't vanish in the true sense of the word, the question simply what happened to her. In contrast, we have the vanishing of flight nineteen, a group of maybe bombers disappeared during postwar training mission. Now they vanished. No oil slicks no wreckage. The five planes it made up the nineteen. None were ever recovered no trace. A search team dispatched to look for them disappeared, but there was an oil slick in wreckage in. In an explosion was noted the five TM's vanished. The rescue team disappeared by ask a question again. Can anything actually vanished from this world? Let's look again. The Franklin expedition that set sail in eighteen, forty, five with two ships in search of the northwest passage. Now there's an incident that disappeared in the Arctic and were considered lost for two hundred years, perhaps vanished, but the two ships, nearly forty crew, simply vanishing was considered a big mystery, almost as big as Amelia earhart recently. Recently, both ships were discovered as well as many of the graves of the crew yet in the eighteen eighties. We have a bride and groom riding in a wagon. The ten miles from bake of Oregon across follow simply vanish. Their progress has been monitored, and when they didn't arrive at the ranch across hollow where they were to wed a month long search was put on an and not a trace was found not of the horses, the wagon or the bride and groom. That I. my point is that people and things do vanish, but do they vanish from this world. The question is addressed by Professor Vincent Pool he stays did Albert Einstein that there are multiple dimensions, but professor pool believes that there are not only many dimensions, but I in there every evolution they are similar to Earth and they are connected to our dimension by what he calls umbilical connections, and that an individual can easily pass through one of these umbilical connections and seemingly vanish. He also spouses a theory that the reason that we have no contact with you. Outside of our atmospheres of flying saucers or flying unidentified flying objects come from another dimension Professor Pool Sites Fifteenth, century issue between Spanish conquistadors and a priest in ancient village of Crisco, where a priest racing ahead of the Spanish invasion took a gold disc from a church, and ran into the Higher Markelle mountains for upon he met to Shaman who took the disc impressed into rock face that opened the door to another dimension. Sounds like a nice story, right? Yet. There is a place in the higher mountains were stone face has been etched, and a small seemingly pressed into stone at the center of that small door. There is a indentation that circular. That is the same size as the disc taken by the priest when he fled the Spanish. Pool claims this represents the. Into another dimension, so do people and things vanish before you scoff at the idea. Take a trip to Peru. The high remark mountains and try to explain the small door the disc indentation. They're gonNA. Decide and if you can't make the trip, we'll google it up. It's an interesting part of the issue of can things vanish

Amelia Professor Vincent Pool Earhart Amelia Earhart Higher Markelle Mountains Percy Fawcett Google Roanoke Oregon Professor Pacific Peru Arctic Albert Einstein
Fat Phobia and It's Racist Past and Present

Short Wave

12:18 min | 2 months ago

Fat Phobia and It's Racist Past and Present

"As a teen Sabrina strings loved getting to hang out with her grandma even when her grandma was obsessing over one of her soap operas I remember one time. She called me into the living room and she's like Sabrina look at Victoria. McCoy's kept on young and the restless. Victoria is killing herself to him. Why are white women dying to be thin? Fast forward to one three adult Sabrina was working at an HIV medication adherence clinic in San, Francisco, where she witnessed real life, examples of women sacrificing their health to be thin nights, spoken to a couple of women both HIV positive who refused to take their HIV medications for fear of gaining weight, and that blew my mind, and immediately took me back to conversations I've been having with my grandma like gosh onto something so important you know when she was talking about it, she saw it as largely a white phenomenon, but the women I interviewed that day. We're both color. Why were these women dying to be thin and did race have anything to do with? Him. Sabrina went on to become a sociologist at the University of California Irvine and wrote a whole book investigating these questions. If you're like me, you might have assumed that. There was some moment in between Marilyn Monroe. TWIGGY EH in which. Suddenly we'll. We suddenly became fat-phobic in those three years, but Sabrina started digging looking at nineteenth century magazines like Harper's bazaar in what she found was troubling articles warning American women well middle class and upper class white women. They needed to watch what they eat, and they were unapologetic, and stating that this was the proper form for. Jackson Protestant women, and so it was important that women eight as little as necessary in order to show their Christian nature and also their racial superiority. Today on the show we go all the way back to the transatlantic slave trade to understand the racial origins of fat phobia, and how black people are still dealing with the consequences today? I mattie Safai and this is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. So Sabrina. Let's let's get into what you discovered about the history of fat phobia a little bit you. You did a ton of research and you started the story several centuries back in Europe definitely in the ethos that like Renaissance Women. you know we're full figured. And that was absolutely a thing that was valued, and then there was a big shift explain what was going on back then so it turns out that the growth of the slave trade, especially by the eighteenth century led to new articulations of what types of appearance we could expect of people by different races, and also what types of behaviors. Such that by the middle of Eighteenth Century, a lot of French philosophers in particular were arguing that you know what when we're in the colonies, we're noticing that Africans are sensuous. They love sex and they love food, and for this reason they tend to be too fat. Europeans have rational self control. This is what makes us the premier race of the world, so in terms of body. Body size, we should be slender, and we should watch what we eat so okay Sabrina. Are you telling me that? When the slave trade started and European saw that African women were essentially curvy much like European women at the time at that point, they decided that being fat being thicker wasn't ideal anymore, and they built a system of oppression around this idea of needing to be. Thinned to prove racial superiority is at eight am I close. It's not quite as intentional as that. Effectively what they determined was that. You know we want it to be able to have a mechanism for ensuring that we could recognize who was slave, and it was free right, and it was easy in the beginning of the was simply skin color. What did you might imagine? After two hundred years of living in close proximity skin color really no longer works has a mechanism right, because now we have all of these people who are We would consider them today to be by racial, and so what they did was they decided to articulate new aspects of racial identity and so eating and body size became of the characteristics that were being used to suggest that these are people who do not deserve freedom. The trans, Atlantic slave trade eventually ended, but argues that we are still absolutely living with these racist attitudes about body size today. And in her book, she also traces how these anti-fat attitudes worked their way into modern medicine for somewhat arbitrarily, reasons for example take BMI or body mass index. That equation actually wasn't intended to be used to measure individual fatness. Though of course doctors did and still do today, can you? Can you explain the problem with using am I as a measure for obesity especially when it comes to black women, who I know have been told that they have the highest rates of obesity according to that measurement to be am I. Yes, so am. I is a measure of the ratio of a person's weight to their height. And what this does not account for is bone density. Muscular already any other type of genetic influences in your way or cultural environmental influences in your weight, and so, what ended up happening? As many people pointed out is that you might have to people with the same BMI, but vastly different life experiences embody compositions outside of the simple reality of their weight to height ratio, right, and the problem of applying this to them in particular, is that African American populations as studies have shown for literal decades since at least the eighties tends to be healthier at heavier weights than white populations. And so that already is an indication that cross racially. This is not a very useful tool, not to mention the fact that even within race there are going to be vastly different experiences, of an individual body between like their weight and their health profile so surreal this message from the medical establishment that excess weight is the biggest you know reason for black women's health problems or a very central of it. Why do you see it as so damaging? For Black Women, ultimately, the main advice that people are given when they so called obese is to lose weight, and there are so many problems with this. We have been telling people to lose weight for decades. What ends up happening is that they either don't lose the weight or they sometimes do lose the weight, and then frequently gain it back so first off. It could be more harmful to tell people to lose weight in the long run, and then in addition to that there are the psychological effects of telling people that their bodies are wrong. Right at their bodies are inherently unhealthy This type of fat stigma also leads to health outcomes right right right, so let's talk about this. In the context of covid nineteen I'm thinking about the recent New York Times op Ed you wrote about how cove nineteen is disproportionately impacting. Impacting people of Color specifically black people, and how you took issue with obesity, gaining traction as a leading explanation for that disparity, so talked me a little bit about that. This piece was actually motivated by something that I felt was very troubling, which was I had been seeing so many report, suggesting that the disparities in Colbert outcomes between white populations and black populations. They would say things like well. You know there's already the pre existing factor of obesity, and somehow that was one of the first things that come up and I thought there is very little evidence that disparities in quote unquote obesity are what's contributing to these negative outcomes, but there's plenty of evidence to suggest that Kobe. Fatalities or maybe even serious complications with Kobe nineteen are being influenced by people's environments. Are they essential workers? Do they have access to enough soap and water hand sanitizer, and so of course might imagine that the ability to socially distance to shelter in place to have access to healthy foods under Corinthian, all of this is very much being structured by a person's social location and black people tend to live in communities without access. Access to a lot of different healthy and life giving resources. Yeah, in in Sabrina, I'll tell you that as a person that reads a lot of the literature on Kovin prisoner biologists I am seeing a lot of papers coming out that are associating with the obesity without with health outcomes of COVID, but those links tend to be correlated right, but even if we were to find out that there's absolutely a causal link. Link between covert and obesity which I think you're arguing. There isn't one especially right now. At least the rates of obesity and white and black populations aren't actually that different right like it wouldn't necessarily be the thing that made it. So can you tell me a little bit about those rates versus the actual percentage of disparities? We're seeing so according to the CDC, the Obesity Twain. African, American and white populations are. Are Forty two point, two percent for white populations and forty nine point, seven percents for black populations are about that and so we're looking at effectively a seven percentage point disparity between white and black populations in terms of rates of obesity, however, when we're looking at serious complications with covert nineteen. What we're seeing is that black people are dying at rates of two point four to seven times that of white populations. How that's seven percentage point differential is leading to two point four to seven times the disparity in serious complications. Death. No one's really being able to explain that. This is the problem with the kind of cords of studies, which is that they lead people to believe that somehow. Is One of the drivers when in fact it could simply be a confounding in these studies, but we're so used to studying obesity and treating these correlations as if they are evidence of causal link that people are frequently not being very critical when they're seeing studies that show these relationships. Sabrina, you've obviously spent years by now working to understand this issue and to educate folks about it I'm wondering you know like why why this. Why have you specifically taken this on one of the reasons? Why continue to do it? Is I've seen what a difference? It's made to people's lives. I mean I've had so many people reach out and tell me that they felt for the longest time like something was wrong, but no one was talking about it or that I have spoken to their personal experience. I couldn't have imagined when I started doing this work. That could have possibly had the impact that it's had you know I'm standing on the shoulders of giants people who have been feminist scholars medical scholars journalists who've been doing this work at least since the nineteen seventies, but we're at a moment right now where there's a critical mass of people who are aware that the discourse surrounding fatness that we've long accepted really is baseless, and we think about a new way of allowing people to have a positive relationship to their bodies, and to cultivate health within themselves and their communities that does not rely on that stigma. Okay Sabrina I appreciate you. Thank you so much for coming on the show and sharing your life and your work with us. I really appreciate it. Thank you so much. It's been a pleasure. Sabrina strings. Her book is called fearing the black body the racial origins

Sabrina Obesity Black Women Victoria Mccoy Europe Marilyn Monroe Obesity Twain University Of California Irvin Francisco New York Times Mattie Safai Kobe NPR SAN Harper Kovin CDC
Could Science Build a Better Grain?

