36 Burst results for "Two Hundred Years"

Alfred Wegner Takes Continental Drift to the Next Level

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:19 min | 1 d ago

Alfred Wegner Takes Continental Drift to the Next Level

"It was a really interesting guy. Born in eighteen eighty in germany got his degree in astronomy but became meteorologist which was still a rather new field at the time. His primary interest was in the northern polar regions. And how air circulated. He participated in four expeditions to greenland and was one of the first meteorologist to adopt the use of weather balloons. However meteorology and expeditions to greenland aren't what alfred wegener is best known for its for his contributions to geology and geophysics. The idea that he is remembered for began innocently enough on christmas day nineteen ten. He was at his friend's house when he began looking at his brand new world. Atlas he made the observation that south america and africa seemed like they fit together like pieces in a puzzle. I should that he was far from the first person to notice this once. Decent maps began being published. In the last part of the sixteenth century people. i observed the same thing. The first person we know of who made the observation was dutch. Cartographer abraham or telling us or telling us created the first modern atlas in fifteen seventy which means he was probably the first person to have the idea because no one before that really had a good grasp of the geography of the continent's william colby wrote in his book on geologic history. Quote abraham are telling us in his work to doris geographic suggested that the americas were torn away from europe and africa by earthquakes and floods and went on to say the vestiges of the rupture. Reveal themselves if someone brings forward a map of the world and considers carefully the coasts of the three continents and quote. Ortelius was far from alone after him. The idea that the continents fit together somehow kept popping up theater. Christoph lilienthal alexander von humboldt antonio snider pellegrini and alfred russel wallace all made the same observation one or two hundred years before moreover there were several other scientists just a decade before who came to a similar conclusion. In fact. there's a good chance that you probably made the same observation. One of the first times that you saw a world map they took the idea to another level however he began by cutting up maps and piecing the landmasses together like a puzzle. He was able to put the continents together into one giant continent that he named panja from the greek words for all and land.

Greenland Cartographer Abraham Alfred Wegener William Colby Doris Geographic Africa Germany Ortelius South America Christoph Lilienthal Alexander Abraham Americas Alfred Russel Wallace Europe Panja
Fresh update on "two hundred years" discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

Uncommon Knowledge

00:28 sec | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "two hundred years" discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

"Or what but it was undermining efforts and it had strategic turns of sort because it was new so there was so many things against us and yet and yet from two thousand fifteen. You can argue that. The us military was not a active combat role. Day day. had stabilizing at least stabilize it. That had in the way that alexander two hundred years of a successor Pirate of the third afghan war that the planes the city's the area that you want had been you know complacent and i shouldn't say complacent but compliant rather joe. What are our strategic aims. Were but if you're gonna go into afghan's down.

Alexander United States JOE
The 1619 Project Lies About the Founding Fathers and Slavery

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:55 min | 5 d ago

The 1619 Project Lies About the Founding Fathers and Slavery

"The book is debunking the sixteen nineteen project and boy does it need debunking. It is preposterous. It's being pushed out there Mary you were You you are a resident fellow at the alexander. Hamilton institute for the study of western civilization. I learned i think only last night watching rick. Burns's nineteen ninety nine nine hundred ninety nine documentary about new york that alexander hamilton one of our founding fathers. He was very active in ending slavery. In his this is over two hundred years ago so again the sixteen nineteen project access though. That never happened exactly and another thing. Is i spend a considerable bowl amount of time on. Thomas jefferson one of the big lies of the sixteen. Nineteen project is that he never intended to abolish slavery. Now thomas jefferson owned hundreds of slaves. He was born into a slave owning family but even for him. That is completely false. He spent his life trying to figure out a way to end slavery peacefully how to how to avoid a civil war he saw that coming and so is completely false to even charge. Thomas jefferson with wanting to continue slavery. That is completely false. It may not be in the way that nicole. Hannah jones in the other riders. What have it which was to start a communist revolution. But he was someone who did want to abolish slavery peacefully.

Hamilton Institute For The Stu Alexander Hamilton Thomas Jefferson Burns Rick Mary New York Hannah Jones Nicole
A Dutch Group May Have a Way to Cut Carbon Emissions

Environment: NPR

02:11 min | 2 weeks ago

A Dutch Group May Have a Way to Cut Carbon Emissions

"Un estimates that twenty percent of global carbon emissions come from residential buildings. A dutch organization thinks it might have found a way to drastically cut that number. Here's villa marks at the hague of all. The niche on tuna have lived in the same apartment in the dutch capital for the past four decades. Last year. they're building gonna makeover with triple glazed windows and a new insulated facade entail every everybody and the whole house is now warm yorker says with much lower energy costs. Almost six thousand other dutch homes have been through a similar retrofit devised by the nonprofit group. Energy sprung or energy leap. They end objective should be buying a retrofit as easy as buying a new kitchen. In ron boehner helped found energy sprung in two thousand ten and it's worked with banks regulators engineers and entrepreneurs to develop the best retrofit approach for homes worldwide. Eighty percent of the buildings that will be here in twenty fifty at least in europe have already been built and they were not built to standard that had in mind that we had to eliminate carbon emissions. And so unless we do that. Too all the buildings. We're never going to get the. I wouldn't say never but not within the timeframe that we got left. We don't have two hundred years to phase out carbon during the small dutch china limited votes. That prefabricated facades that can simply be hooked onto outside of existing old homes improving the energy efficiency eighty percent the undershirts woman from the facade manufacturer. Rc panels explains they use lasers to measure a building's dimensions. The size taylor. Doors and windows added to the panels in the factory exactly set course if he does. The door just doesn't open. The units shipped in a complex of three hundred apartments could be wrapped up in a matter of hours. Another element of an enemy sprung. Retrofit is how these homes a heated a separate dutch firm called factories zero bills a single module with heat pumps electric boilers and solar panels. All computer controlled

Ron Boehner UN Villa Europe China Taylor
Ireland’s Population Passes 5m for First Time Since C19th Famine

Pardon My Take

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Ireland’s Population Passes 5m for First Time Since C19th Famine

"The irish irish back okay. Irish population got over five million for the first time since the potato famine so shout out to the irish shameless fleming potato. It only took like two hundred years of never using condoms irish to get their popular back. It's also very weird to think that the entire population was almost wiped out just because potatoes had a tough year and potatoes have like no nutritional value like their entire society was subsisting unlike the least healthy thing until it got wiped out Well we're all at ideas. Know we kind of. I don't know what else we can eat. We

The History of the Electric Car

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:55 min | Last month

The History of the Electric Car

"It or not. The electric automobile is almost two hundred years old in eighteen. Twenty eight hungarian priest by the name of unused djedovic created a simple electric motor and may have created a device that converted it into motion in eighteen. Thirty two scottish inventor robert anderson created a very simple vehicle which is basically a carriage a non rechargeable electric battery into crude electric motor. It didn't go very far and it didn't go very fast. But it was a self-propelled electric vehicle. Electric vehicles were mostly novelties. And weren't something that could find practical use. There was no centralized electrical generation at the time. And there were. No wires transmitting electricity. And moreover every time you use the car you had to get a brand new battery. It isn't believed that any of these very early vehicles actually ever carried a passenger. Many people in the mid nineteenth century created electric devices which moved including prototype electric trains however the fundamental problem that electric vehicles run into for poor batteries and very inefficient motors. The first big development came in eighteen fifty nine by french physicist guest on plenty who invented the acid lead battery. This was a breakthrough in that. The battery can be recharged over and over. Even though there had been improvements over the years this is still basically the same type of battery found in most cars today in eighteen. Eighty one french inventor gustav trevi created the first thing that we would probably recognize as an automobile. It was an electrically driven vehicle. That could carry a pasture down a public street trevi. Interestingly enough also applied electric motor to a boat thus creating the world's first outboard motor in eighteen eighty two englishman. Thomas parker produced a commercial electric vehicle. It wasn't until eighteen. Five that german engineer karl benz invented the first internal combustion engine automobile and the name benz should ring a bell to anyone who's remotely familiar with cars.

Djedovic Robert Anderson Gustav Trevi Thomas Parker Karl Benz Benz
The Significance of the Alamo

The Experiment

01:58 min | Last month

The Significance of the Alamo

"Happens at the alamo monument. Every day journalist brian burrow is a texan who writes books about texas history and he says people pay tribute to that history all the time at the alamo monument in san antonio texas it's like maca everybody in texas goes to the alamo generally multiple times. This is the jerusalem of texas. This is a secular holy place to texas. it's holy because in eighteen thirty six. The story goes that it was the site of an epic battle to make texas independent from mexico story for going on two hundred years. It's always been that. You know. Jim buoy davy. Crockett all went down in texas to fight. This dashed her mexican dictator. Santa ana course. Everybody was surrounded and killed. Texans lost at the alamo but that battle was said to be a turning point those men who died there were martyrs because after that taxes was finally able to defeat mexico texan colonists were fighting for liberty they were fighting against oppression and they chose to give up their lives at the alamo so that we could what has become the modern american state of texas. That's why some texans still repeat the famous battlecry. Remember the alamo to honor the martyrs who died. There and texans are fiercely protected of this history. I'm eighty miles north. I rallied down. To the alamo plaza. Every time there was a protest that threatened to turn angry. It's all i would do. And so this past june. Brian heard about a protest at the alamo. He didn't think much of it. I

Alamo Monument Texas Brian Burrow Jim Buoy Mexico San Antonio Crockett Jerusalem Santa Ana Texans Alamo Plaza Brian
The Phenomenon Of "Coffin Births"

Unexplained Mysteries

02:10 min | 2 months ago

The Phenomenon Of "Coffin Births"

"Francois are a vias dissuade so lifted a living baby boy out of his wife's coffin. He thought it was a miracle to celebrate his son's birth he named the child. Feast dilatot french for son of the earth. The boy's name would forever be synonymous with coffin births. But he wasn't the only example of a post mortem delivery or even the first there had been other documented examples like one from roughly two hundred years prior during a time of gruesome bloodshed in europe in sixteenth century spain. The inquisition was a tool for catholic. Monarchs to keep control to stop rebellion before it started. Inquisitors traveled around the country and rooted out heresy including anti-catholic and anti royal sentiment. Those accused of betraying the throne were punished severely with practices that ranged from torture to execution. Nobody was safe not even pregnant women in one case in fifteen fifty one. The inquisition tried and sentenced a pregnant woman to death by hanging. These deaths were meant to be examples for the public reminders. Of what happens to those who choose to defy the powerful institutions that govern their lives. The woman's body remained dangling from the gallows long after her death about four hours. After the execution passersby noticed something strange according to his self-proclaimed medical professional from the time quote two living children fell from her womb. This was the first written record of what is now called postmortem. Fetal expulsion given. There aren't any other accounts of this incident. It's impossible to verify. It could have been falsified or exaggerated to illustrate the brutality of the spanish inquisition. But it's probably fair to say that until this moment humans never magin. A corpse could deliver a child

Francois Spain Europe Magin
Why Do Americans Celebrate the Fourth of July with Fireworks?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

02:08 min | 2 months ago

Why Do Americans Celebrate the Fourth of July with Fireworks?

"Does this sound familiar at all. Without a visual clue it might be a little hard to figure out. But that's the sound of fireworks. Many of you are curious about how these celebratory explosions work. And why we use them. Historians and archaeologists think fireworks started in china. Maybe as early as twenty two hundred years ago and they've been used in europe and other parts of the world for at least eight hundred years in the united states where our show is based they've become a big tradition on the fourth of july. So hi my name is nicholas in six years old. And i live in plymouth michigan and i want to know why people do fireworks on the fourth of july. Thank you bye while nicholas. Americans have been celebrating. July fourth fireworks since seventeen. Seventy seven the first anniversary of the signing of the declaration of independence. John adams was one of the people who signed that document in seventeen. Seventy six a year earlier declaring their wish for the american colonies to become independent from england. Afterwards adams wrote to his wife that he wanted that day to be celebrated with lots of parades shows bonfires bells illuminations. Adams was a well known person. In the early days of the united states he later became the first vice president and the second president so his wish would have been shared with others as well and so on the one year anniversary of the signing. The city of philadelphia had a big celebration with thirteen fireworks. One for each of the original thirteen colonies. Now john adams didn't come up with this idea entirely on his own. English royalty had been using fireworks for national celebrations since at least the thirteenth century. Which went fireworks came to europe. They were widely in use by the fifteenth century. That's about six hundred years ago. But they were hard to find in the early days of the united states so celebrations back then often included guns and cannons more than actual fireworks.

Nicholas John Adams United States Plymouth Europe China Michigan Adams England Philadelphia
Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu, Book Review

Mere Mortals Book Reviews

02:09 min | 3 months ago

Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu, Book Review

"I had for you the book the dow de ching by loud z and actually have two versions of this. There is the first translated by stephen mitchell and then another one which is by dc. lau before. I talk about why read translations go to chat about the dow de ching itself and the author lousy. This was supposedly written or at least created somewhere between six hundred to two hundred bc. And there's two versions of who it is and what this is. There is the more traditional version which it was written by one person lousy and that he was a contemporary of confucius this place at the back in time closer to the six hundred to four hundred bc. There's some mythical stories on the origin of him saying he existed two hundred years like he was a some semi multiple type of person. And then there's the more modern version which is scholars looking at saying We're not exactly sure that this was written by solely one person and the name themself loud z. Can actually be translated to something like the elderly. The old man the sage and so they think it was more written after the time of confucius almost as a backlash to it not a backlash in the sense of the essential shrunk z. But more of something that came afterwards and then it could have been written by many people and has just one person as the traditional rider such as harm in the grape myths and this was more a bunch of things put together. And it's not exactly certain that it's like one person ridden at one time. The dow de ching itself is translated. Something like the way of integrity or the text on the path of virtue. Something like that. And this is one of the fundamental texts of taoism and it was the first and probably the most well known as well and so therefore lousy is the most northern of the towel west masses or the towers sages. this is written in the style of eighty-one versus and each verse has somewhere between four to thirty lines. Most of them hovering her inbetween that sort of eight to sixteen period.

Stephen Mitchell LAU
The case for co-ops, the invisible giant of the economy | Anu Puusa [TEST]

TED Talks Daily

07:31 min | 4 months ago

The case for co-ops, the invisible giant of the economy | Anu Puusa [TEST]

"Wow i get to do that a lot around here. It's finally someone else's turn. So yes i happen to marital wonderful man named ted which is pretty rare in finland where i'm from. It's not a typical finnish name at. Aw trust me i myself. I'm a business professor. And i love teaching but you know what my students are fed up. They have really fed up. With the way the business is growing the environment and making wealth inequality was and putting money and profits above all else. And what really makes them mad is when i tell them about the cooperative movement the angry because once they understand how cooperatives they feel like a secret solution has been kept hayden before i tell you more about why cooperative sauce so great. I want to explain what they are. A corporate. dave is an organization that is owned by its members who are also its customer and decision maker and unlike most businesses where certain owners can buy more power and influence in a corporate day of every member has one vote which was the revolutionary idea back when the model was first introduced a regular mind not dimension a woman with no significant means or prestigious position in the society as an owner and partner in business on heard of perhaps it's still a bit revolutionary. Copa dave's exist in a sweet spot between the for profit and nonprofit worlds. They uniqueness is based on the idea of duality. They have two distinct but complementary roles on one hand they act like any other business and try to make money but on the other hand cooperatives are and do so much more they are scented enterprises run by and for then members and they tried to achieve economical but also social and cultural goes to benefit those members who are just regular people like you and me and what has happened for. Almost two hundred years is that cooperatives have proven to make decisions with a view across generations instead of quarter to quarter to benefit more people and wells in communities that might not otherwise attract investment while. Still being competitive and innovative. Sounds pretty good right. I guess that's why. At the end of a clause the other day student all red and chest up basically shouted at me of always been a straight a student. Done all the work read. All the books are now you telling me that all my life. I've missed hearing about a movement with this magnitude. I get this a lot. The organized corporate they've movement started in eighteen forty four with the russia's society of equitable pioneers. This was a group of weavers and artisans who are of desperation. Opened a store together to sell things that they could neither get nor afford alone. The cooperative movements from there and became a global phenomenon. Many of the modern day credit unions and farm credit systems. You see in. North america are descendants of the famous cooperative reiffeisen system in germany and here in finland. A man named hanis gephardt is considered to be the father of the finnish cooperative movement in the nineteenth century. He introduced cooperatives to help. People tackle debt poverty and unemployment. It turns out. This is the foundation opo country known for its democratic values high quality education and the happiness of its citizens and this line of impact of cooperative movement can be found in other places in the world to. I'm proud to say that invalided terms. Finland is one of the most cooperative countries in the world. We have about five point. Five million people who have over seven million memberships in cooperatives. That's run everything from groceries to banks each time. I stop at grocery cooperative. When i feel in my guest tank edo jointly owned restaurant. Stay at a hotel or buy clothes. Ohad west of i could bonuses. That can be up to five percent. And when i pay with bank card get an additional half percent off and i know that win. The copa davis doing well. It's not funding a single person's luxury vacation in the bahamas every year. A governance body comprised of elected representatives decides. How any operating surplus will be used. Some of the money will go back to the members. For example this year all consume the corporate dave boyer's caroline also or beco- or as we call it it's part of the group is the biggest corporate of croup in finland. They had a so close of two percent or members purchases and twelve percent return on money invested. When you add up the savings and the return my family received more than two thousand years back which is more than we spend on groceries in one month not to mention that across race above seven percent cheaper than its main competitor. i'm a member owner intrigue cooperatives and my husband has four memberships consumer a bank an insurance and water cooperative. We have two beautiful girls who are ten and twelve years old. And they're also member owners of the s group then. Memberships caused us one hundred euros. Each we want to pass on the legacy and teach them about the benefits of corporate gives early on and of course they're very happy about the yearly interest on cooperative capital. But it's just about us getting money back. It's about the greater good for our community. I'm not only talking about taxes and employment. Our consumer cooperative is the biggest employer in the area. I'm talking about support for young people. Sports arts university and cultural events for example as a member of the board of beco- or a few years ago we agreed to build a sports hall fully exa which is a nearby city here in the eastern part of finland belonging to our cooperatives operational area after we built it. The city signed a very long term rental agreement with us so financially investment made sense and of course it was a major gesture to the local people who not have proper facilities to do all kinds of sports in another case. We ended up rejecting the investment proposal regarding building a senior house downtown. The idea was very good one but we declined because it was the big hosting complex requiring a lot of capital with low expected investment return that would only serve a small part of the membership less than one percent of our over one hundred thousand members and therefore we decided against it

Finland Copa Dave Society Of Equitable Pioneers Hanis Gephardt Hayden TED Dave Boyer Dave Russia North America Germany Bahamas Sports Arts University Caroline Board Of Beco
A highlight from Under My Skin