BrainStuff

05:34 min | 2 months ago

Could Science Build a Better Grain?

"The ever increasing need to feed Earth's growing population and not always cautious ways that we grow our food are some of the factors that have put our plants environment in peril. Farming accounts for nearly a quarter of human emissions that are warming the atmosphere, and as much as half of that comes from plowing the soil to grow crops, such as wheat, corn and soybeans, which releases carbon, dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, the latter byproduct of fertilizer use, but researchers have been working on ways to reduce the harmful environmental effects of agriculture. One potentially promising innovation is a grain the goes by the trademarked name, her Kneza like familiar grains it can be made into flour for use inbred breakfast, cereal, and other foods, and also as an ingredient in products, ranging from beard ice cream. But unlike many other grains, Kerns is a perennial plant meaning that once it's planted. It'll keep coming back up year after year. It doesn't have to be replanted from scratch year, so it cuts down on labor. In addition, Kerns a has a deep root system it reaches over ten feet or three meters into the soil, and may help to sequester or capture atmospheric carbon that root system could also make more resistant to the impact of drought related to climate change in some areas. Currency was picked by the Land Institute a Salina Kansas based organization founded in Nineteen, seventy, six, the founder West Jackson recognized that a big problem of modern agriculture was that it was wearing the soil by focusing upon monoculture, growing a single crop in a certain area as that practice intensified on modern farms. It's destructive. Downsides became more and more evident in the form of erosion and worn out soil that required increasing amounts of fertilizer, creating increasingly polluted groundwater Jackson saw the development perennial grains to replace annual ones as a vital part of the solution to those problems. The Land Institute's website explains given that grains makeup over seventy percent of our global caloric consumption and over seventy percent of our. Our global croplands, transitioning from an extractive annual model to a perennial model is the best chance we have create truly regenerative food future, but developing new food crops is difficult and time intensive challenge back in Nineteen ninety-three scientists at the Rodale Institute and Other Research Organization identified a plant called intermediate wheat grass species related to wheat as a promising candidate that might be developed into a perennial grain. They worked with researchers from the United States. Department of Agriculture to breed the plant and improve its fertility and seed size in two thousand and three, the Land Institute began working with intermediate wheat grass as well after years of breeding the plant. They developed Kerns the trade name for their variety. In some ways, the process of developing a new crop hasn't changed much since prehistoric times. It involves breeding generation after generation of a plant taking the best from each new batch, and reading them together an effort to promote whatever desirable characteristics your seeking, however plant breeders these days have some tools that the ancients lacked the land institute employed a process called molecular breeding, in which they use genetic analysis to determine the traits of the plant should have even before it grows to full. Full size in order spot plants, but the most potential for breeding. We spoke with Rachel thrower the institute's Chief Strategy Officer. She explained it's taken us ten thousand years, and an intensified two hundred years of modern reading to get the crops. We have today. It's taken twenty to get Kerns to where it is, it might take another twenty to get it to competing at scale with the annuals. But in the effort to turn Kerns a into a commercially viable crop. There's a lot of work ahead. Stroller says that researchers are now working to increase the size number of seeds produced by each plant, and to increase the height of the plants. One drawback of currency is the unlike conventional wheat. It doesn't yet lend itself to free threshing, in which the edible grain is easily loosened from the plant. It instead requires another step called D. hulling to remove the skin of the seed before it can be turned. Turned into flour, that's because the stems remain green, after the plant matures conventional wheat withers, and is thus more easily separated in addition to breeding currency to make suitable for free threshing in the future, scientists are working to make the yield produced by real working farms match what they've been able to achieve on their research plots to that end. They're gathering data from the farmers to help figure out how to time the harvest. What settings would optimal for combines and other factors that might make the fields more productive. Researchers are also working with Baker's chefs, brewers and distillers to develop products that utilize curtains to help create a future market for it. One product already on the market is long route. Pale Ale who's maker Patagonia provision sites Kerns environmental positives in its marketing and last year general mills. CASCADIA and farms brand produced a limited edition. Honey toasted Kerns, a serial, which it sold to raise funds for the researchers. We also spoke via email was Steve, Coleman and assistant professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources and Ohio State University, and the CO author of two thousand eighteen bioscience article on Kerns cultivation methods. He said up and working with Kerns F for ten years, and it's been a fun adventure. I think one of the things that I've really come to appreciate. Is that successfully? Domesticating developing a new crop requires more work than anyone can really appreciate.

Kerns F Land Institute Nitrous Oxide United States Rodale Institute Department Of Agriculture Stroller Salina Kansas Rachel West Jackson Chief Strategy Officer Cascadia Founder Baker Assistant Professor Steve Ohio State University Other Research Organization
The technology behind the discovery of a new blue hue

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:13 min | 2 months ago

The technology behind the discovery of a new blue hue

"The It is feeling an open sky and ocean and chemistry today geeking out about the color blue. From American public media. This is marketplace tech I'm Ali would. So it turns out. It's very rare to discover new color pigments, an oregon chemist, a major breakthrough in the science of color. A decade ago, he discovered the I knew blue pigments in more than two hundred years, and just about a month ago, that pigment was cleared for use in commercial products that as it happens, are actually more energy efficient as paint and surface colorings, and now that same chemist is pushing color science forward again. Oregon public broadcasting just burns reports. Matsu Superman is a scientist versed in serendipity. The happy chance occurrence the lottery of the amazing, many of the importance, scientific discoveries come by accident. Clearly a pot of boiling science serendipity was in play a decade ago when his Oregon State University lab discovered the new pigment which would be named union men blue. He was looking for new materials to use an electronics, but what came out of the furnace was something else entirely I couldn't believe it. I was shocked because the samples Gimmel, so blue paints made with Yin and blue or highly heat reflective in the formula has been licensed for use. Since that Discovery Mayan has focused on the chemistry of color. He and Brett dual who just got his PhD started experimenting with a mineral called Hip night, which is mostly found in meteorites, and they tried adding a little bit of cobalt to make another blue pigment. We didn't expect it to be as intense as it was. The formula for cobalt blue made without hip night was discovered about two hundred years ago, but paint made with the pigment comes with health warnings because it can be toxic, this new color could be less toxic because it uses a fraction of the cobalt. Cobalt was so low. Giving off the same color essentially. It was a little surprised moment followed by an a Ha moment like an hour or so later dual says materials are also cheaper by a six, but it's still too early to know. If night blue will catch on with manufacturers, the labs discovery is only a few months. Old David Waller is with the Color Pigments Manufacturers Association, representing. That produce colors for paints, coatings and plastics. He says the adoption of new pigments can take years certainly room. To add something new because some older technologies have been phased out regardless of hip night, Blues Future Ma Superman Ian is continuing his search for color every day. Walk into this chemistry building. I don't know what I'm going to discover. I have some ideas I have some goals, but once you enter the lab. Put things together. You don't know what's going to be. This is the exciting part what we do and the next big color challenge ahead. We'll be red.

Cobalt Color Pigments Manufacturers A Oregon ALI David Waller YIN Oregon State University Scientist Superman Ian Gimmel Mayan Brett
Travel to Bosnia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:51 min | 3 months ago

Travel to Bosnia

"Welcome to the amateur traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen? Let's talk about Bosnia. I like to welcome to the show. Canaan Charter, which who is coming from Bosnia and his coming to us from highlander adventures dot, be and has come to talk to us about Bosnia Herzegovina. Canaan welcome to the show. Thank you very much happy to be here excellent and for people who can't find Bosnia and Herzegovina on a map. Where are we talking about? Well. Everyone knows how to find Italy. It's a big shoe ships country. You have a boot-shaped country, so just go to the right side across the Atlantic Sea and we are right there. Well and your neighbor of Croatia. Bosnia you know goes around like little crescent moon. knoll on the West and south, and then these we have Serbia and southeast Montenegro. I to address. You're interested in making sure that people understand that. If they remember news about Bosnia, they may be remembering news from twenty thirty years ago when Bosnia was going through. A, war that's done, and that's been done now for quite a long time there there are people who are out in the working world who don't remember that and it's a wonderful place to go I. Want to say that I was anxious to do this show because we haven't done a show on Bosnia for a long time. And since then I have been to the country and loved it. So why should someone go to Bosnia Herzegovina? Well, there is a lot of reasons depending what you're interested in now. Bosnia is very complex country, but extremely small size of Pennsylvania, but inside. You have so much for the adventure seekers. There are so many adventure opportunities from Whitewater. Rafting canyoning to paragliding hiking is spectacular, and then if you're into history, we say that we have much more history than we can handle. Different Than Empires were here. We like to say where the crossroads or that where the meeting between the East and the West. Culturally very complex country, and also religiously we have Muslims, we have the Orthodox Christians, and we have Catholics with three big groups. Of course there's the Jewish community here which has been here since they were thrown out of Spain after Kista, so for five hundred years, all of these make this crazy, crazy and beautiful mix that very interesting for foreigners to see because inside I will for example and. And in many other cities in Bosnia, you can pined mosque Docs Church Catholic, Church and a synagogue literally in two hundred meter radius, and it's been like that for five hundred years while inside I will because that's how will the city is? And all of a Bosnia and we're very proud of that architecturally very different from anything else you can find in Europe you're GonNa, find this mix of. Of European styles as well as the optimum styles and a lot of course, local Bosnian styles in all of that mixed together will like to say that we are a Bosnian pots. That's one dish that we have. It's cooked in a big pot with a lot of things, mixed sight, and that's Bosnia a lot of things mixed, and it works perfectly. An Indian taste is fantastic why you should. Should visit Bosnian well. Whatever you choose. You're GONNA love it. If you're into history too much of it, you're into nature. It's absolutely stunning. It's fantastic, magic Pennsylvania, and then put inside the Rockies Grand Canyon Inca trail at a lot of other things as well a bit of New Zealand as well. We just like seaside. We have twenty four kilometers of seaside, so that's one thing with them have. And then, of course, for actually learning history or getting certain messages, let's say about life about history. How people live together or how they don't like each other, because while we had a lot of wars, let's especially in the last two hundred years. There's a lot of lessons that you can learn in Boston. Let's say war tourism doctors is now very big part of tourism in in Bosnia so if you want to learn about that, we are definitely to come to see what happens. If you don't defeat fascism, like most of Europe defeated off the Second World War and it actually shows how life can be both good and the bat also if you want to visit a place. which is completely different than rest of the Europe and very relaxed very laid back with fantastic food, most at a lot of reasons I think.

Bosnia Herzegovina Europe Chris Christensen Canaan Charter Pennsylvania Croatia Herzegovina Mosque Docs Church Catholic Serbia Atlantic Sea Kista Southeast Montenegro Spain Italy Whitewater Boston Rockies Grand Canyon Inca New Zealand
Pacific Coast Pirate Battle

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:55 min | 3 months ago

Pacific Coast Pirate Battle

"Welcome to kiss Miss Mysteries signed. Your host could crumb true to the name of this podcast, which is true mysteries of the Pacific northwest. Pirates off Oregon's Pacific Northwest Coast. Pick up any book on the Golden Age Pirates sixteen fifty to seventeen thirty, and it would have you believe that they sailed the Atlantic only, but in fact when the English begin actively pursuing what they called privateers and hanging entire crews, many pirates fled attempted to sail around. Cape Horn southernmost tip, south, America but few survive with the Atlantic and Pacific collided strong winds, large waves, predictable, current and icebergs challenged every vessel. Pirates formed gala. -Tarian orders based on elected officials mutual trust they did. Did make some crews captured vessels. Walk the plank. Yes, that really did happen. In eighteen twenty two captain of the British ship Rudd poll was made to walk the plank when his ship was captured by the pirate ship, Emmanuel before turning himself in Captain Kidd buried his treasure buried treasure so war on Long Island. He was hanged for piracy in London before it could retrieve it, but for two hundred years from fifteen, sixty, five, eighteen, fifteen, a Spanish treasury across the Pacific from Alka Poco Laden. With gold and silver. Silver that had been caravan across the isthmus of two one to pack from there. They sailed to new Spain at the time Manila unchallenged until sixteen, Ninety nine late. In that year, the five master pirate ship Peach made the run around Cape Hope Captain by Jack Berryman. The Spanish treasure galleon left behind by the rest of the Spanish fleet was just ten days out of the port of all Caputo Cho sailing. It'll lacy five knots Minoa when they were intercepted by another vessel when the peach pulled within five hundred yards. Yards of the and unfurled Charlie Roger and fired her twenty two cannon on the heavily Laden gallion without hesitation captain, Fernandez distant million unloaded. His sixteen cannons in response and beat a hasty retreat up the coast, of North, America, no match speed because of the gold and silver. He carried the PASSAIC couldn't lose the peach. The San Jose carried eighty pounds of goal, twenty-six tons of on coin, silver and four hundred thousand pesos for ten days with what the damage Rudder Santeria led the peach on a wild chase up. Up Coast of North America finally accurate off the rugged coast, the captain of the peace saw his chance and sailed to within a hundred yards of the guy, in for the best effect of short range cannons, and let fire all twenty two guns in a final show of defiance South Jose, unleashed her sixteen cannons by chance they hit the powder stores or the peach, blowing the ship to splinters, but it was too late for the San Jose sinking by the Stern, the captain gathered the ship's log perched on the bow. Bow made his final entry dated seventeen o one January half of his crew of sixty were lost in the final battle the remains managed wrath from the decking paddle through the surging forty degree water towards shore with the sun, high overhead, the sea retreated leaving the San Jose on Solid, seafloor on her starboard side, wrath and crew, high and dry captain until you crossed himself. As he watched a hundred foot wave sweeping from the ocean, the final entry in the log read longitude forty five point five one six degrees. Degrees north latitude one twenty three point nine, one nine four degrees west with a very slight adjustment of just a couple degrees, the final resting place of the treasure Galleon Song Jose is just off the Oregon coast, a little out from the town of Cohen,

San Jose Captain Kidd Pacific Northwest Coast Oregon Pacific Pacific Northwest America BOW North America Fernandez Cape Horn Spain Caputo Cho Alka Poco Laden Cape Hope Emmanuel Long Island Jack Berryman Rudd Charlie Roger
What does the future of the U.S.-Canada border look like?

The Big Story

02:26 min | 3 months ago

What does the future of the U.S.-Canada border look like?

"I want to turn. Our attention says that the border where the number of covert cases now tops two million. That's more than double the cases in any other to the latest ANA corona virus, emergency Arizona and Texas setting new records while over the weekend Florida reported is biggest one day increase in cases pandemic started. or That? Why is that? What we have very strong to on the southern border as you know with Mexico and we had some troops in Canada, but I'll find out about that. I guess it's equal justice to a certain extent. To how do you feel? About opening up the US Canada, border right now. I, guess would be not crate. That would put you squarely with a majority of Canadians who tell pollsters their extremely nervous as they watch our friends and neighbors to the south handling this pandemic. But while the corona virus has made the difference between our two countries obvious. Truth is that we've been drifting apart for a while now. And there's no better place to see that then at the border. And in the public sentiment for keeping shot. But what does that mean? As the week, stretch into months with crossings close to all the non essential traffic. For the communities who exist right next to one another, but on opposite sides of a line they used to cross every day barely thinking twice. How has the enforcement of the US Canada border changed over the last two hundred, years. And, what will it look like the future? Because if there's one thing, the history of this border has shown us. That when things changed, they never really go back to normal. They evolve. Just like the Kennedy US relationship, the porter is always changing. Pandemic might spark the most dramatic shift get. Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Alex, Bittermann, a professor at the Alfred State College of Technology at the State University of New York, is also the CO author of a piece in the conversation on the past present and future of the US Canada

United States Canada Pandemic Jordan Heath Rawlings Arizona Mexico Florida Texas Alfred State College Of Techno Alex State University Of New York Professor Kennedy Bittermann
James Baldwin: The 1967 Detroit Riots

LGBTQ&A

06:24 min | 3 months ago

James Baldwin: The 1967 Detroit Riots

"Recently, I've been thinking a lot about the work of James Baldwin and in particular this one speech that he gave about the racial problem in America. We're GONNA. Hear a click. Today is from Horace, vase nine thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, nine short film called Baldwin's and word, and like so much work. It feels like he's describing this very moment in time, and then the other thing you'll hear I think is his patriotism James. Baldwin wanted to make our country and world the best possible place for everyone that is true of people protesting in one, thousand, nine hundred. Hundred Sixty seven that he describes, and it's also true with people protesting today hearing from Queer figures like James Baldwin it always makes me feel just a little bit more grounded, and I think it also show is why we unfortunately have to continue to say yes. Black lives do matter and I sang. Nut is also just the beginning of the work that we have to do so to that. We've got some links in the show notes. If you're still looking for resources for how involved where to start, he'll check all those out and then without further ado. Here's James Baldwin. School really was the streets of New York City. My frame of Reference was George Washington and John Wayne. And you are formed by what you see choices you'd have to make and later discover what it means to be black in new. York I know how as you grow older, you watch in the richest city in the world the richest. Nation in the world. In the Western World I know how you watch as you grow older. Literally This is not a figure of speech. The cost of your brothers and your sisters pile up around you. Not for anything they have done. They were too young done anything. And the case to help. What one does realize is that? When you try to stand up. And the world in the face like you had a right to be here. When you do that without knowing this the result of it, you have attacked. The entire power structure of the Western, world. And speak plainly. We know. Everybody knows. No matter what recessions in my unhappy country maybe? But we are not. Bothering people out of existence in the name of freedom. Concerned with freedom, boys and girls, not as Istan here, the perishing streets of Harlem. We are concerned with power nothing more than that. In most unluckily for the Western world is consolidated its power. On the backs of people who are now willing to die. Rather than be used. Any longer. In short. The economic range in the Western world. Food to be too expensive for most of the world. And the Western world will change US arrangements. All these arrangements will be changed for them. This is what it's beneath all the rhetoric. And all those ashamed speeches coming from my president. This imposes on us then. Very considerable burden. I for example do have in principle least choice. I can make a living. And well enough known to be an ornament. And Short I could ally myself on the side of what I most seriously considered to be. A criminal nation. But if I can't do that. All the reasons that I can. When is tried? I tried for a long time and I don't person. Things I wrote things I said. That I was alone. I'm using myself as an example. You to my. White and black. Nature of a danger. And where we were going to go if he cannot resolve. The situation cities and then I'll streets now houses. If they come. When you realize that you cannot make yourself heard that people who? You are addressing plea on the previous ever super. One Saying, look at it. Get all the mountains of nonsense that had been written. And everything has been set. What you look at what is happening in this country? What really happening is the brother has murdered brother knowing it was his brother. White men have been negroes to be their son. Why women have had negroes burn knowing to be their love. It is at a ratio problem. Is a problem whether or not you're willing to look at your life and be responsible for it. And then begin to change its. That Great Western House I come from one house. Nine one of the children that house. Somebody on the most despised child that house. And it is because the American people are unable. The face of fact tonight back I'm flesh out their flesh. Bone of your bone. Created by them. My blood! My father's but is in that soil. They can't say that. And that is why. The Detroit another plane. And when has got to decide I think? The actual. And the moral base. which the world we know now rest. Obsolete. And deposit obsolete. They're wicked. As well as their obsolete, they are oppressive. Is simply not conceivable. That's another five hundred years of two hundred years or one hundred years. Should live and die. In the minds. Being, treated like animals to make other people rich. Civilization which is doing this. By doing this doomed itself. And it's not possible. To agree with it. Nor the possible to compromise with it. As much the much overused word. And it may not be as real as slavery. A very concrete thing. But freedom loved ones actor, and as it cannot I suppose beginning. Then obviously must. Take.