Life in the Son

05:03 min | 5 months ago

A highlight from Under My Skin

"Hey, how're you doing this morning. Good to have you back. And I hope you're ready for today. It's going to be an interesting day. Today is going to be the day that I do something that most people don't expect or don't like prisons to do because it seems so out of character for Christian but bear in mind now. There is such thing as righteous indignation but see. That doesn't come from the Christian. That actually comes from one. That Christian spends most of his time with being christ and quite frankly no Christian can really ever admit to having anything rightist in and of itself because it doesn't exist so when we do talk about things or Point things out. That isn't right away. Like I'm going to do today is basically going to run . But here's the thing is about things that are as anti-god as you can get and don't get me wrong. There's nothing in me. That is absolutely rises. Accept cries to his Emmy and who by the way is quite righteous enough to point out sayings that I'm going to talk about today and the thing is it's not about being a hypocrite. Because i will be the first one to tell you that. I have a hard time sometimes walking Christian wall because god does set the bar pretty high however he does make it possible to reach that ball whether we reach that bar at any particular time is entirely up to us and because of this war with the place that kind of complicates things a little bit but it does get better with time so I guess what I'm trying to say is once a person an one who is lost approaches the cross in total repentance and accept Jesus as the savior that does not mean that person just became one hundred percent perfect. If that person lived as chris for the next two hundred years he would be nowhere near perfection. so I'm just saying that is the beginning of moran. I'll go into it later. But the idea is to remember first of all one who is saved still has to war with the old self because you know his mind and his flesh is still pretty. Well existent okay. And as far as perfection goes no human being on the face of the planet war ever be perfect in this place in this world. So you know. I think. I'm saying that more because more than anything. Because I'm getting tired of being called a hypocrite because are not made. But I'm speaking of the Christian body of people calling Christians hypocrites because we still deal with the human element and the people that do this. Talk about our hypocrisy. I mean I'm assuming this because you know what God expects of us. And I'm just to say you now. If you know what God expects of you, then you can't take the spec out of anybody else's I when you got a beaming your wrong. So let's try to put a lid on that. But i'll be back in just a few minutes and i'm going to discuss a few things and i hate to even admit it but i saw i've been seeing things on Facebook and I say things you know walking down the street or in the grocery store i hear things all the time on. It really gave me Fired up I'm not gonna lie. Gets me fired up. But i will say this before. I decided to do anything with this show today. Operate about it so you're going to get inside of me today. I hope. But I'm still going to discuss a few of these things because I think we really need to pay attention to these things and yes I'm gonna run about it but don't worry it won't be so bad if already prayed about it. I've calmed down a little bit right now. I am going to take a brief break. Lou recess at you will. I'll be right back. They'll go away. I

Ministry Faith Jesus GOD Christian Emmy Moran Chris Facebook LOU
Forget Me Knot,  A Journey to Support Caregivers

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

06:55 min | 7 months ago

Forget Me Knot, A Journey to Support Caregivers

"So with me today. All the way from way across the pond is johnny ball. He is with the forget me not charity. It is designed to end the silent suffering of dementia caregivers mostly in the uk. But i'm sure we can expand a little bit someday. So thanks for joining me johnny. So your mom took care of your dad for many years tell me about your dad and your caregiving journey. Yes so my dad. Got fronted dimension when i was full team. Mac i mean we didn't know initially kinda very subtle onset sir some stuff assigns. Some sort of an ocd behavior and habits ejaculated needs to have sort of started coming in and we. We weren't really sure what is meant. Probably when i was seventeen means fooling diagnosed and definitely before at the age tom shanklin saddam was now twenty years ago so he had yes hunts and and then he had to mention until two years ago when he passed away and and the majority of that time he lived at home. My mum and it was just because my sister. Self we guns university on my other system rather Back ceremony on singlehandedly. Careful for him. Full probably nolan probably fifteen years until it's long time i mean as nearly law tougher laws on sarah and tools variants He was to be introspective scare him. You're amazing awesome. But even then i mean did doesn't end full primary care as you know grown same every single day. She still you know she can go on holiday. She just went down and look at the data. even she wasn't enough to all the time she loves him. Most of the to worry. Also vistas right in terms of you always concerned a well-being the and worrying if it comes to bowl of marrying a happy state of mind and that's all still there. Yeah so that was. Conical happens is really back about seeing my mum's dedication. How tough was even though. She handled it incredibly news so stoic. Yeah it was. That serve inspired this inside this expedition. Maturity stop so. How's she doing now. she's doing well. Yeah crazy agree raw. She's she goes now. I'd say sure exactly now so that it was To two hundred years ago died. Since then i guess she suggested completely to new life. Ace i suppose the even though she's a stephanie very different way of living and in some sense of relief. I suppose it's still transitions dara. It's interesting because you still have guilt. Like i know especially now with the holidays coming. There's just times when i think you know. I tried so hard with my mom and like christmas. Two thousand nineteen. Our city. park is full of christmas. Trees that are decorated with different organizations or businesses. Some of them just decorate 'em however they want some decorate them with the theme like one of them was basically a pizza christmas tree so all. The decorations looked like slices of pepperoni slices of pizza. Which is kind of not super christmas. But it was very cute. I took her there because it was bright. It was outside it. You know i thought. Oh she'll love this and it was just like she was like clueless and it was and she was honoring. I think she was having a bad day. And it's hard knowing. That was her last christmas. We did have a really good lunch on the twenty third of december and then everything went to hell after that. So there's interestingly enough you still have like these guilt feelings. Like i should have done more could have done more and it takes a while to get through those i think so. It's i'm i'm finding that with myself and other caregivers that are in my position. So if you guys are experiencing that it's pretty normal which is frustrating. But there it is so. I read on your website that the alzheimer's society which is pretty much the mirror. Image of the alzheimer's association here in the states found that ninety percent caregivers experienced feelings of stress and anxiety weekly more like daily probably at least sixty percent of them struggle to talk about the impact of caregiving on their lives because of feelings of guilt. It's like. I can't complain about what. I'm going through because my loved. One has a tea or alzheimer's or whatever and so how can caregivers balance their needs and the needs of their loved ones. In your opinion like you know have we. Have you thought that one through as you launch charity. I think the as mansell. How things i i think the fittest into that. It's okay to feel the way you feel. i think. Give a lot of as you just explained guilt and extreme sense of gt Which means the facebook does because the caring for fest often before themselves. That i think is important for the mental health of the unification which ben immediately impacts the wellbeing of the patient. They need to care for themselves as well. A member. the average duty of air to themselves as much as they have achieved care to the person benefitting asta and i think inaccessible and really letting mass inside. You know that that's true. I'm giving yourself giving his a brain give yourself the option to feel how you feel and to Except that you need to care about yourself. As well is the vista

Johnny Ball Tom Shanklin Saddam Dementia Johnny Nolan Dara Alzheimer's Society Sarah Alzheimer's Association UK Stephanie Alzheimer's Mansell Facebook BEN
The Xunantunich Account

Haunted Places

05:09 min | 7 months ago

The Xunantunich Account

"Tucked away. Inside the countryside of modern day belize lies one of the greatest standing ruins of the maya civilization shuna on tunisia's ancient name is unknown but historians estimate that the structures of tune each were built beginning in the seventh century. C e however the land had been occupied by the maya for much longer as early as one thousand bc in those first centuries it was just a small village but at some point in the seventh century it began to grow in size and power. The lords of the ancient maya city built ball courts palaces and temples but the city's crown jewel was the structure known as el custodio. A one hundred thirty foot pyramid topped with shrines offices and a royal palace hsun each was a thriving metropolis the center of a powerful kingdom. Then all of a sudden it wasn't the collapse of the my empire was one of the most devastating and dramatic catastrophes in human history. But it didn't happen all at once. The collapse of the classic my civilization occurred not long after shoot onto each was built around eight hundred ce. By the end of the ninth century the region and its majestic monuments almost totally deserted in less than two hundred years. The city's population had nearly vanished. Royal dynasties disappeared. Cities fell to ruin the great pyramids of the maya sat untouched for and were reclaimed by the jungle. But over the next millennium the region was colonized by european settlers by the eighteen. Hundreds of colonists. An interest in the ancient cities and their expeditions uncovered a wealth of artifacts that were shipped away to european museums and auction houses. However these pieces of history provided few clues as to what cataclysm destroyed the maya cities something had caused the empire to crumble yet to this day. We still don't know why but for a lucky few their spirits and shown on tune each who will show them the keys to this ancient mystery. If only they would listen how. To- felt uneasy as he walked through the ancient temples. There were no real dangerous here. No musket wielding british soldiers on horseback but there was a dense fog shrouded. Everything missed but hocine 'to could still see the dark stones covered in moss and the snake like lines that crept up the temple walls most days to walk the extra two and a half miles just to avoid the sight of it but today be didn't have the energy. He hadn't slept much last night or any night in the past three months. Not since his father died a scene to had borrowed money for a decent burial. He thought he'd be able to pay back but then the storm came. It devastated his crop of bananas now. He barely had enough to pay the englishman who owned his land and not a single schilling left for his wife and son. His wife was getting sicker every day. It was the same sickness that had taken his father the same fever and bloody cough and recently his son. Miguel had become to cough to how cintos didn't know why he'd been spared. His wife said it was a spanish applied. Maria said europeans were immune to the diseases. They brought to the maya and the husino often considered himself native. He'd been born on the peninsula. He was european after all had tried everything to raise money for a doctor. He begged from neighbors tried fishing and hunting but his neighbors were just as poor as he was and even if he caught a fish or a deer there was no one to sell it to how seen was watching his wife and son die he felt as if the world was falling apart which might be. Why the temples made him feel so uneasy because that hopelessness must have been how. The maya felt long ago that there was nothing they could do. Cinco continued walking toward the center of the ancient city in front of him. One moss covered building towered above the others a narrow strip of stone steps visible at its front. Something white flashed at the bottom of the steps at first husino fodder was a bird but as he came closer he saw it was a woman. She wore long white repeal and a belt of turquoise beads tight around your waist her arms were piled high with gold and silver bracelets and the skin above her nose had been painted a vibrant red.