James Baldwin United States New York City NUT York America Harlem Istan President Trump George Washington John Wayne Detroit
Pirate Myths and Mysteries

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:32 min | 4 months ago

Pirate Myths and Mysteries

"And for the next week or so. I will be focusing on tyrus during the Golden Age from sixteen fifty to about seventeen thirty and in my ongoing research for these podcasts. I have had a few surprises one. Pirates DID BURIED TREASURE TO PIRATES. Made MAPS FOR THOSE TREASURE. I will be producing evidence of this also. Pirates did make other pirates and English Spanish ship captains walk the plank pick up any book on the Golden Age Pirates. Sixteen fifty to seventeen thirty and it would have you believe that they sailed the Atlantic but in fact when the English began actively pursuing what they call privateers and hanging entire crews many fled attempting to sail around Cape Horn. The southernmost tip of South America but few survived where the Atlantic and Pacific collided strong winds large waves unpredictable current and icebergs challenge every vessel. Pirates formed egalitarian. Orders based on elected officials and mutual trust. They did make some crews of captured vessels walk the plank in eighteen twenty two captain of the British ship. Rudd poll was made to walk the plank when his ship was captured by the pirate ship. Emmanuel before turning himself in Captain Kidd buried his treasure somewhere on long island also around area will discuss Madagascar. He was hanged for piracy in London before it could retrieve it for two hundred years. Fifteen sixty five to eighteen fifteen. The Spanish Treasury Cross Pacific from Alka Poco laden with gold and silver had been caravan across the isthmus there from there. They sailed to new Spain at the time Manila unchallenged until sixteen ninety nine. It was late in that year. That the five masted pirate ship made the run around Cape Hope captain by check Berryman. The Spanish treasure galleon left behind by the rest of the Spanish fleet was just ten days out of port of Al Capone sailing. Lazy five knots for Manila when they were intercepted by another vessel when the peach pulled within five hundred yards of the Galleon and unfurled the Jolly Roger and fired. Twenty two cannon on the heavily Laden. Gallia well that was all it took without hesitation. Captain Fernandez de the Tinian unloaded his sixteen cannons in response and beat a hasty retreat up the coast of North America. No Vashem's speed for the gold. Silver she carried the San. Jose couldn't lose the peach. A Jose carried eighty pounds of gold twenty-six tons of unkown silver and four hundred thousand pesos. For ten days with a damaged rudder Santellien led the peach on a wild chase up. The coast of North America finally anchoring off a rugged coast the captain of peach saw his chance sailed to within a hundred yards the guy and for best effect of short range cannons and let fire twenty two guns in a final show of defiance. The San Jose unleashed her sixteen cannons. And by chance hit the powder storage of the each flowing. This ship to splitters but it was too late for the San Jose sinking by the Stern. Captain gathered the ship's log and perched on the bow made his final entry dated January. Seventeen O one. Half of his crew sixty were lost in the final battle. The remains managed to wrath from the decade paddle to the surging forty degree water toward shore with the sun high overhead. The Sea retreated leaving the San Jose on Solid C. Four on her starboard side the raft high and Dry Captain. Sotoudeh crossed himself as he watched one hundred foot. Waves sweep in from the ocean. The final entry in the log. Read Longitude Forty five five sixteen degrees north latitude one twenty three ninety one and ninety four degrees west with a slight adjustment of just a couple degrees the final resting place of that treasures. Scallions San Jose is just off the Oregon coast off the little town of Nice. Colin perhaps a mile out from the famed ghost forest. You see the last great cascade. Subduction zone earthquake occurred early in January. Seventeen O one. The famous Oregon Ghost florist was once a Sitka. Spruce forest dropped twenty five feet during that quake justice shifting place of pushed. What's left of that forced to the surface? A fascinating side at low tide. Perhaps in a few years if the place continued shift the remains of the treasure. Galleon San Jose may appear on that same

San Jose Captain Kidd Peach Jose North America Manila Captain Fernandez Spanish Treasury Cross Pacific Atlantic Dry Captain Tyrus South America Cape Horn Al Capone Alka Poco SAN Spain Rudd Sotoudeh Cape Hope
Exporting Authoritarianism

Why It Matters

05:19 min | 4 months ago

Exporting Authoritarianism

"I will relate that interesting story. The president of Kazakhstan actually visited a company called hike. Vision is another one that provides surveillance technology visit their office in China and he saw how with one. Click on a person's face. You could get that person's school history work history financial situation. Wow and wait for it. How did this person spend his or her leisure time? So where did this person go to have fun? Did you go to the movies? Did you stop by the bank to go to the post office where you hang out with friends? Did you participate in a protest and his reaction after seeing all of this was we need this technology. That's not where I thought the story was going. This is probably not the first time you're hearing about China's surveillance technology and that's because it gets a lot of coverage it's like a Black Mirror episode. It gives us visions of a dystopia in future but this technology and the eagerness of some countries to begin implementing. It is only a small part of a much bigger story about China through its belt and road initiative China's in the process of building and funding infrastructure projects across the globe and loaning vast sums of money in the developing world. Some observers argued that as it does this. China is also exporting its authoritarian model of government and eroding democratic norms. That many of us take for granted others say that China is simply taking business opportunities where it sees them and providing countries with an alternative to a global order that has gone unchallenged for decades. The debate comes down to one question. How will we choose to view China as they pour money into hospitals ports and roads around the World I'm Gabrielle? Sierra and this is why it matters today is China exporting authoritarianism. I think the most important thing to understand about China's foreign policy over the past ten years or so is that it really has been transformed. This is Elizabeth Economy. She's a senior fellow and director for Asia. Studies here at the council. She's also a distinguished visiting fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution beginning in about two thousand and eight with global financial crisis China's hosting the Olympics. These are really moments that defined in the minds of many Chinese leaders that China was rising. Chinese have many goals for these Olympics. One of them was to announce to the world. The China is back after two hundred years. China's economy has grown faster than that of any other major country. The Asian giant has now grown into one of the most important export markets for manufacturers from all over. The world is a period of historic change in China. There haven't been many periods in history as fascinating as this so there was a real sense within China for the first time that they had always expected that at some point China was going to surpass the United States but maybe that time was coming sooner than they anticipated. But what really has changed the game on the ground has been Xi Jinping everything for Xi Jinping is under the mantra of the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation and it is a call for reclaiming a much greater degree of centrality for China on the global stage. Xi Jinping became China's president in two thousand thirteen some observers have called him the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao Zedong. Look I think there are any number of objectives and we can find them all and Xi Jinping's writings and speeches but fundamentally what I think. Xi Jinping attempting to do is simply to make the world safer authoritarianism. Teaching is a dictator but dictators. Still have to answer to domestic constituents. This is Jessica. Chance Weiss associate professor of government at Cornell and a leading expert on Chinese politics. She has a different take on China's expansion. One that sees it as being less offensive and more defensive. China's concerned about a whole lot of different risks. Some of them domestic others ones. That emanate from abroad sparks. That might start the prairie fire and bring down the Chinese government and might take units overriding purpose is to continue to make the world safe for the Chinese Communist Party to strive at home. So this is a world that safe for autocracy to coexist alongside democracy in the international space. So it's not been as ideological I think and it's foreign policy is some admitted. It out to be so. China is trying to find a way to sort of fit in with a world. That might not be comfortable with its model of government tried to make space for its form of government to be regarded as one that can continue to exist that is legitimate than democracy isn't the only form of government so to speak and so this has made it easier for other authoritarian states to survive

China Chinese Government Xi Jinping Visiting Fellow Chinese Communist Party President Trump Kazakhstan Elizabeth Economy Olympics Mao Zedong Asia United States Jessica Stanford University Hoover Institution Weiss Associate Professor Cornell
200 years of change started by one woman

Second Opinion

03:23 min | 4 months ago

200 years of change started by one woman

"Also marks the birthday of an amazing woman who in many ways transformed healthcare two hundred years ago this week. Florence Nightingale was born in Florence Italy to British parents. Her name may be familiar to you. What is less well known is how this Amazing Woman Changed Medicine Nursing and hospital care and drove us to use evidence to improve healthcare quality in other words. Looking at whether what we actually do improves health nightingale was born to a wealthy family and was exceedingly well educated. She spoke English French. German Italian Greek and Latin and was a skilled mathematician and statistician. In fact she was the first woman elected to the Royal Statistical Society. Now two hundred years ago there was no germ theory no understanding of bacteria or viruses but there was lots of infectious disease smallpox measles whooping cough diptheria kill thousands of people. Sick people were cared for at home. By family members hospitals were crude dirty smelly and dangerous places in fact one paper ninety gale wrote. It may seem a strange principle to enunciate as very first requirement of a hospital that it should do the sick. No harm well without antibiotics or vaccinations. Nightingales weapons were isolation hygiene and hydration hospitals. Were not built to nor did they function to prevent the spread of disease. Patients were placed in large windowless wards with no ventilation and no sanitation. Nurses often had no formal training and they worked only during daylight hours. Patients were left alone at night. Nightingales drive was to improve safety and care at the hospital. She Championed Pavilion Style Hospital. That's the type. We are all familiar with today. There are separate wings different so as to reduce the spread of disease there are windows provided fresh air and walls with smooth surfaces that allow for cleaning she also developed nursing into a learned profession with a defined curriculum and a rigorously trained skill set. More importantly she was passionate about nurturing the values that she felt were foundational to nursing including being honest sober and loyal as she professionalized nursing. She also felt. Nurses were best supervised by other nurses rather than male doctors later in life. She caused a social uproar. When published a paper documenting. That more men died. In hospitals of infections then died in battle. She insisted that hospitals change people. Listen to her because she was an experienced health expert. Perhaps this is a lesson for our government today. Listen to those around you who have expertise.

Gale Florence Nightingale Florence Italy Pavilion Style Hospital Royal Statistical Society Smallpox
Build the Gut of a Hero

Plant Strong

10:06 min | 4 months ago

Build the Gut of a Hero

"Season. Two of the plant. Strong podcast has focused on those individuals. Who have the heart of a hero? The way we're going to talk about the guy who has the gut of a hero doctor will ball shirts. Or as he is affectionately known doctor be the author of the forthcoming book fiber fueled. This is quite simply the playbook to optimize and restore your gut health. We take a deep dive on. What can be a very complex subject but in fun and lighthearted way leaving you with actionable insights tips and best foods optimize your gut health. A little side note. You can't have a conversation about fiber without discussing poop and as a gastroenterologist Dr B. is more than comfortable with the subject so yep we talked a little about poop because guess what we all do it so grab a big bowl leafy green. Sit Back and prepare to get turned on to fiber with Dr be will show wits the gut health doctor. Today's episode of the plant strong podcast. We have Dr will be Dr be will boss Bozo. It's also which wits got. I did first of all you nailed it on. The first try emailed it on the first try many second. Guess yourself a little bit those who it's also there you go and it's just confidence. My friend is just common. You just gotTa say it with confidence. That's well what. What is that Polish? What is that? It's polishing is a fully Polish name. And you know in the in the hard thing is like we say it now is in American word. Polish names are not meant to be said as American work. It's just so let me let me hear you stay it. Will I say the same way that you said? At the first time I said Bolsa wits I say both Switz- but if you were to go to Poland's they would stable Schevitz and actually think Bolsheviks just roll off the tongue. You know what it does bull shit like that Wife is Polish her her last name. Coalition ski so I think she's my cousin. Actually yeah I see a resemblance So we got a lot of exciting things to talk about here today. You know I think for starters what I'd like to ask you is so you are a gastroenterologist and I think I pronounced that correct. You did a gastroenterologist and so what exactly is a gastroenterologist we are the we are the experts on all organs of digestive function so one of the things that people kind of look at me including my mother-in-law the first time I met her like why did you decide to become a doctor so and so let me. Just say the the reason that I love what I do are the reason I love what I do is that if I were cardiologists I would just be a heart guy all day long art all the time whereas for me I get. I get to have diversity as we're GonNa hold earned during this podcast. Diversity is a good word I love it And so I. I'm the I'm considered the expert on the Asaf. Igus stomach. Small Intestine. The colon the pancreas the liver even the hemorrhoids. I'm expert. That's a good thing to be expert and I bet you I bet you that the line out your door is never ending. Probably can circumstances. There is a line out the door. There is no lack of business. I'm not worried that no matter what I put into the world's that I truly believe a person like my book every person in the entire world could read my book but unless they all actually do. What's in the book? I don't I'm not GONNA be putting myself out of business anytime soon. That's for sure. Yep You're talking about the book and we're GonNa get to the book which is Super Exciting. It's your first book right for smoke. First Book Fiber fueled what? I'm going to save that for a little bit later. So gastroenterologist and how long have you been practicing finish my training in two thousand fourteen so basically six years? Now I've been in practice. But you know if you if you look at just sort of Long drawn-out path and I know that you're familiar with the way this works. Yeah I started college back in ninety eight and I went and I did for years of college. Four YEARS OF MED school. I did four years of internal medicine residency including I was achieved president northwestern and four years of GI training to become a specialist in part of the reason why did four years is actually didn't Epidemiology Fellowship University of North Carolina. So that's sixteen years at Sixteen Years. From Ninety eight until twenty fourteen finally wrapped up. You know it's Kinda funny. I thought about this too by the way sixteen years of training but like working eighty to a hundred dollars a week which means that just my training alone is essentially the equivalent of what most people do for the entirety of their labor campaign. Before they retire. To- totally sixteen years of training right before you went into practice before I enter crackers before you enter practice and in that sixteen years of training. How much information that you have been your new book fiber fueled. Did you learn in that traditional setting and when and when did your education really begin? The education never stops never stops. And that's that's true. I think for all of us but I think that's particularly true in medicine if you're if you're not constantly updating your knowledge base in medicine than your rapidly going to become a dinosaur and but with regard to your question rib and this is a completely valid question and it's one of the weak points to me of traditional Western medicine. I will openly acknowledges very little very little training on Diet. Nutrition lifestyle in honestly. What kind of one of the big things that I did along the way to try to update that nutritional training was actually did the e cornell. Course yeah so. That's that's just one of the things that I did but it's it's actually quite shocking that I do sixteen years of training and have almost no conversations about. How do we fix a person's diet to address the root of the problem well and I would imagine that and correct me if I'm wrong here but I would imagine that those line the lines of people that are out your door that are seeing you because they have some sort of a GI issue distress That ninety percent of those could be resolved by filing what we're GonNa talk about today which is really a a whole food plant based Diet. That has a huge diversity of fiber. That that too simplified. I don't not only do. I not think I think that is spot on number one and number two might here ninety percent and think that you're overreaching and you're being hyperbolic and actually think it might be more than that right. I mean I have not exaggerating. I literally I literally bleed and I'm not saying that that ripped that we would live in this Utopian world where we all live to be two hundred years old literally no disease at all. I'm not saying that what I am saying is that if the root of the problem starts with our microbiome which in my specialty that is where the root of the problem starts if the root of the problem is the microbiome and number one way that you can change. Your microbiome is with the food that you eat then. We need to be doing that when we take care of these patients. Otherwise we're knowing the root of the problem we're putting a patch over it with the pill but so you say the term microbial but in your sixteen years of training was that was that discussed or is that kind of like for example. I feel am. I'm embarrassed to say that you know this is kind of you know wh my huge passion right and I didn't know about the microbiome and how it's considered kind of like the second brain in the lost Oregon until like three and a half four years ago. I mean to the conversation. Just start recently about this or you know others these studies. There's these studies where they say. Okay how long does it take from the day of publication for it to actually get into common knowledge among medical doctors when they look at that? But they come up with seventeen years. It's at seventeen years from the day of papers published and I just think we don't need to be practicing medicine with the research studies that came out in two thousand and three right now. I think we need to be practicing medicine with the Research Studies. That came out last week or or this week right. It's time for us to update and that's the beautiful thing. Is that everything? Every single thing in my book is sourced. It's all source. There are six hundred references. And I'll be honest. I challenge doctors. I challenge the doctors who are listening to this show. Want you to read my book and I want you to check my sources. Because they're there and I think when you do you're GONNA learn you're going to learn that this is the path

Dr B. Research Studies Poland Switz University Of North Carolina Schevitz President Trump Oregon E Cornell
Bourbon, Bad Guys and Cyber Vigilance

Pure Life Podcast

08:33 min | 5 months ago

Bourbon, Bad Guys and Cyber Vigilance

"Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. You're weekly does for all things travel. Who Am sure today? I'm your host. My name is Don Meyer. My wife is off doing some much needed research. On some future travel endeavors and travel destinations So today I am your host for the half hour or so that we have you for For this session and boy. I'm I'm so happy to be able to talk with you again and happy to be able to share with you what we have in store for you today. It has been an interesting couple of weeks to say the least with ups and downs and all over the place with the Kovic Nineteen scare and with certain states opening up and closing down own death tolls getting higher getting the infection rates continuing to grow it has been for all intensive and purposes a very Challenging time for all of us and You know looking at the way things are going. It's going to be quite some time before we get back to any semblance of normalcy For whatever that is whether that's you know going back to work In a work environment for those of us who have been working in corporate environments that could be going to an office space in in cubicles and in gatherings and stuff like that You know looking at what's going on. It's going to be quite some time before that in and of itself becomes the norm again For those of you who are unemployed you know. Hopefully things are going to come back to normal pretty soon. We'll be able to open up the doors to Everything that we've done you know whether it's retail or or or Hospitality or whatever. The industry is war. We're we're certainly hopeful that we'll all get through this really quickly and you know to the best of own abilities. Hopefully you know we we fair through this as best we possibly can You know we here at purely podcast have been battling a number of different things trying to figure out work in school and life. And we've been doing travel cancellations and all sorts of different things it's been been quite Quite challenging to say the least and You know our hearts go to all those who've been affected by this you know fortunately here in Northern California. We've been locked down for cash going on the last seven eight weeks now and It has been interesting to say. The least We are going a bit. Stir crazy as I imagine you all are just trying to get through all this with with our sanity intact and with some semblance of normalcy attributed to what we do Long story short of it. Obviously going back to normal. It's going to be a luxury if you will in the foreseeable future we hope that Things will calm down and we'll be able to you know all resume life is is. Is We enjoyed it before? Obviously things are going to be quite a bit different in here. At pure life will keep you abreast of. What's what's been going on. And how things are progressing along from this front but You know if if there are things that you've you've been planning for You know there's there's travel that she'd been looking to do you know take take some time in review what we've been talking about over the last few weeks about the credit cards in the travel rewards programs in the difference in a hotel programs and things of that nature because once things do come back into play. You know doing a little bit of homework and doing a little bit of pre-planning that's GonNa help to really be able to get you ahead of the game if you will and not not be part of the throngs that come back into everything As things slowly start to get back to normal so with that As I said my wife's off doing some much needed research I'm your host for today In keeping with our recent traditions. I am Here enjoying my My little glass of Of loveliness here And I wanted to continue on with the theme that we've had for the last couple of weeks. Which is our drinking the week and for those of you who've been with us for the last couple of weeks as you know we've been doing some mixed drinks Talked about a really good top-shelf Mar Margarita. With the freshest of ingredients try and keep it as low in the sugar and you know the the high-fructose nonsense that that is added to a lot of these drinks but really just keep it nice and fresh and and and really enjoyable next we followed it up with a inexpressible Martini. Twist if you will on the vodka Martinis but really really good twist. That adds a good kick a good zest. Good Dino Buzz if you will to To the Martini also really complements the Vodkas that we have chosen. This week might take it down and a little bit ticket to simpler more. Simplistic Ingredients As you guys have heard over the last couple of weeks My favorite kind of Indulgent if you will is a straight Bourbon Street whiskey I'm really getting into some of the Scotch whiskies and exploring a lot of the American bourbons or some really really great bourbons that are out there. Obviously there's a staples like Jim Beam Jack Daniels and stuff like that which I certainly do enjoy But if you want to enjoy a really Gosh full-bodied Bourbon That is drinkable that Doesn't require you know Like a coke or anything like that to be added to it My go-to which I've got right here with ME IS A. It's a Basil Hayden's Basil Hayden's is a an American Bourbon. It's been around for quite some time. And it is part of the Jim Beam family And it is a Part of their their small batch bourbons produced by the the Beam Suntory Company Sunsari came in and invested into the Jim Beam Distilleries and of created this huge conglomerate of different spirits if you will Basil is one of their premium brands and it is really true to its roots. Its roots go back about two hundred years There was a Hayden family that migrated from From the UK. During the time we're Catholics were being persecuted. They bolted from the UK. Set up shop on the New England coast of America and then in roughly about When was it seventeen? Eighty five or so the Basil Hayden Senior Moved transplanted from his home in Maryland and went into Kentucky and there he started to brew a a batch of Bourbon based on the things that he had on hand and the stuff that he had on hand was some Ryan. Some other things like that too He tried to stay true to the the Bourbon form if you will But really kind of came up with an interesting mash of his own creation which I truly enjoy. It is a an eighty proof or forty percent alcohol if you will Very very light bodied Bourbon. Whiskey very drinkable in my favorite is just a single cube of ice and you can get these What are they called a whiskey balls if you will Whiskey balls brand of ice cube makers if you will make those Globes or the the the the square or the the cubed type of a larger size cubes I like it with a single ball of ice or cube ice if you will And Basil on top of it port and get it a little Chilled by the ICE. And Oh my goodness it is just. It is just absolute heaven for me so there you have it if you are a Bourbon Aficionado in you are into drinking. Bourbons my recommendation for you right now. If you haven't tried one is a Basil Hayden's need If you like at NEAT Or with a single Cuba vice or on the rocks if you will Once it's it's Gotten a little cool in a little bit of water from the ice itself is just so smooth and just so drinkable and really accomplishments just about

Basil Hayden ICE Bourbon Aficionado UK Don Meyer Jim Beam Jack Daniels Jim Beam Jim Beam Distilleries Beam Suntory Company Sunsari Mar Margarita Northern California Cuba New England America Maryland Ryan Kentucky
Hands!