Maya City El Custodio Tunisia Miguel Cough Fever Maria Peninsula Cinco White
More Sheep than You Can Count: Transfinite Cardinal Numbers

Breaking Math Podcast

02:08 min | 8 months ago

More Sheep than You Can Count: Transfinite Cardinal Numbers

"What are we talking about today. We're talking about cardinal. Infinity is obviously yes now. You you said infinity's the i love the title. If i may real quick the title of the show is more sheep than you can count obviously. That's an allusion to infinity. I love it a fantastic and the reason why we chose that is because there are sets of things collections of things that cannot be counted and And i mean there's a very real sense like not even all the real numbers right like not real numbers. All natural numbers right one two three four five et cetera. You can count all of them. Theoretically they are called countable because you can put them all in a list that has the first item at the first place the second item at the second place on and on and cover all of them. There are some sets. You cannot do that. With and one of those sets is the set of real numbers. And we'll show why on here but basically you cannot. You cannot list all the real numbers in any way shape or form. You will always leave things out any list no matter if it's infinitely long the really nuanced facts about infinity and that will we've we've realized in the field of mathematics and the last two hundred years one thing. I love about this episode. Though is i got especially interested in this topic when i taught sixth grade math. And what's cool is we're going to get into this in a little while but we had to do these socratic seminars. At the school. I taught out it was a charter. School and the kids started exploring infinity completely on their own and they had these group discussions that got into this and what i found a wonderful is there are. There's absolute overlap between some of their discussions. Like i think one of the topics that was brought up was does a circle. Have the same amount of points as a sphere and yes. I kid you not that we had sixth-graders talking about this socratic discussion. Not not everything was maybe correct in that discussion but most touches on the kind of cardinal anthony that we're gonna talk about today for example the answer to the question of does a circle have the same amount of points. A sphere surprisingly is yes and we will find out why.

Cardinal Cardinal Anthony
How Our Election Process Has Failed Us ~ POLITICALLY INCORRECT on #EATruthRadio w/ Andy Shecktor  - burst 02

(EA) Eternal Affairs TRUTH Radio

10:52 min | 9 months ago

How Our Election Process Has Failed Us ~ POLITICALLY INCORRECT on #EATruthRadio w/ Andy Shecktor - burst 02

"Eating politically incorrect with your host and ruth. Scheckter this week's politically incorrect. Podcast topic is why our election process has failed us. Rock you by colonel airs media dot com also known as ea truth media myself andrew scheckter author of dark water game over into time delegates for donald trump the republican national convention. Please help us with a donation to donate ninety eight online. Remind some bling stored idea media. Online please help keep the truth online. This evening we're going to say a deep prayer to understanding of all this going on and all that is yet to come with faith in god. The god alone knows the past. We will succeed. We must have that faith and we must not give up that faith so dear heavenly father. Let's pray your heavenly father. We pray that you give us the power. And the strength to remain ever vigilant to pass your word on the your strength and courage on not only to others outside the fold which there are many these days to those who call themselves great christians who call themselves great levers in god in whatever form who failed to have the face needed to trust in you heavenly father. Please give us that strength. Please see that we have the power to prevail in your holy name. We pray amen. What are the essential in. The human body can have many chemicals that are our cat. Bottler causing many health related challenges. It's crucial to make sure you're consuming clean super antioxidant drinking water. A great sponsor shares. A technology only helps with inflammation in our body also produces the most hydrating water in the world. Please go to the laker description. Learn about our sponsors premium water technology. Darrell k dot com. So as always. We're gonna start out a little bit slow kind of the opposite of what most broadcast or podcast do. We seem to build up people in the on a live cast over time in new. Y- typically on my podcast. The theme runs through the the the majority of the podcast. If you missed the beginning you may be bored with the end. So it's better to be bored to beginning build up that excitement towards the end we start out with a little bit of a philosophy that i have personally a lot of the christians. We look at the new testament as soon as the book. you know. it's the only book to read. In fact a lot of lot of good practicing christian. Good people carry a new testament around my my church minister of modern day christian fellowship reverts that and takes back the old testament and the important things in the old testament because the old testament is the concrete foundation for the new testament. Without which there is no new testament new testament. We're forgiven of our sins from the old testament. We're forgiven sins of the past. But those sins were based on gifts that were given to us by god. The entire universe given to us by god. There's a lot of great things in the old testament that bring people back into the fold. The number of times. That women are empowered in the old testament. Everyone says oh. It's a man's book about men and is true. Men had a lot of the power back in those days. But when god created god created us in his image man and woman he created them in his image. Now why is that. Such an important statement is probably the most important statement in the entire bible old and new testament and most people ignore it. It's incredibly important because it shows us that we have that power with us. The power of god resides within each and every one of us. If we to accept it choose to use it. We have the power to change the way our country runs. We have the power to change the way we think. And the way others think by believing in ourselves and believing that we are got incarnation essentially. Because that's what the test the old testament says. That's why you don't see god you don't stand up and talk to god but when you talk god hears because all of us in existence every human being a small part of that small piece of god. That's why we need to maintain that power and strength and this election is really proven that most christians sir bible people call themselves bible believers most jews who believe in god and tradition more than anyone gave them and they're still giving up. Oh it's over it's over for donald trump. it's over for america it's done. We've used our last card folks. There's still some trump cards left literally rather than the mon the things that we've lost. Let's have faith. Let's have prayer sessions. Let's have believe until the bitter end until the twentieth of january. Nothing is over. And i'm the sixth of january. We may be surprised house george election ago. I don't know. I talked to god every night. I say god. Please help us please. I love you. Please help us. I trust you. You can't pray for something specific like god. Let trump win. Maybe that's not the best thing for. I don't know i hope. Trump wins the pray for god knows is right. What will that be and why will it they. We have to have faith that the path is right. We have to believe that tower of believing that will make things happen. All right waited long enough on the copy of the night. I just had to get that off. My chest elections the election process. How did we get where we are today at. Thomas jefferson said that a republican last about two hundred years most countries lasts most most democracies last about two hundred years and they fall apart. So how did we get to. We are today and is it possible to fix it. I don't think it's ever going to be fixed. Sadly because there too much monetary interest in in having it broken too much monetary interest in having the lust of the world at your fingertips in the money that it brings in greed lust for luxuries. We are everything. The bible tells you not today but why did it work for so long sadie to go back to the days of the constitution and it was about six. I believe sixteen years after the constitution was written it was actually ratified during that sixteen year. Period founders had many many. Many meetings was after the constitution was written. Couldn't figure out how to actually piece everything together so it would function not just for now to get away from england not just from now to get away if the rule of pope for all time and they knew that this wouldn't last they created they chose to discuss rather a democracy republic an answer and several other forms of ruler of role as well. They came down to a choice that most people don't like to call it that but it was was called a. m. democratic republic now call a constitutional republic but basically the democracy part lies in the fact that we can vote for the people that are supposed to represent us theoretically and those people do the bidding for us they chose a constitutional republic because democracy fails and you can see that right now they want you know pop the popular vote. That's a democracy the popular vote and one hundred and three hundred million. Excuse me one hundred. Two hundred million people live in the cities and one

Christianity Spiritual Patriotic Patriot Andy Shecktor Shecktor Delegate Delegate Shecktor Andrew Shecktor Eternal Affairs Truth Truth Bible Prophecy Conspiracy Facts Truthful Trump Conservative Radio Conservative Talk Eternal Affairs Media Eternal Affairs Radio Eternal Affairs Biselliano Ea Truth Media Ea Truth Radio
A Star Wars and Marvel bonanza