The Past and the Curious

06:42 min | 5 months ago

Hands!

"Ignace. Similize was a showman but when he truly believes something he fought through the feelings that might have otherwise nope back his voice one of the few things that he was outspoken and confrontational about was the simple act of handwashing. He was certain it was necessary but only after much observation getting other people to believe him was a different story born in Hungary in the city known as Buddha which would one day join its neighboring city across the river to become Budapest. Similize started law school but he wound up becoming a doctor in the end in Eighteen. Forty seven just three years after earning his medical license. The methodical and intelligent fellow was given a notable position at a maternity ward in Vienna Austria. His job was basically as the chief resident which gave him a lot of responsibility and power over the staff at his hospital. There were actually two maternity wards which is where women go to give birth. The first word was staffed by doctors called obstetricians the other word was staffed by midwives trained health professionals whose main concern as caring for women during before and after the Labor of childbirth more on the difference later when some of I started he noticed two things one. All the women admitted for delivery wanted to go to the ward staffed by midwives and to ten percent of the women who went to his word the obstetrician. Stafford died while they were there. Well no wonder everyone wanted to go to the other word right. The unfortunate women died from thing called child bed fever which we now know to be caused by an infection. Women wanted to go with the midwives because well they weren't done living yet and fair enough but ignace wanted to know why there was a difference in the fate of the patients in the two wards and more importantly how to solve it so he made some methodical observations. I he noted women gave birth in two different positions in the two different words so he had the doctors deliver babies the same way as the Midwest. No difference same fevers same tragic results then he noticed that when someone died a priest walk through the halls ringing a bell in solemn honor of the women who passed he thought maybe this played psychological tricks on the women in the word. Perhaps they realized that someone had died in that they very well could be next. The suggestion alone might make someone gets sick. Meanwhile of course no one died in the other word hence Nobel ringing so do you get as line of thinking. Well he told the priest ago ring his bell somewhere else still no difference with his methodical mind. He tried everything he could think of. No luck of any especially for the poor patients on the ward then. One of the doctors got sick with symptoms similar to the women and before long. He too died at this time. Medical doctors not only took care of living patients but they spent time on cadavers. Or dead bodies. It's kind of gross. When you think about it and it would certainly give me the willies. But what better way is there to learn about the human body than with a real not live human body? It ain't pleasant but it's the truth and we've learned a lot as society in this way anyway. It turns out that this now dead doctor had practised finger while working with a dead body now we know he got an infection and he died eighteen fifties Austria like pretty much everywhere else in the world didn't understand germs or bacteria or viruses or infections yet. There were still plenty of people who most diseases were brought on by miasma which is bad air in shortly idea was that you might smell something really bad and then get sick. It sounds crazy now but you should understand that. Most diseases made a body smell bad You're around some smelly sick person. You might get sick too. We know it's germs now but all they had to go on was that sticky stinky surrounding. The city Sim obese new. They're just had to be a connection between the dead bodies and the sickness. Unlike the midwives who simply dealt with the pregnant women many of the doctor spent time dissecting analyzing and learning from the cadavers which obviously meant touching them then they just hopped on over to the maternity ward when there was a baby to deliver and they did not wash their hands or their tools. Crazy right by today's standards. Yes but two hundred years ago. This was business as usual. The connection had not been made by science. The evidence was pretty clear to some of ice so he made a new rule. Doctors must wash their hands in chlorine and their tools. And guess what happened. The number of deaths fell dramatically. In fact in the obstetricians ward the survival rate was basically the same as the midwives ward so he went around telling everybody about it. Wash your hands. You're bringing gross stuff to a healthy body with your unclean tools and you're unclean fingers and instead of being excited and saying thank you. The doctors were like you're telling me I making my patient sick. Who Do you think you are? I am a good doctor and you know nothing similize before long. He was ridiculed out of existence. It's too bad. They didn't listen to him. Lives could have been saved with some simple handwashing just a few years later. There was a British nurse working in a war zone during the Crimean War who helped revolutionize medical cleanliness Florence Nightingale paid attention to international science. She took her job seriously and was responsible for the lives of thousands of recuperating British soldiers. There's a chance she heard about vices. Observations there's also a good chance that she just figured it out on her own because when she implemented rules about washing hands and tools the same thing started to happen she saved lives but still there were plenty of detractors. The anti hand washers. The dirty hinders the filthy fingered. You know nothing nightingale. They cried but you see these two did know what they were talking about. They might not have understood it on a microscopic level but they could clearly see a relationship between dirty handed doctors and sick or dying patients. The world was changing in the mid eighteen. Hundreds and doctors were doubling as scientists often to determine what was causing serious illnesses.

Ignace. Similize Vienna Austria Budapest Hungary Midwest Ignace Florence Nightingale Buddha Stafford Austria Nobel
"two hundred years" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"Comparing you know, comparing the two hundred years of. Let's say air that we're moving into with the last time it happened and the time before that and the time before that so doing a little cross section of history and sorting things by that technique. Let's see I've been electing for sphere and sundry. We've got a nice we've got an ice Jupiter and Venus series that should be out by the end of April, and I've been procrastinating editing my own podcast. So my my little my little interview project. I've only put out one. But I think I have let's see I have. I have four more already recorded that just need a little love before. I can put them out. So I'll probably make up for not putting out anything and retrograde March by putting out two things in April. The don't don't hold me to that. Or maybe do hold me to that. Right. Enjoyed that. I that you released with Tony Mack. Oh, good. Yeah. Tony's Tony's great. You know in Tony usually lets his work speak for himself or speak for itself. But I thought people would enjoy hearing him here hearing him him hearing him speak with words rather than crafted metals. Right. I gotta get some other. I actually have another one with. I've I won't tell people who. But I have one with another astrological metal Smith. I have one with a publisher and destroy legiter, and I have one with a publisher slash alchemist. And the outcome. A1. was actually was actually conducted in an outside alchemy. Barnwell chickens crowed L, I think I know who that might be. I'm looking forward to not the other. They're all busy down a little bit. Yeah. Yeah. I'm excited about that. So people can find out more about your podcast as well. As the courses that you just mentioned your website, which is Austin copy dot com. So there and then sphere and sundry fear and sundry dot com..

Tony Mack publisher Barnwell Austin two hundred years
"two hundred years" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on WLAC

"Sixty million bison two hundred years ago. We killed them. All replace them with one hundred twenty million cows. In volume of flatulence, and Eric tation, probably more important. We've done more damage to the earth. If that's what you're measuring. Cory Booker today, giving a speech talking about diet. Americans have a bad diet. Folks, we should never. We should never lose an election. Here's all you. Gotta say. House. Democrats don't want you to ever eat. Another hamburger. I'm not joking. If they had their way if they could get away with it. You'd never eat another hamburger. And you know, what really pisses me off about this. These multimillionaire movie stars and. These folks. They have a personal chef coming into their home. Cooking their meals. And once they don't eat meat anymore. They wanna turn around. No worse zealot than the recently converted. I don't think anybody should have meat because I've decided I'm going vegan. If I'm going vegan hotline virtue signal to you. And I would like to declare that you shouldn't have meat either..

Cory Booker Eric tation two hundred years
"two hundred years" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Have over two hundred years of automotive repair experience at magic mechanic that that's in one automotive shop two hundred years in folks, when it comes to diagnosing, engines and transmissions, and electrical stuff experience is everything. And for for any automotive questions or any automotive information, even estimates check us out at magic mechanic dot com. Or my free auto estimate dot com. Once again, if you'd like. Like to get in line to discuss your automotive concern that number is eight four four to two zero zero nine six five. And like I said folks, we have a slow start up here on the phone system. So give us a call eight four four to two zero zero nine six five and you'll be one of the first up. And if you wanna send us a text that text number again is two one two three two. Yeah. And we do have plenty of open lines as Larry said right now. So the sooner you call in the more likely you are to get in line and get that call and save money because that's what Larry is doing for you. What was that six hundred fifty dollars versus all some of them were always five. Yeah. Yeah. I'm like, but but see what it is. You get a a younger generation of technicians. And what happens is they don't have the experience when it comes to diagnosing these internal engine problems. So what is the easiest thing to do. Just recommend a replacement for. The motor. You you see what I'm saying? Nobody wants to go and stick their neck out. And you know, I gotta pull this apart. I'm getting my hands dirty. Chris come. Yeah. Get in there. Eight four four to two zero zero nine six five Larry lakes trying to fix the problems. He doesn't try to find a quick easy solution. He wants to find the best solution for you eight four four to two zero zero nine six five they're lighting up..

Larry lakes Chris two hundred years six hundred fifty dollars
"two hundred years" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

Dear Hank and John

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

"Grow as a community to me public education is one of the massive earth changing innovations of the last two hundred years, and so I really think it's important to vote on those issues because other people definitely feel empowered to vote on them. Even if they don't think they're directly affected by them, as I sure John I got another question comes from Dalton who asks Hank, John. There's a particular spot on my chin that I cut almost every time. I shave I've tried going with the grain against the grain perpendicular to the grain always similar results. Grow a beard and forget about it. But I'm a facial hair is too thin. So look. Awful twenty four. So that's not an issue that is likely to get solved with time. Can you help me shave better? Yes. I have seen roadhouse Dalton. Okay. John. I don't I don't like other than doing what I just did. My eyebrow hairs and just being like, okay. You guys are coming out with tweezers. I don't I don't have much suggestion here help help Dalton. Well, I think the most important thing is actually a it's having a good razor blade. Okay. Having a really sharp razor blade a new razor be it's really working, whether it's shaving cream, or whatever you use to kind of lubricate the surface of your face for shaving really got a work that in carefully. I have a spot that I could probably sixty percent of the time even doing all of these things because there's just one spot on my face. It's near my chin where I don't know if the skin is thinner or what? But I have found that if I really work in the shaving cream stuff that I use us like fancy shaving cream stuff can really work that in for a while. And then I've got a really nice good razor. I can usually avoid getting cut there. I also another thing that I've tried to do is just understand that I can get cut there. And it's not a big deal. It's not the end of the world like cut myself shaving, right before I was on TV for sixty minutes, and they didn't have a hair and makeup department to like fix me up or whatever so Sarah used this magical stuff called makeup on my cut and it went away. And as a result of that. I realized that there is this thing called makeup that can do a lot of different things to make your face look better. And I've been told not to use it by the social order, but the social order is totally wrong about this. Which reminds me joined that this podcast is brought to you by makeup, which is the thing that you can put on your face to make it look slightly different vailable to people of all genders new product out. Now make up. And of course, is also brought to you by good on Chol, Hank. Go Hank distributing obvious advice in an old man's voice. Since earlier today. This is also brought to you by secret dabbing secret, dabbing it occurs alone. Where no one can see. You..