The 3:59

06:16 min | 10 months ago

A Star Wars and Marvel bonanza

"The price hike. It seemed inevitable. I mean it's still cheaper than netflix and considerably cheaper than hvl. Max i would say if people ask me whether or not get disney plus i tend to say like star wars and marvel. Do you have kids at which point. It's definitely word this the sheer volume of content. I'd say it's ok. Okay no for sure. I mean for me. I've got i've got kids. So disney plaza lock. I think anyone who's got a family. This is this is our ramaz. Get a among the many different streaming options that we have nowadays Let's get into the shows. I know star wars near and dear to your heart. So let's let's go there first. They announced or talked about ten shows. Let's let's break out. What are some of the new shows that you're excited for low because of out vehicle order Talk about soka. I dawson brought the character life in live action for the first time in season. Two of the mandalorian and that that's a lot like a backdoor pilot for this show. It's just like suggested that she had her own adventures. going on. this was not a surprise. It is a delight though. It is an interesting we. I think we talked about this earlier. The you know the fact that not to get too deep spoiler as they chee. She was offered a role to mentor. Baby yoda no. You really need to go somewhere else. They felt like definitely had that back door pilot vibe to because like i'm sorry i'm off to other adventures. I've got my own thing. Got to deal with and allow that did seem like a setup for its own show. I'm actually late my own. Tv show salena catch trade this game and it gave a pretty clear idea of what she was up to not to get into splutters between between that and the rebels finale. From a few years ago we have a good idea what her objectives are for this show. Yeah we don't wanna get too deep into spoilers. Maybe we'll we'll devote a whole episode of that later on this year to speculate on what what that might be both water. Somebody other shows that that were announced. It was the next big one we knew this was coming for a long time but they talked about a little with last night and give us a sense that or confirmed that it was filming next march And that christian hated christiansen was returning as dark later. Very very exciting news. That one definitely took me by surprise. tactic territory hidden christmas activator. That's that's interesting. As opposed to advocate skywalker. Which would suggest that he appeared in flashbacks as anikin. But saying he's vader would suggest maybe that he'll appear in four seasons or something that is unclear. It's definitely it's intriguing. Another property was with a character. That's near to many star. Wars fans hearts landau gets his own show yet. These were ten on the ground because we don't know if it's going to be live action or a cgi animated series. I feel like donald glover should be involved. Because he was so well received solo so fingers crossed that he will be returning and then there are a long list of other ones kind of run through them really quickly because we unfortunately only have so much time on this podcast okay so there was the ropes quadrant movie directed by patty jenkins of wonder woman fang which is really exciting. That's super cool. That'd be a fighter pilots. There's the bat batch which will be a follow up to the clone wars at those cartridge orig- use there. There's adore which is about caffeine door from roquan. There's tyco tgi movie which we still don't know what that's about our coop concert raiders of the republic. Which is set around the time. Line of the mandalorian and could be about current june because she became a marshal of the new republic but again that remains unclear star wars visions which is automated shorts from abbey craters. That's really cool quite different the acolytes which obviously is that almost excited with the malls because that is set in the era of the high republic which is two hundred years before the phantom menace. And it's like about some sort of a dark site warrior and it could reveal stuff about the Era some different cool. So those a lot. I know being a super star wars fan. I want to get your opinion on this. Is this too much star wars. It certainly was too much reward announcement. I think parceled out over several years. It should be okay especially since the movies will be quite so frequent. Like i remember when it was only like six months between the last year and solo that felt overwhelming with tv. It's a little different as so you can kind of watch out. I'm at home in a more relaxed environment. it's a lot of star wars. There's no escaping that. Yeah yeah yeah i mean. Brian made a good point before we start recording that you know a lot of these might be one off shows ryden. Obi wan will probably be a one-off sled that that kind of makes sense that they'd wanna have this pipeline but it was a lot to digest all in really what was about thirty minutes a thirty minute presentation just for the star wars section. They're just kept pumping out one announcement after another rapid fire a lot but also i think that's partly a function of the fact that they're no conventions this year star wars celebration was

Disney Plaza Salena Soka Anikin Netflix Patty Jenkins Dawson Disney MAX Christiansen Donald Glover Skywalker Landau Tyco New Republic Obi Wan Brian
It's coronavirus do-over time. What would we do differently?

Coronacast

04:01 min | 10 months ago

It's coronavirus do-over time. What would we do differently?

"I'm health reported teigen tyler an opposition and journalists alter norman swan wednesday the ninth of december. And it's episode. Two hundred of the corona cast so when we hit the one hundredth episode. We buy setback and went. Oh my gosh. We never thought we'd get to one hundred two hundred. I know it was like two hundred years two hundred days. Well it feels like a silent day to answer these questions from dane. Who says what do you think is the most important thing we've learned about. Nineteen in the last year and if we had a time over again what would we do differently. Well let's do something different. You answer that first to you. Know what i think. At an individual level we would have been more mentally prepared for the challenges of these. See the personal challenges of these see but from an infection control perspective especially in australia Harto corinthian outbreaks notwithstanding. I really do think that we have done an incredible job of keeping levels of the virus incredibly low in australia when we say overseas. What could have been here in australia if we hadn't taken that really hard stance from the beginning. So here's what. I think we would do differently. So the first thing. I'll start is internationally and this is a wishlist. I wish that we had had a more cooperative world when the virus hit if we'd had a more cooperative world you know. This is just wishful thinking but we had a habit of world without authoritarian fragile leaders in china russia and the united states. This would be a very different pandemic. in fact it may never even escape from china because they would have dealt with it transparently and they would have controlled it than they would have told people about it and they're told people about it in december. They're abroad in international help into wuhan market and checked where come from and the world would have pulled together on china's behalf and helped china out but we came into an environment where nations were operating by themselves and it was every state for themselves. And that's the sex. The ground for the pandemic so do differently do international relations differently. The biology of a pandemic organism is almost the least important part of that organism of the pandemic loss of different organisms can cause pandemics. It's human behavior that causes the pandemic so the way we live the way we act. Politics works so international travel works. That's what creates a pandemic what we would do. Differently is have a world that's more pandemic aware and aware of their behavior and aware of the broader implications beyond beyond the personal. That's what i would do differently than international level. The wild thing about that is that if we had done that we never would have nine. What scale of crisis. We would have averted but we do know that. This isn't going to be the last pandemic pathogen that if we ever encounter and saw are we need to take these lessons going forward so that the next pandemic is a fisa like this one should main. I'm a comeback to something. We said on corona cast probably in march march april the of the beginning when prevention works. Nothing happens and so the most important thing we've learned we should have learnt is or if you went back in time is that the general community knows that when you actually have prevention working nothing happens. So that's a lesson for everything and we're facing catastrophe with climate change but it's a slow moving catastrophe and if we actually act on climate change not very much will happen and that's what you actually want to happen. So people talk about all paul early in the seventy s sixty s and seventy s doomsayers population and. so on. The are all wrong because nothing happened. Nothing happened because people did some stuff about that sort of thing and of course nothing happened. So what we learn from this is successful. Prevention is dull and boring because nothing happens. There's no drama.

Teigen Tyler Norman Swan Australia China Dane Wuhan Russia United States Corona Paul
Globalization is ending. What's next?

TED Talks Daily

03:31 min | 10 months ago

Globalization is ending. What's next?

"We are at the end of globalization. We taken globalization for granted and as it drifts into history. We're going to miss. The second wave of globalization begun in the nineties and it delivered a great deal. Billions of people rose out of poverty. More impressively both prattled congress like vietnam and bangladesh increased by over six times in the last twenty years. The number of democracies rose in countries as diverse as chile malaysia. Estonia held free and fair elections. The role of women improved in many parts of the world. If you look at wages policy and companies like spain or access to education in countries like saudi arabia economically supply chains spread like webs around the world with car parts criss crossing borders before the final product. Coming into place is also changed the way we live now. it's changed our diets. It's changed how we communicate how we consume news. An entertainment how we travel and how we work but no globalization is on its deathbed. It's run into the limitations of its own. Success inequality a new record levels of business for example world to gdp is now pushing that was not seen since the polio wars. Two hundred years ago. Show us that. The advantages of globalization have been mis directed. The global financial crisis was the result of this mismanagement. And since then policymakers have done little but contain rather than solve the problems of our age. Now some highly globalised countries. Such as arlanda in the netherlands managed to improve income inequality in their countries by better distributing the bounties of globalization to higher taxes and social welfare programs. Other countries have not been as good russia. And especially the united states hub extreme levels of wealth in policy more extreme even during the time of the roman empire and this is convinced. Many people that globalization is against them and that the bounties of globalization have not been shared with the many a now in twenty twenty were confronted by the pandemic which has shaken the groaned under us on further exposed the frailties of the globalized world order in past international crisis. Most of them economic or geopolitical the hers usually ultimately been a sense of a committee to save the world leaders leading nations would come together but this time uniquely there has been no such collaboration against the backdrop of trade wars. Some countries like the. Us have outbid others for masks. There's been hacking of vaccine programs on common enemy. The pandemic has not been met with the common response to any hope that we might have a world vaccine or world. Recovery program is in vain. Snow worth the end over nira in history. An era that began with the fall of communism that set in train the flow of trade of finance of people under ideas

Chile Malaysia Arlanda Estonia Bangladesh Vietnam Saudi Arabia Congress Spain The Netherlands Russia United States
"two hundred years" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on WLAC

"Sixty million bison two hundred years ago. We killed them. All replace them with one hundred twenty million cows. In volume of flatulence, and Eric tation, probably more important. We've done more damage to the earth. If that's what you're measuring. Cory Booker today, giving a speech talking about diet. Americans have a bad diet. Folks, we should never. We should never lose an election. Here's all you. Gotta say. House. Democrats don't want you to ever eat. Another hamburger. I'm not joking. If they had their way if they could get away with it. You'd never eat another hamburger. And you know, what really pisses me off about this. These multimillionaire movie stars and. These folks. They have a personal chef coming into their home. Cooking their meals. And once they don't eat meat anymore. They wanna turn around. No worse zealot than the recently converted. I don't think anybody should have meat because I've decided I'm going vegan. If I'm going vegan hotline virtue signal to you. And I would like to declare that you shouldn't have meat either..