Dalton Hank John facial hair Sarah two hundred years sixty minutes sixty percent
"two hundred years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Of deceit that's gotten built up for one hundred years at least two hundred years now. So we we. Yeah. It's it's going against a machine that is second order that does not that has the inertia that's very very difficult to overcome. So yeah. Yeah. Fifty percent of the public is just not going to wake up to this and tell the few of us stand up and stick our next out and say, I stand for the truth. I let the technical truth emerge. Then if necessary deal with the inevitable conspiracy political issues. Well, and that's that's a good point get to the evidence. I go through it. All I just think it's bizarre that three buildings would all collapse two of which were hit by planes. One was hit by some debris. But. Not enough buildings. Just don't crumble that way. No, no. They sure don't. You're. Absolutely, correct. I mean, if you talk about three buildings this is the third tower that I bring up I with the architects because it doesn't have that pain that we were just talking about relative to three thousand people dying, and these iconic twin towers, we all think we know how they came down we start with what about the third tower. It wasn't hit by a plane. It came down at five twenty in the afternoon after witnesses heard explosions, it has an immediate sudden drop straight down uniformly symmetrically into its own footprint in under seven seconds. And this happens as fast as a bowling bowl falling out of the sky. Absolutely. A ten to a controlled demolition, which we've all seen the old hotels in Las Vegas. So you put them side by side. You cannot tell the difference. And yet NIST the National Institute of standards and technology comes back. Six seven years later to tell us, oh that's building came down by normal author. Let's get into this, Richard. We're gonna take a break, but we'll get into building seven first. Then we'll talk about the other two towers that went down as well. And then next hour. We'll take phone calls. Richard gauge, our special guest on the anniversary of nine eleven. Do you have a photo that you think would interest the coast to coast audience? We're always on the hunt for unique and unusual images. For our photo gallery to submit your image. Simply go to coast to coast, AM dot com and mouse over the media button on the upper navigation bar and you'll.

Richard gauge Las Vegas AM dot NIST National Institute of standard one hundred years two hundred years Six seven years Fifty percent seven seconds
"two hundred years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"You're really not two hundred years Well I'll, tell you feels like I have for that long it's actually been over twenty seven years and that's? That's, a long time to study something Study at twenty four seven so it's been wonderful it is my passion and as you know it's funny about your coast to. Coast grab. A lot of them carry around Glenis has your. Number. Or love by the numbers and they use, it all, the time now they, do they do, it's like a reference guide for life? For them exactly. How old were you not in terms of you know giving me. Your age but I mean how old were you when you started numerology. Little girl I was a teenager when, I started in my, heart was broken I want, to see what I was, told was a psychic turned out she was not, a second per say she was a neurologist and she explained. To me you're just morning the family not just this guy that you broke. Up with, but you're very, close in neurology to the mom and sister and, when she said that it was, like a wake up call for me I'm like oh my gosh. It explained my when. I went to that house I felt. Like, I belonged there but it really wasn't him because we. Were not compatible in numerology we were, a challenge and so that's when I first started First, heartbreak and the money and the numbers and then studying it. For thirteen years before I wrote my first book myself published book gonna says. Your number, and then I, just kept going out there and publishing house picked. Up that book we added one, hundred new pages so it was like the ultimate edition of going. To touch your number. And I've just done it ever since Is a remarkable, thing 'cause Georgia's, very much alive and it's alive if we go. Back to address who actually created this, is he started twenty five hundred years ago but the belief has. Everything has, been like each day has each month that we go through, has, by the world number has vibration and, most importantly people do so when you. Meet somebody you experience energy quickly like you might say oh my gosh, I feel like I've known you my whole life chances are you are compatible and. Neurology but you might be someone. Else and you kind of get tired you're like I don't know why, there was kind of a draining conversation And. That's what I teach my colleague Tim Conway junior who does a show in Los Angeles right before I come on and I do a crossover, with him every night it gets so excited every time you're on the program I mean he just loves listening to you and he's a delight you know one. Time you had me do, his numbers that's right, absolutely and his father's, Tim Conway senior, anybody knows from the Carol Burnett show and comedian. And the son has a lot of, humor to oh yeah yeah and he took after data on that. One but, what he loves the numbers but I'm beginning to wonder yes Everybody seems to love the numbers everybody's, curious about, this I mean all we're going to take calls with you next hour already every phone line is jammed right we're not. Even taking numbers yet but people want to position themselves. So they, don't get left out exactly and and that's how it. Started you, know when I I did radio I was. It was. My. Goodness nineteen ninety five I, was. On KFI talk radio I was supposed to be, on for fifteen minutes promoting comedy because back then, I was, doing. Stand up comedy and I mentioned numerology the. Phone lines went beserk and I, was on for three hours, Georgia I love it It's. Always been true people respond very well to understand who they are and it's nice to have a tool that you can use. That's easier right we don't want it to be so complicated that you can't apply. To your life so I. Do simplifies best I can Glenis McCann's with us numbers. Lady dot com that..

Tim Conway Georgia Glenis KFI Glenis McCann Carol Burnett Los Angeles twenty five hundred years twenty seven years two hundred years fifteen minutes thirteen years three hours
"two hundred years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And women risk their lives often gave to grant us it was well over two hundred years ago now is our forefathers hammered in place a system that would last century creating a nation would help keep the peace worldwide a sanctuary on the planet earth than the fireworks were used to celebrate the declaration was seventeen seventy six but we started using fireworks in seventeen seventy seven which are with one key man who have to win the war and run our nation george washington paul johnson the british writer is one of the greatest historians of our time a few years back he spoke with dennis prager what do we know about him personally what what's we know a great deal in one sense that he left more papers than anyone else of his time personal papers from dr is from the age of fourteen every letter he santo received so i mean in that sense he's very well documented but in another sense he's a very allusive man he didn't easily i'm ben as a difficult man to work out the psychology he possessed and so forth and he baffled his contemporaries some of those closest to him particularly those who fought with him in the wall thought he was a very great man they were very clear on that out such as his vice president john adams underrated him adam thought he was ah very foolish fellow who's been extremely lucky managed to survive mall by bluff then by great intelligence or ability and he attended to ridicule him so forth the truth of the matter is he was a man of great ability was he a man of great intellect i wouldn't say intellect in the sensiti was not an intellectual he wasn't interested in ideas he was in sitting practicalities but he had a library of seven hundred and fifty books which was quite a lot for those days i think he'd read most of them certainly consulted all of them was he a religious man not particularly i mean he was a religious man for social reasons he attended his church and he's hat on the local governing board and so on but he was not a man who all command went to church every sunday he did as a rule but by no means automatic thing i think that his nate nature was a very spiritual if anything he was a very conscientious freemason masonry was an important thought of his life as it was for many of the leaders interestingly indeed yes yes but i would say that he was typical of his time in the late eighteenth century walls a very secular age wolton to spiritual age and yet he invoked god and his inaugural address and invoke god in both senses he invoked god for rhetorical reasons and also for cussing reasons he would say things like to his cabinet when they made life difficult for him by god says i will retire to my estates if you're not careful oh and then that somehow sixth off the more religious it was felt that he'd used god's name in vain yes was he a believing christian would you say that oh i'm sure he was and he was a believing christian he believed in god and in christ but he also believed that religion was an extremely important false in life it was a.

two hundred years
"two hundred years" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

The Church of What's Happening Now

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

"Got acquitted of the witness murders got acquitted of the jury bribery and got acquitted of the cash money laundering he got convicted of writing eight checks on telaviv bank to his attorneys he was convicted of money laundering for paying attorneys with these checks these eight checks judge sentenced to two hundred years in prison so the same stuff that his partner had pled guilty to twenty years he pled guilty got two hundred years so he's gone they got this thing they call acquitted conduct where the judge for whatever reason is allowed to consider for the purpose of sentencing acquitted conduct meaning even though he was acquitted of the murders the judge for the for the purpose of sentencing could consider the other charges that he was acquitted of which sounds to me like a quasiconstitutional we kind of thing it's like alternately you get two hundred years in prison for eight checks ero to your attorney i mean it's it's like an capone thing they got him but they got him creatively let's shut shall we say so it's a crazy story that we were in a pitch meeting yesterday and someone sits when does the story end like one is it come up to i said april twentyseventh two thousand eighteen i'm like it's still going on as we speak discount it should end with us here in the room pitching it to you you buy it and then they can start over and re binge from episode one again it just goes in a circle you know it's a crazy story that just keeps going on and it's a story that if you lived in miami grew up in miami into the nineties in zeros it was front page news.

bribery telaviv bank partner attorney miami capone two hundred years twenty years
"two hundred years" Discussed on FM NewsTalk

FM NewsTalk

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on FM NewsTalk

"What is it that you want us to celebrate what do you want people to take away from the bicentennial other than maybe just a great party or festival somewhere again two hundred years of our history what we're doing specifically with these councils we have a massive travelling exhibit twenty four panel since we're the twenty four state that is going to start at the capital in this december and to the state until about august twenty twenty one as about our struggle for statehood because it was almost toward the union apart for the first time but our partners we have seven partners in this bicentennial alliance we wanna tell the entire two hundred years of history give you some examples one of them deals with are rich literature from tennessee williams too we've got all kinds of literati if you wanna put it that term that we need to celebrate generals we've had some of the greatest generals in american history so we've got two hundred years that we really need to talk about and in about seven minutes we're going to get a preview and a historic look at the general pershing great positively missouri segment here israel history isn't always pretty no it's definitely why do we still need to remember it and talk about well you need to to correct history we're not perfect human beings but if we learn from the past we could possibly correct things for the future one of our largest and most expansive expanding and comprehensive is native american heritage missouri's native american heritage and it's something a lot of people don't realize that there were thousands of people here in missouri before he ever became a state and so we conducted almost a policy of genocide throughout american history and missouri is no different part of that and before we get involved in the middle east and places like syria you know we got i think come to grips with our own history apologize it happened we.

pershing missouri syria tennessee israel two hundred years seven minutes
"two hundred years" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