Cory Booker Eric tation two hundred years
"two hundred years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"More than two hundred years later for the firm the foundation of the United States of America, the tripartite government, the legislative the Congress's I the executive is second article, and the judiciary the three branches. But at this point March fourth eighteen o one three hundred officials and guests watching in the Senate chamber chief Justice John Marshall swears in Thomas Jefferson to be the president of the supreme court. They are at odds immediately because Harlow Joe Jefferson thinks that the supreme court is unnecessary. Correct. The constitution did not create a very powerful supreme court. The supreme court under the constitution was simply an appeals court to hear cases in federal court. And it was a final appeal and that was it. But it didn't have the judiciary powers at that time. Jefferson came in and wanted to tear down all the federalist structure that Washington and Adams had built and the only thing left that hadn't really been built up under federalism, or what was the judiciary Jefferson came in and wanted to pack the judiciary, and and really destroy its power. So the first thing he does is his ram through judiciary acting congress. They basically put spring court in exile sends them all onto circuit duty and separate some also that they can't make a single decision because Adams had put in the judicial activation activation one and Jefferson knows that he can dislodge that by forcing the legislature to obey him. In the meantime, we have to introduce Marbury because I learned from you Harlow that Marbury versus Madison the famous fundamental. Case. And we'll discuss it in depth happens early in the jeffersonian administration Jefferson, ignores it and tries to do way with it for two years when he spends the court, and John Marshall is responsible for for staying with it for bringing it back. Well, before a last few days before the end of his administration, actor your djing of John Marshall is secretary of State John Adams. Saw that the only way to preserve federalism, and strong central government was to build up the judiciary. So he made a whole slew of appointment of of confirmed federalists to various judgeships at every level, including the supreme court where he named Marshall chief Justice at a lower level. He appointed a whole bunch of justices of the peace and the lower court judges and one of these justices.

supreme court Harlow Joe Jefferson judiciary Justice John Marshall John Adams Congress United States Senate chamber Marbury America executive president Madison Washington two hundred years two years
"two hundred years" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And then once you're there, it's a matter of you're living in a habit. I the very first problem is how do we warm this planet? That's a tear forming question, how do we warm this planet which will release the frozen carbon dioxide in the southern polarized Cup and start to thicken up an atmosphere. You can also artificially thick enough the atmosphere with a handful of different chemicals that we talk about in the series. And as you do that the atmosphere protects you from radiation. It also increases the atmospheric pressure, obviously. So people can start walking around. They can't breathe yet. The atmosphere will be the air will be toxic or I guess not really toxic. The air will just not have what we need was dissolved oxygen can bring. Around a little oxygen tank with you wherever you go. And you know, you'd be in probably a sweatshirt and jeans. Hopefully, I mean, that's that's I think like one hundred years out hundred fifty years out of two years from now there's a wide range here. We just haven't done it. So I don't know. I mean, some people some people say with advances in technology into for chemical roaches. It could be a hundred years. Some people say two hundred years two hundred is the first number that I encountered like twenty years ago. When I I thought that this was a kid, and I was looking into all this stuff two hundred year tariff warming thing is sort of. I think that's like the conservative estimate, and is depending on what happens between now. And then we could do it a lot a lot faster. I mean, we're warming this planet pretty quick, and we're trying not to so imagine for really putting our mind to it association of these concepts like building an atmosphere, or I think you also talk about building an ocean on Mars, do these require any scientific breakthroughs done. No, none. None. No, no, no. The the scientists there. The technology. I think engineered a hydrologic cycle. Right. I mean earth it'll have to engineer a hydro LA. So the thing about building an ocean..

engineer hundred fifty years one hundred years two hundred years two hundred year hundred years twenty years two years
"two hundred years" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Double Toasted

"If you're going to try and do this at least be kinda current with in speaking a music store in things that make more sense. There's music in this movie that doesn't happen for over two hundred years later. Sure, Johnny Riley puts on a record that he because he's gonna have some sexy moment with one of the lead actresses in here. And he puts it on his unchained melody from the righteous brothers. What they don't explain it. Don't even do don't even do a reference to ghost which made them famous song famous. It's just it's just playing. I don't know why you know, they don't they don't explain with a time travel. Brought them the album or something. Constantly doing that through the whole movie Marne? And the third worst thing about this is that. It's the third worst things. Probably the best thing about the movie, it actually, I could see Bragan Trump supporters in haters together because it's a movie that thanks is. So smart. Thanks is so clever because stopped ahead this long diatribe about Donald Trump pointing out obvious man, man. Okay. I'm so sick of every thermally. We see this year being an allegory Donald Trump enough already and even allegory they actually just spouting off things that are just point blank on whether you fit for Trump or not, but I can tell you if the if the data was full it would have been Trump supporters and hated the like like shut the fuck up. We know we get it. Looking person usually right? Oh, right. Yeah. Man, even got make America. Great again, joking there. Do they got puts on he puts on a fares says make make make England great again isn't even does like ties in another ties and nothing man. I can't even defend this the story parts of this movie. Because the story parts don't even make sense themselves. The origin of Sherlock, Holmes? He's a he's a genius because well he decides he wants to be oh, he gets tired of being picked on shit. Yeah. Martin is that easy. He gets tired of being picked on. He says, you know, what I'm just going to start getting people expelled from from school by going through all elements and pulling up these clues and just picking up things about him. Because he got beat them is like it's not because he studied is not because he's just naturally that smart. He just like I'm tired of get my as well. So. It's a waste of resources this movie this I've seen I'm not even joking. The fifteen year olds on YouTube who who have more talent and a five minute clip..

Donald Trump Bragan Trump Trump Martin Johnny Riley YouTube England Holmes America Sherlock two hundred years fifteen year five minute
"two hundred years" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

Dear Hank and John

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

"Grow as a community to me public education is one of the massive earth changing innovations of the last two hundred years, and so I really think it's important to vote on those issues because other people definitely feel empowered to vote on them. Even if they don't think they're directly affected by them, as I sure John I got another question comes from Dalton who asks Hank, John. There's a particular spot on my chin that I cut almost every time. I shave I've tried going with the grain against the grain perpendicular to the grain always similar results. Grow a beard and forget about it. But I'm a facial hair is too thin. So look. Awful twenty four. So that's not an issue that is likely to get solved with time. Can you help me shave better? Yes. I have seen roadhouse Dalton. Okay. John. I don't I don't like other than doing what I just did. My eyebrow hairs and just being like, okay. You guys are coming out with tweezers. I don't I don't have much suggestion here help help Dalton. Well, I think the most important thing is actually a it's having a good razor blade. Okay. Having a really sharp razor blade a new razor be it's really working, whether it's shaving cream, or whatever you use to kind of lubricate the surface of your face for shaving really got a work that in carefully. I have a spot that I could probably sixty percent of the time even doing all of these things because there's just one spot on my face. It's near my chin where I don't know if the skin is thinner or what? But I have found that if I really work in the shaving cream stuff that I use us like fancy shaving cream stuff can really work that in for a while. And then I've got a really nice good razor. I can usually avoid getting cut there. I also another thing that I've tried to do is just understand that I can get cut there. And it's not a big deal. It's not the end of the world like cut myself shaving, right before I was on TV for sixty minutes, and they didn't have a hair and makeup department to like fix me up or whatever so Sarah used this magical stuff called makeup on my cut and it went away. And as a result of that. I realized that there is this thing called makeup that can do a lot of different things to make your face look better. And I've been told not to use it by the social order, but the social order is totally wrong about this. Which reminds me joined that this podcast is brought to you by makeup, which is the thing that you can put on your face to make it look slightly different vailable to people of all genders new product out. Now make up. And of course, is also brought to you by good on Chol, Hank. Go Hank distributing obvious advice in an old man's voice. Since earlier today. This is also brought to you by secret dabbing secret, dabbing it occurs alone. Where no one can see. You..

Dalton Hank John facial hair Sarah two hundred years sixty minutes sixty percent
"two hundred years" Discussed on First Mondays

First Mondays

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on First Mondays

"And then let's just see where the conversation goes and sounds good. How about can't? Do you wanna start, you love alphabet. I, I knew at Cal, we just say, I think Adam should go first because his the history and like looking forward. All right. Also I let let me get. Let me give Adam. Huge Pat on the back because he got news yesterday, he's a finalist for the national book award. I saw that congratulations. That is a really zeal. That's all. Yeah. Yeah, so well deserved. So I think any finals for the national book award should go first. Yeah. Alright finalist I so Adam give us the the elevator pitch if the elevator will real slow. Okay, but technically not a finalist for the national book award, but a long listed book. So they picked ten books for the long list and then five finalists. And I'm not in the finals category. So alas, yeah, we, the corporations is a book about the two hundred year backstory to citizens United in two thousand and ten in the citizens United case has so many of your listeners know the supreme court held the corporations have the same rights as individuals to spend their money to influence elections on campaign ads. And since then we've seen other cases like hobby lobby, where the supreme court under a federal statute said the corporations have religious liberty rights and just this past June, we had the masterpiece cake shop case which although is framed largely in terms of the rights of the Baker, the title of the case tells you it was also about the rights of a business corporation. And so I wanted to look what was the history behind corporations gaining constitutional rights. We tell these fundamental stories about America in terms of African Americans and women and others who've been left out of the promise of we, the people and their struggles to become full equal citizens. While there's been a kind of hidden secret civil rights movement of sorts for business corporations to. And while they don't March in the streets, we have seen for over two hundred years corporations going to the supreme court fighting to win. Constitutional protections that were originally written for ordinary individuals are well, there's a lot of fascinating stories in this book, and I want to talk about some of them in a minute, but can't why don't you tell us what your book is about? And then we'll open up the discussion yet. My book is corporations are people too, and they should act like it. So given this history that atom so expertly talks about, you know, what? What should be the rules for for corporations and the constitutional space. And, and of course, this is brought about by the citizens United ruling two thousand ten where most people in the..

national book award Adam supreme court hobby lobby Pat America two hundred years two hundred year
"two hundred years" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"And what happened next has all convinced years later that this was just tragic mistake. I don't think it's that they didn't trust the American people. I think they knew the American people very well and at that would not have been a good enough reason for them. And I think they knew that they had a short window to exploit the fervor for action after nine, eleven, because for better for worse. I mean, it was the largest terrorist attack. On our soil in our nation's history. And so it might seem not not a a year or so might not seem like that long. But like member, there was always the threat and the colors and that like it was still very fresh. And I think they understood if we don't do this now we won't get to, and we have to think that you're being much more generous than I'm willing to be. I don't think it was a, we have to, you know, we have to give them a really good reason because we can't trust them to see the complexity. I think they knew it won't be good enough to justify Cindy their children into a war zone to die because we don't like the mess. We lift and I think what frustrates me so much about this generation of leadership, and I'm going to go ahead and include John McCain in this because we talked about this a little bit with him. I don't understand if Vietnam of the Vietnam war had been. Two hundred years ago and we had several generations who just don't understand what that was like and what happened then maybe it would be able to give a little more grace, but these men lived through that they understood the complexities of modern warfare. They understood that things weren't black and white that we weren't. We were no longer living in World War Two that it wasn't so simple as just going in and taking out leadership be at communist or otherwise that you don't like and people die and it's a quagmire. And I don't understand why they still perpetuated this idea that we just wear the good guys in the white hats, and we come in and we fix things. I mean, even if they saw how wrong it went the first time with the Gulf war and much less the Vietnam War. I don't understand why they continue in this ego driven purposefully. Limited way of like modern warfare. I just don't under stand. I really, really don't. I don't look how they looked at their own life experiences and thought this is a good idea. I just don't. It's blows my mind. It really does. I guess it's just groupthink on crack is the only thing I can come up with. Well, I think it's group think I think it is ego. I think it's also an inability to grapple with a world that has inherent danger Bilton. Because Vietnam should have been present for all of these folks. But remember we talked about operation Desert Storm in America as a resounding success. The the American military was back, right?.

Vietnam John McCain Cindy America Two hundred years
"two hundred years" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The market on the mall now i also think it's important not to necessarily blame the supplement industry for this because really omega three supplements are just the latest incarnation of the the reduction industry trying to market their products we've had a reduction industry around for two hundred years actually the first target of the reduction industry was wales and really in the early twentieth century over three hundred and fifty thousand great whales in the southern ocean where reduced largely to make margarine and remember all the time we were always hearing in the sixties and seventies that margarine was this great heart healthy replacement for butter and all this kind of thing we'll turns out it's not true and it also turns out that it was probably entirely unnecessary to reduce all of these great wales now there used to be four hundred thousand great whales in the southern ocean now there are probably less than fifteen thousand and all that was because of this reduction industry today obviously we're not targeting wales for reduction but instead we're targeting the major chunk of the ocean something like twenty to twenty five million metric tons of fish are reduced each and every year how much is that that's like a quarter of all the fish that we catch a quarter of all the fish that we catch that never hits a human plate most of it goes to feeding animals somebody goes making fertilizer and again some of it goes to making mega three supplements so a lot of the small fish that are being harvested in order to be reduced for animal feed and for supplements what happens to the fish that ethos smaller fish that are being harvested the fish that are harvested by the supplement industry are keystone species they are essential for growing larger fish and if we remove those smaller fish from system then we're going to see fewer bigger fish i mean i think some of your listeners might remember the big cod crashes of the nineteen eighties and mcrae lansky famously wrote that book cod and we all know about how we lost all these cod and we overfished them and so forth and so on but what people don't generally know that prior to the cod collapse there was a huge assault on the prey base of cod on the grand banks to fish called capelin on caitlyn or alto oily fish they are also used by the reduction industry and it was really during the seventies and eighties as the animal feed business started to ramp up inserted catching all those little fish on that we started to see a real impact upon predators and i did when i was working on an earlier book i did go back and interview some of the sources that mark kurlansky used for his book cod and one of them i remember in particular candidates said you know the overfishing of cut it did occur but look at all the little fish that we were catching look at how that may have affected the kat crash and i you know he seemed to feel pretty strongly that the over harvest of those little fish could have had a very strong effect on that cod claps so you wanted to find a way of eating fish that would be both good for you and for the ecosystem of the c so you went on this fish diet for year we're at every meal breakfast lunch dinner you had fish did you have things besides fish did you have fruits and vegetables and grains yes i had protests rules in grades okay so it raised the level of omega threes in your body it also raised the level of mercury in your body which is not a good thing no no no no in fact actually it went up to five parts per million and it was funny at the time i was also working on a frontline documentary which covered some of the same material and i remember we were interviewing somebody from the state of alaska which checks in mercury levels particularly in it communities because they do eat so much seafood and they'd seals in the wales but basically i realized after that interview that if my hair sample and they usually use a hair sample to determine history of mercury contamination if my hair sample had ended up at the at.

twenty five million metric ton two hundred years
"two hundred years" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"Just wanted to comment about your last episode the knee to debate with amy therese i think that she in your left us and hopefully coming from the right place i think it's wonderful that she is so assertive and so able to say no maybe a hundred two hundred years all of us women will be at that place but i don't think right now that we are at that place i think that my myself included many of us for various reasons are free to say no so many of us very much need a firmative consent there was also in i hope i'm wrong about this but there was also a sense in which it almost seemed like amy was demonizing some of the metoo victims as being people privilege the people who've come out with their may two stories and like i said i really hope i'm wrong about that because hey if they are people have privilege still don't deserve to be sexually harassed and be not everybody who has two story is is a person of privilege i really really hope that in five ten years time that she is still left that she is still hate to say on our side but socialista champion of of left wing causes i hope that she hasn't gone men's rights act activist or classical liberal or something like that so i hope she's coming from a good place but as another one and it was pretty hard to hear her say some of the things she said and i was pretty disappointing thank you thank you lisa i'll just say that you weren't alone in that i've heard from some other people like that now in full fairness i heard from this has been pretty split i've heard from a lot of people who are enthusiastic about amy's episode and i've heard from a lot of people who honestly said a lot of of what you said particularly the comment that well off women privileged women can still be salted and you know what along those lines let me read an email i got i tried to get this person to do a voicemail but never heard back but the email i think is great i wanna share it because it's valuable leave off last names just in case because again i never heard back about this just in case they don't wanna be dented but it's by someone i named jennifer and the email says this i strongly disagreed with almost everything regarding this but most wanted to comment on this amy doesn't seem to believe in misogyny the idea that men listen to wealthy women is absurd on its face we know they don't not just from nearly all women's numerous stories but from numerous studies there was a study that showed when two men were on a large panel about sexual harassment not only did they do most of the talking they also completely controlled the course of the conversation determining what got talked about and in what way amy says marez bullshit and talks about ames versus methods but the results of her talking points are basically the same zimeray she thinks certain women are listened to and she suggested that grace could not have been vulnerable to end sorry because she was at a party with well off people in other words she saying that women aren't oppressed on the basis of sex but they can only be oppressed on other axes such as poverty are race the idea that women aren't oppressed on the basis of sex is the most antifeminist concept there is while this was frustrating listen to i think thomas did a great job in this kind of discussion is really useful and actually more interesting than ones between people who already agree on everything well jennifer thank you for that email sorry didn't hear back on on a voicemail thing but i wanted to read it because i found it valuable in actually emblematic of a lot of the response you know here's where i might say something unexpected i listen to the recent sam harris episode i don't really listen to that one that downgraded his podcast for two to like i'll listen if somebody says it's a good episode you know used to never miss it i never missed it for years but now.

amy therese hundred two hundred years five ten years
"two hundred years" Discussed on Fore Play

Fore Play

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Fore Play

"I am well because i flew over yesterday so i've exported myself you have yes just for the show nice of the show so this three of his hair today look looming whiskies myself and of course a gulf but fantastic superb to be associated with such a great brand and and a young brand in many ways in america but of course over two hundred years old home that's young for us that is your that's a very young for us so look if column on gumri comes walking into my office with his own whiskey the spirit of the open we have to try it so we do that we should do that now i think we should do on a shy and even the camp of the bottle is very it looks that'll be the open claret very excited he's really take the edge off the second half of this interview might be yeah go anyway go anywhere i forgive me someone should have helped me now often a scott finds it difficult to open whiskey but then you go open it is i'll start with you first now that should do you worry about you okay so that should be that's about a single okay okay don't overdo things and i'll do the same because i'm not driving around new york i'll leave that pets marshals okay and that's actually a bit of a double have to talk you off they should make it a trip on the late in the day so here we go right my friend cheers good to see you to trent cheers cheers whiskeys whole baby see what i mean that is nice we might have a kid yeah we might all the no can't you hear all afternoon just to keep talking i mean the bottles still still to full oh so we'll keep talking that's right that is delicious yeah this move like it's going to it's going to taste hits the pallet a few seconds often stays that it's lovely isn't it is still there ready to roll so anyway you guys keep talking amongst yourselves and i'll just keep drinking a move that'd be great oh that's easy for us all right everybody out there it's summertime you're going allow trips doing a lot of cool stuff you're play a lot of golf see probably want to save some money do you know.

scott america new york two hundred years
"two hundred years" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