NewsRadio1620

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

"We had two hundred years ago question but it doesn't do it what technology stars is it increases productivity of humans you use technology increases your productivity in that increases the wage that you can earn and that is the story of progress in this country and so technology is very much your friend as as a worker now i'll say two more things along those lines i is that people sometimes say well that's all well and good but what technology does is it is it makes all these high paying high skill jobs like geneticist and it destroys he's low end jobs like ordertaker at fast food and then people say this and watch because this is the bait and switch this is this is this is the part where you have to pay attention if you really think that that ordertaker is going to become a geneticist professor will become a geneticist or high school biology teacher will get the college job as substitute teacher i'll be hired backfield at high school job and all the way down the line the question is can the people at the bottom do these jobs at the top the question is can everybody do a job a little harder than the one they have today and if you answer to that is yes the technology creates he's awesome new jobs at the top and everybody gets a promotion one one step up and that is the story of that is the story of progress that is why we have full employment and a rising standard of living for two hundred fifty years because technology kept making better and better jobs and we all kept kinda shifting up and taking now if you really are we're like okay all of that's good i'll i'll do that but i really do want to know what are those nine percent of jobs that argument get lost you know for my own edification i had a question cussed that you can take dot com that has all and scored on the test and it tells you but they they go like this how similar or two days of your job that lots of people do then that's probably more likely the automated unlike say the person that restored the chimneys yantai chimneys in my house.

professor yantai two hundred fifty years two hundred years nine percent two days
"two hundred years" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"When got two hundred years to figure it out and i today come before you to endorse is that what i'm supposed to do because he passed away i'm not i don't watch it hit the delay button this is not a sign of disrespect does it sound like a sign of disrespect you know of course of course i know i'm the only one in the world it's not just on on the desk stephen hawking passing away me he must mentioned this you know twice a month and whenever i hear about it i say the same thing where are we gonna go in how are we gonna get one billion people there how are we going to get two billion we're going to get five hundred thousand people there musk musk said he's going to have a mars trip next year if you sign up you're likely to die making the trip while sign me up put me on that first vessel i can't wait to die in the west to compromise mars and people swollen because he can make a rocket land back on earth just as it took off you know what i'll go on musk's first mission to mars i will gladly die to facilitate this effort to colonize someplace why would you go on a trip to mars if you're likely to die on the trip wouldn't that kind of mean failure.

stephen hawking musk musk mars two hundred years
"two hundred years" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Science Friday

"Time for mary shelley was writing from two hundred years ago this year and some the technology and science that was on her mind at that don't which strikes me most of our reading frankenstein who in in now is an adult so to speak is that it is so as you mentioned before 80s so different then boris karloff already the other frankenstein this is an intelligent creature and then unlike the go just gino arbel's around like he doesn't know what you're doing these yeah he's a he's an auto died at he teaches himself to read he teaches himself french and arabic actually to languages he the friends people or he tries to on he's really trying to live this autonomous independent life out in the world and as you might see as you finish up reading ira it's okay that you're not finished yet you'll find out that maybe it's a bit of a tragedy for him more than maybe victor frankenstein i might have a side here i got wall really one of the deaths in there um what if i want to read more stuff for a from a really fast if you're really fustrated we have more stuff for you to read and that is our newsletter that were putting out every monday you can go to our website science friday dot com slash book club and join our newsletter that's going out intel february ninth when we have our wrap up conversation with author elizabeth bear bioethicist josephine johnston we're gonna talk about all the various things that we've thought about it in the last five weeks that's february ninth on our show in the meantime that newsletter is coming for you or you can come for it science friday dot com slash book club we at this week are going to have some highlights from the silicon valley conversation out there we're also going to have a educational resource that our fabulous team put together where you can do your own case study of a modern bioethics uh thought process basically and then of course there's twitter which you may or may be on after that conversation science for us our our house cla are hashtag for the book club is hashtag sifi book club now we also want to hear from you if you have any comments you can phone in your comments right correct that's again are off air after hours voicemail fi.

mary shelley gino arbel josephine johnston twitter boris karloff victor frankenstein intel elizabeth bear two hundred years five weeks
"two hundred years" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Like hi how are you going to be at uh legislation and deal make right and i think in fourteen nineteen that might have been different than might have been switched route it could be the same people but so then we had two hundred years where noone is defenestrate write the check sort of like you know kinda given a little bit of elbow room and then in the interim martin luther comes around you know sometimes eighty years after the initial defenestration and he'd nails his 95 theses to the door and now we have lutheranism now there is protestantism and within the holy roman empire you have a lot of leeway because there is no germany at this point right there are a dozen difference they're just little kingdoms in the dutch easy a little little area and saxony and whatever yeah that's right up countries the palatinate of westphalia etcetera etcetera that's good that israel and so but these little independent nations were were given the leeway to choose whether they were protestant or catholic within the holy roman empire and depending and then may each had a vote who would be the emperor of the holy roman empire so there was all this political sort of an electoral college you get your updates nearbly states as ran everybody as a affixed representation of and they were actually called electors is like electoral college yeah it's yeah the original version of kind of these look these kings get to pick the emperor and is the origin of our sort of weird american tradition of like every state will uh have a guy who makes who pulls a lever giving it comes from these european conglomerations it's an interesting question because it it seems like a weird anachronism certainly like we we pride ourselves on having representative democracy be a direct from the greeks but ideally we have this weird german intervening thing yeah yeah it's a i think in fact that may be.

martin luther israel electoral college germany saxony representative two hundred years eighty years
"two hundred years" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Omnibus

"Like hi how are you going to be at uh legislation and deal make right and i think in fourteen nineteen that might have been different that might have been switched around it could be the same people but so then we had two hundred years where noone is defenestrate write the check sorta like you know kind of given a little bit of elbow room and then in the interim martin luther uh comes around you know sometimes eighty years after the initial defenestration and he'd nails his 95 theses to the door and now we have lutheranism now there is protestantism and within the holy roman empire you have a lot of leeway because there is no germany at this point right there are a dozen different they're just little kingdoms in the dutch easy a little little thin area and saxony and whatever yeah that's right a lead up countries the the palatinate of westphalia etcetera etcetera that's good i thought that israel and so but these little independent nations were were given the leeway to choose whether they were protestant or catholic within the holy roman empire and depending and then they each had a vote who would be the emperor of the holy roman empire so there was all this political sort of an electoral college irritates nearbly states as ran everybody as a affixed representation and they were actually called electors is like electoral college yeah it's yeah the original version of kind of these look these kings get to pick the emperor is this the origin of our sort of weird american tradition of like every state will uh have a guy who makes who pulled a lever giving it comes from these european conglomerations it's an interesting question because it it seems like a weird anachronism certainly like we we pride ourselves on having representative democracy be a direct from the greeks but ideally we have this weird german intervening thing yeah yeah it's a i think in fact that may be.

israel electoral college martin luther germany saxony representative two hundred years eighty years
"two hundred years" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on KPCC

"More than two hundred years ago mozart premiered the magic flute in vienna the opera is a love story of a handsome prints who travels far and wide to rescue a beautiful princess from the forces of evil now cornerstone theaters artistic director michael john goddesses has adapted mozarts famous work two spokesman gregson there at the magic flute would be a good inspiration to write a play that allow for lira gholam lightness and love as well as some real darkens leeds cold the magic fruit and it explores the crossroads of growing food protecting our planet and all types of hunger when you see a cornerstone show it's always a mix of actors telling the story some are working professionals while others are folks who may have never stepped on a stage but they belong to the group that the stories about they feel comfortable in this stage manager nikki hiding there is that people that just like they like oh yeah i know any qaeda's eight in him the magic fruit is a capstone that ends cornerstone sixyear exploration of hunger it tells the story of tammi in ex gang member the queen the rain played by veteran cornerstone actress page leong since tammy on a quest to fight drought addiction and poverty no the on his head quite a journey herself after years of exploring the topic of hunger with all kinds of people across la she made a personal discovery she can grow garden anyone bananas ripen they're calling it on a harvested them i take him to the farmer's market i i barter for all my fruits and vegetables and flowers in two connected me to my land creating connections now that is the real magic fruit for cornerstone it's a see the gut feted way back when amending bill roche was still in seventh grade as a young gay kid i felt safety and hope and potential for community in theatre.

qaeda tammi the queen tammy bill roche director michael john leeds nikki la two hundred years
"two hundred years" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"At the tree that he's impaled on that would have been laura just just holding his daughter's hand and feeling love and being unfettered by fear of it by fear of of of what the villa news doing or anything else by just that veil lifting and he feels for the it if you live two hundred years for the last thirty seconds he gets to exalt in something he's never once felt and that the love of a child the pure love of a child the devotion of a child the sense that he is living on through her and the sense that they're connected and that that to me if we could nail that moment and it wasn't about it was much more about the talking about it than writing it was somehow crafted so that that somehow at alchemy happen for you in that moment helen was your production schedule how long did you get to shoot seventy two days some editing last stage of storytelling were similar reasons and editing because he you know you've got away with a two hour twenty minute movie which which says a lot and i'm curious what you're lessons were in editing and if you ever had to fight me buddy no that kinda run solomon's radio was a dream on this movie i excellent say that the brewers never any kind of big battle on this film the um it was really just shaping performance and carving out um uh and pace and kind of a you know it's a challenging film in the sense that it it isn't for the it uh it isn't you know eighty feeder it it it does so it does take its time you know and it and that's part of it being character film and i knew that given what it is that some people are gonna be arriving with the sense of the kind of up cut nature of what it could be and that i couldn't deliver that and the other so was i think most of what happened in the cutting or was trying to find that balance on pacing balance in which we could deliver and give real moments of life for the characters um and give the performers a little bit of space to find the words were there any scenes were tough to con something that was kind of along the eu.

helen solomon brewers laura two hundred years seventy two days thirty seconds twenty minute two hour
"two hundred years" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Signs adviser meant and a good science adviser uh hopefully um in order to be able to make these decisions so so dc's will i mean it's not the only thing that i am concerned about but this is definitely something that the time concerned about uh concerning wartime hopeful about um well i'm really hope for that actually we will find answers to many questions that we do you know don't know the answers to add new about two hundred years ago i i working astrophysics and cosmology a about one hundred years ago not only that we didn't know the answers we note don't we note today we didn't even know the questions now we know the questions you know so for example i personally am extremely curious about is their life outside the solar system in open in our own moved away galaxy let's say man i actually believe that we are for the first time in the history of humanity at the point where we theme i would say two to three decades we will either find to life in in other places actually find it i don't mean necessarily intelligent let more likely a two elite more simple life yes villa we will find some bio signatures some signatures of life on some other planets or at the very least we will be able to play some meaningful constraints on how rare at meaning if we don't find anything on how rare life acuity is you know and by that i mean you know we would be able perhaps to say something like oh cain all planets that are like earth which are these goldilocks distance from their starred which is neither do all north of called less than ten percent of life in that you know something that and then obstinately estimate you know the the occurrence throughout the united states district malan's so so that so these wanted to but but even more per hips importantly in both the life sciences end in.

dc solar system malan united states one hundred years two hundred years three decades ten percent