The Church of What's Happening Now

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

"Got acquitted of the witness murders got acquitted of the jury bribery and got acquitted of the cash money laundering he got convicted of writing eight checks on telaviv bank to his attorneys he was convicted of money laundering for paying attorneys with these checks these eight checks judge sentenced to two hundred years in prison so the same stuff that his partner had pled guilty to twenty years he pled guilty got two hundred years so he's gone they got this thing they call acquitted conduct where the judge for whatever reason is allowed to consider for the purpose of sentencing acquitted conduct meaning even though he was acquitted of the murders the judge for the for the purpose of sentencing could consider the other charges that he was acquitted of which sounds to me like a quasiconstitutional we kind of thing it's like alternately you get two hundred years in prison for eight checks ero to your attorney i mean it's it's like an capone thing they got him but they got him creatively let's shut shall we say so it's a crazy story that we were in a pitch meeting yesterday and someone sits when does the story end like one is it come up to i said april twentyseventh two thousand eighteen i'm like it's still going on as we speak discount it should end with us here in the room pitching it to you you buy it and then they can start over and re binge from episode one again it just goes in a circle you know it's a crazy story that just keeps going on and it's a story that if you lived in miami grew up in miami into the nineties in zeros it was front page news.

bribery telaviv bank partner attorney miami capone two hundred years twenty years
"two hundred years" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Science Friday

"And in case you were just joined us we're talking about how to have a civil conversation with people who are sceptical about science we've talked about discussing climate change and the gmo is on this program but how about vaccination coincidentally denoted today marks the one hundred ninety fifth anniversary of the death of edward jenner the position who brought us the smallpox vaccine in your yard two hundred years later when many parents are hesitant about the safety of immunisation or dubious about the necessity of getting their kids immunized only about forty percent of us population forty percent of the population had received the flu vaccination in by november this season is there a way to convince people they should still get their kids or themselves vaccinated especially in this brutal flu season i'll meet you do so my next guest gretchen chapman who is a professor in the department of social and design scientists at carnegie mellon diversity in pittsburgh welcome to science friday and also with me as a man to dmc associate professor of pediatrics at the university of colorado in denver welcome amanda thank fire well how big is the problem of people saying no to vaccines well it's a growing problem uh we know from national studies that in the past there have been about maybe ten to fifteen percent of parents who had um concerns about vaccines such that they might not get one or more of the vaccines that were recommended for their children and over the last decade or two that number has grown to be more lake 25 to 35 percent who are refusing at least one vaccine for their child that said though there's a pretty stable population of the percent of people who refuse all vaccines for the last couple of decades that's remain steady at about one to two percent.

climate change edward jenner gretchen chapman professor pittsburgh denver flu carnegie mellon associate professor of pediatr university of colorado forty percent one hundred ninety fifth two hundred years fifteen percent two percent 35 percent
"two hundred years" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Science Friday

"Time for mary shelley was writing from two hundred years ago this year and some the technology and science that was on her mind at that don't which strikes me most of our reading frankenstein who in in now is an adult so to speak is that it is so as you mentioned before 80s so different then boris karloff already the other frankenstein this is an intelligent creature and then unlike the go just gino arbel's around like he doesn't know what you're doing these yeah he's a he's an auto died at he teaches himself to read he teaches himself french and arabic actually to languages he the friends people or he tries to on he's really trying to live this autonomous independent life out in the world and as you might see as you finish up reading ira it's okay that you're not finished yet you'll find out that maybe it's a bit of a tragedy for him more than maybe victor frankenstein i might have a side here i got wall really one of the deaths in there um what if i want to read more stuff for a from a really fast if you're really fustrated we have more stuff for you to read and that is our newsletter that were putting out every monday you can go to our website science friday dot com slash book club and join our newsletter that's going out intel february ninth when we have our wrap up conversation with author elizabeth bear bioethicist josephine johnston we're gonna talk about all the various things that we've thought about it in the last five weeks that's february ninth on our show in the meantime that newsletter is coming for you or you can come for it science friday dot com slash book club we at this week are going to have some highlights from the silicon valley conversation out there we're also going to have a educational resource that our fabulous team put together where you can do your own case study of a modern bioethics uh thought process basically and then of course there's twitter which you may or may be on after that conversation science for us our our house cla are hashtag for the book club is hashtag sifi book club now we also want to hear from you if you have any comments you can phone in your comments right correct that's again are off air after hours voicemail fi.

mary shelley gino arbel josephine johnston twitter boris karloff victor frankenstein intel elizabeth bear two hundred years five weeks
"two hundred years" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Like hi how are you going to be at uh legislation and deal make right and i think in fourteen nineteen that might have been different than might have been switched route it could be the same people but so then we had two hundred years where noone is defenestrate write the check sort of like you know kinda given a little bit of elbow room and then in the interim martin luther comes around you know sometimes eighty years after the initial defenestration and he'd nails his 95 theses to the door and now we have lutheranism now there is protestantism and within the holy roman empire you have a lot of leeway because there is no germany at this point right there are a dozen difference they're just little kingdoms in the dutch easy a little little area and saxony and whatever yeah that's right up countries the palatinate of westphalia etcetera etcetera that's good that israel and so but these little independent nations were were given the leeway to choose whether they were protestant or catholic within the holy roman empire and depending and then may each had a vote who would be the emperor of the holy roman empire so there was all this political sort of an electoral college you get your updates nearbly states as ran everybody as a affixed representation of and they were actually called electors is like electoral college yeah it's yeah the original version of kind of these look these kings get to pick the emperor and is the origin of our sort of weird american tradition of like every state will uh have a guy who makes who pulls a lever giving it comes from these european conglomerations it's an interesting question because it it seems like a weird anachronism certainly like we we pride ourselves on having representative democracy be a direct from the greeks but ideally we have this weird german intervening thing yeah yeah it's a i think in fact that may be.

martin luther israel electoral college germany saxony representative two hundred years eighty years
"two hundred years" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"At the tree that he's impaled on that would have been laura just just holding his daughter's hand and feeling love and being unfettered by fear of it by fear of of of what the villa news doing or anything else by just that veil lifting and he feels for the it if you live two hundred years for the last thirty seconds he gets to exalt in something he's never once felt and that the love of a child the pure love of a child the devotion of a child the sense that he is living on through her and the sense that they're connected and that that to me if we could nail that moment and it wasn't about it was much more about the talking about it than writing it was somehow crafted so that that somehow at alchemy happen for you in that moment helen was your production schedule how long did you get to shoot seventy two days some editing last stage of storytelling were similar reasons and editing because he you know you've got away with a two hour twenty minute movie which which says a lot and i'm curious what you're lessons were in editing and if you ever had to fight me buddy no that kinda run solomon's radio was a dream on this movie i excellent say that the brewers never any kind of big battle on this film the um it was really just shaping performance and carving out um uh and pace and kind of a you know it's a challenging film in the sense that it it isn't for the it uh it isn't you know eighty feeder it it it does so it does take its time you know and it and that's part of it being character film and i knew that given what it is that some people are gonna be arriving with the sense of the kind of up cut nature of what it could be and that i couldn't deliver that and the other so was i think most of what happened in the cutting or was trying to find that balance on pacing balance in which we could deliver and give real moments of life for the characters um and give the performers a little bit of space to find the words were there any scenes were tough to con something that was kind of along the eu.

helen solomon brewers laura two hundred years seventy two days thirty seconds twenty minute two hour
"two hundred years" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Signs adviser meant and a good science adviser uh hopefully um in order to be able to make these decisions so so dc's will i mean it's not the only thing that i am concerned about but this is definitely something that the time concerned about uh concerning wartime hopeful about um well i'm really hope for that actually we will find answers to many questions that we do you know don't know the answers to add new about two hundred years ago i i working astrophysics and cosmology a about one hundred years ago not only that we didn't know the answers we note don't we note today we didn't even know the questions now we know the questions you know so for example i personally am extremely curious about is their life outside the solar system in open in our own moved away galaxy let's say man i actually believe that we are for the first time in the history of humanity at the point where we theme i would say two to three decades we will either find to life in in other places actually find it i don't mean necessarily intelligent let more likely a two elite more simple life yes villa we will find some bio signatures some signatures of life on some other planets or at the very least we will be able to play some meaningful constraints on how rare at meaning if we don't find anything on how rare life acuity is you know and by that i mean you know we would be able perhaps to say something like oh cain all planets that are like earth which are these goldilocks distance from their starred which is neither do all north of called less than ten percent of life in that you know something that and then obstinately estimate you know the the occurrence throughout the united states district malan's so so that so these wanted to but but even more per hips importantly in both the life sciences end in.

dc solar system malan united states one hundred years two hundred years three decades ten percent
"two hundred years" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"two hundred years" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"What are the beliefs that we believe now that one hundred years or two hundred years from now people will look at an so it's ridiculous so every society looks back at even one hundred years ago or two hundred years ago and it all seems patently ridiculous but we are living through one of those moments right now and thinking about our own period and all the believes that we have and we're about to get that get into that with humanism because it made me realise i'm a humanist like and i had no idea that there was even a name for it that ultimately almost certainly future generations are going to look back on it like it's just sorta obviously ridiculous and then he goes into defining that there are three types of reality one subjective to objective in three inner subjective the one that's really interesting here is inner subjective and money is the best example so something that's an inner subjective truth is something that is only true because we all agree that it's true so money is religious paper or jeez and today's modern air it's like zeros and ones in a computer somewhere so that is only valuable as long as we all agree that is valuable and if we all stopped agreeing that it was valuable it would immediately cease to be valuable so take bitcoin right bitcoin people started saying hey it's valuables were something and because that because they're willing to traded for goods and services than it actually became valuable so that's really interesting in this the notion of member these are all bricks that he's building to lead up to like what's that next movement so inner subjectively becomes critically important as begin to ask a question.

bitcoin one hundred years two hundred years